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Society & Culture
History

History Ireland

Updated 7 days ago

Society & Culture
History
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History Ireland magazine has now been in production for over 27 years. The History Ireland Podcast covers a wide variety of topics, from the earliest times to the present day, in an effort to give the listener a sense of the distant past but also to offer a contemporary edge.

Read more

History Ireland magazine has now been in production for over 27 years. The History Ireland Podcast covers a wide variety of topics, from the earliest times to the present day, in an effort to give the listener a sense of the distant past but also to offer a contemporary edge.

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

Cover image of History Ireland

History Ireland

Latest release on Jan 20, 2021

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 7 days ago

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Rank #1: ‘Spies and informers beware!’—intelligence and counterintelligence in the War of Independence

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One of the most important—and controversial—aspects of the War of Independence was the ‘intelligence war’.  Given the role of spies and informers in defeating previous insurrections, it is not surprising that Michael Collins, the IRA’s Director of Intelligence, was keen to insure that history did not repeat itself.  How successful was he? To shed light on this ‘shadow war’ listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, in discussion with Andy Bielenberg, Cécile Gordon, Eunan O’Halpin and Gerry White.

Image: Foyer card for the 1935 film, The Informer. (Movie Stills Database) This podcast is supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 Initiative.

Jan 20 2021

1hr 15mins

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Rank #2: Kildare in the revolutionary decade

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While not in the vanguard of armed activity during the War of Independence, Kildare was central to the ‘revolutionary decade’ as whole, not only for its strategic importance and proximity to Dublin but in particular as the site of the largest British military establishment at the Curragh and elsewhere. It also has the dubious distinction of being the county worst affected by the flu pandemic of 1918-19. Listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, in discussion with James Durney, John Gibney, Ida Milne and Fionnuala Walsh. This podcast is supported by Kildare County Council’s Decade of Commemorations Programme and the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 Initiative.

Image: The Curragh camp—(National Library of Ireland)

Jan 11 2021

1hr 12mins

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Rank #3: Wicklow in the revolutionary decade (part 2, South)

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While not in the vanguard of armed activity in the revolutionary decade, Wicklow was, nevertheless, active in other respects. Moreover, its unique characteristics—proximity to Dublin, pioneering development of tourism, and one of the highest Protestant populations outside Ulster—make it worthy of study. Join History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham in discussion with Sheila Clarke (Ashford), Brendan Flynn (Wicklow), Kevin Lee (Carnew), Jim Rees (Arklow), Padraig Óg Ó Ruairc (author of several books on the Irish revolution). Supported by the Commemorations Unit of the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media and Wicklow County Council’s Archives Service.

Image: Group outside Wicklow Gaol 1920 with republican prisoner William O’Grady back row left with the fine moustache. Image: Courtesy of John Finlay

Jan 01 2021

1hr 7mins

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Rank #4: Wicklow in the revolutionary decade (part 1, North)

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While not in the vanguard of armed activity in the revolutionary decade, Wicklow was, nevertheless, active in other respects. Moreover, its unique characteristics—proximity to Dublin, pioneering development of tourism, and one of the highest Protestant populations outside Ulster—make it worthy of study. Listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham in discussion with Rosemary Raughter (Greystones), James Scannell (Bray), Brian White (Enniskerry) and John Dorney (editor of ‘The Irish Story’). This podcast is available at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/history-ireland/id1503109266 and https://www.historyireland.com/hedge-schools/ or wherever you get your podcasts. 
Supported by the Commemorations Unit of the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media and Wicklow County Council’s Archives Service.

Dec 07 2020

57mins

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Rank #5: The Government of Ireland Act 1920—100 years of partition

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Originally conceived as a ‘temporary’ amendment to the Third Home Rule Act, on the statute book since 1914, the 1920 Government of Ireland Act was presciently derided by the Freeman’s Journal as ‘the Dismemberment of Ireland Bill’—partition was the only element of it to endure.  How did it come about and what were its effects over the following century?  Listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, discuss these questions with Dr Martin Mansergh, Cormac Moore, Dr Margaret O’Callaghan and Professor Brian Walker. Image: A National Army soldier and an RUC constable at the border in 1922. This Hedge School is supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 initiative.

Dec 01 2020

1hr 7mins

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Rank #6: History, Memory and Bloody Sunday 1920

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The events of Sunday 21 November 1920 are well named. Within fifteen hours on that fateful day, 32 people died: in the morning, eleven British intelligence officers killed by Michael Collins’s ‘squad’ (plus two Auxiliaries and two civilians); in the afternoon, fourteen civilians killed by British forces at Croke Park (including player Michael Hogan of Tipperary); and that evening, in murky circumstances in Dublin Castle, two high-ranking IRA officers, Dick McKee and Peadar Clancy, and civilian Conor Clune.  Did these events mark a decisive turning point in the ongoing War of Independence?  How were they presented at the time?  How are they remembered today?  Listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, discuss these and related matters in a lively and unfettered discussion with Joe Connell Jnr, Dr Siobhán Doyle, Dr Brian Hanley and Professor Fearghal McGarry. This Hedge School, in association with the GAA Museum, is supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 initiative.

Image: Glasses belonging to spectator Annie Burke (who survived) damaged on the day by a ricocheting piece of grit and never worn again. (GAA Museum)

Nov 18 2020

1hr 6mins

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Rank #7: Belfast and the North 1920-22

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As the War of Independence raged in southern Ireland a different type and more deadly form of conflict erupted in the northeast, and in Belfast in particular. Should this be considered part of the overall Irish revolution? Or a separate and distinct conflict with its roots in the sectarian geography of city? What was the long-term effect on community relations and on the formation of Northern Ireland? Join History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham in discussion with Marie Coleman, Kieran Glennon, Brian Hanley and Brian Walker.
 This podcast is supported by the Department of Foreign Affairs’ Reconciliation Fund in association with the Linen Hall Library. Image: Military and police in Belfast at the junction of May Street and Joy Street on 23 March 1922.

Nov 09 2020

56mins

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Rank #8: Bloody Sunday 1920—the Tipperary Connection

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Founded in Thurles in 1884, the GAA has had a long association with Tipperary, an association intensified by the events of Bloody Sunday, 21 November 1920, when Crown forces attacked a Dublin vs Tipperary football match at Croke Park. Three of the fourteen victims were from Tipperary, including, famously, the only player killed on the day, Michael Hogan. Listen to History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, in conversation with John Flannery, Aogán Ó Fearghail, Enda O’Sullivan and Jayne Sutcliffe.  This podcast is produced in association with Tipperary County Council, supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 initiative.

Image: Michael Hogan of Grangemockler, Co. Tipperary—the only player killed on Bloody Sunday.

Nov 02 2020

1hr 11mins

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Rank #9: Commemorating Bloody Sunday in the Junior Cycle history classroom

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In the early morning of Sunday 21 November 1920 units of Dublin’s IRA assassinated 11 suspected British intelligence agents; two Auxiliaries and two civilians were also killed. That afternoon Crown forces opened fire on the crowd at a Dublin vs Tipperary football match in Croke Park, killing 14 people. Later that evening senior IRA officers Peadar Clancy and Dick McKee, and civilian Conor Clune, were ‘shot while trying to escape’ from Dublin Castle. Collectively these killings became known as Bloody Sunday. To discuss these events, with particular relevance to history teachers, join History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, in discussion with Donal Fallon, John Gibney, Liz Gillis and Angela Hanratty.

Image: The Dublin football team on Bloody Sunday, 21 November 1920.

Oct 30 2020

1hr

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Rank #10: The West’s awake!–Revolution in Roscommon 1916-1921

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Roscommon was one of the first counties to reflect the ‘utter change’ of the post-1916 period, with the election of the first Sinn Féin-backed MP in February 1917; in less than two years that party would win a landslide victory in the general election of 1918. But that mandate for independence was ignored by the British, resulting in the War of Independence. How typical of that transformation was Roscommon and how did it fare in the War of Independence? Join History Ireland editor, Tommy Graham, in discussion with John Burke, Brian Hanley, May Moran and members of the County Roscommon Historical and Archaeological Society (CRHAS). This podcast is produced in association with Roscommon County Council and the CRHAS and supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 initiative.

(image caption) Patrick Moran, from Crossna, Co. Roscommon, in Irish Volunteer uniform—executed in Mountjoy Gaol in March 1921 for his part in the early morning assassinations of Bloody Sunday .

Oct 27 2020

1hr 23mins

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