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Intersectionality Matters!

Intersectionality Matters! is a podcast hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw, an American civil rights advocate and a leading scholar of critical race theory.

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2. I Believe I Can Lie: R. Kelly (Still) In Denial

R. Kelly’s serial abuse of Black women and girls has been one of the entertainment industry’s worst-kept secrets for the entirety of the 21st century. In the mid 90s, Kelly was romantically linked with and even briefly married to 15-year-old singer Aaliyah, for whom he wrote and produced the incriminatory hit “Age Ain’t Nothing But a Number.” An explicit bootleg tape which appeared to feature Kelly abusing yet another teenage girl circulated on street corners as early as 2001. In 2017, a Buzzfeed exposé alleged that the man who famously crooned “I’m a bad man/And I’m not ashamed of it” held several women captive in his home in a cult-like harem. Yet it took the convergence of the #MuteRKelly movement, the January 2019 release of documentary Surviving R. Kelly and popular culture’s broader reckoning with the pattern of sexual violence perpetrated by powerful men for the self-proclaimed Pied Piper of R&B to face consequences for orchestrating his salacious symphony. At long last, Kelly has now been charged with 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse involving four women, three of whom were minors at the time. On this timely and trenchant episode of Intersectionality Matters, host Kimberle Crenshaw goes beyond the sheet music with #MuteRKelly co-founder Kenyette Barnes to rupture the rhythm Kelly has used to give Black women and girls the blues for decades. Intersectionality Matters! is recorded and produced by Julia Sharpe-Levine. This episode was edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Rebecca Scheckman and recorded by Robert Jimison, Michael Kramer, and Julia Sharpe-Levine. Additional support was provided by Michael Kramer, Naimah Hakim, G’Ra Asim, Kevin Minofu, and Madeline Cameron Wardleworth.Music by Blue Dot SessionsJuror Audio from Lifetime Docuseries, "Surviving R. Kelly" Kenyette Barnes: @legisempressMute R Kelly: ig: @officialmuterkelly, twitter: @offMuteRKellyKimberlé Crenshaw: ig: @kimberlecrenshaw, twitter: @sandylocksIntersectionality Matters: ig: @intersectionalitymatters, twitter: @IMKC_podcastLearn more: https://www.muterkelly.org

42mins

9 Mar 2019

Rank #1

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4. The Anatomy of An Apology

You’ve probably heard the phrase “Love means never having to say you’re sorry”--the misguided notion that love eliminates the need for apology. In politics, the love that mutes apologies is often same-party affinity--as in, “we know we’re on the same side” so accountability is unnecessary. Yet it’s more likely that the contrary is true: love as well as coalition demand an openness to saying “I’m sorry,” for without it, justice is impotent. But what are the consequences when apologies don’t materialize? Is letting it go really the only way to think about healing, both emotionally and politically? In this episode of Intersectionality Matters, host Kimberlé Crenshaw talks to Tony award-winning playwright and activist Eve Ensler about her groundbreaking new book The Apology and how the withholding that is the touchstone of the inviolable code of silence among men can be broken. Ensler discusses the journey she traveled to conjure the apology she needed from her late father for sexual and physical abuse.We also hear from philosopher Kate Manne on himpathy, the term she coined to describe the disproportionate and inappropriate sympathy powerful men often receive in cases of sexual assault and other forms of gendered violence. Himpathy, she explains, may help us understand how some women who stood by Anita Hill are now embracing Joe Biden’s candidacy despite his failure to fully come to terms with his role in in her heinous treatment during Clarence Thomas’s senate confirmation hearings in 1991. Both Manne’s and Ensler’s interviews illustrate the grim reality that men are often socialized to deny their commission of gender-based harm, and that many of us are socialized to condone that very inability to accept blame— sometimes to the degree that we position men who have victimized others as victims themselves. Tune in for a thought-provoking exploration of what it could mean for perpetrators and bystanders to genuinely confront and atone for violence they’ve either committed or enabled.Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe LevineRecorded by UCLA and Cornell UniversityMusic by Blue Dot SessionsWith: Eve Ensler, (@vday, @eveensler) Kate Manne (@kate_manne)Intersectionality Matters: ig: @intersectionalitymatters, twitter: @IMKC_podcastAdditional support from G'Ra Asim, Michael Kramer, Kevin Minofu, Naimah Hakim, Madeline Cameron Wardleworth

48mins

6 Jun 2019

Rank #2

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3. #MeToo and Black Women: From Hip Hop to Hollywood

After hip hop icon Dr. Dre brutally assaulted trailblazing emcee and television personality Dee Barnes in 1991, his career continued to skyrocket while she was effectively blacklisted from the entertainment industry. Nearly three decades later, Dre, who has allegedly assaulted several other women in addition to Dee, continues to enjoy a celebrated career in which his heinous misdeeds have become mere footnotes. The combination of racism and patriarchy is the condition of possibility that allows Beats by Dre to be well-known commodities while beatings by Dre remain largely overlooked.As part of their fifth annual event series, Her Dream Deferred: A Week on the Status of Black Women, the African American Policy Forum, in partnership with the Hammer Museum, convened a panel called “Black Women and #MeToo”. Along with Dee, the panel included such leading lights as actor and Times Up WOC activist Rashida Jones, supermodel and Bill Cosby accuser Beverly Johnson, cultural critic Jamilah Lemieux, historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers and #MuteRKelly co-founder Kenyette Tisha Barnes. The panel was moderated by AAPF Executive Director and Intersectionality Matters host Kimberlé Crenshaw.The panel uplifted the unsung genealogy of the Me Too movement by acknowledging forerunners like Tarana Burke, who coined the hashtag #MeToo to raise awareness around the question of Black women’s vulnerability to sexual violence, and Anita Hill, who told the world her story about what a Supreme Court nominee had done to her as a young lawyer. Black feminists like bell hooks and Alice Walker were recognized also for laying bare the realities of gender-based violence that impacts Black women. Tune into this profound and pathbreaking episode of Intersectionality Matters for a thorough post-mortem on the powerful insights shared on the panel, as well as a look into what the movement’s path forward might look like.Hosted by Dee Barnes (@sistadbarnes) and Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe LevineRecorded by the Hammer MuseumMusic by Blue Dot SessionsFeatured panelists: Kenyette Barnes, Beverly Johnson, Rashida Jones, Stephanie Jones-Rogers, Jamilah LemieuxMore on Her Dream Deferred: aapf.org/her-dream-deferred-initiativeIntersectionality Matters: ig: @intersectionalitymatters, twitter: @IMKC_podcastAdditional support from G'Ra Asim, Michael Kramer, Kevin Minofu, Naimah Hakim, Madeline Cameron-Wardleworth, UCLA School of Law

57mins

10 May 2019

Rank #3

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5. Stonewall 50: Whose Movement Is It Anyway?

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising, the wrenching demonstration against a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar and refuge for queer and trans people in Lower Manhattan. The courageous act of resistance that took place over the course of several days in 1969 is widely perceived as the catalyst to the modern LGBTQ+ liberation movement in the United States.As Pride month reaches an exuberant crescendo this weekend with World Pride in NYC, an event that’s one part party, one part protest, questions about the trajectory, priorities, and composition of the movement persist, including how to best foreground the lives and concerns of members of the LGBTQ+ community whose experience is filtered through the interstices of more than one form of oppression.On this episode of Intersectionality Matters, host Kimberlé Crenshaw ponders these questions with two of the movement’s torchbearers: Barbara Smith, trailblazing Black feminist critic and co-founder of the Combahee River Collective, and Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, also known as Lady Phyll, co-founder and executive director of UK Black Pride. Tune in for their fascinating insights on living in the overlapping margins of race, gender and sexuality, the future of LGBTQ activism and their commitments to retrieving the experiences of queer Black women from a location that resists telling.Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe LevineRecorded by Elizabeth Press, the Sanctuary for Independent Media, and Michael KramerMusic by Blue Dot SessionsWith: Lady Phyll (@msladyphyll), Barbara Smith (@thebarbarasmith), and the Reclaim Pride Coalition (Colin Ashley, Robert Baez, Francesca Barjon) (@queermarch)Intersectionality Matters: ig: @intersectionalitymatters, twitter: @IMKC_podcastAdditional support from G'Ra Asim, Naimah Hakim, Madeline Cameron Wardleworth, Peter Gaber, Ezra Young~~~NYC Trans Day of Action Friday, June 28 from 4-6pm: https://alp.org/events/15th-annual-trans-day-actionNYC Dyke March Saturday, June 29 from 5-8pm: https://www.nycdykemarch.com/Queer Liberation MarchSunday, June 30 from 9:30-3pm: https://reclaimpridenyc.org/World Pride ParadeSunday, June 30 at 12pm: https://2019-worldpride-stonewall50.nycpride.org/UK Black PrideSaturday, July 7 at 12pm: https://www.ukblackpride.org.uk/

1hr 1min

28 Jun 2019

Rank #4

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8. When They See Her: The Story of Michelle Cusseaux

December 14th, 2019 marks the fifth anniversary of the Say Her Name campaign, a movement founded to raise awareness of the names and stories of Black women, girls and femmes killed by police, and to provide support to the families affected. The campaign has produced a groundbreaking report expanding the conversation on police violence so that it foregrounds the experiences of Black women and girls, earned a nod in a tweet from a major presidential candidate, developed a multimedia arts-activism venture called Say Her Name: The Lives That Should Have Been, and convened the #SayHerName Mothers Network, a community for mothers of Black women lost to police violence.But none of these developments would be possible without the courage, resilience and ingenuity of Fran Garrett, the mother of Michelle Cusseaux. Cusseaux, a 50-year-old Black woman, was shot and killed on August 14, 2014 by Officer Percy Dupra while Phoenix police were trying to serve a mental health wellness check. Her life was taken just days after the police killing of Ferguson, MO teenager Mike Brown became national news, sparking nationwide outrage and galvanizing the modern movement for Black lives. To help Cusseaux’s story gain resonance in its own right, Garrett led a group of local activists in marching her daughter’s casket through downtown Phoenix, calling for an outside agency to investigate the shooting and a slew of reforms aimed at racial justice and mental health parity. It was this brave act that drew the attention of the African American Policy Forum, which catalyzed the Say Her Name campaign and the delineation of a throughline linking the loss of Cusseaux with countless other Black women like her lost too soon to state violence. Garrett’s bid for broader attention to the cause was amplified a few months later at the Millions March NYC, where AAPF made an intersectional intervention by saying the names of Michelle and other slain Black women to politicize their legacies alongside the demands made on behalf of Brown and other victims of police violence.On this special episode of Intersectionality Matters, Kimberlé Crenshaw dives deep with Fran Garrett to go beyond the headlines for the unvarnished truth on the unspeakably tragic loss of a beloved Phoenix community member. Tune in as they take stock of the movement’s progress five years in and assess the headway still to be made in making Black women’s vulnerability to police violence fully legible as a social problem. Music by Blue Dot SessionsProduced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-LevineRecorded by Sarah Ventre and Julia Sharpe-LevineAdditional support provided by Andrew Sun, G’Ra Asim, Emmett O’Malley and Michael KramerTwitter: @IMKC_podcast, IG: @IntersectionalityMatters, Fb: Intersectionality Matters with Kimberlé Crenshaw#IntersectionalityMattersLEARN MORE: http://aapf.org/shn-campaignSAY HER NAME CEREMONY OF REMEMBRANCE (NYC)- https://www.eventbrite.com/e/say-her-name-5th-anniversary-remembrance-ceremony-tickets-85292830151MICHELLE CUSSEAUX MENTAL HEALTH FAIR (PHX)-https://www.aahherc.com/

37mins

13 Dec 2019

Rank #5

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6. What Slavery Engendered: An Intersectional Look at 1619

In this episode, Kimberlé chops it up with Dorothy Roberts, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and a leading scholar in race, gender, bioethics, and the law. In a conversation that merges intersectional inquiry with The 1619 Project, which interrogates America’s history of slavery in order to understand racial disparities in 2019, Crenshaw and Roberts shed light on the lasting consequences of slavery, segregation, and White Supremacy, and their impact on Black women specifically. Their timely conversation highlights the relationship between the legacy of slavery and instances of modern oppression against Black women, such as the curbing of welfare, forced sterilization, and mass incarceration. Music by Blue Dot Sessions Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine Recorded by Emmett O’Malley and Julia Sharpe-LevineAdditional support provided by Andrew Sun, Mihir Samson, G’Ra Asim, and Michael KramerTwitter: @IMKC_podcast, IG: @IntersectionalityMatters, Fb: Intersectionality Matters with Kimberlé Crenshaw #IntersectionalityMatters

48mins

14 Nov 2019

Rank #6

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7. Defending the C.R.O.W.N.: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Nappyness

There's a natural boom among women of African descent. Kinky, curly and coily hairstyles have joined cornrows, locks and twists as just a few of the looks that Black women, girls and femmes are rocking confidently and unapologetically. This Black hair renaissance is reshaping what we see in fashion magazines, on television, in classrooms, and even in boardrooms. But constant vigilance is the price of freedom, with the exception of new legislation in California and New York, it remains true that anti-discrimination laws nation-wide do virtually nothing to protect Black people from getting fired, suspended, and otherwise disciplined for wearing their natural hair.In 2012, Vanessa Van Dyke was threatened with expulsion by her Florida middle school unless she “tamed” her natural hair. Tiana Parker was told by her school that her dreadlocks were faddish and unacceptable. In 2013, Melphine Evans, a top executive at British Petroleum, says she was fired for wearing braids and dashikis to work. And in 2016, Chastity Jones lost her case against an employer who withdrew her job offer for refusing to cut off her natural locs.On this special episode of Intersectionality Matters, Kimberlé Crenshaw dishes with Mixed-ish star and PATTERN founder Tracee Ellis Ross on their respective journeys towards loving their own natural hair, aesthetic freedom, and how the current convulsive political moment is expanding the social justice imaginary. We also hear from award-winning journalist Brittany Noble Jones about her personal experience with hair discrimination in the workplace and modeling self-love for the next generation. Tune in for an inspiring look at Black women’s tireless advocacy for life, liberty and the pursuit of nappyness.Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe LevineRecorded by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Susan ValotMusic by Blue Dot SessionsWith: Tracee Ellis Ross, (@traceeellisross), Brittany Noble Jones (@noblejonesontv)Pattern Beauty: @PatternBeautyIntersectionality Matters: ig: @intersectionalitymatters, twitter: @IMKC_podcastAdditional support from G'Ra Asim, Michael Kramer, Emmett O'Malley, Zoe Bush, Andrew Sun

43mins

2 Jan 2020

Rank #7

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19. Under the Blacklight: The Fire This Time

Alicia Garza, Robin D.G. Kelley, Devon Carbado, Maria Moore, and special guest AG Keith Ellison join Kimberlé Crenshaw for an emergency episode of “Under the Blacklight”, the 10th in the series, to address this historic moment of social and political mobilization ignited by George Floyd's death at the hands of Minneapolis police just two weeks ago. Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
Produced by Julia Sharpe-LevineEdited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Sarah Ventre
Additional support provided by Awoye Timpo, Shermena M. Nelson, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Gregory Bernstein, Alanna Kane
Music by Blue Dot Sessions
Graphics by Julia Sharpe-Levine
Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcastFull bios: aapf.org/ep10-utb

1hr 8mins

10 Jun 2020

Rank #8

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18. Under the Blacklight: Narrating the Nightmare & (Re)Imagining the Possible

Kiese Laymon, Viet Thanh Nguyen, and Arundhati Roy join Kimberlé Crenshaw for the 9th installment of "Under the Blacklight." Together, they mine the complexities of narrative construction amid disaster, and shine the blacklight on the stories and counter-stories that shape the future and make meaning of the past. Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
Additional support provided by Awoye Timpo, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Gregory Bernstein Alanna Kane
Music by Blue Dot Sessions

Graphics by Julia Sharpe-LevineFollow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcastBios available here: aapf.org/ep9-utb

1hr 6mins

26 May 2020

Rank #9

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17. Under the Blacklight: Virus, Voting & Vigilantism in Georgia

On Pt 8 of “Under The Blacklight,” LaTosha Brown, Anoa Changa, Crystal Feimster, Talitha LeFlouria and Emery Wright join together to discuss vote suppression, state violence, vigilantism, and fatal public health experiments in the state of Georgia. With:
LATOSHA BROWN — Award-winning organizer, political strategist, jazz singer; Co-Founder of the Black Voters Matters FundANOA CHANGA - Electoral justice reporter for Prism; Organizer; Lawyer; Host of “The Way with Anoa”CRYSTAL FEIMSTER — Professor, Yale; Author of Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching
TALITHA LEFLOURIA — Professor, UVA; Author of Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South
EMERY WRIGHT — Political Organizer; Educator; Co-Director, Project South(Read full bios here: aapf.org/under-the-blacklight-covid19)Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
Produced by Julia Sharpe-Levine
Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Raffi Marhaba 
Additional support provided by Awoye Timpo, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Gregory Bernstein Alanna Kane

Music by Blue Dot Sessions

Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

1hr 3mins

19 May 2020

Rank #10

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16. Under the Blacklight: Mobilizing Whiteness to 'Re-Open America'

On Episode Seven of “Under The Blacklight,” Carol Anderson, Alex DiBranco, Joseph Lowndes, Mab Segrest, Dorian Warren, and Jason Wilson unpack the central role that ideological Whiteness continues to play in the US response to COVID-19, including ongoing efforts -- on the part of individuals and institutions alike -- to unlock the lockdown. With: CAROL ANDERSON — Chair & Professor of African American Studies, Emory University; Author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's DivideALEX DIBRANCO - Co-founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Research on Male SupremacismJOSEPH LOWNDES — Professor of Political Science, UOregon; Co-author of Producers, Parasites, Patriots: Race and the New Right-Wing Politics of PrecarityMAB SEGREST — Professor emeritus of Gender and Women’s Studies, Connecticut College; Organizer with Southerners on New Ground (SONG), Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ)DORIAN WARREN — President of the Center for Community Change Action (CCCA) and Vice-President of the Center for Community Change (CCC)JASON WILSON — Journalist who specializes in far-right, white supremacist, and right-wing movements; Writes for The Guardian (Read full bios here: aapf.org/under-the-blacklight-covid19)Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
Produced by Julia Sharpe-LevineEdited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Sarah Ventre
Additional support provided by Awoye Timpo, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Alanna Kane
Music by Blue Dot Sessions
Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

1hr 6mins

12 May 2020

Rank #11

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15. Under the Blacklight: COVID in Confinement

On Episode Six of “Under The Blacklight,” Josie Duffy Rice, Nina A. Kohn, Marc Lamont Hill, Rebecca Nagle, Ravi Ragbir, and Alyosxa Tudor map the devastating path of COVID through various locations of confinement — including prisons and jails, immigration detention centers, Native country, nursing homes, and the home — and examine the historical precedents, ideological frameworks, and surprising intersections between these seemingly separate sites that inform this movement and offer us a path forward. Speakers:JOSIE DUFFY RICE -- Journalist and Lawyer; President of The Appeal; Host of Justice in AmericaNINA A. KOHN -- Visiting Professor of Law, Yale; Professor of Law,, Syracuse University; Elder Rights AdvocateMARC LAMONT HILL -- Best-selling author and journalist; Professor, Temple University; Host, BET NewsREBECCA NAGLE -- Writer and community organizer; Host of This Land PodcastRAVI RAGBIR --Immigrant rights activist; Executive Director, New Sanctuary Coalition of New YorkALYOSXA TUDOR -- Senior Lecturer in Gender Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies at SOAS, University of London(Read full bios here: aapf.org/under-the-blacklight-covid19)Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
Additional support provided by Awoye Timpo, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Alanna Kane
Music by Blue Dot Sessions
Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

59mins

5 May 2020

Rank #12

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14. Under the Blacklight: History Rinsed and Repeated

On Episode Five of “Under The Blacklight,” David Blight, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, William Darity Jr., Ibram X. Kendi, and Kate Manne navigate the historical contours of the pandemic, and the pre-existing inequalities that shape its impact. Building on last week’s interrogation of “disaster white supremacy”, this week's conversation explores how intersecting systems of capitalism, patriarchy, racism, and nationalism have converged to define another dark moment in American history. In the coming weeks, we'll continue hosting live events that bring together artists, activists, thought leaders, scholars, service-providers and others on the frontlines of the fight against COVID-19. Each Wednesday we’ll bring you a virtual conversation over Zoom, which will be released as an episode of Intersectionality Matters! the following week.Speakers:DAVID BLIGHT — Professor, Yale University; Pulitzer Prize Winning Author of Frederick Douglass: Prophet of FreedomEDUARDO BONILLA-SILVA — Professor, Duke University; President of the American Sociological Association; Author of Racism Without RacistsWILLIAM DARITY JR. — Economist; Professor, Duke University; Director, Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social EquityIBRAM X. KENDI — Professor, American University; Author of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in AmericaKATE MANNE — Professor, Cornell University; Author of Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny(Read full bios of panelists here: aapf.org/under-the-blacklight-covid19)Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
Additional support provided by Andrew Sun, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Alanna Kane
Music by Blue Dot Sessions
Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

54mins

28 Apr 2020

Rank #13

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13. Under the Blacklight: COVID & Disaster White Supremacy

On Episode Four of “Under The Blacklight: The Intersectional Failures that COVID Lays Bare,” Paul Butler (Professor of Law, Georgetown; Author of Chokehold: Policing Black Men), Bree Newsome Bass (Community organizer & artist), Barbara Arnwine (Founder and Director, Transformative Justice Coalition), Kehinde Andrews (Professor, Birmingham City University; Author of Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for the 21st Century), and Jonathan Metzl (Professor, Vanderbilt University; Author of Dying of Whiteness) examine the role of Disaster White Supremacy in shaping the current crisis. Together with Kimberle Crenshaw, the five panelists mine the different locations where White Supremacy has been deployed and unveiled amidst crisis -- from voting booths in Wisconsin, royal handshakes at 10 Downing Street, and gun stores in the “American heartland,” to overcrowded jails in Chicago, public housing in the American South, and the chambers of Congress.In the coming weeks, we'll continue hosting live events that bring together artists, activists, thought leaders, scholars, service-providers and others on the frontlines of the fight against COVID-19. Each Wednesday we’ll bring you a virtual conversation over Zoom, which will be released as an episode of Intersectionality Matters! the following week.Read full bios of panelists here: aapf.org/under-the-blacklight-covid19Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-LevineAdditional support provided by Andrew Sun, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Janeen Irving, Alanna KaneMusic by Blue Dot SessionsFollow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

1hr 1min

21 Apr 2020

Rank #14

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12. Under the Blacklight: Mapping COVID's Racial Geography

In the third episode in our new series, “Under the Blacklight: The Intersectional Vulnerabilities that COVID Lays Bare” (originally aired over Zoom April 8th), six incredible change-makers — Rosa Clemente (organizer and journalist; President and Founder of Know Thyself Productions), Asali DeVan Ecclesiastes (Executive Director, Ashé Cultural Arts Center in New Orleans), Dallas Goldtooth (Keep It in the Ground Organizer, Indigenous Environmental Network), Daniel HoSang (Associate Professor of Ethnicity, Race & Migration, Yale University), Mari Matsuda (Professor of Law, University of Hawaii), and Rinku Sen (Racial justice strategist and writer; Co-president, Women’s March board) — join host Kimberlé Crenshaw for a conversation about building collective resistance and power in the time of COVID-19.In the coming weeks, we'll continue hosting live events that bring together artists, activists, thought leaders, scholars, service-providers and others on the frontlines of the fight against COVID-19. Each Wednesday we’ll bring you a virtual conversation over Zoom, which will be released as an episode of Intersectionality Matters! the following week.Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
Produced and Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine

Additional support provided by Andrew Sun, Emmett O’Malley, Michael Kramer, Janeen Irving

Music by Blue Dot Sessions
Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

1hr 2mins

14 Apr 2020

Rank #15