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Earthquake and Seismology (Video)

Updated 4 days ago

Education
Science
Natural Sciences
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Earthquakes occur all over the world. Hear from scientists who study this branch of science.

Read more

Earthquakes occur all over the world. Hear from scientists who study this branch of science.

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iTunes Ratings

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Average Ratings
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Cover image of Earthquake and Seismology (Video)

Earthquake and Seismology (Video)

Latest release on Jan 04, 2019

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 4 days ago

Rank #1: Computer Simulations of Earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area

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Computer simulations of earthquake shaking can provide valuable information on the expected intensity of shaking from earthquakes. Arthur Rodgers, a seismologist/geophysicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, covers seismic hazard in the Bay Area, describes computer simulations of past and possible future earthquakes and looks at the physics that underlies the numerical methods. Series: "Lawrence Livermore National Lab Science on Saturday" [Science] [Show ID: 29612]

Jun 22 2015

56mins

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Rank #2: Earthquake Lessons - Professor Richard Allen

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Richard Allen, professor and director of the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, discusses the lessons learned from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake which was centered on a section of the San Andreas Fault near Santa Cruz. It shook Northern California at 5:04 p.m., causing 63 deaths, several thousand injuries, and $6 billion in property damage, including the collapse of a section of the upper deck of the Bay Bridge, a section of the Interstate 880 freeway in Oakland, and many residential homes in San Francisco’s Marina District. Series: "UC Berkeley News" [Science] [Show ID: 29314]

Mar 23 2015

3mins

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Rank #3: Earthquake Science at Scripps

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Join Neal Driscoll for an illuminating look at how Scripps scientists are working to understand and monitor earthquakes. Learn how scientists model the potential impacts of major events in Southern California. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [Science] [Show ID: 28674]

Dec 10 2014

54mins

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Rank #4: Listening to Earth’s Atmosphere: Tuning into the Sounds of Our Dynamic Planet

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Join geophysicist Michael Hedlin as he describes how the exciting new field of atmospheric acoustics is allowing researchers to listen to Earth as never before. Discover how researchers tune into sounds in the atmosphere to learn more about dynamic Earth processes—from earthquakes and volcanic eruptions to meteorite impacts. You'll be surprised at what you can hear when you know how to listen! Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [Science] [Show ID: 24911]

Jun 12 2013

57mins

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Rank #5: Seismic Networks: Observing Earthquakes from Near and Far - Perspectives on Ocean Science

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When the massive 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck Japan last March, Scripps Oceanography was listening. The Institution operates local, national and international seismic observing systems, each finely tuned for detecting earthquakes – from those in our backyard to ones on the other side of the globe. Join Scripps seismologist Frank Vernon as he describes two such projects: the USArray Transportable Array and the San Jacinto Fault Zone Experiment. Learn how Scripps scientists are “wiring” the earth to understand the rumblings of our dynamic planet. Series: "Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series" [Science] [Show ID: 23548]

May 09 2012

58mins

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Rank #6: Sleuthing Seismic Signals: Understanding Earthquake Hazard and Monitoring Nuclear Explosions

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The probability of a magnitude 6.7 or greater earthquake in the Greater Bay Area during the next 30 years is 63 percent, or about two out of three. Lawrence Livermore National Lab scientist Sean Ford and teacher Ken Wedel discuss what an earthquake of that size in the Bay Area would look like and explain its effects. Just like an earthquake, a nuclear test can cause seismic disturbances that are recorded at monitoring stations around the world. Learn how seismologists tell the difference between these two sources by sleuthing seismic signals. Series: "Lawrence Livermore National Lab Science on Saturday" [Science] [Show ID: 24772]

Mar 11 2013

46mins

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Rank #7: Building it Better: Earthquake-Resilient Hospitals for the Future

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Go behind the scenes of the first-of-its-kind structural test conducted at UC San Diego as a five-story mockup of a hospital, including a surgical suite, is subjected to dramatic earthquakes and fire testing in order to better understand how the many complex systems within hospital buildings perform after earthquakes. Teaming up with the California Seismic Safety Commission, this UCSD-TV documentary explored the history of seismic safety for California's hospital infrastructure, and what is being done to secure its future. Series: "Earthquake and Seismology Programs" [Science] [Show ID: 21399]

Oct 31 2012

29mins

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Rank #8: Protecting California’s Hospitals - The Preview - UCTV Prime Cuts

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From UC San Diego’s Englekirk Structural Engineering Center comes this preview of the largest, most complex seismic test ever conducted, designed to test nonstructural systems in hospitals including the first-time-ever seismic test of a working elevator and fire testing. Series: "UCTV Prime cuts" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 23597]

Mar 20 2012

13mins

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Rank #9: The BNCS Project Preview

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From UC San Diego’s Englekirk Structural Engineering Center comes this preview of the largest, most complex seismic test ever conducted, designed to test nonstructural systems in hospitals including the first-time-ever seismic test of a working elevator and fire testing. [Science] [Show ID: 23626]

Mar 02 2012

12mins

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Rank #10: UC Berkeley News: Stadium Science

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UC Berkeley's 1923 Memorial Stadium sits on top of an active earthquake fault. In case of a major quake, the Hayward fault could tear the ground apart below the stadium. A huge retrofit project is well underway, and the seismic solutions that are being implemented have never been tried before. The stadium is being rebuilt so that parts of it will actually be mobile, moving with the shifting earth when the rupture occurs. The new state-of-the-art press box, sitting above the stadium at eight stories high, will be able to rock back and forth. Berkeley's earthquake scientists are known to be among the best in the world, and they played a key role in working with the design team on the retrofit. There's also a large training facility being built underground next to the stadium, for use by 13 Cal sports teams. Series: "UC Berkeley News" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 22923]

Oct 17 2011

5mins

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