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Rank #14 in News category

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Coronavirus Daily

Updated 12 days ago

Rank #14 in News category

News
Science
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A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

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A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

iTunes Ratings

1634 Ratings
Average Ratings
1130
150
101
84
169

Excellent info as always from NPR

By nerka3 - May 15 2020
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I really like the daily format, it gives bits of information on a timely basis, perfect!

Clear Info

By fRg9 - May 13 2020
Read more
I appreciate the clear, comprehensive information. Thanks!

iTunes Ratings

1634 Ratings
Average Ratings
1130
150
101
84
169

Excellent info as always from NPR

By nerka3 - May 15 2020
Read more
I really like the daily format, it gives bits of information on a timely basis, perfect!

Clear Info

By fRg9 - May 13 2020
Read more
I appreciate the clear, comprehensive information. Thanks!
Cover image of Coronavirus Daily

Coronavirus Daily

Latest release on May 30, 2020

Read more

A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Rank #1: Q & A: Ethical Dilemmas And Disinfectants

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A scientist and a philosopher answer listener questions on 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered,' NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis. Excerpted here:

- Aerobiologist Joshua Santarpia discusses disinfectants.
- Professor David Chan talks through the day-to-day ethical dilemmas during the pandemic.

If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.

We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.

Apr 25 2020

15mins

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Rank #2: New Symptoms; A Missed Chance At Early Detection

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Challenges with testing and logistics, clashes between federal and state officials and even hospitals' fears of being stigmatized as a source of infection — all cost valuable time in detecting the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S., reports NPR's Lauren Sommer.

The federal government has re-started the Paycheck Protection Program, which gives loans to small businesses. Lawmakers required some of the money to go community banks this time around.

Also, the CDC recognizes new symptoms of the coronavirus.

Meanwhile, Italy will start reopening the country next week. The country has suffered high death rates, second only to the U.S., and it was the first western nation to lock down.

Plus, one of the top-grossing movie theaters in the country this past week was the Ocala Drive-In in Ocala, Florida.

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Apr 27 2020

11mins

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Rank #3: Coronavirus Not Going Away Before Next Fall, Fauci Says

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Dr. Anthony Fauci said we will still be dealing with the coronavirus next fall. The severity depends on what we do over the next few months.

What about college campuses? NPR's Elissa Nadworny reports universities are figuring out if they can reopen for fall semester or go virtual.

Plus, a study finds wearing a nylon stocking over homemade masks can boost protection.

And a look at why COVID-19 seems to be killing more men than women.

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Apr 23 2020

11mins

Play

Rank #4: Georgia's Plan To Reopen; Anti-Shutdown Protests And Fox News

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Posthumous autopsy results revealed the first U.S. death from COVID-19 happened much earlier than previously thought.

The state of Georgia will reopen parts of its economy on Friday, even as members of the White House coronavirus task force can't say how all parts of the state could safely do so.

NPR's David Folkenflik reports on the link between Fox News and anti-shutdown protests.

Plus, a website that recreates the sounds of your office.

NPR's reporting on the NIH's recommendation against doctors using hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for the treatment of COVID-19 patients.

Listen to the latest episode of NPR's Rough Translation on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.

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Apr 22 2020

12mins

Play

Rank #5: Southern States, Moving To Reopen, Could Be Most Vulnerable

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Data shared at a White House press briefing Thursday was unusual, says David Lappan of the Bipartisan Policy Center — and not just because it prompted the President to wonder if disinfectants could be injected into coronavirus patients.

Southern states are some of the first to start reopening, but NPR's Debbie Elliott reports people there may be more vulnerable to COVID-19 because of high rates of poverty, chronic diseases, and natural disasters.

Plus, a Washington Post reporter on what America looks like from the open road.

The biggest risk in grocery shopping comes from the people you could come in contact with, not the food. Watch Life Kit's video for tips on grocery shopping safely.

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Apr 24 2020

12mins

Play

Rank #6: CA, NY On Lockdown; Mortgage Relief For Some Homeowners

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Two of the hardest-hit states order residents to stay home in an effort to fight the pandemic. Plus what the World Health Organization has learned about the coronavirus in the months since it began to spread. And how homeowners could have their mortgage payments reduced or suspended for up to 12 months.

More links:
Life Kit's episode on how to spot fake news.
Find and support your local public radio station.
Follow host Kelly McEvers on Twitter.
Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org.

Mar 20 2020

11mins

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Rank #7: Trump Signs Aid Package, Epicenter Is Now The U.S.

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The $2 trillion economic recovery package is now law, as the number of COVID-19 cases in America approaches 100,000 and deaths near 1,500. A Johns Hopkins scientist weighs in on the idea of relaxing social distancing in select locations and the importance of more testing for coronavirus. And we explain when Americans could expect to receive federal stimulus money.

More links:
Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour's episode, 'Family Friendly Crowd Pleasers: Three Things To Stream Your Whole Family Can Enjoy' on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or on the NPR One App.

Check out Tarriona 'Tank' Ball's Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

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Mar 27 2020

10mins

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Rank #8: More Small Business Aid; Antibody Test Results

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The Paycheck Protection Program was created to help small businesses hit by the pandemic, but the program was exhausted quickly. Now congress has secured another round of funding.

Recovering from COVID-19 can be a long journey. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports on the oftentimes grueling process.

Experts say contact tracing and antibody testing are crucial steps for reopening the country.

Plus, a look at one part of the economy that never closed. Must-run factories operating around the clock have lessons for other businesses about how to keep workers safe.

Listen to Life Kit's episode on how to spot misinformation on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.

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Apr 21 2020

12mins

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Rank #9: GOP Senator Raised Virus Alarms Weeks Ago — In Private

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U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, in a private luncheon, compared the coronavirus to the 1918 flu. NPR's Tim Mak obtained a secret recording — more of his reporting is here. Plus how nurses are coping in the Seattle region, and why schools are struggling to make informed decisions about keeping kids home from school.

Check out Life Kit's episode '8 Tips To Make Working From Home Work For You' here.

Find and support your local public radio station here.

Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org.

Mar 19 2020

12mins

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Rank #10: Why Testing Is Still So Far Behind

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President Trump's guidelines for reopening the country put the onus on governors across the nation. But many say they don't have enough testing supplies to reopen their states.

A Harvard infectious disease specialist explains why testing in the United States is still a problem.

Plus, a couple share the lessons they learned from the 1918 flu pandemic. (He's 107-years-old. She's 100.)

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Apr 20 2020

11mins

Play

Rank #11: Social Distancing Extended; Grocery Store Tips

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Two weeks ago, President Trump told Americans to stay home for 15 days. On Sunday, he extended that guidance for another month, as the U.S. trails behind other countries on per-capita testing. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on a new test expected this week that promises quicker results.

Plus, tips on how to grocery shop safely.

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Mar 30 2020

12mins

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Rank #12: Q & A: Pets And COVID-19, Ventilators, And The View From Wuhan

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Public health experts and NPR journalists answer listener questions on 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered,' NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis. Excerpted here:

- NPR's Emily Feng discusses China's next steps.
- Emergency Physician Richard Levitan addresses skepticism about the effectiveness of ventilators.
- Veterinarian Krista Miller answers questions about pet care and adoption.

If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.

We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.

Apr 18 2020

20mins

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Rank #13: The Cost Of Social Distancing

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How do officials weigh the economic cost against the public health benefit? Plus a report from the hardest-hit area of Italy, and a sampling of free things that you had to pay for before the coronavirus.

Planet Money's episode 'How To Save The Economy Now' is here.
Here's a list of things that weren't free before the coronavirus from NPR's Brakkton Booker.
Email the show at coronavirusdaily@npr.org.

Mar 23 2020

12mins

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Rank #14: Masks Now Recommended; Not All States Are 'Staying Home'

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The CDC now recommends Americans cover their nose and mouth when they leave their home, but to save medical masks for healthcare workers. And as deaths from the coronavirus climb, some states have yet to declare a stay-at-home order.

Plus the groups racing to produce a vaccine for COVID-19.

And some physicians say racial and economic disparities are emerging in the testing and treatment of the virus.

Links:

Rough Translation's episode, 'WeChats From The Future' is on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and NPR One.

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Apr 03 2020

13mins

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Rank #15: Trump And Governors Mix Messages; Managing Your Mortgage Or Rent

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Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, messages from President Trump and state governors have been mixed. Meanwhile, New York City has over 40,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, making it the epicenter of the pandemic in America. WNYC reporter Gwynne Hogan visits a Brooklyn hospital on the front lines of the pandemic, and the owner of a restaurant in Manhattan's Chinatown explains why he closed three weeks ago. Also, tips to help you pay your mortgage or rent if you've lost your job.

Links:

Find and support your local public radio station

Rachel Martin's conversation with Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan

Life Kit's guide to receiving financial help during the pandemic on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.

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Mar 31 2020

13mins

Play

Rank #16: The Mask Debate; Preventing More New York-Sized Clusters

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Officials on the White House coronavirus task force have a goal: to limit the number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 to 100,000 people. But they say preventing more clusters the size of New York and New Jersey is key.

And with conflicting opinions about who should be wearing masks, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports new guidance may be coming soon.

Plus, what a 1995 heat wave can teach us about fighting today's pandemic — and the scientific debate over what could be early symptoms of COVID-19 — a loss of taste and smell.

Links:

Short Wave's episode, 'Is This Real? Loss of Smell And The Coronavirus' on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and NPR One.

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Apr 01 2020

12mins

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Rank #17: New York City, U.S. Epicenter, Braces For Peak

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Governor Andrew Cuomo said the pandemic could peak in New York in the next 14-21 days — around the same time President Trump said he'd love to "open" the economy. Plus why the aviation and other transportation industries are lining up for federal bailout money, and a theory about why the virus might be so good at spreading.

More links:
Find and support your local public radio station here.
NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on how to clean surfaces inside your home.
Listen to Atlantic journalist Ed Yong on 'Short Wave' on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or at npr.org.
Listen to 'Wow In The World' on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or at npr.org.

Mar 24 2020

12mins

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Rank #18: Ventilator Shortages; 6.6 Million New Unemployment Claims

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6.6 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week, doubling the record-setting numbers from the week before. The rapid increase has overwhelmed state offices.

Ventilators are a scare resource right now. While they are lifesaving for some, NPR's Jon Hamilton reports when it comes to COVID-19, they do not guarantee survival.

Plus, how to protect essential workers when ordering delivery and going to the grocery store.

Links:

The Indicator's episode on scarcity in the emergency room on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.

Camila Domonoske's reporting on grocery store worker safety.

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Apr 02 2020

12mins

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Rank #19: Reopening Won't Feel Normal; Tech Giants Plan For Contact Tracing

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Governors around the country are starting to plan for what reopening their states could look like. California Gov. Gavin Newsom said testing will be a big part of his decision-making.

Millions of Americans should have received an economic impact payment from the government today. Meanwhile, many are still waiting on unemployment benefits.

Plus, Apple and Google's plan to help with contact tracing will depend on trust from the public.

Listen to Life Kit's episode on giving back on Apple, Spotify and NPR One.

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Apr 15 2020

12mins

Play

Rank #20: Trump's Unfulfilled Promises; What Contact Tracing Could Look Like

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Exactly one month ago, President Trump declared a national emergency and promised a mobilization of public and private resources to attack the coronavirus. NPR's Investigations Team finds that few of those promises have come to pass.

The CDC says they'll soon release a plan to help state and local governments with contact tracing, but Massachusetts has already started building its own contact tracing system.

NPR's Allison Aubrey discusses why some are more vulnerable to COVID-19 than others, and looks ahead at what opening up the country may look like.

And if you're one of the many families feeling a budget squeeze right now, Life Kit has some tips for you.

NPR's Investigations Team's full story on each claim Trump made one month ago

Tips on budgeting from Life Kit.

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Apr 13 2020

13mins

Play

Q & A: Voting And Acts Of Kindness

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Bestselling author Cheryl Strayed joins NPR's Ari Shaprio as listeners share stories about acts of kindness they've experienced.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:

-NPR reporter Miles Parks answers questions about how upcoming elections can be run safely.

-Cheryl Strayed, bestselling author of 'Wild' and host of the podcast Sugar Calling, joins NPR host Ari Shapiro to hear listeners' stories about acts of kindness during the pandemic.

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May 30 2020

16mins

Play

The Rural/Urban Divide; Safe Summer Activities

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Democrats want another coronavirus relief bill. A sticking point for Republicans is $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits — which means some workers have been able to collect more money on unemployment than they did in their previous jobs.

Essential workers who have continued to work may have received temporary wage bumps. But NPR's Alina Selyukh reports many companies are ending that hazard pay.

Challenges to statewide stay-at-home orders are mounting in rural communities that have few coronavirus cases. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on the dispute in Baker County, Oregon.

Plus, experts weigh in on the safety of different summer activities.

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May 29 2020

12mins

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Why Are Some Countries Doing Better Than Others?

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A new study suggests the coronavirus is both more common and less deadly than it first appeared, NPR's Jon Hamilton reports.

From NPR's Joel Rose: a shortage of machines to process tests is the latest bottleneck in the pandemic supply chain.

Certain countries like New Zealand, Germany and several nations in Asia have been successful in controlling the coronvavirus. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports on how leadership played a strong role.

Mara Gay is 33-years-old, lives in New York City and got sick with COVID-19 in April. She spoke with NPR's Michel Martin about her long recovery process, despite being young and healthy.

Plus, two teenagers who were looking forward to competing in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which was cancelled this week.

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May 28 2020

13mins

Play

Global Vaccine Competition; More Than 100,000 Dead

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According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 100,000 people have died in the United States from COVID-19, and experts at the World Health Organization warn a second peak of COVID-19 infections could occur during this first wave of the virus. Meanwhile, the global race for a vaccine is generating competition between nations, mainly the U.S. and China.

New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal more than 60,000 health care workers have been infected with COVID-19, and almost 300 have died. This is a dramatic increase since the CDC first released numbers six weeks ago.

Bangladesh has extended its coronavirus lockdown — except for the garment factories. But with big brands canceling orders, workers face pay cuts, hunger and little to no social distancing.

Plus, an obituary writer reflects on COVID-19 deaths.

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May 27 2020

13mins

Play

99,000 People Dead And A Dire Summer Prediction

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As the United States nears 100,000 coronavirus deaths and states begin to re-open, what's next for the country? Dr. Ashish Jha of Harvard's Global Health Institute cautions it's still early in the crisis.

Researchers have found the coronavirus was introduced to the U.S. in part by affluent travelers — but those weren't the people hit the hardest.

Cathy Cody owns a janitorial company in a Georgia community with a high rate of COVID-19. Her company offers a new service boxing up the belongings of residents who have died. Read or listen to the full story from NPR's Morning Edition.

Plus, rollerblading is having a moment.

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May 26 2020

13mins

Play

The Cost Of Being "Essential"

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From NPR's Embedded: The workers who produce pork, chicken, and beef in plants around the country have been deemed "essential" by the government and their employers. Now, the factories where they work have become some of the largest clusters for the coronavirus in the country. The workers, many of whom are immigrants, say their bosses have not done enough to protect them.

Regular episodes return tomorrow.

May 25 2020

20mins

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Q & A: Vaccine Development And Kids' Questions

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NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca answers listener questions about vaccine development, and medical experts tackle questions sent in by kids.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:

-NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca explains how vaccines are made and the unique challenges associated with COVID-19.

-Kids' questions are answered by pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison from the Capitol Medical Group in Washington, D.C., and Dr. Wanjiku Njoroge, medical director for the Young Child Clinic at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

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May 23 2020

12mins

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Fauci Optimistic On Vaccine; What's Different About Military Homecomings

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Earlier this week, an experimental coronavirus vaccine showed promise. But, for the moment, the full data from that research hasn't been released.

Friday morning, Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR he's seen the data and it looks "quite promising." According to Fauci, barring any setbacks, the US is on track to have a vaccine by early next year.

Millions of Americans are turning to food banks to help feed their families during the pandemic. A new federal program pays farmers who've lost restaurant and school business to donate the excess to community organizations. But even the people in charge of these organizations say direct cash assistance is a better way to feed Americans in need.

A few months ago, before the lock downs, nearly 3,000 paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division left on a short-notice deployment to the Middle East. The 82nd is coming back is being welcomed back to a changed nation and a changed military.

Plus, about 180 people are hunkered down together in a Jerusalem hotel, recovering from COVID-19. Patients from all walks of life — Israelis, Palestinians, religious, secular groups that don't usually mix — are all getting along. Listen to the full Rough Translation podcast "Hotel Corona."

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May 22 2020

11mins

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Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

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A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home.

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Research with mice, guinea pigs and monkeys is making scientists increasingly optimistic about the chances for developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Three studies released Wednesday show promising results after the animals received experimental vaccines. But public health success will require global cooperation.

Meanwhile, state unemployment agencies are feeling the pinch as they try to keep up with unparalleled demand for their services.

And as bordering towns begin to ease stay-at-home restrictions, the logistics around reopening neighboring areas is leading to quite a bit of confusion.

Plus, sometimes you just need a hug. And if you're isolating alone, TikTok star Tabitha Brown has got you covered with comfort content to help you feel loved.

May 21 2020

12mins

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What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

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Three-quarters of Americans are concerned that a second wave of coronavirus cases will emerge, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Despite that, groups around the country, including in Michigan, are protesting state lockdowns.

President Trump's stance on hydroxychloroquine has made the drug harder to study, according to some scientists.

Researchers have been digging into contact tracing data from countries that had early outbreaks. Data suggest high risk activities include large indoor gatherings. Lower risk is going to the grocery store.

Plus, what is happening with classroom pets when school is out of session due to the coronavirus. Reporter Sara Stacke's story with photos.

You can hear more about the NPR poll on the NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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May 20 2020

12mins

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Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

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There are still a lot of questions about how the coronavirus is transmitted through air. Researchers are looking at how the virus is spread indoors and how to safely have people under one roof.

As states around the country lift restrictions and businesses reopen, many workers in close-contact jobs are scared for their health and would rather stay on unemployment. NPR's Chris Arnold reports on what options workers have.

Listen to Short Wave's episode about why it's so hard to remember what day it is and some tips for giving time more meaning on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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May 19 2020

11mins

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Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

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A new coronavirus vaccine candidate shows encouraging results. It's early, but preliminary data shows it appears to be eliciting the kind of immune response capable of preventing disease.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been signaling that more government spending might be necessary to prevent long-term economic damage.

As the pandemic becomes more political, researchers are concerned debates over masks, social distancing and reopening the economy are inflaming an already divided nation. Incidents of violence are rare, but concerning to experts.

Plus, a 102-year-old woman who survived the influenza of 1918, the Great Depression, World War II and now, COVID-19.

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May 18 2020

10mins

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Q & A: Sleep Problems And Summer Childcare

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Sleep experts answer listener questions about insomnia, and a nurse practitioner offers advice to parents about summer childcare.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered.' In this episode:

- Dr. Sonia Ancoli-Israel of the Center for Circadian Biology, and Dr. Christina McCrae of the Mizzou Sleep Research Lab offer advice to listeners who are having trouble falling asleep.
- Pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison answers parents' questions about childcare this summer.

If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.

We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.

May 16 2020

14mins

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The Government's Vaccine Push; Businesses Struggle With Reopening Rules

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To speed up the process of developing a coronavirus vaccine, the Trump Administration says the government will invest in manufacturing the top candidates even before one is proven to work.

As parts of the country reopen, different rules apply across state and even city lines, leaving business owners trying to figure things out for themselves, 'All Things Considered' host Ari Shapiro reports.

Demand for goods and services plunged in April according to new data. NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith of The Indicator reports on pent-up demand and what that means for the future of the U.S. economy.

The Navajo Nation has one of the highest rates of COVID-19 deaths per capita in the United States. NPR's Code Switch podcast examines why Native Americans have been so hard hit by the coronavirus. Listen to their episode on race and COVID-19 on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

Listen to Throughline's episode about the origins of the N95 mask on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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May 15 2020

13mins

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Whistleblower: U.S. Lost Valuable Time, Warns Of 'Darkest Winter In Modern History'

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Career government scientist-turned-whistleblower Rick Bright testified before Congress Thursday that without a stronger federal response to the coronavirus, 2020 could be the "darkest winter in modern history."

Schools might not open everywhere in the fall, but some experts say keeping kids home is a health risk, too.

Apple and Google want to develop technology to track the spread of COVID-19 while protecting individuals' privacy, while some states like North Dakota are developing their own apps.

Plus, tips on social distancing from someone who's been doing it for 50 years: Billy Barr's movie recommendations spreadsheet.

Listen to the NPR Politics Podcast's recap of today's hearing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

Send your remembrance of a loved one to embedded@npr.org.

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May 14 2020

13mins

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Public Health Vs. Politics; Lessons From An Anti-Mask Protest

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The U.S. has more coronavirus deaths than any country in the world. Dr. Anthony Fauci says the number of American fatalities is likely an under count.

Nearly 40% of households making less than $40,000 a year lost a job in March. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said on Wednesday that additional government spending may be necessary to avoid long-lasting economic fallout.

A small but vocal minority of people are pushing back against public health measures that experts say are life-saving. It's not the first time Americans have resisted government measures during a pandemic. Listen to Embedded's episode on the backlash on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

President Trump has prioritized getting sports running again after the coronavirus lockdown. But NPR's Scott Detrow reports the idea is facing logistical and safety challenges.

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May 13 2020

11mins

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Testing, Reopening Schools, Vaccines: Fauci And Others Testify

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In a Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, Chair Lamar Alexander of Tennessee asked Dr. Anthony Fauci whether coronavirus treatments or a vaccine could be developed in time to allow college students to return to school in the fall. Fauci said that "would be a bridge too far."

There's a full recap of today's hearing on The NPR Politics Podcast. listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

New York is trying to build what could become one of the largest contact tracing programs for COVID-19. Starting this month, public health officials there are looking to hire as many as 17,000 investigators.

Nursing homes account for nearly half of COVID-19 deaths in some states. NPR's Ina Jaffe reports on why nursing homes have been so vulnerable to the virus and what could be done to improve them in the future.

Plus, a professional musician sidelined by the coronavirus becomes a one-man marching band for his neighborhood.

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May 12 2020

13mins

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How To Stay Safe As States Reopen; The Latest on Masks

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Democrats want another stimulus plan, but Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin says the Trump administration wants to wait before providing any further aid.

As more states ease stay-at-home orders, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on ways to stay safe while seeing friends, going to church and returning to work. The CDC still recommends people wear masks.

The coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionately large effect on black Americans. Lawmakers and local officials are looking for ways to make sure the communities hit hardest are getting the right information about the virus.

In Life Kit's latest episode, Sesame Street's Grover answers kids' questions about the coronavirus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.

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May 11 2020

11mins

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Q & A: Home Cooking And Environmental Impact

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Chef Samin Nosrat, author of 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,' answers listener cooking questions. NPR's science correspondent discusses the pandemic's environmental impact.

These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered.' In this episode:

- NPR Science Desk correspondent Lauren Sommer talks about the environmental impact of the economic slowdown
- Samin Nosrat, author and host of the Netflix series 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,' offers inspiration to those who find themselves short on ingredients or cooking for one

If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.

We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.

May 09 2020

18mins

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Antibodies And Immunity; Why Even Health Care Workers Are Losing Jobs

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Most people infected with the coronavirus develop antibodies in response. NPR's Richard Harris reports that scientists are trying to figure out if that means people who've been exposed are immune from reinfection and, if so, for how long.

The Labor Department reported 20.5 million jobs were lost in April, putting the jobless rate at its highest level since the Great Depression.

Health care workers are among those hard hit by the economy. Many are losing work as hospitals struggle financially due to a decrease in non-emergency visits and procedures.

Only a few states have enough tests to ensure safe reopening. One of them, Tennessee, has taken a unique approach to testing: Its state government pays for every single test, no questions asked.

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May 08 2020

12mins

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Excellent info as always from NPR

By nerka3 - May 15 2020
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I really like the daily format, it gives bits of information on a timely basis, perfect!

Clear Info

By fRg9 - May 13 2020
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I appreciate the clear, comprehensive information. Thanks!