OwlTail

Cover image of Classes without Quizzes at Reunion Homecoming

Classes without Quizzes at Reunion Homecoming

Classes without Quizzes at Reunion Homecoming

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Popular episodes

All episodes

The best episodes ranked using user listens.

Podcast cover

The Journey from Evil to Heroism: In Honor of Daniel Pearl

Professor Emeritus of Psychology Philip G. Zimbardo delivers a lecture in honor of journalist and Stanford alumnus Daniel Pearl, his commitment to improving the human condition, and his lifework of connecting people through words. (November 10, 2008)

1hr 24mins

20 Jan 2009

Rank #1

Podcast cover

CRISPR: Genome Editing and Deadly Diseases

Mutations in single genes cause thousands of diseases. On a chalkboard, it’s easy to change a single letter in a disease-causing DNA strand to eradicate disease. Professor Porteus demonstrates the progress towards editing the genome of stem cells to cure patients of disease, effectively turning this science fiction vision into reality. Matthew Porteus is an associate professor of pediatrics. He studies genome editing as therapy for children with genetic disorders. His research has enabled scientists to “edit” genes using a technology called CRISPR, which removes a singular bad gene. He attends at the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital where he supervises children undergoing stem cell transplantation.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. This talk was filmed at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2016.

1hr

12 Dec 2016

Rank #2

Similar Podcasts

Podcast cover

How Understanding Probability Helps Us Make Better Decisions

Although we make daily decisions, many people base them on initial reactions or gut feelings. However, powerful frameworks exist for making more effective decisions by analyzing available choices and their possible outcomes. Learn how to make better decisions and also understand why people sometimes make seemingly reasonable, yet irrational, decisions.

1hr 1min

12 Dec 2016

Rank #3

Podcast cover

A Data-Driven Approach

13mins

12 Dec 2016

Rank #4

Most Popular Podcasts

Podcast cover

How to Have Better Sleep

Do you or a loved one have symptoms of one of the 90 different sleep disorders? Close to 40% of Americans experience problems with falling asleep or daytime sleepiness. Learn more about sleep and sleep conditions, what new tools can diagnose and treat sleep disorders, and what you can do to naturally improve your sleep. Clete Kushida, ’81, MS ’82, is a neurologist and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, medical director of the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center, and director of the Stanford Center for Human Sleep Research. His interests include the changes associated with sleep apnea and sleep loss countermeasures. He is currently the President of the World Sleep Society. Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. This talk was filmed at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2016.

1hr 9mins

8 Dec 2016

Rank #5

Podcast cover

Crowds, Computation, and the Creation of a Globally-Networked Mind

What if the smartest minds of our generation could be brought together with a single click? What would you do with them? I will talk about how design and technology intertwine in crowdsourcing, and show how computer science research is enabling the crowdsourced creation of short animated movies, mobile apps, Kickstarter-backed card games, and much more.

59mins

8 Dec 2016

Rank #6

Podcast cover

Elections 2016

With less than three weeks until the U.S. election, Professor Brady analyzes the 2016 presidential campaign from the nomination through the campaign including pivotal states and key issues. He’ll conclude with an exploration of the issues the new government will face post-election.

54mins

2 Dec 2016

Rank #7

Podcast cover

The Fog of Concussion

Gaining more news attention due to the spotlight on sports, a concussion is caused by a blow to the head or body, a fall, or another injury that shakes the brain causing mainly attention and balance problems. Professor Ghajar discusses the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and biology of concussion.

57mins

2 Dec 2016

Rank #8

Podcast cover

The Mathematics Revolution: Helping Children Learn and Love Mathematics

In recent years, scientific studies have demonstrated that the mindsets people hold have a profound impact on learning and resilience. Professor Boaler discusses the ways in which positive mindsets can encourage greater persistence, engagement and high mathematics achievement. Jo Boaler is a professor of mathematics education, founder of youcubed, and author of the first MOOC on mathematics teaching. Her book, Experiencing School Mathematics, won the 'Outstanding Book of the Year' award for education in Britain. Professor Boaler serves as an advisor to several Silicon Valley companies, and is a White House presenter on girls and STEM.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. This talk was recorded at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2016.

52mins

2 Dec 2016

Rank #9

Podcast cover

Reunion Forum: From Inequality to Equal Opportunity

In recent years, increasing attention has been devoted to inequality, opportunity and mobility. What are the facts on these issues? What are the roles of our government, Stanford and each of us in building opportunity? What factors and policies are likely to have the largest effects on inequality, opportunity and mobility, in America and globally?Larry Diamond, ’73, MA ’78, PhD ’80 is the Haas Faculty Director for the Haas Center for Public Service, a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Hoover Institution, and a professor, by courtesy, of political science and sociology.Michelle Wilde Anderson is a professor of law at Stanford Law School.Michael J. Boskin is the Friedman Professor of Economics, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.Francis Fukuyama is the director of the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, the Nomellini Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a professor, by courtesy, of political science.Caroline Hoxby is the Bommer Professor in Economics, a professor, by courtesy, of economics at the Graduate School of Business, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Jesper Sørensen, PhD ’96 is the Jeffe Professor of organizational behavior at the Graduate School of Business, a professor, by courtesy, of sociology, and the faculty director, Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Countries.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015 in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service.

1hr 29mins

12 Jan 2016

Rank #10

Podcast cover

Educational Neuroscience: Your Child’s Brain and Early Literacy

Imaging the brain in action is changing the way we view education. How does brain activity change as children learn new cognitive skills, like reading? How does this challenge differ from one brain to the next, and can we intervene to help struggling students?Bruce McCandliss is a professor at the Graduate School of Education.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015 in partnership with the Graduate School of Education.

49mins

2 Dec 2015

Rank #11

Podcast cover

Finding Meaning in an Unjust World

To find meaning in life, people seek happiness, authenticity, spirituality, love, knowledge. But the existence of suffering and injustice begs the question: How can it be right to work on one’s self when others face harder challenges? Professor Willer navigates this tension and offers insights for cultivating a meaningful life without ignoring injustice.Robb Willer is an associate professor in sociology, and a professor, by courtesy, of psychology and at the Graduate School of Business.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

49mins

2 Dec 2015

Rank #12

Podcast cover

Young Blood for Old Brains

Every culture and civilization had its dreams about eternal youth, but what if there was something to it? Professor Wyss-Coray will share an amazing development in aging research that could revolutionize how we understand aging and treat age-related diseases.Tony Wyss-Coray is a professor of neurology and neurological sciences.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

44mins

2 Dec 2015

Rank #13

Podcast cover

How Culture Shapes our Feelings: Implications for Happiness and Other Important Things

Our emotions seem so natural and automatic that we assume everyone feels and wants to feel the same way we do. In this talk, Professor Tsai focuses on cultural differences and how they influence people’s definitions of happiness, perceptions of others and other aspects of daily life.Jeanne Tsai, ’91 is the associate professor of psychology and director of the Culture and Emotion Lab.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

50mins

2 Dec 2015

Rank #14

Podcast cover

Water Witching: Solutions to Global Droughts

Almost 20% of the United States suffers from severe to exceptional drought, as well as sizable portions of every inhabited continent, costing global agriculture and business $6–$8 billion per year. Come learn about and discuss solutions to what the United Nations has called “the world’s most costly natural disaster.”Buzz Thompson, ’73, MBA ’75, JD ’76 is the Paradise Professor of natural resources law and McCarty Director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

49mins

2 Dec 2015

Rank #15

Podcast cover

Why Inequality and Violence are Sometimes Good: The Evolution of Human Values

Are democracy and gender equality always good? Are violence and wealth inequality always bad? This presentation will dive into what drives changes in human values and what we as a society consider good or evil.Ian Morris is a Willard Professor of Classics and fellow of the Archaeology Center.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015 in partnership with the Humanities Center.

38mins

2 Dec 2015

Rank #16

Podcast cover

Why the Opera Changed the Course of Music

Operas—those beautiful melodies that stick in our brain for us to sing all week after a show. Are you aware that this started about 400 years ago, thanks to a small group of artists in the city of Florence? Professor Aquilanti shares how they radically changed the way composers wrote music and the inner technique of composition.Giancarlo Aquilanti, DMA ’96 is a senior lecturer in music and director of the Music Theory Program.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

38mins

2 Dec 2015

Rank #17

Podcast cover

Misled by the Map: Geography Gets Political

The standard world political map appears to be a straightforward depiction of the earth’s sovereign states. In actuality, it forwards a vision of how we think the world ought to be structured—omitting some countries and including non-existent others.Martin Lewis is a senior lecturer in international history.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

42mins

1 Dec 2015

Rank #18

Podcast cover

Macaroon, Macaron, Macaroni: The Secret Language of Food

"Why does ""macaroon"" sound like ""macaroni""? Did ketchup really come from China? Do the adjectives on a menu predict how much your dinner will cost? Do men and women use different words in restaurant reviews? The language we use to talk about food offers surprising insights on world history, economics and psychology.Dan Jurafsky is professor of linguistics and computer science, and chair of linguistics. A 2002 MacArthur Fellowship recipient, he teaches computational linguistics—he co-wrote the popular textbook Speech and Language Processing and co-created the first massively open online course in “Natural Language Processing.” Professor Jurafsky's research focuses on the automatic extraction of meaning from speech and text in English and Chinese, with applications to the behavioral and social sciences. His most recent book is The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2014."

51mins

12 Jun 2015

Rank #19

Podcast cover

The World’s Strangest Borders and How They Got That Way

Today’s international borders have been shaped by warfare, colonialism, geography, and demography. While some borders seem quite sensible because they follow a river or mountain range, others appear irrational and arbitrary – often with real consequences for the people who must live with them. We’ll explore the processes that have formed the world’s borders by examining some of the strangest, including one that might not even exist.Kenneth Schultz, MA ’93, PhD ’96, is a professor of political science and an affiliate at the Center for International Security and Cooperation. His interests include international conflict and conflict resolution with a particular emphasis on the role of domestic politics in foreign policy choices. Professor Schultz’s current research seeks to understand the origins and resolution of conflicts over territory. He is the author of Democracy and Coercive Diplomacy and co-author of World Politics: Interests, Interactions, and Institutions.Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2014.

36mins

12 Jun 2015

Rank #20