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Woodrat Podcast – Via Negativa

Purveyors of fine poetry since 2003.

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Warrior poets, shape-shifters and other unlikely characters: a year of reading aloud

http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/2013-books-read-aloud.mp3Woodrot Padcost 47: books read aloud in 2013 [MP3, 25 MB] Duration: 27:50‘Tis the season for literary bloggers to write about the best things they read this year. But in my case, much of my most interesting reading is out loud, in nightly Skype calls with Rachel Rawlins. Usually I’m the reader, but sometimes she is able to get an electronic version of whatever it is we’re reading and we take turns. I thought it might be fun to record us talking about what we liked and didn’t like this year (though Rachel had her doubts that anyone else would care). Here are the main books we talked about: Sweeney Astray: A Version from the Irish [Buile Suibhne] by Seamus Heaney (Farrar Straus Giroux, 1983) Ten Poems About Sheep selected and introduced by Neil Astley (Candlestick Press, 2012) Bee Journal by Sean Borodale (Jonathon Cape/Random House, 2012) The Bees by Carol Ann Duffy (Pan Macmillan, 2012) Seven Viking Romances translated by Herman Pálsson and Paul Edwards (Penguin, 1985) Orkneyinga Saga: The History of the Earls of Orkney translated by Herman Pálsson and Paul Edwards (Penguin, 1978) The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki translated by Jesse L. Byock (Penguin, 1998) Other books mentioned in passing: Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths by Nancy Marie Brown (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012) The Saga of the Jomsvikings translated by Lee M. Hollander (University of Texas Press, 2011 [1955]) Sagas of Warrior-Poets (various translators), edited by Diana Whaley (Penguin, 2002) Comic Sagas and Tales from Iceland (various translators), edited by Vidar Hreinsson (Penguin, 2013) The Saga of the Volsungs translated by Jesse L. Byock (Penguin, 1999) Heimskringla: History of the Kings of Norway by Snorri Sturluson, translated by Lee M. Hollander (University of Texas Press, 1964) Grettir’s Saga translated by Denton Fox and Herman Pálsson (University of Toronto Press, 1974) Grettir’s Saga translated by Jesse Byock with skaldic verses translated by Russell Poole (Oxford University Press, 2009)

16 Dec 2013

Rank #1

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Woodrat Podcast 46: A philosophical lunch with Will Buckingham (Part 2)

The second half of my epic bull session wide-ranging conversation with British novelist, philosopher and blogger Will Buckingham (listen to Part 1). Will talks about how he got into Buddhism and why he eventually drifted away from it; how he turned his doctoral thesis about the literary qualities of Emmanuel Levinas’ writings into a work of philosophy for a popular audience (Finding Our Sea Legs: Ethics, Experience and the Ocean of Stories); and why he’s so fascinated with the I Ching. “What I love more than anything in life,” Will says at one point, “is to have interesting conversations.” I couldn’t agree more. This conversation was definitely a high point of my two weeks in the U.K. http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/episode-46-will-buckingham-part-2.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

21 Oct 2011

Rank #2

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Woodrat Podcast 45: A philosophical lunch with Will Buckingham (Part 1 of 2)

On my visit to the U.K. last spring, I arranged to meet with the novelist and philosopher Will Buckingham in a restaurant near the Birmingham train station on my way from Aberystwyth to London. I’m a long-time reader of his blog ThinkBuddha (and more recently of his personal blog) and a fan of his first novel, Cargo Fever. So knowing that he was a guy with wide-ranging interests and a gift for translating abstruse ideas into ordinary language, I figured he had to be pretty interesting to chat with. I wasn’t disappointed. In this first half of our conversation, I got Will talking about the philosophy in the Moomin books of Tove Jannson; the ancient Chinese Daoist text Zhuangzi (actually, I’ve spared you most of that — Will and I share a great fondness for the work, but I realize most listeners won’t have read it); the pervasive sense of loss in the Western philosophical tradition; teaching and writing; Martin Heidegger; why existentialism is no longer popular; Emmanuel Levinas; and parallels between Indian and Greek philosophy. http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/episode-45-will-buckingham-part-1.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

30 Sep 2011

Rank #3

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Woodrat Podcast 43: Marly Youmans in Wales

admiring yew #35 on the grounds of Powis CastleEven though my friend the poet and novelist Marly Youmans lives just five hours away from me in upstate New York, we went all the way to Wales to record this podcast. How’s that for dedication? We start out at a tea house on the grounds of Powis Castle, where we’re joined by another novelist and blogger, Clare Dudman. Then we go to Ty Isaf, the stately Clive Hicks-Jenkins residence near Aberystwyth, where we talk about such topics as the ghosts of Cooperstown, New York; whether children are an inspiration or a hindrance for a busy writer; women leaving the world for the woods; and how writing in rhyme resembles surfing. We are serenaded by rooks. Marly’s latest book of poems is The Throne of Psyche and her latest novel is Val/Orson. She blogs at The Palace at 2:00 a.m. and tweets about raspberries and radishes. http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/episode-43-marly-youmans.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

25 Jul 2011

Rank #4

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Woodrat Podcast 42: Tea with Fiona and Kaspalita

Fiona Robyn and Kaspalita on the waterfront at Aberystwyth, WalesBrew yourself a nice cuppa and join Fiona Robyn, Kaspalita and me for a conversation about writing, religion, spirituality, science, small stones and more. We met on May 7 in Aberystwyth, Wales; Fiona and Kaspa subsequetly tied the knot on June 18th, and starting on July 1 they will again curate a month-long river of stones, with contributions from around the world. Fiona Robyn is a novelist, a blogger, a therapist, and a creativity coach. She is very fond of Earl Grey tea and homemade cake. Kaspalita is a Pure Land Buddhist priest, a sometime blogger and is still learning to play the ukulele. Together they are on a mission, they say, to help people connect with the world through writing. In addition to the river of stones (see the aggregator blog) they also host the Writing Our Way Home forum and run e-courses on writing, spirituality and connecting to the world. Fiona has even written an e-book, available as a free download, called How to Write Your Way Home. http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/episode-42-fiona-and-kaspa.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

29 Jun 2011

Rank #5

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Woodrat Podcast 41: A walk with Clive Hicks-Jenkins (Part 2)

(l-r) Clive points out hart's-tongue fern; Jack on bridge over Ystwyth; sand martin nests in the riverbank; Basil the Shetland pony; Clive in front of his painting "Green George"The conclusion of our May 5 walk around Clive’s neighborhood in rural Wales, near Aberystwyth. (It should stand on its own, but do listen to Part 1 if you haven’t already.) I’m grateful to Clive for taking the time to show me around in the midst of frantic preparations for the launch of his retrospective exhibition just two days later (for more about which, see the series of posts on his Artlog). We’re also lucky he’s such a great communicator, because as the naive quality of my couple of questions about his painting demonstrate, my general knowledge of art is woefully inadequate. Nevertheless, somehow this walking conversation with Clive has turned into one of my most satisfying podcasts to date, I think. Give a listen. http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/episode-41-clive-hicks-jenkins-part-2.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

28 May 2011

Rank #6

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Woodrat Podcast 40: A walk with Clive Hicks-Jenkins (Part 1)

(l-r) view of Llanilar, Clive and Jack at table, three Welsh cowsJoin me for a walk with the Welsh artist Clive Hicks-Jenkins and his dog Jack. Clive and his partner Peter Wakelin live a few miles from Aberystwyth in a beautiful old place called Ty Isaf, which I’d been reading about on his Artlog for a couple years now, and was lucky enough to visit — and even stay three nights in — earlier this month. I thought it would be fun to record a tour of Clive’s neighborhood for the podcast, allowing us to hear how a major artist relates to, and finds inspiration in, the land and people around him. For those unfamiliar with his work, it’s worth mentioning that specific places have always featured prominently in his paintings. Even elements which I had assumed to be fanciful, such as castles beside the sea, turn out to have been common features of the local and regional landscape. (For more on the sense of place in Clive’s work, see the essay by Andrew Green, “The Place of Place,” in the new monograph simply entitled Clive Hicks-Jenkins, from the British art publisher Lund Humphries in cooperation with Grey Mare Press.) http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/episode-40-clive-hicks-jenkins-part-1.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Be sure to check back next weekend for the conclusion of our walking conversation, in which I prompt Clive to talk about his journey from the theater world to art, what he looks for in painting, and more. Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

22 May 2011

Rank #7

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Woodrat Podcast 39: William Trowbridge

William Trowbridge was the last of the four poets Kristin Berkey-Abbott and I read for National Poetry Month (here are my review and hers). We called him up last Monday to talk about Fool and foolishness, humorous versus serious poetry, and why the Midwest produces so many poets, among other things, and got him to read some poems from Ship of Fool, too. Check out his website for a bio and links to all his books. http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/episode-39-trowbridge.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

2 May 2011

Rank #8

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Woodrat Podcast 38: Ren Powell redux

Poet, playwright, translator and teacher Ren Powell returns to the Woodrat Podcast to talk about her new collection of poetry (and North American debut) Mercy Island, religion in Norway, her shifting perspective on poetry animation, and other topics. She’s the third author in Via Negativa’s informal Poetry Month book club. Ren recently consolidated her web presence at a new website. I last interviewed her in early March 2010, for the 9th episode of the podcast. My blog response to Mercy Island is here, but do also check out the more proper reviews and interviews from Kristin Berkey-Abbott, Deb Scott, Fiona Robyn, Rachel Barenblat, and Carolee Sherwood. http://shadowcabinet.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/episode-38-ren-powell.mp3 Podcast feed | Subscribe in iTunes Theme music: “Le grand sequoia,” by Innvivo (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike licence).

25 Apr 2011

Rank #9