OwlTail

Cover image of Trees A Crowd
(49)

Rank #76 in Nature category

Arts
Science
Nature

Trees A Crowd

Updated 18 days ago

Rank #76 in Nature category

Arts
Science
Nature
Read more

Ever wondered what happens when you fill a cello with bees? Or how robins have successfully colonised the outer-reaches of our universe? Or why the world is destined to be populated purely by female turtles? This podcast celebrates nature and the stories of those who care deeply for it. Join artist, actor and Woodland Trust ambassador David Oakes, for a series of informal, relaxed conversations with artists, scientists, creatives and environmentalists as they celebrate the beauty of the natural world and how it inspires us as human beings. All episodes available at: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Read more

Ever wondered what happens when you fill a cello with bees? Or how robins have successfully colonised the outer-reaches of our universe? Or why the world is destined to be populated purely by female turtles? This podcast celebrates nature and the stories of those who care deeply for it. Join artist, actor and Woodland Trust ambassador David Oakes, for a series of informal, relaxed conversations with artists, scientists, creatives and environmentalists as they celebrate the beauty of the natural world and how it inspires us as human beings. All episodes available at: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

iTunes Ratings

49 Ratings
Average Ratings
47
2
0
0
0

Amazing!!

By Tokyo.Chic - Feb 27 2019
Read more
Love David, and his passion of learning about the world and the peculiarities of nature.

Long live the tree!

By Bert'sFriend - Feb 27 2019
Read more
Quirky, fascinating and educational. If you love trees, you’ll enjoy this.

iTunes Ratings

49 Ratings
Average Ratings
47
2
0
0
0

Amazing!!

By Tokyo.Chic - Feb 27 2019
Read more
Love David, and his passion of learning about the world and the peculiarities of nature.

Long live the tree!

By Bert'sFriend - Feb 27 2019
Read more
Quirky, fascinating and educational. If you love trees, you’ll enjoy this.

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

Cover image of Trees A Crowd

Trees A Crowd

Latest release on Oct 05, 2020

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 18 days ago

Rank #1: Dr Helen Pheby: Sculpture for sheep, and rhubarb trains; the place ‘Extraordinary’ can happen

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Helen Pheby is the head of curatorial programmes at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Set in 500 acres of historic parkland, the park has provided a “gallery without walls” for artists such as Elisabeth Frink, Auguste Rodin, Giuseppe Penone, and local legends such as Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore. Helen has collaborated on projects in Iraqi Kurdistan, South Africa, India, and even Barnsley! Born in the so-called ‘rhubarb triangle’, Helen reminisces over “the rhubarb express”, a train which ran from her village in Yorkshire to London, and muses over how magical it was being able to see the contrast between rural and urban environments. In this insightful conversation, Helen explains how she believes creativity and art is a human right, how the YSP was visited by Henry VIII, and how another Henry, Henry Moore, believed it was the job of artists to show people the natural world and subsequently designed artwork for sheep. She explains how the Sculpture Park aims to be inclusive, free from the barriers of social standing, wealth and a gender imbalance that art is often associated with. Subsequently, the YSP is now home to brain-controlled helicopters, women on horseback steeplechasing through the landscapes of the First World War, and all of this second to the migratory routes of the Great Crested Newt. In her own words: “We are places the extraordinary can happen.” For more information on this podcast, including David's thoughts following this interview, head to: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/dr-helen-pheby/

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 30 2020

58mins

Play

Rank #2: Dr Jo Elworthy: Living in Eden – how to leave the world better than you found it

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Jo Elworthy is a botanist and the director of interpretation at the Eden Project in Cornwall. She’s been involved with Eden since its inception, and has spent a great deal of time researching plantlife as well as creating books and films specialising in botany and horticulture. A chance encounter with the man who dreamt up the Eden Project, Sir Tim Smit, led her to take the biggest risk of her career – and the best decision of her life. The sounds of robins frame this conversation as Dr Elworthy sets out to prove that we can leave the world better than we found it, armed with many captivating anecdotes about the trail that led her to paradise. Jo also talks about her collection of four-leaf clovers, how to make art inspired by cyanobacteria, filling her father’s Jaguar with winkles, and why moss is as spectacular as David has been telling people it is for the past 30 years!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 14 2019

1hr 8mins

Play

Similar Podcasts

Woodland Walks - The Woodland Trust Podcast

UK Wildlife Podcast

The Casual Birder Podcast

Go Wild

Smashing Sundays

The Stubborn Light of Things

Growing Wild

The Knepp Wildland Podcast

The War on Wildlife Podcast

Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation: hands-on conservation

BatChat

Clever Trees

Roots and All - Gardening Podcast

Gardens, weeds and words

BBC Countryfile Magazine

Rank #3: Alastair Gunn: Roses, wildflowers and tending ‘to the manor’s thorn’

Podcast cover
Read more
In the third and final episode of the Castle Howard trilogy, you’re introduced to head of gardens and landscapes, Alastair Gunn. Starting in one of the estate’s rose gardens, we meet a stunning, rare, white china rose, thought to be a devoniensis, planted over 40 years ago. Alastair has been on the team for just over two years, coming from managing the gardens at Hatfield House, but he’s very much committed to bringing life back to the gardens with a mandate to renovate, restore and ‘zhuzh things up’ - a challenge he’s clearly than risen to. Alastair explains the challenges of working in a different parts of the country, with different soil and vastly differing seasons and conditions. From roses to rhubarb and Read Dead Redemption 2, this conversation is full of interesting and funny moments, including an idea to pioneer Japanese Knotweed Gin, or crumble (for the under 18’s). For further information on this and other episodes, visit: http://www.treesacrowd.fm/alastair-gunn/

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 17 2020

25mins

Play

Rank #4: Amanda Owen: Deep in the Dales with the Yorkshire Shepherdess

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda Owen is a farmer, known to readers and television viewers worldwide as the ‘Yorkshire Shepherdess’. With her husband Clive and their nine children, she looks after Ravenseat, Swaledale – one of the most exposed farms in the Dales. Alongside running the farm, she has found time to write a number of books, having come to public attention on ITV's ‘The Dales’. On a “glishy sort of day”, sitting by a brook, David and Amanda chat without the distraction of phones and technology in this stunning signal ‘not spot’, interrupted only by a passing heron. Amanda, having grown up in the city, admits finding inspiration to become a hill shepherd from reading James Heriot's All Creatures Great and Small, and the couple wax lyrical about how a place like this, open and wild, builds one’s character.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 18 2019

1hr 5mins

Play

Most Popular Podcasts

The Joe Rogan Experience

TED Talks Daily

The Tim Ferriss Show

The Daily

Stuff You Should Know

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Rank #5: David Fettes: Going against the crowd - and the best moment to press the button

Podcast cover
Read more
David Fettes is technically a wildlife photographer but is far better described as a force – and primarily a part – of nature. Growing up in India and in England, surrounded by snakes, langur monkeys and even more baleful creatures, he has stretched the definition of “self-taught”. An initial career in curiosity led to a mandatory career in management and insurance, before he landed, feet-firm, in what proved to be his destined vocation. His work has featured in the Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition and in magazines worldwide. In this in-depth conversation, he explains why he’s dedicated to educating children on where we fit into the ecosystem, argues that relying on technology has encouraged photographers to be “lazy”, and pleads for listeners to immerse themselves within other cultures, other species, and a more tolerant world to break down our woeful human misconceptions.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 25 2019

48mins

Play

Rank #6: Mark Carwardine: "Don’t ever french-kiss a Narwhal”... and other words of wisdom

Podcast cover
Read more
Mark Carwardine is a zoologist, leading conservationist, broadcaster and photographer. He came to prominence through his book and BBC documentary series “Last Chance to See” which he created with Douglas Adams of “The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy” fame. One of Mark’s big passions is diving - he organises whale and dolphin trips in Baja California, Mexico. In this fascinating conversation dusted with the sounds of nearby Canada geese, coots and black-headed gulls, Mark describes his most moving experience, snorkeling with humpback whales, and admiring their five meter long flippers. He talks about his childhood, rescuing animals wherever he found them, and about creating his own mini zoo. He reminisces about an unforgettable moment from his youth; cramming his idols David Attenborough, David Bellamy, David Shepherd and Peter Scott into his old Hillman Imp, which catastrophically broke down on the way to the train station. From the green woodpecker that sits on his office window sill every day, to the narwhals in the high arctic that you absolutely ‘shouldn’t french kiss’, Mark describes the endless joy that nature brings him. For more information on this podcast, including David's thoughts following this interview, head to: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/mark-carwardine/

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 03 2020

53mins

Play

Rank #7: Dr Terry Gough: Sowing seeds in the flowerbeds of Kings and Queens

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Terry Gough is the head of gardens and estates at Hampton Court Palace. For nearly three decades, he's followed in the footsteps of the likes of Lancelot Capability Brown, and has made the palace look and smell fit for a king. On a private walking tour through the heart of these historic gardens, Terry shares how his horticultural roots, bedded at the age of 16 by working as a boy in a Battersea Garden Centre, have grown to include working at Buckingham Palace and Historic Royal Palaces. He now oversees three National Collections of Plants, including the lilies, passion flowers, and olive trees that make up Queen Mary's Exotic Collection. As you will discover, there is seemingly little Terry does not know about horticulture or indeed history!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 29 2019

1hr 7mins

Play

Rank #8: Dr Catherine Barlow: No puffins were harmed in the making of this golden eagle podcast

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Catherine Barlow is project manager of the South of Scotland Golden Eagle Project, and previously worked on the ground-breaking Osprey Translocation Project at Rutland Water. This episode was recorded in front of a live audience at the Open Book in Wigtown, Scotland. Hear how Catherine’s ‘forced’ love of birds in childhood led to a real passion through adulthood – particularly for the mighty birds of prey. In this episode she takes us through her first experience of a golden eagle – catching only a glimpse of a brown smudge in the sky – and, in describing its characteristics, it’s clear she’s come to see it as the most impressive and beautiful of creatures and is now devoted to increasing the British population of these magnificent birds. Among many intriguing anecdotes, find out why golden eagles are bigger, better and stronger than David Oakes, and how a murderous eagle called Beaky has caused difficulty for the conservation project. You’ll also get an insight into Catherine’s earlier work, like her time spent on the Otterburn military range, watching short-eared owls, kestrels and hen harriers. For more information on this podcast, including David's thoughts following this interview, head to: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/dr-catherine-barlow/

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 20 2020

56mins

Play

Rank #9: Maldives Underwater Initiative: Diving with Pearls

Podcast cover
Read more
In this episode, David speaks to members of the Maldives Underwater Initiative based at the Six Senses resort in Laamu Atoll. The initiative includes members of The Manta Trust, Blue Marine Foundation, The Olive Ridley Project and other marine specialists. The team have a shared vision for preserving the marine environment in the Maldives and beyond, and have been monitoring the health of the reefs there since 2012. Their research and conservation work includes nurturing seagrass, turtles, manta rays, dolphins and sharks, as well as various education and community outreach initiatives, all whilst working in close proximity with the local tourism industry. In these often humourous exchanges, they discuss changing public perception towards swimming in the ocean, the impact of fisheries, argue that biodegradable plastics are merely a “step in the right direction”, and David witnesses first hand the devastating impact of ghost nets on the olive ridley turtles.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 30 2019

1hr 14mins

Play

Rank #10: Rebecca Speight: The Overstory and Understory of the Woodland Trust

Podcast cover
Read more
Rebecca Speight is currently the CEO of the Woodland Trust and will shortly be taking over the reigns of the RSPB. Beccy began her foray into the Natural World to satisfy her “sense of connectivity”. Following years working for the National Trust she was ultimately appointed to her current role in 2014, where she heads up the largest woodland conservation charity in the UK (for which David has proudly become an ambassador.) In this in-depth conversation, she discusses the devastating decline in ancient woodland - which has almost halved in the past 50 years, elaborates on the “Young People’s Forest” project which aims to inspire and engage new generations on environmental concerns, and talks about the landscapes and literature that have come to shape her as an individual working for our beautiful and historic country.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 11 2019

51mins

Play

Rank #11: Dr Steve Etches MBE: Plumbing the prehistoric depths of the Kimmeridge Clay

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Steve Etches MBE is a renowned fossil expert. His collection of over 2,000 pieces from the Kimmeridge Clay include remains of ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, pterosaurs and a whole host of Jurassic marine life. Once housed in his garage, the collection is now on display at the Etches Collection in Dorset. In this in-depth conversation, he describes how he stumbled across the world's first ammonite eggs, shares how his discoveries still give him “that same childhood thrill” that he first experienced as a five-year-old, and explains how the centre, with 25,000 visitors a year, is as much about educating people about the past as it is preserving it.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 22 2019

55mins

Play

Rank #12: Astrid Goldsmith: Puppets, politics, and The Wind in the Willows with extra Wombles

Podcast cover
Read more
Astrid Goldsmith is an award-winning stop-motion animator. After tuition from Great Uncle Bulgaria and 12 years of hand-making models for other people - including Garth Jennings (for “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”), the boy band Blue and the unrelenting Duracell Bunny - she made her debut solo film, “Squirrel Island”. Astrid’s animations question the impact of human policy on the natural world, and her latest commissioned film, “Quarantine”, was nominated for the Debut Director Award at the Edinburgh TV Festival’s New Voice Awards. In this in-depth conversation, we talk grey squirrels vs. red squirrels, badgers as a focus for nationalism, how “good and bad” animals are an unfair human construct, and how anthropomorphic animation lends itself perfectly to deeper reflection about us and about our diverse ecosystem.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 04 2019

52mins

Play

Rank #13: Wolfgang Buttress and Dr Martin Bencsik: Hive minds waxing lyrical

Podcast cover
Read more
Wolfgang Buttress is an award-winning artist who creates multi-sensory artworks that draw inspiration from our evolving relationship with nature, and Dr Martin Bencsik is an associate professor in the School of Science and Technology at Nottingham Trent University. Together they have become a unique creative force! Here, talking to David, they discuss their initial collaboration, HIVE. At 17 metres tall and now based at Kew Gardens, the sculpture represents the intrinsic relationship between bees, humans and our shared landscape. Their most recent collaboration, BEAM, which made its debut at Glastonbury Festival 2019, is co-produced with Greenpeace, and converts signals from a nearby bee colony and ambient sounds from the surrounding concert stages into light and sound effects to provide an ever-changing soundscape – and a truly immersive experience. If that isn’t enough, they recall when they filled Martin’s wife’s cello with bees... as one does!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 26 2019

1hr

Play

Rank #14: Harry Barton: Balancing Wildlife in Devon and a Vision of Natural Justice

Podcast cover
Read more
Harry Barton is the chief executive of the Devon Wildlife Trust. He has worked for nearly 25 years in the environmental sector, including spells at the Earth Trust, the Council for National Parks, Kew Gardens, CPRE and the Wiltshire Wildlife Trust. Amidst extolling the virtues of Devon and it’s newfound beaver population, Harry explains the Trust's mission to preserve, protect and enhance the county's areas of natural wildlife. This conversation addresses the differing roles of the wildlife trusts, environmental groups like Extinction Rebellion and individuals like Greta Thunberg in solving the crisis of climate change, but takes numerous gear changes along the way – from musings over childhood memories of cars being swept away by the river at Richmond, to the threats to our marine environment hidden beneath the waves. Harry also talks about one of the issues closest to his heart, that of the importance of the outdoors for young children, particularly for his son, who has autism.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 02 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

Rank #15: Joanna Lentini: Swimming with crocodiles to photograph her fears

Podcast cover
Read more
Joanna Lentini is an underwater photographer and adventurer. She runs ‘Deep Focus Images’, a company that organises trips for those interested in pursuing wildlife photography. She is also the COO of ocean education organisation ‘Oceans in Focus’. Her accolades include having her work exhibited at the 2015 Climate Change Conference in Paris, and featuring as a finalist in the 52nd Wildlife Photographer of the Year Awards. In this bonus Christmas episode, Joanna gives us a frank and open insight into her life, her passions and her anxieties. She explains how she combats her fears by swimming with crocodiles and orcas, and the thrill in doing so, and details the problems humans will continue to face as we become even more disconnected from nature. In this episode, she reminisces about an amazing trip to Glacier National Park and recalls how the natural world affected her from a very early age, and has gone on to hold a special place in her heart. For more information on this podcast, including David's thoughts following this interview, head to: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/joanna-lentini

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 16 2019

24mins

Play

Rank #16: Dr Jess French: Two legs, good – six legs, better! One woman and her many minibeasts

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Jess French is a veterinary surgeon, writer and television presenter. She fronts the CBeebies show Minibeast Adventureand has recently published the book, How to Help a Hedgehog and Protect a Polar Bear, both aimed at getting our younger generations excited by the world they have a part share in. Unflinching when it comes to handling insects, as a child she didn’t realise her love of tiny creatures was unusual – but it eventually earned her the nickname ‘the bug girl’, and ultimately a career she loves. Prodding David with an “Are you scared?” as she unveils the millipedes, this fascinating chat is full of many wonderful moments of distraction, from a tarantula in a box firmly labelled ‘do not open’, to a leaf insect climbing onto the microphone.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 09 2019

51mins

Play

Rank #17: Edward Davey: Learning how to feed the planet in response to COVID-19

Podcast cover
Read more
Edward Davey is the Director of Geographic Deep Dives for the World Resources Institute and the Food and Land Use Coalition. Here, David and Ed speak briefly in direct response to the state of the global COVID-19 pandemic and how we might feed the people of the world moving forward. Ed and David discuss the agricultural concerns both in Britain and abroad, how the environment and economy are interlinked and how now is a time for compassion and careful consideration. This epsiode was released as part of the London Climate Change Festival 2020. For further information on this and other episodes, visit: http://www.treesacrowd.fm/edward-davey/

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 26 2020

17mins

Play

Rank #18: Dr Fay Clark: Ring-tails, Killer Whales and the history of the British Zoo.

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Fay Clark is an animal welfare scientist. A self-confessed “zoo geek”, she specialises in the assessment and enhancement of captive animal welfare in traditional zoos, safari parks, sanctuaries and aquariums. She is currently based at Bristol Zoo where she examines how the welfare of large-brained mammals can be enhanced through cognitively challenging activities. In this in-depth conversation, she reflects on how zoos have transformed from a victorian spectacle with “poking sticks” to educational conservations, describes how ring-tailed lemurs can adapt to habitats that differ from their Madagascan roots, and explains how technology is revealing how animals solve puzzles, including when they are playing us at our own game!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 06 2019

57mins

Play

Rank #19: Dr Katherine Brent: Morris dancing, bees and badger cull protestors

Podcast cover
Read more
Dr Katherine Brent from Wotton-Under-Edge has danced the Morris since she was 18 years old for sides including Red Stags, Winterbourne Down, Rag Morris and Madcap Morris. She also teaches beekeeping for Rory’s Well, a charity dedicated to regenerating the local economy of an area in Sierra Leone. In this conversation, she describes the history and traditions behind morris dancing and the origin of the colourful rag coat. She explains why she is passionate about the introduction of Inga alley farming in Sierra Leone, which regenerates the soil removing the need for the traditional “slash and burn” cultivation, and argues the badger cull is neither “scientific nor successful” in reducing TB, which is why she remains opposed to it.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 11 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #20: Sir John Lawton: The wit, wisdom and winged omens of the man who would re-wild Chernobyl

Podcast cover
Read more
Professor Sir John Lawton is a fellow of the Royal Society, president of the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust and chair of the Endangered Landscapes Programme. Previously a trustee of the WWF, head of the Natural Environment Research Council and the most recent chair of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, there are seemingly few environmental organisations that John hasn’t been involved with. That said, it is birds that have driven John’s lifelong obsession with the natural world. Sitting in John’s back garden amidst the sound of birdsong, this conversation flows from a childhood obsession of brilliant blue hedge sparrow eggs tucked away in his nan’s back garden to following in the shoes of Darwin with a (now frowned-upon) fascination for collecting specimens. John explains how he helped to set up nature protection areas across the world, how he visited Chernobyl in the hopes of persuading the Belarus government to turn the exclusion zone into a national park, and what he got up to with a dolphin in Durham with David Bellamy.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 04 2019

59mins

Play