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LSE: Public lectures and events

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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Reimagining Capitalism in a World on Fire

Contributor(s): Professor Rebecca Henderson | The world is on fire. Inequality is skyrocketing while climate change threatens to destabilize the entire economy. What can be done? Join us for this online public event at which Rebecca Henderson will talk about her new book, Reimagining Capitalism: How Business Can Save the World.In her book Henderson argues that the private sector has a critical role to play in addressing the great problems of our time. Drawing on more than ten years of research she suggests that many firms have a compelling economic case for adopting a purpose beyond simple profit maximisation, and that authentically purpose driven firms are already driving the kinds of systemic change that are needed to build a truly just and sustainable society.Rebecca Henderson (@RebeccaReCap) is one of 24 University Professors at Harvard, a research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a fellow of both the British Academy and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is an expert on innovation and organisational change, and her research explores the degree to which the private sector can play a major role in building a more sustainable economy, focusing particularly on the relationships between organizational purpose and innovation and productivity in high performance organizations. She teaches “Reimagining Capitalism: Business & the Big Problems”, a course that has grown from 28 students to over 300. Rebecca sits on the boards of Amgen and of Idexx Laboratories. Her publication include Leading Sustainable Change: An Organizational Perspective, and Accelerating Energy Innovation: Lessons from multiple sectors. In February 2019 she was named one of three “Outstanding Directors of 2019” by the Financial Times.You can order the book, Reimagining Capitalism: How Business Can Save the World, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.Nava Ashraf (@profnavaashraf) is a Professor at the Department of Economics and Research Director at the Marshall Institute, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). As the Research Director she leads the Marshall Institute’s effort to imbue private action for the public good with the science that illuminates how to maximise its impact.The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening.This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

58mins

29 Sep 2020

Rank #1

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Defending the Future: gender, conflict and environmental peace

Contributor(s): Hannah Bond, Bineta Diop, Helen Kezie-Nwoha | There is a growing recognition of the need for the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda to take into account how the climate crisis poses risks to women and girls’ peace and security, particularly in conflict and post-conflict contexts. Food security, water insecurity and displacement are issues affecting women and girls due to extreme weather and the climate emergency. The intersection of WPS, climate change, ecological destruction and conflict or post-conflict situations thus raises a myriad of issues. This discussion project addresses these issues and launches a report written in partnership between LSE's Centre for Women, Peace and Security, the Women’s International Peace Centre and Gender Action for Peace and Security. Meet our speakers and chairHannah Bond (@h_rbond) is Director of Gender Action for Peace and Security (GAPS). Hannah has worked with CSOs and government in the UK and Global South. In the early stages of her career, Hannah worked for the UK Women’s National Commission, focusing on violence against women. She has since worked for humanitarian and development NGOs in the Europe and Sub-Saharan Africa and for the British Embassy in Addis Ababa where she worked on Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somaliland. Hannah lived and worked for six years in Ethiopia, where she specialised in conflict, gender, human rights, community-based development and economic empowerment. Hannah focused on conflict and gender in her Master’s degree at King’s College London.Bineta Diop (@AUBinetaDiop) is currently the Special Envoy of the Chairperson of the African Union Commission on Women, Peace and Security. She is the founder and President of Femmes Africa Solidarité (FAS), an international NGO based in Geneva with its operation office in Dakar/Senegal. The organisation seeks to foster, strengthen and promote the leadership role of women in conflict prevention, management and resolution in Africa. Mme Diop played an instrumental role in the adoption of the Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality in Africa as well as the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. She has led peacebuilding programs as well as many women’s peace and security initiatives.Helen Kezie-Nwoha (@keziehelen) is a feminist peace activist, women human rights defender and the Executive Director at The Women’s International Peace Centre. Helen has an academic background in gender and international development with over 20 years of experience working on women’s rights, gender, peace building, conflict resolution and governance. She has led peace advocacy efforts at international, regional and national levels specifically in Africa and Asia. Her research interests focus on women’s peace efforts and women’s participation in peace building and post conflict reconstruction; documenting women and girls’ refugee experiences; and gender and humanitarian response.Keina Yoshida (@intlawninja) is a Research Officer in the Centre for Women, Peace, and Security, where she works on the AHRC funded project Feminist Approaches to the International Law of Peace and Security (FILPS) led by Professor Christine Chinkin and Dr Louise Arimatsu. Keina is researching the links between the environment, nature, sustainable development goals, the gendered causes and impacts of violence against women, and structural inequalities in the context of international legal conceptions of peace and security.More about this eventThe Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world.This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

1hr 27mins

1 Feb 2021

Rank #2

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Solutions for a Planet in Crisis

Contributor(s): Inger Andersen | The planet is in the throes of the three connected crises of climate change, nature and biodiversity loss, and pollution and waste. We urgently need to start delivering solutions or face major disruption.Inger Andersen, UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme, discusses how we can make science more democratic and inclusive to inform better policies. How the economic and businesses community can recognise the true value of nature and so protect it. How governments can unite the nature, climate and pollution agendas to start delivering results. And how every one of us can contribute by making more sustainable choices in our daily lives.Meet our speaker and chairInger Andersen (@andersen_inger) is Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme, headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya. Between 2015 and 2019, Ms. Andersen was the Director-General of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Ms Andersen has more than 30 years of experience in international development economics, environmental sustainability, strategy and operations. She has led work on a range of issues including agriculture, environmental management, biodiversity conservation, climate change, infrastructure, energy, transport, and water resources management and hydro-diplomacy.Between 1999 and 2014, Ms. Andersen held several leadership positions at the World Bank including Vice President of the Middle East and North Africa; Vice President for Sustainable Development and Head of the CGIAR Fund Council. Prior to her 15 years at the World Bank, Ms. Andersen worked 12 years at the United Nations, first on drought and desertification, beginning with the UN Sudano-Sahelian Office. In 1992, she was appointed UNDP’s Water and Environment Coordinator for the Arab Region.Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.Thomas Smith is Assistant Professor in Environmental Geography at LSE. He teaches on a number of environmental courses, focussing on innovative technology-enhanced experiential learning and field-based education in geography.More about this eventThe Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUNEP

1hr

20 Jan 2021

Rank #3

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The 'True' Brexit: where are we now?

Contributor(s): Professor Tony Travers, Jill Rutter, Vicky Pryce, Professor Katy Hayward | In the aftermath of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the negotiations for the UK’s future relationship with the EU look even more challenging. Now that the UK is finishing its transition to Brexit, do we now know what it means? We explore the realities of Brexit for government, the economy, and our politics and look ahead to the policy choices we face. What are the unresolved questions for the UK? Our speakers will comprise a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law to assess where we might be heading.Katy Hayward (@hayward_katy) is Professor of Political Sociology in Queen’s University Belfast and a Senior Fellow at ‘The UK in a Changing Europe’ think-tank, where she leads a project on The future and status of Northern Ireland.Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor at the Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service.Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is Senior Research Fellow at the UK in a Changing Europe.Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE.Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory.This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond'. The LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond is a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy.The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSEBrexit #LSECOVID19

1hr 23mins

10 Dec 2020

Rank #4

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Imperialism and the Developing World

Contributor(s): Professor Atul Kohli, Dr Natalya Naqvi | How did Western imperialism shape the developing world? And what effect has Anglo-American expansionism had on economic development in poor parts of the world? This discussion will cover how Atul Kohli tackles this question in his new book, Imperialism and the Developing World, by analyzing British and American influence on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America from the age of the British East India Company to the most recent U.S. war in Iraq.Atul Kohli is the David K.E. Bruce Professor of International Affairs at Princeton University. His principal research interests are in the area of political economy of developing countries. He is the author of Imperialism and the Developing World: How Britain and the U.S. Shaped the Global Periphery (Oxford University Press, 2020); Poverty amid Plenty in the New India (2012) (a Foreign Affairs Best Book of 2012 on Asia and the Pacific); State-Directed Development: Political Power and Industrialization in the Global Periphery (2004) (winner of the Charles Levine Award (2005) of the International Political Science Association); Democracy and Discontent: India's Growing Crisis of Governability (1991); and The State and Poverty in India (1987). He has also edited or coedited ten volumes (most recently, Business and Politics in India, 2019; and States in the Developing World, 2017) and published some sixty articles. Through much of his scholarship he has emphasized the role of sovereign and effective states in the promotion of inclusive development. He currently serves as a co-chair of the editorial committee of the journal World Politics, where he also served as the chief-editor during 2006-13. During 2009-10 he was the Vice President of the American Political Science Association. He has received grants from the Social Science Research Council, Ford Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. He received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.You can order the book, Imperialism and the Developing World, from the Oxford University Press website.Natalya Naqvi (@natalyanaqvi) is Assistant Professor in International Political Economy in the Department of International Relations at LSE.Karen E. Smith is Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at LSE, and is Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit.The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. It is ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies.

1hr 28mins

8 Dec 2020

Rank #5

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Why Does Globalisation Fuel Populism, and What Can We Do About It?

Contributor(s): Professor Sara Hobolt | Dani Rodrik will explore the globalisation backlash and the ways (hyper-) globalisation has produced a political counter-reaction. He will present an alternative model of globalisation that is more compatible with economic prosperity and social inclusion.Dani Rodrik (@rodrikdani) is the Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is currently President-Elect of the International Economic Association, and co-director of Economics for Inclusive Prosperity. His newest book is Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy.Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute. Previously, she has held posts at the University of Oxford and the University of Michigan. She is the Chair of the European Election Studies (EES), an EU-wide project studying voters, parties, candidates and the media in European Parliamentary elections, and the Principal Investigator of the ERC-funded project EUDEMOS: Constrained Democracy: Citizens’ Responses to Limited Political Choice in the European Union.Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House.The United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Its mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.

1hr 28mins

8 Dec 2020

Rank #6

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The Value of Inclusion for a Post-COVID-19 World

Contributor(s): Ann Cairns, Ruth Cairnie, Wanda Hope, Lance Uggla, Nate Yohannes | The impacts of COVID-19 within firms include cost-cutting, a move towards virtual working for many workers and the pivoting of business objectives. These impacts of COVID-19 have the potential to erode the gains to inclusive culture that have been made within many firms over the last decade as focus is placed elsewhere. This is at a time when the benefits to having an inclusive culture have never been more needed. In this webinar we bring insights from the academic literature to a panel of diverse leaders and ask them what these insights mean for them in practice.Ann Cairns (@AnnMCairns) is Executive Vice Chair at Mastercard, and is senior ambassador and executive leader. She also sits as part of the company’s global management committee. Prior to joining Mastercard in 2011, Ann was head of the Financial Services Group with Alvarez & Marsal, CEO of Transaction Banking at ABNAMRO and held senior positions at Citigroup. Ann is currently chair of ICE Clear Europe, owned by the Fortune 500 company Intercontinental Exchange (ICE). She is also global chair of the 30% Club, the chair of the Financial Alliance for Women and serves as a member of the UK government’s AI Council and the IBDE advisory board. She has a Pure Mathematics degree and honorary doctorate from Sheffield University and a MSc. with research into medical statistics and honorary doctorate from Newcastle University.Ruth Cairnie (@RuthCairnie) has worked in the engineering sector for 37 years spanning senior functional and line roles at Royal Dutch Shell PLC as well as experience advising government departments on strategic development and capability building. She is currently the Senior Independent Director of Associated British Foods Plc. She is Patron of the Women in Defence Charter, the Chair of POWERful Women, an initiative to advance gender diversity within the energy sector and a trustee of Windsor Leadership. Prior to this, she has been a Non-Executive Director of Rolls Royce Holdings plc, ContourGlobal plc and Keller Group PLC and a member of the finance committee of the University of Cambridge. Ruth is a Master of Advance Studies of Mathematics from the University of Cambridge and holds a BSc Joint Honours in Mathematics and Physics from the University of Bristol.Wanda Hope (@WandaBHope) currently serves as Johnson & Johnson’s Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer and is responsible for globally advancing the company’s diversity and inclusion (D&I) outcomes, strengthening D&I capabilities, improving reputation, and driving innovation and growth for future success. Prior to this role, Wanda held a variety of leadership positions across Johnson & Johnson including Vice President, Sales & Marketing; Vice President, Commercial Analytics, Development & Operations; and Vice President, Global Performance & Development. She recently presented at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Conference as well the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Annual Conference. She currently serves as a strategic advisor on the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on the New Equality and Inclusion, the Penn State Smeal College of Business Board of Visitors, the State Theater New Jersey Board of Trustees, and the Board of the National Sales Network.Lance Uggla (@LanceUggla) is Chairman and CEO of IHS Markit, responsible for leading the strategic direction and operational results of the company. He founded Markit in 2003 having identified opportunities to create greater transparency and data accuracy in illiquid financial markets, initially focusing on derivatives. In 2016 he jointly led the merger of equals between IHS and Markit, becoming Chairman and CEO in January 2018. Lance earned his BBA at Simon Fraser University and his MSc at the London School of Economics. He was previously Head of Global Markets at CIBC and latterly Head of Europe and Asia and Cohead Credit Trading at TD Securities. He was the UK EY Entrepreneur of the Year in 2012 and won the Outstanding Alumni Award, 2014 at Simon Fraser. Lance sits on the Board of Directors of Mastercard is a Trustee and Honorary Member of Tate Foundation.Nate Yohannes is currently a Technical Advisor and Corporate Strategy Leader to the Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft. Nate joined the CTO’s office after directing Product Management & Planning at Microsoft Artificial Intelligence (AI) & AR/VR and as a member of the task force advising Microsoft’s vision and social-ethical responsibilities for AI Video Surveillance. Nate graduated from the University at Buffalo School of Law as a Barbara and Thomas Fellow for Human Rights and clerked for NYS Supreme Court’s Hon. Paula Feroleto. Elected Class Director, he received the Hon. Green Commencement and Alumni Trailblazer Award. Following graduation, Nate became Associate General Counsel at the Money Management Institute, representing the wealth management industry to the U.S. government. This led to his political appointment by President Obama as the Senior Advisor to the Chief Investment and Innovation Officer, U.S. SBA. He was a Team Leader for the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, U.S. Department of Treasury and a member of the White House Broadband Council and the White House Business Council.Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is Associate Professor in Behavioural Science and the founding Director of The Inclusion Initiative at LSE.The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.The Inclusion Initiative (@LSE_TII) is part of the Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science.

1hr 25mins

25 Nov 2020

Rank #7

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Two Faces of Populism

Contributor(s): Professor Stephanie J. Rickard, Professor Barry Eichengreen | Explanations for variants of populism are typically framed as a contest between culture and economics. Building on his recent book, The Populist Temptation, Professor Barry Eichengreen (University of California-Berkeley) will consider the arguments for both. Utilising data from British Election Surveys, he will show that populism, and Brexit in particular, is as much about economics as it is about culture and identity.Barry Eichengreen (@B_Eichengreen) is the George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley.Stephanie J. Rickard (@SJRickard) is a Professor of Political Science at the LSE in the Department of Government. Her research examines the effects of political institutions on economic policies. She has appeared on various media outlets to discuss events in the global economy, including BBC Radio 4's flagship Today programme.Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is a Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House.The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Its mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSPopulism

1hr 26mins

24 Nov 2020

Rank #8

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Covid-19 and global gender strategy: if not now, when?

Contributor(s): Ginette Azcona, Dr Roopa Dhatt, Dr Roopa Dhatt, Megan O’Donnell | This event brings together global experts on gender issues to discuss the urgent need to support women. How can women’s vulnerability be considered in pandemic preparedness and response? And what is the role of the policymaker in reestablishing the path to a more equal society for men and women?While there have been significant advances in gender equality in the past 30 years, the COVID-19 threatens to undo this good work. Studies show more men are dying of COVID-19 but the negative secondary social and economic effects as a result of the pandemic will negatively affect more women. School closures, lockdowns and reduced access to healthcare are just some of the ways the pandemic is already exaggerating existing gender disparities.Ginette Azcona is a Research and Data Specialist at UN Women and one of the principle authors of UN Women's 2018 flagship report Turning Promises into Action. She joined UN Women in 2010 to work on its flagship report Progress of the World’s Women. Before this, she was part of the research and writing team for UNDP’s 2009 Human Development Report: Overcoming barriers: Human mobility and development. She has authored numerous publications on human development, human rights, social justice and gender and development data and currently leads the data and statistical work for UN Women’s flagship reports.Roopa Dhatt (@roopadhatt) is the Executive Director of Women in Global Health. She is a passionate advocate for gender equality in global health and a leading voice in the movement to correct the gender imbalance in global health leadership. She is also a practicing internal medicine physician.Sarah Hawkes is a medical doctor with a degree in sociology and a PhD in epidemiology. She is Professor of Global Public Health at University College London where she leads a research theme analysing the use of research evidence in policy processes, particularly in relation to gender and health equity. Sarah is Director of the UCL Centre for Gender and Global Health and co-Director and co-founder of Global Health 50/50 which advances action and accountability for gender equality in global health.Megan O’Donnell (@modonnell1231) is the assistant director for gender and a senior policy analyst at the Center for Global Development, where she works on issues related to women’s economic empowerment and financial inclusion, gender data and measurement, and development effectiveness. Prior to CGD, O’Donnell worked at the ONE Campaign, the Inter-American Development Bank, the International Center for Research on Women, CARE USA, Banyan Global, and the Middle East Institute. She has a master’s degree from the University of Oxford and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia.Clare Wenham (@clarewenham) is Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at the LSE. She specialises in global health security and the politics and policy of pandemic preparedness and outbreak response. She has researched this for over a decade, through influenza, Ebola and Zika, ranging from questions of global governance, role of WHO and World Bank, national priorities and innovative financing for pandemic control. More recently she has been examining the role of women in epidemics and associated policy. For COVID-19 Clare is Co-PI on grant from the CIHR and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation analysing the gendered dimensions of the outbreak.The Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) trains and inspires people passionate about health by advancing and challenging their understanding of health systems and the social, economic and political contexts in which they operate.This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.

1hr 30mins

23 Nov 2020

Rank #9

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Europe's (Euro) Crisis of Legitimacy

Contributor(s): Professor Vivien Schmidt | In this lecture, Vivien Schmidt will define democracy and legitimacy, discuss it's split-level nature in the EU and detail the processes of Eurozone governance that led to deteriorating economic performance and the rise of populism.Europe’s crisis of legitimacy stems from the European Union’s ‘governing by rules and ruling by numbers’ during the Eurozone crisis. Rules-based governance focused on austerity and structural reform played havoc with the Eurozone economy while fuelling political discontent. Subsequent reinterpretation of the rules ‘by stealth’ may have improved performance but it did nothing to change the suboptimal rules or to address increasing Eurosceptic politicisation. Even though by 2015 EU actors began acknowledging their rules reinterpretations and doing more to improve the situation, the damage had been done. Legitimacy remained in question, understood not only in terms of economic performance (output) and political responsiveness (input) but also the quality of the governance procedures (throughput).Vivien Schmidt (@vivienaschmidt) is Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration; Professor of International Relations and Political Science at Boston University. She was Founding Director of Boston University's Centre for the Study of Europe.You can order the book, Europe's Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone, from the Oxford University Press website.Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Government and European Institute at LSE.The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government.

1hr 21mins

18 Nov 2020

Rank #10

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After Brexit: the UK in the North Atlantic trade triangle

Contributor(s): Anthony Gardner, Beatrice Kilroy-Nolan, Luisa Santos | As the UK steers its post-Brexit future, it is placed between US and EU trade policies. What might these mean for the UK’s economic future? With multilateralism under threat, what are the implications for a ‘Global Britain’ strategy? Can the UK balance its US and EU interests or will it be squeezed out? What can we expect from Washington and Brussels?Anthony Gardner (@tonylgardner) is former US Ambassador to the European Union, serving from 2014-2017, and previous Director for European Affairs in the National Security Council from 1994-95. He currently serves as Senior Counsel at Sidley Austin and as Senior Adviser at the Brunswick Group in London.Beatrice Kilroy-Nolan is a former senior EU and trade advisor to the Prime Minister in No.10 Downing Street. In 2019, working with the PM’s Sherpa David Frost, she co-led the UK negotiating team in finalising the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement. She is a leading expert on EU economic and trade policy development and negotiation. Beatrice is currently a Partner at Flint Global.Luisa Santos (@milugrad) is Deputy Director General at BusinessEurope, responsible for international relations and Chair of BusinessEurope’s EU-UK Task Force.Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE.This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond'. The LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond is a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy.The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit #LSECOVID19

1hr 32mins

12 Nov 2020

Rank #11

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Is Greece Falling Behind in the E-Economy? What is to be Done?

Contributor(s): Effie Bitrou, Dr Charalambos Tsekeris, Professor Calliope Spanou | The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted further – and indeed raised critically – the importance of digital connectivity and digital literacy for economic and societal resilience. From enabling teleworking during times of lock-downs to facilitating social contact with vulnerable or self-isolating individuals, digital connectivity and internet use have become essential prerequisites of everyday life.Even prior to the pandemic, Greece had been a laggard within the European Union with regard to its digital infrastructure, its internet penetration and its use of e-services (digital economy). As an example, the country ranks 27th out of the 28 EU Member States in the EU Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI 2020). The panel will draw on data from the latest wave of the World Internet Survey to discuss a number of issues related to this: the extent and patterns of internet use; the size of the e-economy and recent developments with regard to the provision of e-services; the digital divide among individuals, regions and socio-economic groups; digitalisation of government and public services; and questions concerning privacy risks and citizen’s rights. In this, the panel will consider how well Greece has responded to international developments in the digital economy in recent years and discuss the strategic priorities for it to do better in the future.Effie Bitrou is Head of Digital Banking at National Bank of Greece. In her current role, Effie is responsible of the continuous growth and development of NBG’s digital offering. Previously she led the digital product management and consumers digital banking teams. Before NBG, Effie held the position of Vice President at JPMorgan Asset Management in London, UK and was responsible of digital transformation programmes in Europe and Asia. From 2007 to 2013 Effie was a manager with Accenture UK, working in the Systems Integration practice for Retail and Banking space. Effie holds a BEng in Electrical and Computer Engineering from National University of Athens and a MSc in Information Systems Management from the London School of Economics and Political Science.Calliope Spanou is Professor of Administrative Science – Public Administration at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, Department of Political Science and Public Administration. She was elected by a special committee of the Hellenic Parliament and served as the Greek Ombudsman (2011-2015) while she had also served as Deputy Ombudsman (2003-11). She has extensive experience regarding administrative reform. Among other, she has cooperated with the OECD/SIGMA as an expert regarding public administration reform in various countries. Her research interests cover issues of public administration, civil, public policy, citizen-administration relations, Europeanization etc. She has published books and articles in Greek, English and French.Charalambos Tsekeris (PhD) is Research Fellow (Assistant Professor rank) on Digital Sociology at the National Centre for Social Research (Athens, Greece), and Professor Extraordinary at the School of Public Leadership, Stellenbosch University. He is also Academic Head at European Communication Institute, and Associate at the Anti-Corruption Centre for Education and Research, Stellenbosch University. Prof. Tsekeris is Principal Investigator of the World Internet Project-Greece and has authored more than 100 scholarly papers and one book from the Academy of Athens (also edited 3 books from Routledge). His current research involves the dynamics of digital society and economy in Greece.Vassilis Monastiriotis is an economist and economic geographer by training, specialising in three areas of Labour Economics, Economic Geography and Political Economy. He has significant policy engagement on all three areas, including appointments in Experts Committees (e.g., on Regional Incentives policy and on Minimum Wage policy in Greece) and work with international bodies such as the European Commission (DG Regio, DG EMPL, DG EAC), the CEFTA Secretariat and the EBRD.The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreece

1hr 31mins

10 Nov 2020

Rank #12

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International Climate Politics after the US Presidential Election

Contributor(s): Professor Anne-Marie Slaughter, Professor Naomi Oreskes, Professor Lord Stern, Laurence Tubiana | Taking place one week after the election, this panel assesses the outcome of the US election and the prospects for the future of American and international climate policy.The outcome of the 2020 US Presidential Election could have a lasting impact on the future of international climate politics. With the US set to exit from the Paris Agreement in November, a win by Donald Trump would seal America’s withdrawal from climate multilateralism. His opponent Joe Biden, who has promised a Green New Deal, would recommit the US to the Paris Agreement and intends to ramp up global climate ambition.Anne-Marie Slaughter (@SlaughterAM) is the CEO of New America and the Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. From 2009-2011 she served as the director of Policy Planning for the United States Department of State, the first woman to hold that position. Prior to her government service, Dr. Slaughter was the Dean of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs (formerly the Woodrow Wilson School) from 2002–2009 and the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law at Harvard Law School from 1994-2002.Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Head of the India Observatory at the London School of Economics. He was President of the Royal Economic Society (2018-19) and President of the British Academy (2013- 2017). He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society (June 2014). He has held academic appointments in the UK at Oxford, Warwick, the LSE and abroad at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Ecole Polytechnique and the Collège de France in Paris, the Indian Statistical Institute in Bangalore and Delhi, and the Peopleʼs University of China in Beijing. He was Chief Economist of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development 1994-1999, and Chief Economist and Senior Vice President at the World Bank, 2000-2003.Naomi Oreskes (@NaomiOreskes) is Professor of the History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University. She is an internationally renowned geologist, science historian, and author of both scholarly and popular books and articles on the history of earth and environmental science, including The Rejection of Continental Drift, Plate Tectonics: An Insider’s History of the Modern Theory of the Earth, and in recent decades has been a leading voice on the issue of anthropogenic climate change. Her research focuses on the earth and environmental sciences, with a particular interest in understanding scientific consensus and dissent. Her 2004 essay “The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change” (Science 306: 1686) has been widely cited, both in the United States and abroad, including in the Royal Society’s publication, “A Guide to Facts and Fictions about Climate Change,” in the Academy-award winning film, An Inconvenient Truth. She is a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow.Laurence Tubiana (@LaurenceTubiana) is CEO of the European Climate Foundation (ECF). In addition to her role at ECF, she is the Chair of the Board of Governors at the French Development Agency (AFD), and a Professor at Sciences Po, Paris. Before joining ECF, Laurence was France’s Climate Change Ambassador and Special Representative for COP21, and as such a key architect of the landmark Paris Agreement. Following COP21, she was appointed High Level Champion for climate action.Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House.Robert Falkner (@robert_falkner) is the Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (GRI) and an Associate Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy.The LSE’s United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.The event will be co-chaired by Professor Peter Trubowitz and Robert Falkner.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimatePolitics

1hr 31mins

9 Nov 2020

Rank #13

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How Not To Be Wrong: the art of changing your mind

Contributor(s): James O’Brien | Join us for this event with LSE alumnus and writer and broadcaster James O’Brien who will talking about his new book, How Not To Be Wrong.In How Not To Be Wrong, James puts himself under the microscope, laying open his personal beliefs and opinions on everything from racial prejudice to showing emotions, from fat-shaming to tattoos, as he digs up the real reasons – often irrational or unconscious – behind them. James airs the toxic masculinity and traditional “stiff upper lip” attitude that coloured his childhood, and the therapy and personal growth that led him to question his views and continually explore new perspectives. How Not to Be Wrong also includes thought-provoking exchanges on unconscious bias, privilege and the right to be wrong, with some of his most popular interview guests, such as Akala, George The Poet and Malcolm Gladwell.James O’Brien (@mrjamesob) is an award-winning writer and broadcaster whose journalism has appeared everywhere from the TLS to the Daily Mirror. Best known for his daily current affairs programme on the radio station LBC, with over 1.2 million weekly listeners, he has also presented and appeared on a variety of TV shows including Newsnight and Have I Got News For You? His first book, How To Be Right, was a Sunday Times bestseller and won the Parliamentary Book Award for Best Political Book by a non-politician.You can order the book, How Not To Be Wrong, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.Ella Whiteley is a Fellow in LSE’s Department of Philosophy Logic and Scientific Method. Prior to joining the department Ella worked for 'The Invisible Labour Project' at Cambridge University, where they researched the unpaid and undervalued work conducted in academia. Ella’s research interests include political philosophy, the philosophy of biology, and ethics.The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) at LSE was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant.Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEJamesOBrien

58mins

4 Nov 2020

Rank #14

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Bullshit jobs, technology, capitalism

Contributor(s): Professor David Graeber | This episode is dedicated to David Graeber, LSE professor of Anthropology, who died unexpectedly in September this year. David was a public intellectual, a best-selling author, an influential activist and anarchist.He took aim at the pointless bureaucracy of modern life, memorably coining the term ‘bullshit jobs’. And his book ‘Debt: The First 5000 years’ was turned into a radio series by the BBC.But David started his academic career studying Madagascar. Anthropology interested him, he said, because he was interested in human possibilities - including the potential of societies to organise themselves without the need for a state - as he had seen in his own research.He was also a well-known anti-globalisation activist and a leading figure in the Occupy Wall Street Movement.David was generous enough to do an interview for us in 2016 when LSE iQ was in its infancy. That episode asked, ‘What’s the future of work?’ and in his interview he reflected on the disappointments of technology, pointless jobs and caring labour.David was such an interesting speaker that we would have liked to use more of it at the time, but we didn’t have the space. Now, it feels right to bring you a lightly edited version of the interview. ContributorsDavid Graeber Research  The Utopia of Rules: On Technology, Stupidity, and the Secret Joys of Bureaucracy, published by Melville House. ‘On the Phenomenon of Bullshit jobs: A work rant’, STRIKE! Magazine Bullshit Jobs: A theory, published by Allen Lane

36mins

3 Nov 2020

Rank #15