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AgEconMT

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As part of the AgEconMT.com outreach website, we focus on spotlighting the people, events, and research that is important to the agricultural and natural resources sectors in Montana and northern Great Plains.

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As part of the AgEconMT.com outreach website, we focus on spotlighting the people, events, and research that is important to the agricultural and natural resources sectors in Montana and northern Great Plains.

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AgEconMT

Latest release on Dec 18, 2018

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 1 day ago

Rank #1: (Podcast) Episode 024: Agricultural Land Values in the northern U.S.

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Anton chats with Kate Fuller, an assistant professor of economics and extension specialist at Montana State University, about what has recently been happening to agricultural land values. Kate also dives deeper into the topic by discussing agricultural economics research and her own findings about factors outside of agriculture that can be important drivers for agricultural land values. For more information about agricultural land lease values (mentioned in the podcast), visit http://www.msuextension.org/aglease

For this podcast, we’ve also included a video that presents charts and figures associated with the discussion. You can view the video below.

Highlights:

3:25  What are the typical questions that are being asked about land values?

5:35  What has been happening to current agricultural land value and lease rates in Montana and other regions.

10:45  How do broader economic factors affect agricultural land values?

11:35  What about real-estate values, which capture a broader characterization of farm assets? What impacts those?

12:10  Does proximity to urban areas affect agricultural values?

13:50  To what extent do these “other factors” impact agricultural land values in Montana? 

15:20 . What exactly is the economic explanation for why agricultural land values are impacted by population in urban areas?

17:00. What might we see with agricultural land values going forward?

(Intro and outro music by Trevor Sensor)

(Photo by Unhindered by Talent is licensed under CC BY 4.0)

Dec 14 2017

20mins

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Rank #2: (Podcast) Episode 030: COOL: Was Removing It the Right Economic Decision?

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Anton and Eric chat with Dr. Amanda Countryman, associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Colorado State University. We discuss issues surrounding the mandatory country of origin labeling for beef, and reasons for why it was eventually repealed. Dr. Countryman provides insights from her recent paper that examines the economic implications of the repeal and what could have happened if Canada and Mexico imposed retaliatory measures if mCOOL remained. Who benefited and who lost from the repeal? Was repealing a more economically beneficial decision or did it end up costing us more than potentially facing tariffs?

Highlights:

1:15:  what’s COOL? How did it come about? Who wanted it?

4:10:  Do consumers value COOL?

7:30:  Who didn’t like COOL and why did COOL get repealed in the United States?

10:05:  What are the economic implications of imposing COOL and then removing it?

14:15:  Why did the U.S. Congress repeal COOL?

17:45: Who are the winners and losers of the COOL repeal?

20:20: Do indirect benefits exist? If so, what are they?

25:15:  Does U.S. beef naturally carry a quality (and price) premium? And is there value to voluntary labeling?

28:00: Without mCOOL, will other countries simply dump their cheaper, lower-quality beef into the United States? And what are the WTO measures that exist to protect against these dumping practices?

34:00: What else is Dr. Countryman working on?

(Intro and outro music is from “Out of It” by andrewbowden licensed under CC BY 3.0)

(Photo by Colin Remas Brown is licensed under CC BY 4.0)

Dec 18 2018

38mins

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Rank #3: (Podcast) Episode 029: Trade, Trade, and More Trade

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Anton and Eric chat with Dr. Amanda Countryman, associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Colorado State University. The discussion focuses on all things trade. Dr. Countryman’s research focuses on agricultural trade issues, and we cover topics, including an overview of current trade negotiations, the role of the World Trade Organization, the recently negotiated USMCA, and to what extent US agricultural can withstand the economic impacts of temporary or potentially permanent trade restrictions.

Highlights:

2:01: What’s the basic background on where we’ve been and where we are in the current trade negotiation timeline? How does trade affect domestic farm incomes?

8:40: How did we get to perhaps the most important dispute for US agriculture: the conflict with China?

15:25: How does the World Trade Organization set up and how is it supposed to deal with trade disputes?

21:15: What’s the deal with USMCA? What changed from NAFTA?

24:45: What does USMCA have in store for northern US wheat and its potential for being sold in Canada?

27:00: When are these trade disputes going to end? The experts take their best guess.

(Intro and outro music is from “Out of It” by andrewbowden licensed under CC BY 3.0)

(Photo by Thomas_H_photo is licensed under CC BY 4.0)

Dec 15 2018

33mins

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Rank #4: (Podcast) Episode 028: The Average Farmer No Longer Exists: Reasons and Implications

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Anton chats with Dr. Alfons Weersink, professor in the Department of Food, Agricultural, and Resource Economics at the University of Guelph. The discussion focuses on the increasing heterogeneity of farms: why do farms look more different from one another today than at any time in the past? Dr. Weersink helps provide a historical perspective of the evolution of the agricultural sector and provides insights about reasons why a mid-sized farm—prominent 50-60 years ago—is much less a typical characterization of modern agriculture. He also discusses how these dynamics are likely to impact policy development, farm-level management, and education in the next several decades, because an “average farmer” is becoming less and less representative of a typical farmer in the 21st century.

Highlights:

3:05: Why did farms look much more similar to one another 50-60 years? What was the market structure that created this landscape?

5:30: When did this homogeneous farm structure begin to change and what were some of the underlying factors? What is the role of technology in this movement?

6:30: What about financial stress in the agricultural sector? Does this drive significant change in how farms are structured?

8:50: How do you define heterogeneity across farms? What are the major differences that currently characterizes farms?

10:20: Midsize farms have experienced the most change in the past 50 years. Why is that? What’s particular about those farms that has led to the changes? Why has ag “become cool again”?

14:20: Farms are either niche or commodity producers. How has this changed the consolidation and market power structure in the agricultural sector? And how has this changed the risk to farmers?

18:00: What are the biggest implications of these changes for the agricultural sector going forward? How will policy affect farm structures in the next 30-40 years? Is the “average farmer” still a reasonable measure to use when considering the implications and targets of farm policy? What is the aim of food policy today? How is the emergence of agro-environmental policies changing things?

23:30: What about the farm-level implications? What can we expect to see in the next 30-40 years emerging as the top issues in the farm sector and how has the changing landscape of farm heterogeneity impacted these trends? Who’s responsible for collecting, managing, and analyzing data that will be coming from farms? Are farmers responding to these challenges?

27:30: Another big issue on the horizon is the growing separation of ownership and management of farm land. How will this change the agricultural landscape? How is this affecting the dynamics of intergenerational transfer of farm operations?

29:40: As the farm technology increases, producers will also need to increase their understanding of how to operate and manage technology. How is this changing the training that farmers require?

31:00: How are things different in New Zealand? How has policy changed there and what could be learned?

(Intro and outro music is from “Out of It” by andrewbowden licensed under CC BY 3.0)

(Photo by Oregon State University is licensed under CC BY 4.0)

Apr 05 2018

35mins

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Rank #5: (Podcast) Episode 027: What’s Ahead for the 2017/18 Pulse Markets?

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Anton chats with Joe Janzen, assistant professor of economics at Montana State University, about what happened in the 2017 pulse markets and what’s ahead in the marketing year. Joe provides insights about several key market metrics that can be used to evaluate economics signals of how much pulse crops are valued, which can be useful in production and management decisions. He also discusses the implications of the recently enacted Indian trade restrictions for peas.

For this podcast, we’ve also included a video that presents charts and figures associated with the discussion. You can view the video below.

Highlights:

2:05  What exactly are pulse crop markets in the northern Great Plains? And why are they important to this region’s agricultural sector?

4:00  How economically significant are pulse markets to the northern Great Plains? Are we at corn and soybean levels? Or are pulse crops still a “specialty” crop?

5:00  How has the grain handling infrastructure changed to adapt to the increased pulse production?

6:15  What’s the latest on pulse crop prices? What do they mean for crop production decisions?

9:25  What should we look forward to in the upcoming year? What signals should producers and consumers of pulse crops watch for?

11:40 What are the market and policy issues on the 2018 horizon that may impact production and management decisions?

15:25  What’s the importance of export markets for pulse producers? What’s the biggest issue facing this market in 2018?

20:40  Who cares that there is a pulse tariff in India? How does that affect northern U.S. producers?

22:10  What are the 2-3 main drivers of pulse market trends that we are likely to observe in 2018?

(Intro and outro music by Trevor Sensor)

(Photo by tuchodi is licensed under CC BY 4.0)

Jan 04 2018

25mins

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