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The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Open your mind to the world with New Zealand’s number one breakfast radio show.Without question, as New Zealand’s number one talk host, Mike Hosking sets the day’s agenda.The sharpest voice and mind in the business, Mike drives strong opinion, delivers the best talent, and always leaves you wanting more.The Mike Hosking Breakfast always cuts through and delivers the best daily on Newstalk ZB.

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Open your mind to the world with New Zealand’s number one breakfast radio show.Without question, as New Zealand’s number one talk host, Mike Hosking sets the day’s agenda.The sharpest voice and mind in the business, Mike drives strong opinion, delivers the best talent, and always leaves you wanting more.The Mike Hosking Breakfast always cuts through and delivers the best daily on Newstalk ZB.

Mike's Minute: The pay rises are fine, until the economic reality comes

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At PWC in Britain, the pay rise coming is 9 percent. They employ about 20,000 locally. Some pay rises will be as high as 10 percent . The chairman says you can't ignore reality, which is true.
Given the job market, if you are not offering the 9 percent, someone is. And that person will be hoovering up the scare resource that makes up today's labour market.
Locally, Air New Zealand is offering in house bonuses to those who nominate people who can be hired. They currently have about 1100 jobs up for grabs. I was shown an ad last week for a job at TVNZ, they are offering five weeks leave. And it's not just for the job ad I saw, but it seemed all jobs advertised.
A whole bunch of worrying stuff comes out of all of this. Firstly, where does it end? How many rises? How many bonuses? And who ultimately pays the bill?
Secondly, it’s the exact opposite of what central banks all over the world want you to be doing.
Thirdly, are you taking a job just for the perks? If you are, what sort of calamitous workforce predicament have we created as we get more and more people in any given office not necessarily there for the pathway, environment, or challenge, but for the sugar on the top
The natural outworking of all this activity is sooner or later it starts to fall over. The very thing the central banks want will happen; it's called a recession.
As the increasing costs of doing business get too great to pass on, people start to fail and fall. Layoffs begin. You still have your 9 percent pay rise, but only if you still have your job.
As more and more of it happens, that creates what they call "slack" in the workforce or labour market. In other words, the job ads drop, but the people looking for work goes up. So instead of an employer begging you to join or praying someone applies for the role, you are up against a whole bunch of others looking for the same spot.
The great piece of magic central banks are looking to pull off is they land their respective economies so softly you don’t even notice this is happening. In reality that most likely won't happen, what most likely will happen is economies will go thump, bits will break, the hard landing will be on, and we will get a much-needed re-calibration.
We are living through one of the great financial and economic cock ups of all time and the banks are working out as we speak how to put it right.
Your 9 percent is their mistake, but you don’t mind. But if you lose your job that’s on them too, you will mind then.
But for every 9 percent pay rise, the day of reckoning is a day closer.

Jun 29 2022

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Paul Coll: Squash star on his return home, NZ Champs

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Time to catch up with one of sporting stars that deserves far more attention.
Paul Coll topped the squash world rankings earlier this year and became the first New Zealand man to achieve that.
Add to that he's taken home the prestigious British Open and a slew of other tournament wins.
He's back home for the first time in three years and is playing in the New Zealand Squash Championships this weekend.
Paul Coll joined Mike Hosking.
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Jun 29 2022

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Bronwyn Kivel: Victoria University professor on grant to advance the development of a safer opioid alternative

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New Zealand researchers could provide the answer to the opioid epidemic.
Victoria University has received a $1.2 million grant to advance the development of a safer opioid alternative to the pre-clinical phase.
Associate Professor Bronwyn Kivel told Mike Hosking one in five New Zealand adults suffer from chronic pain, and half of those report current treatments don't offer much relief.
She says they're aiming to develop a double-whammy drug that relieves pain, and isn't as addictive.
Kivell says they know a lot about the anti-addiction properties of the compound they're studying -- and that's why they're investigating it.
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Jun 29 2022

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Andrew Little: Christchurch stabbing: Health Minister was briefed about staffing issues at mental health service

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Concerns about understaffing at a mental health service that treated a 37-year-old man accused of killing a mother-of-four in Christchurch were escalated to the Minister of Health Andrew Little, the Herald has learned.
In a briefing on January 20, officials at the Ministry of Health told the minister that the workforce at the Canterbury regional forensic mental health service was so stretched that its secure psychiatric facility at Hillmorton Hospital was operating only 12 of its 15 beds and "running a waitlist for acutely unwell patients".
The Herald understands that the man accused of killing Laisa Waka Tunidau, 52, in what police have described as a "random attack" in the suburb of Sockburn on Saturday was treated in the Hillmorton forensic facility.
The chief executive of Canterbury DHB, Dr Peter Bramley, confirmed in a statement on Wednesday that the man "was a patient of the DHB's specialist mental health service based at Hillmorton, who had been on community leave", but did not provide further details about his care.
The DHB is carrying out a full review, Bramley said.
The January briefing to Little followed a series of media reports about unsafe conditions and staff departures at the Hillmorton forensic facility. According to the document, officials from the ministry visited the hospital on January 19, where they discussed the problems with the DHB's leadership and were assured it was working with staff and unions to "put a strong contingency plan in place".
The Ministry later wrote to the DHB's chief executive asking for a turnaround plan with "short, medium, and long-term actions which will be closely monitored".
"The underlying issue appears to be staff have left and are not being replaced," officials told Little. This was a problem across the entire Canterbury mental health service, they noted, with 100 full-time positions vacant in a mental health workforce of around 1,100 at the time.
The problems at Hillmorton are indicative of wider pressures on forensic mental health services nationally, the officials said.
New Zealand's five regional forensic inpatient services were "under considerable occupancy pressures", running at an average occupancy of 104 per cent, officials told the minister in a related memo.
Since that briefing in January, the pressures on forensic services have continued.
The strain on forensic services starkly illustrates how publicly funded mental health providers across the country are struggling to cope with increasing numbers of people seeking their help at a time when there is a drastic shortage of skilled and experienced health professionals.
It also raises serious questions about the safety of some of the most unwell people in the mental health system, the staff who care for them, and the public.
The Herald obtained the briefings as part of a six-month investigation into the state of mental health services, which has included interviews with dozens of service users, carers, clinicians, researchers, and officials; a review of data from more than 25 public bodies; and an examination of thousands of pages of government and health authority documents, many of which have not been made public before.
In a series of articles in recent weeks, the Herald has exposed how the specialist services were weakened by years of underfunding, understaffing, and poor planning and are now failing to respond to an increase in demand that has been amplified by the coronavirus pandemic.
The five regional forensic services, operated by the Canterbury, Capital & Coast, Southern, Waikato, and Waitematā DHBs, exist at the hard end of this system, responsible for some of the most acutely unwell, risky, disadvantaged, and hard-to-treat patients.

The Mason Clinic, run by Waitemata DHB, is the regional forensic psychiatric facility in Auckland. Photo / Dean Purcell
The nature of their work requires intensive staffing and a high level of supervision and security. However, officials say resources have been con...

Jun 29 2022

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Phil Goff: Auckland Mayor says City Rail Link hasn't derailed despite Auditor-General concerns

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Auckland's Mayor says the Central Rail Link project hasn't derailed,  despite concerns from the Auditor-General.
A report from the Auditor-General's office praises the project's governance, but has found its budget and timeline is likely to change.
It's found supply chain disruption, rising material costs, and trouble recruiting overseas expertise is all contributing.
Phil Goff told Mike Hosking he knows despite challenges, that the project will stay on track.
He says he's been through the tunnels and seen the boring machine at work.
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Jun 29 2022

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Charles Finny: Former trade negotiator says what the EU is proposing in a FTA won't be good for meat and dairy sectors

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NATO's agreed to a fundamental shift to how it responds to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.
The alliance has wrapped up a summit in Madrid, agreeing to set up a permanent army headquarters in Poland and make an unshakeable commitment to Ukraine
Jacinda Ardern has addressed the summit, and says the war is the single biggest issue facing the continent.
Ardern is now on her way to Brussels, where she'll continue talks on a free trade agreement with the EU.
Former trade negotiator Charles Finny told Mike Hosking what Europe is proposing wouldn't be good for our dairy and meat sectors.
“They’re talking about continuing quotas, limiting the amount we can send and also tariffs within those quotas. They might be actually below what we’re trading right now.”
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Jun 29 2022

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Craig Hudson: Managing director for Xero New Zealand on figures revealing business wages and jobs grew 5.3% in May

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We have a couple of trends in the small business sector that are performing stronger than a couple of international heavyweights.
Xero has released their Small Business Index for May, revealing small business wages and jobs grew during the month.
Wages were up 5.3 percent, the fastest pace since January 2017 while the number of jobs grew 4.1 percent.
That's better than the likes of the UK and Australia.
Managing director for Xero New Zealand Craig Hudson joined Mike Hosking.
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Jun 29 2022

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Pollies: Police minister Chris Hipkins and National MP Mark Mitchell clash on police issues

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Police Minister Chris Hipkins has accused National MP Mark Mitchell of making comments that suggest diversity among police undermines confidence.
Hipkins' comments on social media came after he and Mitchell clashed during an on-air interview on Newstalk ZB this morning.
Hipkins tweeted that Mitchell "attacked" him during the interview for talking about increased diversity in police and the fact that a quarter of police on the frontline are women.
"He claimed it's undermining confidence. Wow!! National really do seem to have a problem with women at the moment!," he wrote.
In the interview, Mitchell said that Hipkins should be paying attention to an increase in crime and fatigue among police.
He said that "talking about diversity in the house with patsy questions was not a good start."
"We've been very proud for over 30 years to have been increasing diversity in the police, it's not something new, you don't bring anything new to the table on that," he said.

Mark Mitchell just attacked me on NewstalkZB for talking about increased diversity in the Police and the fact that a quarter of our frontline police are now women. He claimed it’s undermining confidence. Wow!! National really do seem to have a problem with women at the moment!— Chris Hipkins (@chrishipkins) June 28, 2022
Mitchell later told the Herald that Hipkins twisted what he said in an effort to make a political attack on the National party.
"Instead of doing that, he should be focusing on doing what his job is meant to be and that is the police minister coming in, realising and actually being prepared to understand that there is a real problem at the moment. There is a lot of pressure our frontline."
He said Hipkins should be focused on retention of current experienced staff and discussing this issue with Police Commissioner Andrew Coster.
"Because at the moment they're going to have a major issue emerging of people leaving the police."
Hipkins said having "more cops on the beat" was going to make a difference but Mitchell argued back that an increase in cops has not been seen.
He urged the police minister to "get out" and talk to frontline staff.
"They're fatigued with hearing you guys keep talking about that, you haven't been able to deliver the 1800, your two years behind on that. Get focused on the crime."

Jun 28 2022

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Dr Peter Lineham: Professor of Religion on Australian census revealing Christianity is losing its lustre

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Christianity is losing its lustre across the Tasman.
The first numbers from the Australian 2021 census are out and it shows that for the first time, less than 50 percent of the population identify as Christian.
52 percent down to 44 percent.
And the non-religious numbers are increasing – 39 percent compared to 30 percent in 2016.
Professor Emeritus of Religion at Massey University Dr Peter Lineham joined Mike Hosking.
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Jun 28 2022

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Mike's Minute: Free speech is something we must protect, even if you don't like it

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For me, the more interesting aspect of our Roe v Wade reaction is the intolerance of so many in a country that would argue the opposite.
We love free speech, we love freedom of thought, and we love our ‘rights’, all of our ‘rights’, until of course it affects us or affronts us.
Then we go nuts.
I got a lot of reaction to the Simon O’Connor post on Roe v Wade, National had just lost half their votes was a theme.
The attacks on Christopher Luxon were another.
Such an extreme reaction to something that has literally no impact in this country whatsoever.
We took the actions of the court of another country and somehow transferred them to our place and started hypothesising as to what would happen if something similar were to unfold here, even though it wasn’t going to.
People like Lorde stood on a stage at Glastonbury and said “F the Supreme Court” as if f’ ing them is an achievable thing.
At least Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day in renouncing his American citizenship is in fact an American and therefore is a great deal more closely tied to the United States Supreme Court than we are.
Simon O’Connor’s view is not my view, but I like the fact he is allowed to have it.
I’m not at all convinced that Luxon making him take the post down did himself or his party any sort of service.
On a conscience issue, why are you closing down a conscience because it doesn’t align with your parties policy? Do all MPs have to line up lock step on everything their party says?
And if they do, how out of wack with the real world is that?
But Luxon, who is pro-life, and more than welcome to be, then gets second-guessed by Grant Robertson for purely political purposes.
Once again, seemingly suggesting that you can’t have a separate personal view to party policy.
If the Nats aren’t changing abortion law, if no one is changing abortion law 1) Why don’t we believe the people who say it and 2) What a waste of an exercise arguing about something that isn’t happening.
As for losing half the votes, that’s the sort of emotive tosh far too may intolerants rely on to bully people.
Historically, single issues don’t swing votes, so threatening it is pointless.
If anything has been learned out of these three or four days of overreaction, it’s that we are ideological frauds.
Big supporters of free speech, unless that free speech doesn’t suit us.

Jun 28 2022

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Merepeka Raukawa-Tait: Rotorua councillor on emergency housing situation in the area

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Since December the government has spent $1.2 billion on emergency housing, with a lot of it on housing people in motels around the country.
There are currently 8000 households living in emergency housing around the country, working out to $150,000 spent on each household.
Rotorua Lakes councillor and chair of Whanau Ora Merepeka Raukawa-Tait is right in the thick of it all in her city and joined Mike Hosking.
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Jun 28 2022

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Leanne Geraghty: Sleep pods, help-yourself food - Air NZ's biggest cabin overhaul in decades

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Air New Zealand's Dreamliners are undergoing the airline's biggest cabin transformation in almost 20 years.
The airline's new planes will be fitted with new-style seats throughout and will have an ultra-luxe business class area, the outdated herringbone layout in Business Premier is being modified, and there will be new areas for passengers further back in the plane to graze and stretch during flights.
Innovative new sleep pods for economy passengers, the Skynest, launched just as the pandemic hit, have been further developed and are now awaiting regulatory approval before being fitted.
Inflight entertainment is being revamped - including meditative content, Zentertainment - will play on much bigger seat-back screens than on current aircraft.
The all-new interiors will be in new planes and retrofitted to the airline's 14 existing Boeing 787s from the middle of 2024. The new aircraft will have a much higher proportion of the new Business Premier Luxe, Business Premier and Premium Economy seats to meet the demand of more high-end leisure travellers, especially on North American routes.

Skynest sleep pods will have room for six passengers. Photo / Supplied
Following work at a test facility near its central Auckland headquarters during the last five years - and pandemic related delays - Air New Zealand has unveiled what it hopes will give passengers "the best sleep in the sky".
The airline says it has responded to "overwhelming" customer feedback on the importance of sleep and the need for more comfort and space. Already announced was a new menu which will be introduced on long-haul routes later this year but the airline gave media from New Zealand and overseas a peak at the new seats and cabin this week.
Air New Zealand chief executive Greg Foran says the airline aims to create the greatest flying experience and says the new cabin would be combined with world-leading Kiwi hospitality provided by the crew. One of the first routes the airline will use the new planes on is the non-stop flight between Auckland and New York which will take more than 17 hours to reach New Zealand. Its non-stop flight to Chicago is also an ultra-long haul service.
"New Zealand's location puts us in a unique position to lead on the ultra-long haul travel experience. We have zeroed in on sleep, comfort, and wellness because we know how important it is for our customers to arrive well-rested."

The airline has fallen behind its rivals in revamping its cabins and Foran said it was a proud moment to finally unveil five years of hard mahi, in what truly is "a cabin of possibility. One that will provide customers with options to get some shut eye wherever they're sitting."
Some proceeds of the recent $1.2b capital raise would be spent on the new cabins.
The Skynest, first announced in 2020, will be a world-first.
"We wanted to offer our Economy customers a lie-flat option and that's how Skynest was born. It's going to be a real game-changer for the economy travel experience."
Interiors will have a new colour palette and leather seats are being dropped in favour of fabric ones. The switch saves about one kilogram in weight per seat.
The new aircraft will be more premium-dense.

Air NZ's Leanne Geraghty and Greg Foran in Business Premier Luxe. Photo / Supplied
The eight Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners arriving from 2024 and retrofitted current 787-9 fleet will have either eight or four Business Premier Luxe seats, 42 or 22 Business Premier, 52 or 33 Premium Economy, 125 or 213 Economy seats, and - specifically on the ultra-long haul aircraft - six Skynest sleep pods.
Airline bosses have for years wanted to replace the sharply angled business premier seats.
"The angle of those seats has been considered because when the research has been done, we know people don't [like] having the head right next to an aisle," said Foran.
Chief customer and sales officer Leanne Geraghty says the cabin's interior design is inspired by the uniqueness of Aotea...

Jun 28 2022

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Thomas Coughlan: NZ Herald reporter says there's no guarantee PM will come home from Europe with a FTA with the EU

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There's no guarantee Jacinda Ardern will come home from this week's visit to Europe with a free trade agreement with the EU.
The Prime Minister is pushing the deal during meetings with European leaders.
She's received support from Spanish President Pedro Sánchez‌ during a meeting in Madrid overnight, but other EU members are more reluctant to sign an FTA.
Reporter Thomas Coughlan is travelling with the PM and told Mike Hosking she isn't taking an FTA for granted, and won't want to sign up to a sub-par agreement.
“She might get on the plane to Australia at the end of this week without a deal, there’s certainly a chance if the Europeans don’t move and in particular, if they don’t move on agriculture.”
Ardern and Sánchez‌ have also announced an expansion to New Zealand's working holiday agreement.
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Jun 28 2022

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Dr. Shane Reti: National Party Health spokesperson says Andrew Little failed to act on warnings from the sector

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Health Minister Andrew Little is being accused of spending too much on reform, rather than access to healthcare.
The country's 20 DHBs warned the Government a year ago of "critical workforce issues", calling it an "unsustainable situation".
They wrote to the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, warning some overloaded hospitals were at "code red".
National Party Health spokesperson Dr. Shane Reti told Mike Hosking the minister failed to act on warnings from the sector.
He says the letter's gloomy prognosis has now come true.
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Jun 28 2022

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Mike Fuge: Contact Energy Chief says potential electricity shortages shouldn't worry people

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Contact Energy says potential electricity shortages shouldn't worry people.
It follows concerns being averted both last night and last week, after warnings there were risks of insufficient power generation and reserve to meet demand.
Chief Executive Mike Fuge told Mike Hosking we're never close to the edge, as the country has a robust power system and recent events show it responds well.
“Sometimes unusual things happen, Transpower as a prudent operator steps in and says we need a bit of generation, we need a bit of demand response.”
It's unclear if overnight outages in Wellington's Miramar and Seatoun were related to the Transpower warnings.
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Jun 28 2022

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Mike's Minute: Higher education can't just be given away

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Part of the reason we started student loans is before that it was all funded by the taxpayer.
So, like when anything is free, people just wandered off to university to see what it was all about, to see if there was anything they liked, and to just generally “discover themselves.“
That led to a tremendous number of people never completing anything, as they worked out tertiary study wasn’t for them. You are either on a path to university or you aren't.
So, the idea of a student loan scheme was to allow you to go even if you didn’t have the funds. It gave you the incentive to chase your dream, but you had to be determined enough to realise some of the cost was on you and therefore you'd better be determined to make it work.
It's not been fool proof.
I can name you any number of people at university this very day who don’t know why they are there, don’t like it, probably won't stick it out, and they’ll have to face the debt of that decision.
The decision and its make up is part of life and part of growing up.
Canterbury University has decided to hand out 300 scholarships to low decile schools to make university more accessible. It's laudable, although woefully misguided.
Almost as much as Joe Biden's plan to forgive some student debt. He's promised it, but yet to deliver it as the reality of the size of the bill and the complexity of who you give it to and who you don’t smacks him between the eyes.
The critical mistake in Canterbury's decision is the simple fact that university isn't inaccessible because it is. It's accessible to everyone given the loan scheme.
Just because you come from a low decile school, a system so flawed by the way they are now getting rid of it, doesn’t mean you can't achieve and doesn’t mean you can't study at a higher level.
In some respects, it’s condescending. "Oh, you poor thing. Decile 2? Allow us to offer some charity."
A lot of people don’t have the money up front to attend university, the same way a lot of people don’t have the money up front to buy a house.
But both are investments and both are worth incurring debt for. That's what the loan scheme is. Where you come from is not a barrier to a better education, life, or outcome.
Unless you convince yourself, it is.
Loans, debt, pressure, uncertainty, hard work, diligence, and risk. They are all part of growing up, of taking on a challenge, of dreaming, and chasing achievement.
Handing it out on a plate because of perceived disadvantage diminishes the journey in life that makes it all worthwhile because you did it by yourself.

Jun 27 2022

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Phil Tippett: Award-winning animator on his directorial debut Mad God

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Phil Tippett is a Hollywood legend - he's an Oscar awarding-winning animator, visual artist and supervisor.
He's known as the father of stop-motion animation and CGI - and is the man behind the stop motion characters in the Star Wars universe, the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park, and is behind RoboCop.
He's taken home two Oscars, a BAFTA and two Emmys for his work.
Now he's making his directorial debut in the horror film Mad God - which is out now.
Phil Tippett joined Mike Hosking.
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Jun 27 2022

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Paula Southgate: Hamilton mayor on city performing better economically compared to other cities

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Look no further than the mighty Hamilton for how a city survives during a pandemic when it isn't locked down.
A recently released 2021 economic report shows that Hamilton has had the strongest economy compared to other cities.
Since 2019 it's GDP has increased 4.3 percent - compared to 3.3 percent for Wellington, 3.1 percent for Christchurch, 0.4 percent for Auckland and 3.6 percent across the country.
They also had growth last year of 0.9 percent, compared to the rest of the country's growth of only 0.1 percent.
Hamilton mayor Paula Southgate joined Mike Hosking.
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Jun 27 2022

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Brad Mooar: All Blacks assistant coach on where to next after Covid strikes the team

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Just as the excitement was building for the first All Blacks test of the year - Covid has struck.
Ian Foster and his assistants John Plumtree and Scott McLeod are out of action with the virus.
Add to that midfielders David Havili and Jack Goodhue testing postive.
Former Ireland coach Joe Schmidt is being brought in to help - but what does something like this do for preparations?
All Blacks assistant coach and the last coach standing Brad Mooar joined Mike Hosking.
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Jun 27 2022

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David Seymour: ACT Party Leader says no one gets any undue influence over any New Zealand party for $15,000

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ACT says Labour's attempt to change the rules around political party donations will have the opposite effect.
Justice Minister Kiri Allan's Electoral Amendment Bill will lower the limit for public disclosure of donors from $15,000 to $5,000 by the 2023 election.
But, ACT Party Leader David Seymour says no one gets any undue influence over any New Zealand party for $15,000.
He says they're reducing the amount of money to screw the scrum politically, and bring the law in before the next election.
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Jun 27 2022

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