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RightsUp: The Oxford Human Rights Hub Podcast

Updated 17 days ago

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RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions.RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann.(This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)

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RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions.RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann.(This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)

Cover image of RightsUp: The Oxford Human Rights Hub Podcast

RightsUp: The Oxford Human Rights Hub Podcast

Latest release on Oct 30, 2020

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RightsUp explores the big human rights issues of the day through interviews with experts, academics, practicing lawyers, activists and policy makers who are at the forefront of tackling the world's most difficult human rights questions.RightsUp is brought to you by the Oxford Human Rights Hub, based in the Law Faculty at the University of Oxford. Music for this podcast is by Rosemary Allmann.(This podcast is distributed under a CC by NC-SA 4.0 license.)

A Decolonial Approach to Education and the Law (with Dr Foluke Adebisi)

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This episode is part of a four-part series in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. In this episode, we speak with Dr Foluke Adebisi, a Senior Lecturer in Law at Bristol University in the United Kingdom, about decolonizing education. 

The Oxford Human Rights Hub is an anti-racist organisation, and we are committed to continuously working to be better allies to communities protesting against deeply entrenched systems of racial domination and oppression. In this spirit, this podcast series aims to amplify the voices of Black and Brown scholars, activists and practitioners. We also want to acknowledge a long legacy of work that has collectively, across time and disciplines, built and bolstered the foundations of this present movement. Now is a time to listen, learn, support and amplify. 

This episode focuses on decolonising education. It looks particularly at the intersection between human rights and the decolonial approach to education. Dr Adebisi is an expert in an intersection of areas looking at law, race, equality, legal education, and decolonising education. She's also the founder of Forever Africa Conference and Events (FACE), a hub for Pan-Africanist thought and community in the UK. 

A full transcript of this episode is available at: http://ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/


Hosted and recorded by: Nomfundo Ramalekana

Edited by: Christy Callaway-Gale

Co-produced by: Gauri Pillai and Christy Callaway-Gale

Executive producer: Kira Allmann

Show notes by: Sarah Dobbie

Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Thanks to: Mónica Arango Olaya and Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

Oct 30 2020

36mins

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The Transformative Possibilities of a Constitution (with Joel Modiri and Gautam Bhatia)

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Constitutions are the legal bedrock of many countries, but they're also political, and are produced within a specific socio-historical context, much like any text. As much as Constitutions are there to protect citizens, they can also exclude certain groups of people. And when a Constitution doesn't work for all, how do we best address this? To what extent can we reinterpret a Constitution so it's more inclusive? And when do we need to start again, from scratch? In this episode, Gautam Bhatia and Joel Modiri discuss these questions in the context of India and South Africa.

Interview with: Gautam Bhatia and Dr Joel Modiri
Recorded by: Nomfundo Ramalekana
Produced and edited by: Christy Callaway-Gale
Executive producer: Kira Allmann
Shownotes: Sarah Dobbie
Music: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 25 2020

35mins

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How Our Clicks Cost the Planet: The Internet, Climate Change, and Human Rights (with Michael Oghia)

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Covid-19 lockdowns worldwide have forced huge portions of our lives online, from education to work, with important human rights ramifications. But there's an argument to be made that the Covid-19 lockdown has been good for the environment. there have been reports of lower levels of littering and urban pollution. As humans withdrew from public spaces, some native wildlife has reemerged. But our newly intensified online routines, from video conferencing to binge-watching Netflix, might have more of a negative environmental impact than we realise. The Internet and the systems that support it are reportedly responsible for 3.7% of global greenhouse gas emissions, roughly the same as the airline industry. And it's estimated that the typical professional creates 135 kilogrammes of CO2 just sending emails — which is equivalent to driving 200 miles in a family car. We don't often think about the effect of the Internet on the natural environment, and the related implications for human rights. In this episode, we talk to Internet governance consultant Michael Oghia about why we need to build an environmentally sustainable Internet for the future.


Interview with: Michael Oghia (Global Forum for Media Development)

Host: Kira Allmann

Producer/Editor: Kira Allmann

Executive Producer: Kira Allmann

Music: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 11 2020

28mins

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The Politics of Global Health Data (with Sara Davis)

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The COVID-19 pandemic has brought questions around global healthcare financing and equitable access to treatments to the fore. But this is not the first time a spotlight has been thrown on the thorny issue of fair resource allocation in efforts to tackle global health issues. In her book, “The Uncounted: Politics of Data in Global Health” (Cambridge University Press), Dr Sara Davis considers how human rights issues can affect the data which underlie global healthcare funding. She looks closely at the indicators which drive resource allocation, the metrics used to measure success in tackling health issues, and the people whose experiences healthcare data often fails to capture. Ultimately, in a world of finite resources, this data plays an important role in determining who is more likely to live or die.


Interview with: Sara Davis (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva)

Host: Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

Producer/Editor: Christy Callaway-Gale

Executive Producer: Kira Allmann

Music: Rosemary Allmann

Jul 24 2020

29mins

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A Reason for Hope: The Pursuit of Restorative Justice in Colombia (with Julieta Lemaitre)

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In 2016, a peace agreement was negotiated between the Colombian  Government and one guerrilla movement known as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or the FARC. But the peace deal was rejected by a narrow margin in a referendum in 2016. A revised peace deal was eventually ratified by the Congress of Colombia. The peace agreement provides for the Special Jurisdiction for Peace, a tribunal created in 2018 to implement the transitional justice component of the peace agreement. In this episode, we talk with Judge Lemaitre, who currently the Investigating Judge for the jurisdiction's first macro case, about the future of restorative justice in Colombia.

Interview with: Julieta Lemaitre (Special Jurisdiction for Peace, Colombia)

Host: Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

Producer: Natasha Holcroft-Emmess

Executive Producer: Kira Allmann

Music: Rosemary Allmann

Jun 26 2020

31mins

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The Impact of Covid-19 on Workers' Rights in the UK (with Michael Ford)

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The spread of Covid-19 has affected many areas of our lives with major implications for our rights and freedoms. The instigation of a UK-wide lockdown has had an especially pronounced effect on our rights, and the burden of this disruption will fall most heavily on those whose livelihoods, health, and security were already fragile. Furloughed employees, those who are self-employed, and those who must now seek social security benefits face an unprecedented level of uncertainty. Today we discuss the impact of coronavirus on worker's rights in the UK.

Interview with: Michael Ford, QC (University of Bristol & Old Square Chambers)
Hosted by: Natasha Holcroft-Emmess
Produced and edited by: Christy Callaway-Gale
Executive producer: Kira Allmann
Shownotes: Sarah Dobbie
Music: Rosemary Allmann

May 15 2020

34mins

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The Need for Empathy: Understanding India's COVID-19 Lockdown (with Kalpana Kannabiran)

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The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all of us in many ways. States around the world have imposed restrictions of varying levels of stringency to control the spread of the virus. The Central Government in India introduced a nationwide 21-day lockdown on 24th of March 2020. The lockdown saw an almost complete restriction on the movement of people and the closure of all establishments except those providing essential services. India’s lockdown has been described as the world’s biggest coronavirus lockdown and the harshest coronavirus containment measure in the world. The lockdown was declared with a four-hour notice period. It has been extensively reported that the impact of the lockdown has fallen most heavily on those most vulnerable. In this episode, we speak to Professor Kalpana Kannabiran, a professor of sociology and the Director of the Council for Social Development Hyderabad, about the Indian government's response to the pandemic and the impact on rights.

Full transcript and shownotes: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/the-need-f…pana-kannabiran/

Interview with: Kalpana Kannabiran (Council for Social Development Hyderabad)
Hosted by: Gauri Pillai
Produced and edited by: Christy Callaway-Gale
Executive producer: Kira Allmann
Shownotes: Sarah Dobbie
Music: Rosemary Allmann

May 08 2020

37mins

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Defending Human Rights During a Global Pandemic: Lessons from UNAIDS (with Luisa Cabal)

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In this episode, we discuss the intersection between the responses to public health crisis and human rights with Luisa Cabal, Acting Director of the Community Support, Social Justice, and Inclusion at UNAIDS. UNAIDS recently published a guidance paper of lessons learned from other pandemics, such as the HIV pandemic, about how to respect and uphold human rights during exceptional times.

Download a full transcript: ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/how-to-uph…ith-luisa-cabal/

Interview with: Luisa Cabal (UNAIDS)
Hosted by: Mónica Arango Olaya
Produced and edited by: Christy Callaway-Gale
Executive producer: Kira Allmann
Shownotes: Sarah Dobbie
Music: Rosemary Allmann

Apr 24 2020

28mins

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Comparative Human Rights Law Book Launch: Sandy Fredman in Conversation with Colm O'Cinneide

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This is a special episode of RightsUp, which takes Sandy Fredman’s new book, Comparative Human Rights Law, as a starting point for global conversation around the role of law, lawyers, courts, and judges in forwarding human rights in different contexts. Each episode will delve into the overarching themes of the book and highlight some specific examples from different jurisdictions -- on issues such as capital punishment, abortion, the right to housing, health, and education, and the right to freedom of speech and religion.

In this discussion, Sandy speaks with Colm O'Cinneide, a professor of human rights law at UCL, who also served on the member of the European Committee on Social Rights of the Council of Europe. They discuss the intersections between socio-economic rights and civil/political rights in the context of Europe.

Guests: Sandra Fredman and Colm O'Cinneide
Produced by: Kira Allmann
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Dec 20 2019

46mins

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Comparative Human Rights Law Book Launch: Sandy Fredman in Conversation with Justice S. Muralidhar

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This is a special episode of RightsUp, which takes Sandy Fredman’s new book, Comparative Human Rights Law, as a starting point for global conversation around the role of law, lawyers, courts, and judges in forwarding human rights in different contexts. Each episode will delve into the overarching themes of the book and highlight some specific examples from different jurisdictions -- on issues such as capital punishment, abortion, the right to housing, health, and education, and the right to freedom of speech and religion.

In this discussion, Sandy speaks with Justice S. Muralidhar, a judge on the High Court of Delhi, who has delivered judgments in some of the most important housing rights cases in India. They discuss a right to housing and the value of comparing how different legal systems deal with this issue.

Guests: Sandra Fredman and Justice S. Muralidhar
Produced by: Kira Allmann
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Dec 13 2019

47mins

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Comparative Human Rights Law Book Launch: Sandy Fredman in Conversation with Edwin Cameron

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This is a special episode of RightsUp, which takes Sandy Fredman’s new book, Comparative Human Rights Law, as a starting point for global conversation around the role of law, lawyers, courts, and judges in forwarding human rights in different contexts. Each episode will delve into the overarching themes of the book and highlight some specific examples from different jurisdictions -- on issues such as capital punishment, abortion, the right to housing, health, and education, and the right to freedom of speech and religion.

In this discussion, Sandy speaks with Judge Edwin Cameron, who recently retired from the Constitutional Court of South Africa after serving for more than two decades as a judge in South African courts.

Guests: Sandra Fredman and Edwin Cameron
Produced by: Kira Allmann
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Dec 06 2019

46mins

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Working Together: Human Rights and the SDGs (Sandra Fredman)

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The United Nations adopted the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015. They aim to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all people. The goals provide policy objectives for countries to aspire to meet over a number of years. In this final episode of our SDG podcast series, we talk about how the Sustainable Development Goals and human rights can work together to achieve transformative change in the realm of gender equality. In order for the SDGs to be truly transformative for women, attention needs to be paid simultaneously to four dimensions of equality: first, redressing disadvantage; second, addressing stereotyping, stigma, prejudice and violence; third, facilitating voice and participation; and fourth, achieving systemic or institutional change. Professor Sandra Fredman (University of Oxford) talks about applying these dimensions of equality in her recent report for the British Academy on human rights, the SDGs, and gender equality.

**This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals,” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman, Fellow of the British Academy and Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub. As part of this project, the Academy convened a roundtable in January 2018 with academic experts, policymakers and practitioners from the UK and overseas to discuss the ways in which human rights and developmental goals can work together to achieve the SDG agenda and particularly gender equality and women’s empowerment.**

Interview with: Sandra Fredman (University of Oxford)
Produced by: Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Jan 14 2019

35mins

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Poverty and Politics in the SDGs (Philip Alston)

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SDG Goal 1 is to eliminate poverty in all its forms everywhere. Poverty stands in the way of people enjoying many of their basic human rights and it can also be the product of violations of certain rights, like the right to education. Tackling global poverty requires bridging questions of human rights law and economic development. In this episode, Professor Philip Alston (UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights) talks about the challenges of using both human rights law and economic development agendas to address poverty.

Sep 28 2018

36mins

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Women, Poverty, Equality: The Role of CEDAW (Meghan Campbell)

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[Original release: 7 September 2018] Sustainable Development Goal number 1 is to end poverty in all its forms everywhere. And the targets specifically state that poverty must be eliminated for all men, women and children. But poverty affects these groups differently, and the causes of poverty for men, women, and children also differ. Empirical evidence tells us that women disproportionately live in poverty. So how do we tackle the gendered nature of poverty, when it seems to be missing from both development agendas and human rights frameworks?

This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals,” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman.

Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Interview(s) with: Dr Meghan Campbell (University of Birmingham)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 24 2018

25mins

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Gender Equality and Female Genital Mutilation (Brenda Kelly)

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[Original release: 13 July 2018] Sustainable Development Goal number 5 is to ‘achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.’ One of the targets under Goal 5 is to eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early, and forced marriage, and female genital mutilation, or FGM. In this episode, we talk with Brenda Kelly, a consultant obstetrician at the John Radcliffe Hospital and a founder of the Oxford Rose Clinic, which specialises in treating women and girls who have experienced FGM. Brenda shares her insights from working with FGM patients about how the law and medicine interact when it comes to achieving gender equality.

This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman.

Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Interview(s) with: Dr Brenda Kelly (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 24 2018

33mins

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Challenging the Death Penalty in India (Anup Surendranath)

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[Original release: 23 April 2018] The death penalty was written into the colonial penal code in India when the country was under British direct rule, and it stayed on the books after independence. Today India remains a ‘retentionist’ country – meaning that it retains the death penalty in the face of a growing global movement to abolish it worldwide on human rights grounds. At the end of 2017, there were 371 prisoners on death row in India. India is one of the few democracies that retains the death penalty, and it has voted against recent UN resolutions seeking a global end to the death penalty. In this episode, Anup Surendranath talks about the research he and his team at the National Law University in Delhi have conducted on death row inmates in India and what challenges remain on the path to abolition.

Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Interview with: Dr Anup Surendranath (National Law University in Delhi)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 24 2018

29mins

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Defending the Rights of Nature (Mari Margil)

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[Original release: 10 April 2018] There is an unmistakable growing awareness of the ways in which our human lives and the environment are intertwined and interdependent. Unprecedented environmental degradation, resource depletion, and the looming reality of climate change have all drawn anxious attention to the human impact on the environment. Law is critically important here. Countries like Spain, France, Portugal, and Finland have already recognized a human right to a healthy environment. But some environmental advocates are arguing that this isn’t enough. We need to recognize the inherent rights of nature itself. In this episode, we discuss the limitations of human rights in confronting environmental harms and how we could realise the rights of nature.

Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Interview(s) with: Mari Margil (Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 24 2018

29mins

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Gender Equality and Economic Development (Isabel J. Sierra)

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[Original release: 26 March 2018] Sustainable Development Goal 5 is to ‘achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.’ But gender equality cuts across many of the other sustainable development goals. This raises some questions – about whether gender equality can ever be realised on its own, in its own right – or whether it has to be realised in context. In this episode, we explore development issues that disproportionately affect women and girls and interrogate how the SDGs can do better to address them.

This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman.

Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Interview(s) with: Isabel Cristina Jaramillo Sierra (Universidad de los Andes)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 24 2018

30mins

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Sustainable Development as a Human Right (Olivier De Schutter)

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[Original release: 12 March 2018] In September 2015, the UN adopted a set of goals to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all people. But do we integrate human rights into development agendas? What will the relationship between human rights and the Sustainable Development Goals look like in practice?

This episode is part of a special series on “Working Together: Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals” a British Academy project led by Professor Sandy Fredman.

Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Interview(s) with: Olivier de Schutter (Université catholique de Louvain)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

Sep 24 2018

30mins

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Disability Law in the UK (Marie Tidball)

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[Released: 29 January 2018] Almost exactly a year ago, in January 2017, the UK Department of Education published a report by the Disabled Students Sector Leadership Group (DSSLG) which offered guidance on how universities and other higher education providers could better support disabled students. In this episode, Dr Marie Tidball talks about disability rights and the importance of teaching a new generation of lawyers about disability law.

The Disability Law and Policy Project aims to put disability law at the centre of learning and teaching in the law curriculum.

Interview with: Dr Marie Tidball (University of Oxford)
Produced by: Dr Kira Allmann (University of Oxford)
Music by: Rosemary Allmann

A transcript of this interview is available on the Oxford Human Rights Hub website: http://ohrh.law.ox.ac.uk/media/nothing-about-us-without-us-disability-law-and-policy-in-the-uk

Sep 24 2018

24mins

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