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Rank #64 in Golf category

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Golf

Edel Golf Podcast

Updated 20 days ago

Rank #64 in Golf category

Sports
Golf
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Go behind the scenes with putting designer and PGA professional, David Edel as he answers your questions, talks about how to play your best, and sits down with friends for candid golf conversations.

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Go behind the scenes with putting designer and PGA professional, David Edel as he answers your questions, talks about how to play your best, and sits down with friends for candid golf conversations.

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
0
0
0
0

Great Discussion

By tigers still gonna win tho - May 22 2020
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Edel Golf has continually pushed the boundaries of conventional thinking when it comes to equipment. As someone who used David’s wedges and putter for some of the best golf of my college career, it’s great to hear and better understand what goes into the product. Looking forward to future podcast!

Edel Golf

By No more 3 putts - May 22 2020
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Really interesting and informative podcast. I own 2 Edel putters and craftsmanship is great. The fitting process is the best out there and I highly suggest going thru one. You will learn a lot about yourself and your putting.

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
0
0
0
0

Great Discussion

By tigers still gonna win tho - May 22 2020
Read more
Edel Golf has continually pushed the boundaries of conventional thinking when it comes to equipment. As someone who used David’s wedges and putter for some of the best golf of my college career, it’s great to hear and better understand what goes into the product. Looking forward to future podcast!

Edel Golf

By No more 3 putts - May 22 2020
Read more
Really interesting and informative podcast. I own 2 Edel putters and craftsmanship is great. The fitting process is the best out there and I highly suggest going thru one. You will learn a lot about yourself and your putting.

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

Cover image of Edel Golf Podcast

Edel Golf Podcast

Latest release on Dec 31, 2020

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 20 days ago

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This means that the episode rankings aren't working properly. Please revisit us at a later time to get the best episodes of this podcast!

Rank #1: Mike Adams: Outliers Don't Exist in Golf

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Welcome back to another edition of the Edel Podcast.  Today, we have the pleasure of sitting down with my longtime friend, Mike Adams.  To this day, Mike continues to mentor both students and teachers.  He’s a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame and has worked with the majority of the Top 100 Teachers.

I ask Mike what biomechanics means to him.  He says it’s “It’s the study of human movement and how people move in time and space.”

Mike got started in the biomechanics sphere when his wife retained a ski injury.  The doctor that performed her surgery, Dr. Steadman, worked alongside Dr. Chuck Dillman who was the biomechanist for the U.S. Olympic Ski Team.  “Dr. Dillman and I became friends and started working on projects together.”  Through a lot of time and toil, the pair came up with different body types and how they relate to the motion of swinging a golf club.

As time wore on, the pair, with the help of Dr. Ned Armstrong, developed a “testing system to find out what students could and could not do.”  This revolutionary process screens players for six things: wingspan vs. height, middle knuckle to elbow, elbow to shoulder socket, right hand grip, external shoulder rotation, and lower body pivoting.  The screens “give teachers a blueprint to move forward with their students.”

When Mike describes the Ultimate Golf Lesson, he recounts the first one he did last year with Terry Rowles.  The event also featured some of the leading authorities in biomechanics and how their research and findings relate to golf.  He used force plates, video, launch monitors, and three-dimensional technology.  The premise was that “it’s better to test than guess.”

Mike and I both maintain that it’s vitally important for the teachers of today to take these measurements and properly apply them to their students.  Where teachers get into trouble is trying to fit all their students to a single methodology.  That’s why these scientifically backed screenings are so valuable.

In order for teachers to continue to improve their craft, and in turn get results for their students, they have to be continually learning instead of repackaging information that already exists.

Mike and his partner Terry Rowles are about to release a new book.  It’s based on the two Ultimate Golf Lessons.  Their goal is to write the “the most extensive golf instruction book ever written, backed by science.”  If you want to become a better instructor, this book is a must read.

Terry and Mike are also hosting a webinar that starts in February.  In the webinar, the industry’s best biomechanists and instructors are going to explore all the quantitative information they’ve realized.  It’s not meant just for instructors, however.  The information is accessible for players of all levels that have a desire to improve their game.

I ask Mike what he wants his legacy to be.  His response is that “I contributed to helping people get better.”  Pretty simple and modest for one of the game’s greatest teachers.

This podcast is chalked full of game-changing information so be sure to set aside a few minutes and give it a listen.

As always, thanks for taking the time to sit down with us at the workbench on the Edel Podcast.  We’ll see you next time.

Dec 31 2020

35mins

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Rank #2: Terry Rowles: Does Biomechanics Matter for YOUR Golf Swing?

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Welcome back to the Edel Podcast.  On this week’s installment, we have the pleasure of sitting down with Terry Rowles.  Terry is a Top 100 Instructor who works with a host of PGA and LPGA Tour players.  

When I asked Terry who some of the other people he’s been influenced by, he said “technology has been a good friend… and before that I worked with David Ledbetter in the late 90’s and early 2000’s which stimulated me to think about a holistic approach to golf…” 

Terry points to the importance of teachers understanding how the body works as it relates to the golf swing.  It’s absolutely critical.

He says there’s two pieces to being a great teacher.  “First is having an understanding of the game… we’ve got to look at a golfer and see what the skills they need to score better are… Second you have to be good at listening… Who is this human being in front of you and what are they asking for?”

When we talk about biomechanics as it pertains to golf, Terry thinks “it’s quantifying movement… to enhance performance or reduce injury.” Biomechanics gives us “the framework to understand where we are on a map and how to move forward.” 

For modern teachers, Terry stresses that understanding biomechanics and how to properly apply them is a long process.  Unfortunately, not enough teachers make the necessary investment to go through the process.  In order to be an industry leader, these skills have to be mastered.

Through the process of quantifying the movements of the best players in the world, Mike and Terry have learned two things.  First, that what players are working on usually coincides with their biomechanics.  Second is that these players are so good, “they don’t usually need to make big changes.” The key is determining what the right things to work on are in a biomechanic sense.

According to Terry, the ultimate golf lesson involves biomechanical tests that determine what a player needs to do with their golf swing in order to improve.  Keep an eye out for his upcoming book. 

What’s so great about Terry and Mike is that “they aren’t just teachers, they’re teachers of teachers.” To that end, their ideas have proven tremendously beneficial in helping other instructors learn and therefore, allow their students to see real, tangible benefits.

As it pertains to fitting, Terry thinks the key is  “matching up all the pieces so that you can go after it hard… it’s a matter of matching up the offense and defense.” 

If there’s a single pinch pin where the golf swing goes wrong, Terry says  “Average is the enemy… if Matt Kuchar and Dustin swung ‘in the middle,’ they wouldn’t be the players they are… We need to fit the golf swing (and therefore equipment) to the way a person’s body is supposed to move.” 

We’re all too thankful for Terry taking the time to sit down at the workbench with us today.  If you’d like to learn more about his ideas and teaching philosophies, head over to his website and tune into the full podcast above.

As always, thanks for hanging out with us here on the Edel Podcast.  We look forward to being with you again on our next episode.

Dec 03 2020

36mins

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Rank #3: Mike Schy: the REAL reason why you should try single length irons

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 Today, we’re lucky to be joined by Mike Schy.  His coaching philosophy and methods have helped thousands of golfers improve from beginners to Tour Players, including Bryson DeChambeau.

More than anything else, Mike is passionate about helping people.  Even more, he thinks outside the box.  That’s evidenced by the work he’s done with players like Bryson DeChambeau. 

His philosophy on teaching constantly evolves.  He’s always seeking out new information and loves to learn.  He says, ”the longer I do this the less I know.”  Unlike a lot of younger teaching professionals, Mike refuses to put his students in a singular box.  It takes time to learn who students are as golfers, and as people. 

Concerning Bryson, Mike knew he was different from other players around the age of 12 or 13.  “He was smart, had a passion that was unlike anything I’d ever seen…”  As a teacher, Mike has learned that great players like Bryson, “have to discover things on their own… It’s my job to help facilitate that.”  A great example of that was Bryson’s discovery that playing single-length equipment made the most sense. 

Mike has some interesting thoughts about why people are so hesitant to try playing with single-length irons like Bryson.  “It’s because of what he does.  His golf swing looks funky.”  Coupled with the fact that the clubs are so upright, he uses jumbo grips, and wears odd hats, he doesn’t conform to what most everyone else is doing. 

Mike thinks that the biggest advantage of single-length irons is that they make the game easier to learn.  Because the clubs are the same length and weight, beginners aren’t having the learn a bunch of different swings.  For good players, the consistency that single-length clubs afford is undeniable. 

When I asked Mike about what club fitting means to him as a Golf Professional, he said fitting clubs is like buying a pair of shoes.  Of course, you’re going to try them on before you buy them.  Golf clubs are no different.  Club fitting is “absolutely essential.” 

As for the direction of his instruction in the future, Mike was very candid when he said “I don’t know and that’s probably a good thing…”  One he absolutely maintains however, is that “you have to understand the makeup of a player way before you start developing a golf swing.”  Even more, he’s working to understand more about biomechanics and the mental side of the game. 

Now that he spends so much time out on Tour, Mike learns a lot through observation.  “I’m observant.  I love watching other teachers and players and learning about what they do… There’s a big difference between being a teacher and a coach.” 

Any time I get to spend with Mike is always a treat.  I really appreciate him taking time out of his busy schedule to sit down and pass along some of his wisdom to our listeners. 

If you’re interested in learning a little more about Mike, visit MikeSchy.com.  Should you happen to be in the Fresno area, be sure to stop by Dragonfly Golf Club and take a lesson – you won’t be disappointed.

Nov 19 2020

38mins

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Rank #4: Case Study: How to Better Aim Your Driver

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Welcome back to the Edel Golf Podcast.  Today we’re taking another listener question about aim markings on a driver and aim bias in regard to offset vs. no offset.

The question specifically reads “how does the same aim bias due to lines on a putter also apply to markings apply to other clubs in the bag such as the driver?”

To answer this question, let’s start with a story from a longtime Edel Golf friend, Lon Hinkle.  After we did a putter fitting with Lon, he said to me, “you know what, I’ve switched to a driver that looks a lot like this mallet putter.”  In comparison to his recent switch from an angular and closed driver to a more round and bulbous, concluding that aiming a putter is just as important as properly aiming all the other clubs in the bag.

This leads us to discussion of the popular notion that blade clubs with little or no offset aim farther right and clubs with more offset aim farther left.  In reality, the opposite is true.  We were surprised when we came to this realization that turned conventional wisdom on its head.

In the end, there’s no denying that aim markings on a golf club absolutely effect aim bias.  The same can be said for paint patterns and top lines.

If you’re curious to learn more about how aim markings and other factors impact directional bias, all you need a laser and mirror to do the test for yourself.  Listening to the podcast above is a great place to start.

As always, thanks for your questions!  We can’t wait to sit back down at the workbench and help you understand and learn how to play your best golf.

Nov 12 2020

8mins

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Rank #5: Forward Press: is it Really Improving Your Putting?

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Usually when golfers forward press, they’re “trying to take something away.”  Some people say they need something to get the stroke going.  In reality, the reason they “can’t get the wheels going is because they know if they stay in the position they’re in at address, with the aim bias that accompanies that issue… they know that nothing good is going to happen from it.”

Let’s talk about what a forward press is.  It’s the “changing of a vector… which is a power angle, like hitting a cue ball with a cue…”  In general, forward presses are trying to take away left aim.  This delofts the putter and opens the face. 

The problem is that people forward press so much that they create negative loft which is terrible for trying to roll the ball truly.  Even more, it makes both speed control and direction difficult to achieve. 

While there’s most definitely something to be said for having a trigger, like a forward press, to get things in motion, the negative variables that it brings about tend to create more serious issues. 

In the end, a little bit of forward press can be good.  However, most people do it too much.  For some players, it works great and by all means, if it’s not broken, don’t fix it.  However, if you’re forward pressing and not seeing the results you want, it’s probably best to try and negate the motion as much as possible.

Thanks for tuning into to another episode of the Edel Podcast.  We are always hearing from our listeners so feel free to drop us a comment with your thoughts below. 

Oct 30 2020

6mins

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Rank #6: In Gee Chun stops into the studio and talks FITTING

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We’re lucky to be joined in-studio by In Gee Chun.  She’s twice been a major champion on the LPGA Tour winning the Evian Masters and U.S. Open as well another LGPA event.  Altogether, she has 14 worldwide wins. 

When I asked In Gee Chun about the things she’s learned from the Edel fitting process, she says it changed her “whole perception of the game, especially the scoring clubs.”

Going through the fitting process, one of the things she learned most was about the right setup for her game and her confidence has grown significantly. 

As it pertains to wedges, finding the right grind has been a game changer.  She says “I can’t use any other wedges anymore.”  With the new grinds, she’s able to make solid contact out of trouble lies more consistently.  Again, the result has been a big increase in confidence. 

For In Gee Chun, the “scientific approach to golf makes all the difference…”  That’s what we’re all about at Edel Golf – using science to help you find what looks real and feels real. 

Oct 22 2020

4mins

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Rank #7: Matching Your Putting Perception to Reality

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The Perception of Reality 

If you listened to Bryson DeChambeau talk during the U.S. Open, he spoke about this very concept with his putting and how his goal was to match both perception and reality.  

The secret to becoming a great player is to “match what you see and match what you feel and match it against reality.”

When it comes to selecting a putter, most golfers take what they see and feel, and hope that it matches reality.  It doesn’t have to be that way because there is an exact science to all of this. 

More than any other part of the game, putting is a perceptive process.  The validity of this process can be found immediately by using a laser on the face of the putter to see where it’s aiming.  Even with all the focus patterns that putters come with (lines, head shape, length, colors, etc.), it’s astounding that “only three percent of golfers we’ve tested can aim their putter correctly.”

The question becomes what causes so much aim bias?  

1. The answer is that we all perceive things differently.  

What makes us so proud of the job we do at Edel Golf is that 96% of the people that get fitted for a putter by us, can aim their putter precisely and correctly. 

2. The other prominent perceptive process in putting has to do with speed.  

When golfers struggle with speed, it’s usually a weight issue.  That’s why having a putter that’s properly weighted to your perception of what speed is, is so important. 

When we’re able to fit golfers with putters that they can aim correctly and are correctly weighted, the end result is confidence. 

“Confidence is knowing you can do something and having the result match the intention… Confidence comes from doing something over and over…” 

What’s cool about the process of putter fitting is that it’s fluid from one golfer to another. Sure, the tenants and mechanics are rooted in science but that science is applied differently to every individual. The key to becoming a great putter is understanding your process and perfecting it. 

At Edel Golf, we’re here to help you learn the process and equipment that works best for you. We have fitters all over the country that know how to fit putters correctly.  All you have to do is reach out to us and find one. 

Oct 15 2020

17mins

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Rank #8: Radial vs Linear Putting Stroke

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Today’s question is “How do you go about switching from radial to linear and what are some drills?” 

Even though this process is multi-faceted, it’s generally easier than people think.  In order to answer this question, we have to start with the assumption that radial strokes are more complicated than linear strokes.  To that end, most of the game’s greatest putters have had linear strokes. 

If you’re trying to move from a radial stroke to a linear stroke, you first have to understand that there are three types of linear strokes - short, medium, and long. 

When switching to linear putting, fitting the right putter is the first step in the process.One of the biggest issues we see is that people with linear strokes have putters that are too heavy.  Excess weight results in inconsistencies with regard to pressure, lag, and face rotation in the forward stroke. 

Another factor to consider is the slot in which you putt.  Slot is determined by arm length differentials.  Depending on your measurements, your slot is going to be steep or flat relative to if your arms are the same length.  If your putter doesn’t match the slot in which you putt, issues with path are going to become magnified. 

Once you have an understanding of the biodynamics of linear putting, and you have a putter that properly fits your stroke, there are some drills that you can start doing to get more comfortable and make your stroke more repeatable. 

The first drill is nothing more than “putting with your right arm only.”  This drill trains you to use your right arm efficiently during the linear stroke. 

Another drill is a string drill.  All you have to do is lay a piece of string perpendicular to your putting line and hit putts trying stop the ball as close to the string as possible.  This drill is all about speed, which is the most important factor in putting well consistently. 

Lastly, a useful drill is to find a straight putt and work on starting the ball online, all the while being conscious of setting up to the putt with the right body positions. 

There’s always plenty of room for gate drills, much like you see Tiger use as he’s warming up for a round.  If you can roll the ball through your gate consistently, those short you used to dread are going to become a lot easier. 

In the end, it’s tough to argue that linear putting is much more simple and repeatable than radial putting.  Making the transition is easier than you might think but, you need a putter that fits your body type and natural tendencies. 

Oct 08 2020

19mins

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Rank #9: Fascinating Correlation Between Eye Position and AIM

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Our question for today is “Do your aim and eye position directly correlate to each other?”  This isn’t a yes or no answer.  Everybody has different perceptions.

With that being said, the most obvious correlation is with eye dominance.  Left eye dominant players “tend to leave the shaft more forward and right eye dominant players tend to lean the shaft back.”

When we see aim bias, there tends to be a lot of head rotation.  The is especially true with right-handed golfers that exhibit left aim bias. 

When it comes to putter length correlation, “longer aims more right and shorter aims more left.”  This is because the longer the putter is, the steeper the eye plane becomes. 

Other factors include putter shape, weight, perception of closed vs. open, the list goes on. 

In the end, there are a lot of factors that go into understanding the relationship between eye position and putter aim.  That’s why it’s so important for players to get properly fit for a putter. 

Oct 02 2020

6mins

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Rank #10: Rich Beem: Major Champ Talks Keys to GREAT PUTTING

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When you think about Texas golf, names like Hogan, Nelson, Mangrum, Crenshaw, Kite, and Speith come to mind just to name a few.  Over the years, however, there’s one PGA Tour player I like sitting down to have a beer with more than most.  That’s Rich Beem. 

The proud son of El Paso Country Club, you probably remember Rich Beem as the winner of the 2002 PGA Championship at Hazeltine in Minnesota.  Though he’s played less and less in recent years on the PGA Tour, he’s gearing up for the Champion’s Tour, and I couldn’t be more excited for him.

Recently, he was kind enough to join us for an insightful chat about putting and what he’s been up to. 

Our conversation starts out with Rich sharing his thoughts on putting over the years.  He makes no bones about the fact that he “vaguely remembers what it was like to be a kid going out there to the putting green and just taking one ball and knocking it in… There wasn’t a single thought about how to do it, just how many… I have actually digressed from that probably as much as you can…”

As Rich gets ready for the Champion’s Tour, he’s “trying to get back to the point where (putting) doesn’t have a value… If it goes in, great.  If it doesn’t, that’s great too… It doesn’t matter.” 

We proceed to talk about how Rich learned the game growing up and putting specifically.  He credits his dad with teaching him the fundamentals.  One of the most important pieces of advice was keeping his elbows close together throughout the swing.  That same thought governs much of how Rich goes about both his swing and putting today. 

His dad also stressed how important it is to “never stop searching.”  If one thing isn’t working, you can’t be afraid to try something else.  That thought is likely one of the reasons Rich has never been afraid to switch putters and putting methods.  Self-admittingly, he’s “played with a smorgasbord of putters.”

To that end, Rich has never been an overly mechanical putter.  Instead, he sees reading greens as more of an art.  “Those greens books… they help out a little bit if you’re unsure, but I still think there’s an art to how you do it… Tiger seems to have a way that he sees it in his eyes.”

When asked what his putting looks like today, Rich says “I’m looking at a putter that also mimics what I’m trying to do in the golf swing.  And that’s my posture.”

Today, Rich’s putter is longer and more upright than a lot of players.  This fits his body type and cross-handed grip. 

Since Rich’s days of grinding week in and week out have curtailed, he’s spent more time as an announcer.  During that time, he’s noticed a couple of significant differences in how today’s young players go about putting compared to the older guard.  First, “they aren’t afraid to try anything… They will go and find the strangest looking thing… put it up their forearm…”  Next, “they don’t leave anything to chance.  He’s blown away by the “amount of apparatuses they have to try and show them what the ball is doing off the stroke or… just embed it in their muscle memory.”

As always, it was great to sit down with Rich for a few minutes and record this week’s podcast.  He truly is one of the great guys in the game and, we wish him nothing but success as he gets ready to head out on the Champion’s Tour.

To hear the full conversation, listen in to our podcast above.  Thanks for tuning in and we’ll see you next week. 

Aug 28 2020

22mins

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