Cover image of LangFM
(1)
Society & Culture

LangFM

Updated 2 months ago

Society & Culture
Read more

A podcast about language and what people do with it: Conversations and stories with interpreters, translators, copywriters, and other fun professions and passions.For more information, please go to https://www.adrechsel.de/podcast/.

Read more

A podcast about language and what people do with it: Conversations and stories with interpreters, translators, copywriters, and other fun professions and passions.For more information, please go to https://www.adrechsel.de/podcast/.

iTunes Ratings

1 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
0
0
0
0

Great to have a podcast especially for interpreters

By Tesstranslates - Feb 25 2016
Read more
Love listening to the different experiences. Thank you!

iTunes Ratings

1 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
0
0
0
0

Great to have a podcast especially for interpreters

By Tesstranslates - Feb 25 2016
Read more
Love listening to the different experiences. Thank you!
Cover image of LangFM

LangFM

Latest release on Dec 19, 2019

Read more

A podcast about language and what people do with it: Conversations and stories with interpreters, translators, copywriters, and other fun professions and passions.For more information, please go to https://www.adrechsel.de/podcast/.

Rank #1: 6: Patrick Kendrick and the beautiful game

Podcast cover
Read more
Listen in as Patrick and I explore his work as a football commentator and interpreter oscillating between the UK, Italy, France and Portugal.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/o-jogo-bonito-com-patrick-kendrick
Listen in as Patrick and I explore his work as a football commentator and interpreter oscillating between the UK, Italy, France and Portugal.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/o-jogo-bonito-com-patrick-kendrick

Aug 19 2015

53mins

Play

Rank #2: 32: Brian Fox, A Life In Interpreting

Podcast cover
Read more
This episode was special for me: I had the chance to sit down for a chat with Brian Fox. Just weeks after his retirement, Brian looks back at a long and rich career in SCIC, the interpreting service of the European Commission, both as an interpreter...
This episode was special for me: I had the chance to sit down for a chat with Brian Fox. Just weeks after his retirement, Brian looks back at a long and rich career in SCIC, the interpreting service of the European Commission, both as an interpreter and in various roles in administration. We chat about his personal background, how he got into foreign languages and interpreting, his various roles in SCIC, the development of interpreting (including remote) and the future of our profession.

Apr 05 2017

45mins

Play

Rank #3: Sign of the times III - France

Podcast cover
Read more
Stéphan Barrère

Cette épisode est la troisième, et la dernière, dans une petite série à propos des langues des signes. J’ai commencé en Ecosse avec les professeurs Jemina Napier et Graham Turner et l’histoire de la British Sign Language Scotland Act. Après, j’a rencontré Laura Schwengber en Allemagne, ou elle invite les sourds de vivre la musique que, normalement, ils peuvent pas entendre. Et bien voilà, maintenant, on conclut la série en France avec Stéphan Barrère, qui nous parle de son parcours personnel et de la vie d’hier et d’aujourd’hui des sourds en France. Bonne écoute !

Une transcription et plus de liens et informations se trouvent sur: https://adrechsel.de/langfm/signofthetimes-iii-stephan-barrere

Sources audio

Musique

Aug 23 2018

30mins

Play

Rank #4: 17: Introducing Glossary Assistant

Podcast cover
Read more
In this episode, I talk to developer Reg Martin, the person behind Glossary Assistant for Android. Glossary Assistant is an app that Reg created for his wife, who works as a conference interpreter. If you want to get started using it, tune in and...
In this episode, I talk to developer Reg Martin, the person behind Glossary Assistant for Android. Glossary Assistant is an app that Reg created for his wife, who works as a conference interpreter. If you want to get started using it, tune in and bring your tablet.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/glossaryassistant

Dec 10 2015

28mins

Play

Rank #5: Live at TC39: New Frontiers in Interpreting Technology

Podcast cover
Read more
On 17 November 2017, Danielle D’Hayer, Anja Rütten, Joshua Goldsmith, Marcin Feder, Barry Olsen and yours truly organised a panel discussion at the 39th “Translating And The Computer” Conference in London. We discussed many aspects of technology use...
On 17 November 2017, Danielle D’Hayer, Anja Rütten, Joshua Goldsmith, Marcin Feder, Barry Olsen and yours truly organised a panel discussion at the 39th “Translating And The Computer” Conference in London. We discussed many aspects of technology use in interpreting. More info here: http://adrechsel.de/dolmetschblog/tc39

Nov 29 2017

1hr 7mins

Play

Rank #6: 22: Tess Whitty

Podcast cover
Read more
My guest on episode 22 of LangFM is Tess Whitty, a translator, fellow language podcaster - and a fellow European, who now lives in Utah. We talk about how Tess got there, about marketing and podcasting and many other interesting things.
Show notes:...
My guest on episode 22 of LangFM is Tess Whitty, a translator, fellow language podcaster - and a fellow European, who now lives in Utah. We talk about how Tess got there, about marketing and podcasting and many other interesting things.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/tess-whitty

Apr 20 2016

24mins

Play

Rank #7: 15: Geeking out with Josie Holley and Joshua Goldsmith

Podcast cover
Read more
Josie Holley and Joshua Goldsmith are dyed-in-the-wool tablet interpreters. Their final thesis at the University of Geneva covered the use of tablets in consecutive interpreting. Listen in as we geek out about tablets, styli, apps and their research...
Josie Holley and Joshua Goldsmith are dyed-in-the-wool tablet interpreters. Their final thesis at the University of Geneva covered the use of tablets in consecutive interpreting. Listen in as we geek out about tablets, styli, apps and their research project.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/josiejosh

Nov 18 2015

51mins

Play

Rank #8: Sign of the times I - Scotland

Podcast cover
Read more
The Story of the BSL (Scotland) Bill
This episode is part of a mini-series on sign language interpreting, a topic I have become increasingly fascinated by in recent years. In the same time, sign language interpreting has moved more into public awareness, including within our profession. AIIC, the international association of conference interpreters, now has members working with sign language. The European Parliament has become involved, as you heard in episode 28 of LangFM, about the EUsigns conference. And more and more countries are upgrading the status of their national sign languages.

Full transcript and further reading: https://www.adrechsel.de/langfm/the-story-of-the-bsl-scotland-bill

Feb 20 2018

45mins

Play

Rank #9: 24: Interpreters' Help

Podcast cover
Read more
I had the chance to sit down with Benoît and Yann, the two developers, for a nice conversation, which I've edited down to this episode. Learn more about how Interpreters' Help came about (there's even a cameo!), how it can help you and what's in store...
I had the chance to sit down with Benoît and Yann, the two developers, for a nice conversation, which I've edited down to this episode. Learn more about how Interpreters' Help came about (there's even a cameo!), how it can help you and what's in store for the future.​
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/interpretershelp

May 18 2016

20mins

Play

Rank #10: 27: Katerina Strani

Podcast cover
Read more
Katerina Strani was born in Thessaloniki, studied in Brussels and Moscow and now lives and works in Edinburgh. She translates and interprets from French and Russian into English and Greek. Oh, and not only does she hold a PhD on Communicative...
Katerina Strani was born in Thessaloniki, studied in Brussels and Moscow and now lives and works in Edinburgh. She translates and interprets from French and Russian into English and Greek. Oh, and not only does she hold a PhD on Communicative Rationality in the Public Sphere, she also managed to translate (!) her research into two comedy stand-up routines. Listen to the latest episode of LangFM to get the full picture!
Show notes and more at http://adrechsel.de/langfm/katerinastrani

Sep 28 2016

22mins

Play

Rank #11: 4: A conversation with Holly Behl

Podcast cover
Read more
Holly and I talk about how a volunteering opportunity in Mexico led her to become an interpreter, what her job looks like and how she uses her Samsung tablet and a handful of clever apps to be more productive.
Show notes:...
Holly and I talk about how a volunteering opportunity in Mexico led her to become an interpreter, what her job looks like and how she uses her Samsung tablet and a handful of clever apps to be more productive.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/holly-behl

Aug 04 2015

30mins

Play

Rank #12: 36: Alexander Smith, protected by his innocence

Podcast cover
Read more
An interview with my former colleague in DG Interpretation in the European Commission

This is LangFM, the podcast about language and what people do with it. My guest on this episode: fellow Alexander and former fellow conference interpreter at the European Commission: Alexander Smith. (You'll even hear him sing, by the way!)

In 2017, Alex hung up his interpreting headphones for good. I jumped at the chance to sit down with him for a chat about his life in interpreting and in music.
You will notice that I really enjoyed talking to Alex. I don’t usually include my side of the interview in my episodes anymore. In this case, however, it seemed like a good fit. (Also, I set up my audio recorder incorrectly.)

Pour la petite histoire, as Alex would say, he was there when I went on my very first interpreting trip abroad - what we in SCIC call a „mission“. The trip was to Reggio Emilia and I remember thinking, wow, what interesting characters they have in this interpreting service.

By the way, the music extracts throughout this episode are from two bands that Alexander’s been involved in: „About Time“ and their album „Songs from underground“, and folk band Bothan. Their album is called „Binnorie“, and the other band members (and fellow SCIC interpreters) are Elise Docherty, Jane McBride and Andy Upton.

If you’ve enjoy listening to this episode, please spread the word. I’d love for you to recommend the podcast to anyone and everyone you think might be interested. The podcast website is www.langfm.audio, and there’s also a Twitter account at @langfmpod. Do say hi!

Links

Sep 26 2018

47mins

Play

Rank #13: 5: Rocking the boat with Jonathan Downie

Podcast cover
Read more
Find out about Jonathan's PhD and his upcoming book "The successful interpreter" - and many other things, including monkeys and chocolate teapots.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/jonathan-downie
Find out about Jonathan's PhD and his upcoming book "The successful interpreter" - and many other things, including monkeys and chocolate teapots.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/jonathan-downie

Aug 13 2015

48mins

Play

Rank #14: 13: Geneva calling: Ewandro Magalhaes

Podcast cover
Read more
Ewandro tells me how he made it from fitness instructor to A-level interpreter, from Brasil to Monterey to Geneva. We take a deep dive into remote participation at ITU meetings in Geneva and how both interpreters and delegates adapt. Ewandro also...
Ewandro tells me how he made it from fitness instructor to A-level interpreter, from Brasil to Monterey to Geneva. We take a deep dive into remote participation at ITU meetings in Geneva and how both interpreters and delegates adapt. Ewandro also shares valuable thoughts for both novice and experienced interpreters.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/ewandromagalhaes

Oct 21 2015

49mins

Play

Rank #15: 25: Around the world with Eugenia Durante, translator and music writer

Podcast cover
Read more
My guest is Eugenia Durante, a translator and writer from Italy. We talk about how she got into languages, writing for Rolling Stone magazine, her career and her travels, most notably to the South By Southwest festival 2016.
Show notes can be found at...
My guest is Eugenia Durante, a translator and writer from Italy. We talk about how she got into languages, writing for Rolling Stone magazine, her career and her travels, most notably to the South By Southwest festival 2016.
Show notes can be found at www.adrechsel.de/langfm/eugenia/.

Aug 24 2016

20mins

Play

Rank #16: 12: AIIC-Workshop "Dolmetscher für Dolmetscher" 2015

Podcast cover
Read more
Am 5. September 2015 fand in Köln wieder einmal der jährliche "Dolmetscher-für-Dolmetscher"-Workshop der AIIC-Region Deutschland statt. Dieser Podcast ist ein akustischer Einblick in den Weiterbildungstag.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/dfd2015
Am 5. September 2015 fand in Köln wieder einmal der jährliche "Dolmetscher-für-Dolmetscher"-Workshop der AIIC-Region Deutschland statt. Dieser Podcast ist ein akustischer Einblick in den Weiterbildungstag.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/dfd2015

Oct 07 2015

48mins

Play

Rank #17: 3: Das Alexander-Doppelpack

Podcast cover
Read more
Alexander spricht mit Alexander über Dolmetschen, Android und Umberto Eco.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/3
Alexander spricht mit Alexander über Dolmetschen, Android und Umberto Eco.
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/3

Jul 08 2015

32mins

Play

Rank #18: 30: Voice, personality, vocal fry, as Rebecca Gausnell returns

Podcast cover
Read more
Rebecca Gausnell is back! After a wonderful chat in episode 23 (embedded below), we chat about what she's been up to since working on Berlin Station. And we dive deep into standard and neutral accents and debunk the "vocal fry" myth. Listen in!
Full...
Rebecca Gausnell is back! After a wonderful chat in episode 23 (embedded below), we chat about what she's been up to since working on Berlin Station. And we dive deep into standard and neutral accents and debunk the "vocal fry" myth. Listen in!
Full show notes at: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/rebecca2

Dec 08 2016

22mins

Play

Rank #19: 34: My Chat With Matt Baird, The Bolder Translator

Podcast cover
Read more
Matt Baird is a US-born and Germany-based translator and copywriter with many interesting stories to tell. Matt also hosts the podcast of the American Translators Association. Tune in to find out how Matt got interested in learning German, about his...
Matt Baird is a US-born and Germany-based translator and copywriter with many interesting stories to tell. Matt also hosts the podcast of the American Translators Association. Tune in to find out how Matt got interested in learning German, about his many hops across the pond and how he almost got sucked into the Washington beltway bubble.
Show notes: adrechsel.de/langfm/matt-baird

Jul 25 2017

31mins

Play

Rank #20: 23: Rebecca Gausnell

Podcast cover
Read more
A conversation with accent and dialect coach Rebecca Gausnell about voice, language, her work in film and TV, and much more!
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/rebecca
A conversation with accent and dialect coach Rebecca Gausnell about voice, language, her work in film and TV, and much more!
Show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/rebecca

May 03 2016

46mins

Play

Bonus: Sergei Chernov on the history of interpreting

Podcast cover
Read more
The history of simultaneous interpreting in Russia

As part of my interview with Sergei, we also took a deep dive into the lesser known history of simultaneous interpreting in Russia. In parallel to Filene and Finley, a certain Dr. Epstein and an engineer called Goron developed their own sim system for the congress of the Communist International in 1928.

Full transcript with links and more: https://adrechsel.de/langfm/sergei

Dec 19 2019

25mins

Play

40: Sergei Chernov

Podcast cover
Read more
Interpreting on both sides of the Iron Curtain

The name Chernov is one of the big names in the interpreting profession. Like Kaminker, Herbert, or Seleskovich. In this episode of LangFM, I sit down with Sergei Chernov to talk about his famous father, but mostly about his upbringing in the US and the USSR, his time as a freelancer in post-Soviet Russia and his move to the US to work for the IMF.

Full transcript with links and more: https://adrechsel.de/langfm/sergei

Dec 19 2019

28mins

Play

39: The WISE Interpreting Workshops

Podcast cover
Read more
How Joe Burbidge & José Sentamans started a movement

José Sentamans and Joe Burbidge have been bringing interpreters together for peer-feedback practice since 2013. In August 2018, I sat down with them during a busy practice week in Brussels to talk about the past, present and future of the WISE interpreting workshops.

Full show notes: https://adrechsel.de/langfm/wise

Aug 25 2019

18mins

Play

38: Michael Erard Bonus Track

Podcast cover
Read more
The People (and Piano) of MPI Nijmegen

Transcript: The People (and the Piano) of the MPI Nijmegen

Introduction

Hey, thanks for tuning into this LangFM bonus track. As I mentioned in the main episode with Michael Erard, he was kind enough to introduce me to several researchers at the Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen. But before we listen to what they have to tell us about their research, how about we start with a little story? The story of the piano in the basement.

Michael: The piano in the basement

One day in late November I was at lunch again with Charlotte, Mark, and his officemate, Edwin, who works on chimp behavior. “Sometimes I hear music being played, piano music,” Edwin said, “but only after work hours.” “Where is there a piano?” I asked. In the basement, they said. There’s a basement? I hadn’t known.
Two days later, my oldest son came to the institute with me; there was a teacher’s strike, and he had no school. On such days, usually we sat for a while in my office, the door closed, while I wrote; he watched videos or looked at photos of trains on my desktop computer to sketch. Then at 10:30 we wandered down to the canteen for a muffin. That day I suggested we explore the basement, and he agreed, but as soon as we started down the dark staircase, he balked. He’s been like this, hesitant to enter spaces that might look forbidden. There’s no sign here, I said, no reason to avoid this. Plus there’s the piano they were talking about. I have to see the piano. I persuaded him further down. As soon as we entered the hallway, a light snapped on. We crept along the corridor and found an entrance to the library’s lowest stack, which we’d explored from above during a previous visit.
“It’s not the library,” he insisted. “It is! It’s the same,” I said. Magic bunny holes existed all over the institute. Do people map out routes using the basement to avoid others they don’t want to see? If they don’t, they could.
We rounded the corner, looked into an office, and saw Jan, the main janitor. He’s jolly, bald, plain-talking and friendly. Booming voice: “Hi Michael!” He’s the one responsible for all the physical systems. If it can be moved or can break, Jan is in charge of it. Don’t take Jan for granted. The man has keys.
“We’re checking out the basement,” I said. “I’d never been down here before.”
“Well, let me show you some other things,” he said.

Well, now it’s my turn to show you some other things that happen at MPI. Let’s listen to Hans Rutger Bosker, Mark Dingemanse and Charlotte Horn. First up, Hans:

Hans Rutger Bosker

Nice to meet you! - It’s much cooler down here, isn’t it? - It’s quite pleasant, yeah! Especially compared to two floors up.

I have always been interested in speech and not necessarily language per se, but rather the speech signal, the spoken signal and most of my work is on speech perception so how come… I mean you can understand me right now perfectly well because this is a quiet quiet surrounding right now. But once we get into a situation with this loud traffic or competing talk within the bar, music… - It’s the worst! - Or even just a non-native speaker or someone who produces noise inside the signal, inside the compound communicative signal itself, still we somehow cope, right? We don't have that much struggle in a bar. So somehow we cope and we do that much better than Google does, right? And all these speech recognition software.

I'm interested in this speech perception especially when it gets bad. Right. And it gets difficult. So for instance, one of the topics is very fast speech. At some point it breaks down, right? We can compress speech to a certain degree, make it really fast. But at some point it breaks down. Why does it break down at a particular rate? What is it in the brain that fails then?

I mean, I can produce this simple sentence and speed it up by two, you have no problem, right? But acoustically, it’s very, very different. If you just look at the signal, it's completely different. But we understand the same words. If we compress it by three, you can still kind of somehow pick up the words but somewhere along, you know, when you compress by four or five, we lose that ability and it becomes too fast. Now why is that? Right? So we look at how our brain processes fast speech, for instance.

Another topic is is disfluency. Communication can also get difficult when there's lots of ums or pauses or breakdown. And somehow the brain has developed a clever way of dealing with those. So we also have done some research into, for instance, how the brain processes online, right? So we use eye tracking research where we show pictures and we then present disfluent speech and see how that influences how people interpret the speech. Because the eyes follow what you think is gonna come up. It's a picture of, say, a sewing machine, something really low-frequency that we don't see every day. A spinning wheel, you know, very low-frequency items, and high-frequency items: cars, bikes. You see two pics on the screen. That's it. And then you hear a sentence: now click on the… It's not gonna be the hand, right? It's not gonna be difficult to name. So somehow we use those ums to already predict that it's gonna be the difficult item. Well before we hear the S of sewing machine or we hear the S and P of spinning. So it's evidence of that, that we actively use these kind of meta-cognitive, meta-linguistic cues, these performance cues that don't have really meaning themselves. Um doesn't mean anything, but nevertheless… - Maybe it does? - Yeah. Listeners can cleverly use those symptoms of speech production in perception.

For the speech rate thing, we also use neuro-biological methods, we’ve used EEG and MEG, which is measuring brain activity at a given moment in time and that has a very, very small temporal resolution. Very good in terms of the temporal resolution so you can measure every millisecond what's going on the brain. And what we've been showing is that people actually track the rate of speech, so if we take a normal speech signal that has, I don't know, I’ll say five syllables every second, then we actually see in the brain a kind of a five-beats-a-second response as well. So it's like the brain adjusts to what you hear. Now if you compress that by two, you end up with 10 beats a second. You again see the ten beats a second back in the brain. Once it gets too fast, so when compressed by three or four or five, we lose that correlation between brain and speech. So it's like the brain tries to keep up with the signal as it comes in. But somewhere it breaks down. And the moment it breaks down is said to be relevant for the kind of brain waves that are in the brain. The edge is around 10 Hertz, right? Everything below 10 Hertz is trackable, syllable rates below 10. And you'll find that languages all around the world will have syllable rates below 10 Hertz. - They do? - Yeah. One reason might be, given all this neuro stuff, that the brain has been designed to track rhythms within this range and not outside. And therefore, languages have evolved to be within that range.
It's like, you can fool a brain as long as you follow its rules. You can help it to understand speech and ideally that's where you want to go. You know, people with hearing aids, elderly people lose their hearing acuity, and cochlear implants. That's ideally where you want to go.
Understanding how speech perception works. What are the constraints that the brain imposes over the years or whatever. If we know, if we can understand that, then we can apply it. Right? So it's in the end, of course, it's fundamental research but it's driven by this idea of wanting to understand in order to be able to then tweak perception

All these languages, I mean they're all spoken languages. We all speak with our mouths, and our mouths constrain how we speak. We can only speak so fast. We can't speak at 10 Hertz. Right? So therefore we also don't find that that much.
-- But it looks fairly consistent. Is that true or is that just the layman…?
That's my point. Yeah. Across all languages. This is just Dutch, but the theory is, the suggestion is that this is general across the board simply because this is how our jaws work. And maybe even how our brains work. Our brains can’t keep up with 10 Hertz, so why would you speak above 10 Hertz?
-- Because sometimes, there's this perception at least, that some languages are quicker than others. Like Spanish would be the typical example. And they sound so quick, but apparently… That may just be individual perception.
That's clearly a perception issue because if you do the math, if you look at the acoustics, the signals yourself, they're very compatible.
-- It checks out.
There's also stuff on speech rate where it's all within the same range. But of course, perception deviates from merely objectively observing the world. If you listen to Spanish, we can’t pick up the sounds, right, because they might have sounds that we don't use. We don't hear the word boundaries. I mean if you look at the speech signal, there's no pauses.
-- If you don't know Spanish.
Yeah. So it's very difficult to pick out the words simply because we don't know where they end. We just get a blur of sound and it’s just like, what? So perceptually, that sounds a lot faster and it's been called the gabbling foreigner illusion, right?
-- Oh yeah, sounds very familiar.
And everybody has this intuition. But of course that can't hold because a Spanish person will think Dutch is fast.
-- Because it's a foreign language.
Exactly. It can't be in the acoustics. It's clearly a perception.

Michael: What that speech modulation curve also tells me is that it's probably very, very unlikely that someone who's an interpreter would have to be dealing with or resolving differences in modulation rates between the two languages.

Yeah. I think so. But that's mere acoustics. That's just listening to sound. Of course, there's much more when it comes to interpreting because you also have to understand the sound, pick out the words, make sentences in your mind, understand them and then go all the way back from that meaning, construct a sentence in a different language.

-- It looks, from your research, like there's probably almost no difference between a professional language user like an interpreter, let's say, and a normal person because there are some kind of physical limitations to the rate that you can sort of tolerate.
Yeah, of course there's a range, right?
-- Because I would have said maybe, you know, a professional language user who has more training, maybe that makes you difference? Maybe it doesn’t, I don't know.
Yeah. No, certainly. I mean it's only a range. I'm just saying that extremely fast or extremely slow won't happen. And the reason might be the jaw, it might be the brain. But within that, there's still considerable variation of both. If we are proficient speakers of the language much faster than non-native speakers and there's individual variation in people who are just generally slow. So there's still of course considerable variation. Nevertheless, that variation is constrained. It doesn't go up to 15 Hertz. There are boundaries and that's that's what we try to to pinpoint, to limit the variability because there is plenty of variation.

Mark Dingemanse

A few floors up, there’s Mark Dingemanse:

[Introductions]

Michael: I’m gonna step out and get some coffee.

So there are two main strands to my work. And the one that Michael [Erard] mentioned that I think is the one to do with… he mentioned this little word “huh”. That's the word that you use when you didn't quite catch what somebody said - or at least one of the ways in which you can do that. It's the most informal way. And the most widely used way. But the larger research program is more broadly about how we manage to communicate at all, you know, against overwhelming odds. So much can go wrong and goes wrong all the time that it's kind of a miracle that we manage to be able to talk somehow.
-- Even if you speak the same language.
Yes. Even without me thinking about all the formidable issues of different languages. But this is just about using a word that the other doesn't quite know or using a name that has multiple possible references but also communicating in noise, of course, you know: traffic passing by, all sorts of other trouble, overlapping. So you know there are very many ways in which things can go wrong. And what's so interesting about human language as opposed to many other animal communications systems is we actually have pretty good ways to deal with that.
We can do some of the same things that other animals also do. This is one of my interests, actually. You know, animal communication and how language relates to that. But animals’ options are limited. What they can do is basically just keep repeating what they did until they get some form of success. Or give up or not. That's it. I mean we can do that, too, but fortunately we can do more.
And so our research program into what we call repair was precisely aimed at trying to find out how exactly we solved these kinds of breakdowns. And so in the course of that we discovered a couple interesting things, one of which was this little word “huh” which we found to be basically universal in spoken language. And that was totally unexpected for us as linguists. Doesn't make sense at all. You know, in unrelated languages, you would have a word with a similar kind of function that also has a similar kind of sound. It doesn't work like that normally. As you as an interpreter well know. -- Yeah, exactly. I mean, even words like you when you hurt yourself, even those are a little bit different. Or sometimes very different. -- Yeah.

This word is, I mean, it's a nuanced story in the sense that languages do have their own version of this word. But I can put it like this: every spoken language that we've been able to check and that anybody else has been able to check has a simple mono-syllable with questioning intonation being used to ask the other to repeat what they just said. And so in some languages it might sound like “he?” - that's Dutch, my native language. I think German has... -- German is very similar. -- Yeah. Now in English, of course, it sounds a little more nasalized and with a less clear fricative at the beginning, so you don't quite go “he” but more like “uh”. In Spanish, the vowel is slightly different, so you go “eh”. But still, it's this mono-syllable with questioning intonation in all of those languages, so it's never in another part of the vowel space. You know, if you think about it as, you know, you can go “e” or “oo” or “ah”, and then in this region, there would be “eh”, “uh”… And so it's always in that region. It's never “e” or “oo”. And there's no particular reason that it couldn’t be, but it so happens never to be like that. So that was our first discovery. One of the most interesting ones to do with, you know, how people solve this universal problem.
-- And the differences that you've seen between languages are linked to phonology, for example? So a Spaniard would be hard pressed to pronounce a “h” as we pronounce it. Those are the main differences?
Yeah, the only ones as far as we can tell. So basically what you can say is this is a word that is always in that same part of the possibility space and it adjusts slightly within that space to the phonology of the language. That's it. It never, you know, there is no example that we know of where the vowel goes beyond that little “a” or “u” sound, for instance. And it so happens of course that most languages do have a vowel somewhere there and then you pick it, that’s basically how it works.
The reason that we think this is, is what we call convergent cultural evolution. We think that across the world this is such a common communicative need that languages converge to find the same solution, essentially, to that need. And the need is not just “can I get you to say again what you just said” but we're on under some pressure in conversation. You know, we take turns and we do so at quite an amazing pace. We do so very quickly, normally, and we also know that when we're a bit slower that that invites all sorts of implicatures. If you ask me what I'm doing tonight and I'm slow to reply, you already know that this is gonna be “I’m busy” or whatever. -- The pragmatics of... -- Yeah. So that pressure is always there. Because it's always there, when we didn't quite catch what the other one said in the first place, we need some quick way of indicating that. And that's precisely what this little word gives you. So it's basically the simplest possible question where it's really easy to plan. You basically just have to leave your mouth open, emit a little, you know, make it a syllable without the questioning intonation and off you go.
-- So basically, what you're saying is that this was a conversion, I think you said, of languages. This is not just some leftover from an ancient proto-language?
So that's the thing that we are at present of course not able to say. It's difficult to say. In fact, when when the paper came out, some newspapers who were writing about it said: Oh, this is the oldest word, it's the most ancient word, the only word that we still have left from our... And it's just, we can't say anything about that. So it could be that, but it could also be that languages independently just converge on that same option. And one reason to think that it's at least partly that second possibility is that we can now see this happening.

Danish is an excellent example. In Danish, you do have something like “hm”. Danish is of course known as the language that minimizes everything, all the vowels smudged together. -- Oh yeah. -- So you know it makes kind of sense that what they have in the way of this interjection would be just a nasal like “hm”. But they also have another form which they write with four letters as H-V-A-D. So it's cognate with the Germanic “what”. And it sounds nothing like it, it sounds like this: “hve”. -- That’s so Danish! -- There's a tiny bit of labio-dental closure there which, you know, if you really want, you can hear it as “hvad”. But if you listen to Danes speaking casually, it just sounds like “hæ”. Now what's interesting there is that it seems that... the way I look at it is this is the case of the question word in Danish, you know, the one that we know from other Germanic languages to be like “vaht” or “vahs” - that question word getting caught up in this vortex of selective pressure is wanting this interjection to be minimal. -- Super-efficient. -- And you know it’s being pulled into that same part of the possibility space where the other interjections of all the other languages already are. That's my reason for thinking it's not just that we are stuck with the oldest word, but even if we try to use a new word, it ends up getting pulled towards that same part of the space.

-- Transcribed text, is that what you use?
Only transcribed audio recordings of informal conversations. So, you know, you can never ask somebody about these things because you can’t trust people's intuition. I can't trust my own intuition about this. Because these things are so much below our awareness. Ask anybody about whether they think “uh” or “um” is a word or whether they think “huh” is a word and they'll say, nah, these are just sounds and I don't use them anyway because they're impolite and so on. Whereas: record them in an everyday conversation with their friends and you see them or hear them using these words all the time. So that's what we did. We made recordings in field sites all over the world and traced. We didn't go listening for these sounds in particular. We instead looked for situations in in which you can simply see things going wrong. So where, you know, you say something and then the other person does something, whatever it is. And then following that something you do your thing again. So you know you repeat yourself in response to something that the other person did. Yeah. Now having these two cases of you speaking and, in between, a person doing something else, we can look at all of the cases where that person does something and we can say these are all cases that somehow elicit repetition from you. So those are like what we call repair initiations. Those are cases where I ask you for clarification and then we can do a typology, we can compare them across languages, and that's how we found that one of the things you can reliably do in all those corpora of all those languages is use this simple syllable to elicit repetition.

I would say it’s speech, I would say even it's a word yeah. Some people think it's not. -- “It’s just a sound!” -- But it doesn't make sense to me to say it's just a sound because you have to learn it.

We found that it's not very common. -- You mean the polite forms are not very common? -- Yeah, exactly. So even in the most, you know, even in English conversations or you know the other Western languages that we had in our sample, we know that these forms exist. But in informal conversations, they are highly infrequent. Instead, what you find is that when there are larger social asymmetries or when there are special work situations or more formal situations, that's when these things get mobilized. But in informal interaction, in the form that we use language most, these polite forms are the least frequent. They're there, but not in all languages, interestingly.

What's so nice about “huh” is it's extremely efficient. So I put very low demands on your time by using it. And it's a very efficient way of solving that problem. So in a way it's a good use of our time. If I use the most efficient way that's available what you do when you're being polite is you choose to convert some of the time that you might want to pay to efficiency, you can choose to convert it to politeness to show that you are doing more work essentially to be more polite.

-- Um… Um!
There you go.
-- Here I go.
Michael wrote a book about it.
-- Yeah exactly.

There's another cool thing that we found which was that in all languages you can do something special with that word to signify that you're doing something special with the meaning. So in particular what you can do is you can make it more exaggerated, so to say, so you can go “huh???” to signify that now it's not just that I didn't hear you. In fact I heard you quite well. Perfectly fine. But I'm doing surprised in a way, I'm acting surprised, and so I invite you now not to repeat it but just to say, yeah, isn't that amazing? And so on. And you know we know that use from American English and from Dutch. It's been documented in a few Western languages but it's kind of cool that we've found that in all of the languages in our sample. So no matter where you are, you can do the same thing, exaggerate the form to, in a way, exaggerate the meaning. That same kind of operation on the form to get a particular meaning is available in all those languages.

So there are several cues in simple dyadic interactions that people use. I'm sure you know all of them. The most obvious one is syntax. Does it sound like it's syntactically complete? But that's never a single cue - the interesting thing is that these cues are always cumulative. Usually, a single cue isn't enough so complete syntax in itself is just one sort of point in favor of “this may be a possible place for a turn transition”.
-- So for example when it's a question you would go up?
Yeah.
-- But there could be a second question after that!.
Exactly. Yeah. But that would be two cues already; in a way you, can tell something from the syntax, you know, the word order in an English question is different from that in a statement. So that's one of the cues. The other cue is intonation - does it indeed go up then. OK. More evidence it's a question and therefore now a response is required. And then there are things like - and I'm wondering whether this holds up in this scenario and I don't think fully - there are things like gaze patterns which are actually hugely important. So what people do in dyadic interactions is, when they are close to finishing their turn and it is something like a question, where, you know, the next speaker is obviously selected as next speaker, then they'll turn their gaze to that speaker. And then you know “this is my cue” and “now I go”. And if that lines up with the syntax and the intonation and other available cues, then clearly you can go. And I'm wondering how much of that is available in this because… essentially, all of the turns are pulled apart in this four person scenario certainly. Let's keep with Trump and Putin just because it’s easy. Is Trump actually, when asking his question and nearing the end of it, is he gonna look at Putin? And if he is, then that is the cue for the interpreter to say “okay, now I know it's basically the end of the turn and so I can start translating.”

Well, this was you know a great sort of conversation. -- Yeah! -- About your work and a little bit about my work. And lots of follow-up questions.
Michael: Well, both of you are remaining in Europe. So I encourage you to stay in touch. -- We might actually do that, yeah.

Charlotte Horn

One person that Michael worked closely with was Charlotte Horn, then the Public Outreach Officer at MPI and a dyed-in-the-wool Dutch woman:

Michael: A couple of years ago, she spent 7 months living in New York City; she worked as a bike courier, a job she got as soon as she arrived. “How did you think you could work as a courier if you didn’t know the city?” I asked. She shrugged. “I’m Dutch. Dutch people figure, if it involves a bike, they can do it.”

Michael: Charlotte and I spent a lot of time together. Actually, the first day that I was here, it’s 9:00 in the morning: knocks three times “You're here!” laughter
Charlotte: I am doing PR and communications for the institute. So, yeah, I'm not a researcher.
Alex: And were you the one who brought Michael on board?
Charlotte: Well, that was Simon Fisher, who is a director here.
Michael: Just say yes!
Charlotte: Yes, I did that! Yes/no!
laughter
Yeah. And obviously we worked together. Just back and forth a little bit with some outreach things or press releases or stories or that kind of thing.
Alex: And your background is in communication or in science?
Charlotte: Neurobiology!
Alex: And you then decided at some point that you're more interested in the communication aspect of the work?
Charlotte: Yeah, the translating of that work.
Alex: Translating as in…
Charlotte: … making it understandable. Not a different language.
Alex: It is a way of translation.
Michael: You do work in both English and in Dutch.
Charlotte: I do. I work also in German because the Max Planck Gesellschaft obviously is German and they communicate all their work in German.
Alex: Only in German?
Charlotte: Mostly in German.
Alex: Interesting.

Charlotte: I started working here and there was no one before me that did communication. So I was phoned a lot, which was really great, by a lot of people. It was a very busy job. So I just got all of these requests like: We have this, this is cool, this is cool. And so I went in a lot and talked to people and I saw the experiment and at some point you know - and this is what we spoke about as well - what is the institute actually doing. That it's actually the only place in the world where we do only language research all in one building on so many levels. And that is sort of your selling point. There's a lot of really interesting work here, obviously.
Alex: Yeah, I was just saying to Michael, you could pop into any office and you could have a three-hour conversation which would be fascinating.
Charlotte: Everyone’s so driven and open.
Michael: I should’ve done that actually, just have, like, a random number generator. And just spun a wheel and then every day: Well, let's see what's happening in 17.
Alex: Because even if you're here for a year, you don't get to meet everyone necessarily.
Michael: No. I mean there's just so much. You realize at the beginning, like, oh my God, I’m in a candy store. And by November, you go: I’m so tired of candy. I can’t eat any more candy. So you gotta step back and digest it a little bit.

Mar 06 2019

31mins

Play

37: Michael Erard

Podcast cover
Read more
and the Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen

I visit writer Michael Erard during his residency at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, Netherlands. We talk about the institute, his writing, the language of the dying and the expat experience.

You can find show notes and a full transcript here: adrechsel.de/langfm/michael-erard-mpi

Mar 04 2019

38mins

Play

36: Alexander Smith, protected by his innocence

Podcast cover
Read more
An interview with my former colleague in DG Interpretation in the European Commission

This is LangFM, the podcast about language and what people do with it. My guest on this episode: fellow Alexander and former fellow conference interpreter at the European Commission: Alexander Smith. (You'll even hear him sing, by the way!)

In 2017, Alex hung up his interpreting headphones for good. I jumped at the chance to sit down with him for a chat about his life in interpreting and in music.
You will notice that I really enjoyed talking to Alex. I don’t usually include my side of the interview in my episodes anymore. In this case, however, it seemed like a good fit. (Also, I set up my audio recorder incorrectly.)

Pour la petite histoire, as Alex would say, he was there when I went on my very first interpreting trip abroad - what we in SCIC call a „mission“. The trip was to Reggio Emilia and I remember thinking, wow, what interesting characters they have in this interpreting service.

By the way, the music extracts throughout this episode are from two bands that Alexander’s been involved in: „About Time“ and their album „Songs from underground“, and folk band Bothan. Their album is called „Binnorie“, and the other band members (and fellow SCIC interpreters) are Elise Docherty, Jane McBride and Andy Upton.

If you’ve enjoy listening to this episode, please spread the word. I’d love for you to recommend the podcast to anyone and everyone you think might be interested. The podcast website is www.langfm.audio, and there’s also a Twitter account at @langfmpod. Do say hi!

Links

Sep 26 2018

47mins

Play

Sign of the times III - France

Podcast cover
Read more
Stéphan Barrère

Cette épisode est la troisième, et la dernière, dans une petite série à propos des langues des signes. J’ai commencé en Ecosse avec les professeurs Jemina Napier et Graham Turner et l’histoire de la British Sign Language Scotland Act. Après, j’a rencontré Laura Schwengber en Allemagne, ou elle invite les sourds de vivre la musique que, normalement, ils peuvent pas entendre. Et bien voilà, maintenant, on conclut la série en France avec Stéphan Barrère, qui nous parle de son parcours personnel et de la vie d’hier et d’aujourd’hui des sourds en France. Bonne écoute !

Une transcription et plus de liens et informations se trouvent sur: https://adrechsel.de/langfm/signofthetimes-iii-stephan-barrere

Sources audio

Musique

Aug 23 2018

30mins

Play

Sign of the times II - Deutschland

Podcast cover
Read more
Ausflug nach Gehörlosistan mit Laura Schwengber

[Musik: "Love, love, peace, peace"]

Hallo, hier ist LangFM, der Podcast über Sprache und was man so alles damit anstellen kann. Ihr hört Folge 2 einer dreiteiligen Miniserie über das Gebärdensprachdolmetschen. Nachdem wir uns in der ersten Folge vor allem in Schottland umgeschaut haben, geht es diesmal nach Deutschland.

[Musik: "Love, love, peace, peace"]

Ich weiß nicht, wie’s euch geht, aber ich bin eigentlich kein großer Fan des Eurovision Song Contest. An den ESC 2016 in Stockholm aber kann ich mich noch ganz gut erinnern. Er war in vielerlei Hinsicht denkwürdig: Mit „Heroes“ hatte Vorjahressieger Måns Zelmerlöw die Großveranstaltung in seine schwedische Heimat geholt, die er zusammen mit Petra Mede auch selbst moderierte.

Der Siegertitel der ukrainischen Sängerin Jamala war schon im Vorfeld politisch heftig umstritten. Und das Schlusslicht der Beiträge bildete einmal mehr: Deutschland. Ganz vorn dabei allerdings war Deutschland in Sachen Sprache und Inklusion.

[Musik: "Love, love, peace, peace"]

„Na ja den Eurovision Song Contest hatte ich zusammen mit zwei ganz großartigen Kollegen aus Hamburg gemacht. Die ganze Sendung ist so viereinhalb, fast fünf Stunde; es war der Wahnsinn. Es gab weltweit keinen einzigen zweiten Anbieter, der neben diesem Angebot aus Stockholm, die das in International Sign gemacht haben… Der NDR war der einzige Sender weltweit, der das nochmal mit einer nationalen Gebärdensprache, also einer tatsächlichen Sprache, nochmal angeboten hat. Das hat weltweit kein anderer Sender gemacht oder sich getraut.“

[Musik: Scott Holmes - "Positive and Fun"]

Darf ich vorstellen? Die deutsche Gebärdensprachdolmetscherin Laura Schwengber. In Sachen Gebärdensprache und Musik in Deutschland ist Laura eine echte Koryphäe. Aber fangen wir mal am Anfang an. Laura ist Ossi, so wie ich. Sie kommt aus dem Spreewald. Aus Lübben, um ganz genau zu sein.

„Ich bin Spreewälderin, ganz ursprünglich auch, ein Teil meines Herzens hängt da auch immer noch. Also ich hab da immer noch gute Freunde, Oma wohnt da noch. Der Spreewald ist immer so ein bisschen dabei und als echte Spreewälderin hat man halt auch immer so Sachen wie anständiges Mückenspray dabei. Ich komme aus Lübben und wir sind sehr stolz darauf, dass Lübben die Kreisstadt ist. Und wir haben ein paar ganz nette Sachen für Touris und da kann man auf jeden Fall mal hinfahren. Also viele von denen die irgendwie da noch wohnen, die fahren tatsächlich ganz selten in Urlaub sondern irgendwie ins nächste Dorf nebenan und nehmen sich da ein Zimmer, weil es einfach so schön ist da. Wenn das Wetter passt ist das echt großartig. Schönes Fleckchen Erde.“

Schon im Kindergarten ging Laura zur musikalischen Früherziehung, allerdings nicht unbedingt so gern:

„weil die immer so gelegen war, dass ich aufstehen musste vom Mittagsschlaf, ganz unangenehm! Das geht gar nicht, liebe Musikschullehrer, macht das nicht!“

Aber Laura hat sich nicht abschrecken lassen und blieb dran. Sie spielte Instrumente,

„Dann wollte ich unbedingt Saxofon spielen, aber das Saxofon war leider größer als ich, deswegen musste ich Blockflöte spielen.“

turnte, begann zu tanzen und wollte dann auch noch Gesangsunterricht nehmen. Aber da kam von ihren Eltern der Einspruch:

„Kind, ich glaube es reicht, ich glaube, du singst mal unter der Dusche weiter. Und ich wollte das so unbedingt machen, dass ich gesagt, gar kein Problem: Dann suche ich mir halt einen Job. Und hatte dann noch'n Termin in der Woche mehr, aber dann konnte ich halt den Gesangsunterricht selber bezahlen.“

Bei so einer musisch geprägten Kindheit würde man einen klar vorgezeichneten Berufsweg erwarten. Zumindest ging es Laura so:

„Es war so vorgezeichnet. Es war nach der Grundschule ganz klar: Ich gehe ans Gymnasium. Und es war nach dem Gymnasium total klar, ich mache Abitur. Es war auch völlig klar, dass Laura studieren geht. War aber andersherum auch klar, dass wenn ich in keinem meiner Instrumente so gut bin, dass ich's studieren kann, fällt es aus als Beruf. Geht nich. Ne Beamtentochter. Geht nicht. Also musste ich mir dann was anderes einfallen lassen quasi. Und bin dann echt lang gestrauchelt. Das war schon bestimmt 'n Jahr, so letztes Jahr Abiturphase, wo ich echt nicht wusste, wohin mit mir danach.“

Wie schön, wenn man bei so einer Durststrecke einen richtig guten Freund wie Edi hat!

„Also nachdem ich dann so gar nicht wusste, was ich machen soll, habe ich sehr lange und oft mit meinem bis heute noch besten Freund gesprochen. Und Edi ist jetzt seit 15 Jahren ungefähr taub und blind, ist aber sehend und hörend geboren. Es war ein ganz gesundes Kind und ist ganz normal aufgewachsen und hat durch eine Erbkrankheit seinen Sehsinn und seinen Hörsinn verloren. Und gerade in der Zeit, in der das akut wurde, haben wir uns kennengelernt. Und weil das relativ schnell so war, dass es genervt hat, als wir gespielt haben, wir waren beide irgendwie acht und zwölf, also echt Kinder, haben wir einfach angefangen, uns so Sprachen auszudenken, irgendwelche Zeichen, Symbole für Buchstaben. Also ich habe ihm einmal auf dem Kopf auf den Kopf geklopft: das war der i-Punkt fürs I. Einmal Finger auf'n Mund war das M. Nase war das N. Und so Sachen, die man sich einfach leicht merken kann, und die irgendwie easy auszuführen sind. Und er war dann derjenige, der gesagt hat: Merkste eigentlich was?“

„Lern’ doch mal 'ne richtige Sprache“, schlug Edi vor. Genau das hat Laura dann auch gemacht.

„Ich habe quasi ein Au-Pair-Jahr in Gehörlosistan gemacht.“

Richtig. In Berlin war Laura auf der Suche nach Kursen für Gebärdensprache fündig geworden. Aber die über 80 km von Lübben in die Hauptstadt will man ja nicht unbedingt zwei Mal täglich zurücklegen. Eine Wohnung musste her!

„Da war ich dann zum Glück wirklich zur richtigen Zeit am richtigen Ort und habe eine Familie gefunden, die taube Eltern hat und hörende Kinder. Immer morgens hat mich die Mutter geweckt, und hat mir halt in Gebärdensprache erzählt, wann, wo, wie ich die Kinder abholen soll, wer welche Sachen machen muss und wer wohin gebracht werden muss. Und am Anfang war das immer so, oh Gott, oh Gott, kannst du das aufschreiben? Die war knallhart. 'Du bist hier zum Sprachenlernen, ich sage es noch mal. Ich erzähl dir das so lange, bis du's verstanden hast.' Und das hat am Anfang echt lange gedauert. Aber die war cool. Die waren echt auf Zack. Ja, so hab ich echt unheimlich schnell gelernt. Das war echt großartig.“

[Musik: Ryan Andersen - Sweet Life]

Ein echter Sprung ins kalte Wasser. Mitten in Gehörlosistan.

Dabei ist es für viele Hörende, die anfangen, deutsche Gebärdensprache zu lernen, gar nicht so einfach, Anschluss an die Community zu finden. Ist ja eigentlich auch klar: Als Hörende sind wir nämlich „gebärdensprachbehindert“. Das fängt schon dabei an, dass viele, mich eingeschlossen, gar nicht so gut Bescheid wissen über, nein, nicht Zeichensprache, sondern: Gebärdensprache. Daher an dieser Stelle ein kleiner Exkurs.

Stichwort: Deutsche Gebärdensprache, kurz: DGS. Die Deutsche Gebärdensprache wird in Deutschland und Luxemburg von rund 80.000 Gehörlosen und etwa 120.000 Hörenden bzw. Schwerhörigen gesprochen. Die DGS gehört u.a. mit ihrem polnischen Pendant zur Familie der deutschen Gebärdensprachen und unterscheidet sich damit deutlich von der Deutschschweizer und der Österreichischen Gebärdensprache. Die gehören ihrerseits interessanterweise zur französischen Gebärdensprachfamilie.
Eines hat die DGS aber mit so gut wie allen anderen Gebärdensprachen gemeinsam: die langjährige Unterdrückung. Über Oralismus habe ich ja in Folge 1 dieser LangFM-Miniserie schon einiges erzählt, bspw. über die Mailänder Konferenz. Gerade in den Schulen wurde das Gebärden zum Teil strengstens unterdrückt. Die Eltern wurden dazu gedrängt, mit ihren gehörlosen oder schwerhörigen Kindern nur in Lautsprache zu kommunizieren. In den letzten Jahrzehnten, und gerade seit dem Behindertengleichstellungsgesetz 2002, hat sich aber in Deutschland schon einiges getan. Zumindest offiziell ist die DGS als eigenständige Sprache anerkannt. Menschen mit Hör- bzw. Sprachbehinderungen haben das Recht, DGS, Gebärden oder sogenannte „andere geeignete Kommunikationshilfen“ zu verwenden. Das passiert dann bspw. bei Arztbesuchen.

„Da hat 'ne gehörlose Frau 'nen ganz schönen Begriff dazu geprägt. Die hat gesagt, naja, eigentlich würfeln wir Gehörlose den ganzen Tag. Wir verlassen uns immer darauf, dass der Dolmetscher, dem wir heute unser Leben darlegen, weil er mit zum Arzt kommt, weil der meine Kinder kennt, weil der im Zweifel auch mal bei mir im Wohnzimmer sitzt, dass der morgen noch da ist. Keine Ahnung, weiß ich nicht, vielleicht hat der morgen Bock, was anderes zu machen. Und das ist dieses Würfeln, fand ich ein ganz schönes Bild dafür, dass das Vertrauen, das wir da genießen, unheimlich hoch ist, und dass man das sehr, sehr wertschätzen muss, damit sehr, sehr achtsam umgehen muss, das finde ich ganz wichtig.“

Aber Moment mal: Wie ist Laura jetzt vom Gebärdensprachlernen zum Dolmetschen gekommen?

„Ich hab schon in den Kursen gedacht, ich habe total Bock irgendwas mit der Sprache zu arbeiten. Ich hatte großartige Lehrer, die waren irgendwie einfach gut drauf. Ich habe dann irgendwann angefangen, in der Gebärdensprachschule zu arbeiten, weil die Assistenten gesucht haben, die so ans Telefon gehen und mal irgendwie 'ne Email Korrektur lesen, Arbeitsassistent nennt man das. Weil Deutsch für viele Gehörlose eine Fremdsprache ist. Ich dachte irgendwann: Ich will in dieser Sprache arbeiten, aber nur Arbeitsassistenz war so ein Punkt, nee, hier möchte ich eigentlich nicht stehen bleiben. Ich war ja auch erst 21. Ich hatte ja an Ausbildung oder so noch nichts gemacht. Mir war klar, da kommt noch irgendwas.“

Nach einigem Überlegen und einigen Anläufen meldete sich dann die Humboldt-Universität in Berlin...

„und sagte Frau Schwengber Sie Haben sich doch da damals mal beworben. Ja, da wäre jetzt ein Platz frei. Und dann bin ich allerdings nicht ins Lehramt, sondern in die Deaf Studies gerutscht, das ist Sprache und Kultur der Gehörlosengemeinschaft … was total großartig ist für die Sprachbildung ist, dass fast alle Dozenten taub sind und man am Anfang noch einen Dolmetscher hat. Irgendwann sitzt der Dolmetscher nur noch da, falls man wirklich den Faden verliert, dann kann man den fragen. Das macht man natürlich bei 15 Leuten im Semester nicht so oft. Und relativ schnell sitzt da einfach kein Dolmetscher mehr. Und wenn man dann halt Soziologie nicht in Gebärdensprache versteht, in der Fremdsprache, dann sollte man schleunigst irgendwie was tun. Und dadurch wird man aber einfach sehr schnell sehr gut. Der Druck ist unheimlich hoch, aber es lohnt sich unterm Strich total. Ich bin dann aber nicht in den Master, sondern habe die staatliche Prüfungen gemacht zum Dolmetscher. Ich bin quasi - diese klassische Dolmetschausbildung, die habe ich quasi übersprungen, weil ich während des Studiums schon sehr sehr viel einfach gemacht habe für Kollegen, für ehemalige Kollegen, für Freunde, und ich immer gesagt habe, wenn ich schon rausgehe und irgendwie, ja, mehr oder weniger dolmetsche, dann kann ich mich auch mal vor eine Prüfungskommission stellen und die fragen, ob ich das überhaupt machen sollte, weil ich's kann oder nicht kann. Und als die dann sagten, ja, Frau Schwengber, sie können das, bestanden, hier ist ihr Zeugnis, hab ich natürlich auch diesen Master nicht mehr studiert.“

So wurde Laura also zur Gebärdensprachdolmetscherin. Und das zu einem guten Zeitpunkt. Die Nachfrage nach qualifizierten DGS-Sprachmittlern steigt nämlich. Wer einmal mit einem Profi gearbeitet hat, muss sich zukünftig nicht mehr allein durchwursteln oder ein Familienmitglied mitbringen, sondern kann sich auf eine professionelle Dolmetscherin verlassen. Zumal die Krankenkasse die Kosten dafür übernimmt. Wer jetzt aber denkt, dass man Gebärdensprachdolmetscher nur in Arztpraxen oder Amtsstuben antrifft, ist auf dem Holzweg:

„Dadurch dass wir eben doch alles Generalisten sind, und kaum einer von uns sich auf einen wirklich speziellen Bereich spezialisiert, sondern ich morgens bei einer Teamsitzung sitze in einer Firma, die technische Bohrer herstellt, und am nächsten Tag beim Arzt sitze, da geht es irgendwie vielleicht um eine Krebsdiagnose, und am übernächsten Tag dolmetsche ich Biounterricht im Abitur. Das ist total unterschiedlich. Also nicht immer, aber habe ich so das Gefühl mit mehr Kollegen werden auch die Auftragsvielfalt und auch die Auftragsdichte wesentlich höher, und natürlich dadurch, dass es mittlerweile Institutionen gibt die sagen: Wir machen eine öffentliche Veranstaltung. Selbstverständlich muss die so barrierefrei wie möglich sein! Und egal, ob sich da jetzt, also es muss sich keiner anmelden. Warum sollen sich die Gehörlosen anmelden? Das wäre eine Diskriminierung. Das machen wir nicht. Dolmetscher sind da. Und wenn kein Gehörloser da ist, wir haben Dolmetscher und dann ist's OK. Das heißt natürlich auf der einen Seite, es werden in Einsätzen Kräfte gebunden, wo eigentlich in dem Moment akut kein Gehörloser ist. Auf der anderen Seite ist es für die Öffentlichkeitsarbeit natürlich bombastisch, wenn einfach Dolmetscher da sind. Allein für den Beruf ist das natürlich toll, und es gibt uns natürlich auch die Möglichkeit, in Einsätzen wo jetzt mal doch kein Gehörloser ist, wo wir natürlich trotzdem dolmetschen. Klar, wir werden bezahlt fürs Arbeiten, also machen wir es dann auch. Haben wir haben natürlich in den Pausen, wo dann eben kein Gehörloser da ist, der die klassische Mittagspause nutzen möchte, um mit Hörenden zu kommunizieren, was sie natürlich auch möchten; da haben wir dann eben Zeit, einfach die klassischen Fragen zu beantworten: Ist Gebärdensprache eigentlich international? Wo studiert man das, wie macht man das? Mensch, meine Tochter, oder ich selber, oder… Das ist großartig. Also ab und zu so ein Einsatz ist echt, ich feier’ die sehr.“

[Musik: Podington Bear - 60s Quiz Show]

Herzlich willkommen zu einer neuen Runde Gebärdensprache-Bullshit-Bingo! Auch heute haben wir wieder einen bunten Blumenstrauß von Missverständnissen und falschen Vorstellungen für Sie zusammengestellt:

  • [Ping] „Zeichensprache!“ [Buzzer] „Zeichen sind quasi willkürliche Zeichen die jeder machen kann, so wie Gesten, und Gebärden sind eben festgelegt. Ist so ein bisschen wie Wörter. In der deutschen Sprache kann ich ja auch nicht irgendwelche Laute erfinden und sagen, das heißt jetzt Baum! So, das kann ich machen, versteht halt keiner.“
  • [Ping] „Lippenlesen!“ [Buzzer] „Das, was wir unter Lippenlesen verstehen ist so, dass zumindest im Deutschen man nur 30 Prozent ablesen kann, weil einfach das Verhältnis aus den Lauten, die wir machen im Deutschen und den Mundbildern, also das, was die Lippen an unterschiedlichen Bewegungen machen, beim Sprechen nur zulässt, dass 30 Prozent unterschiedliche Bilder dabei rauskommen. Der Rest ist einfach so weit hinten im Kehlkopf und so weit hinten im Mund, das sieht man nicht. Das ist nicht da. Das kann jeder mal ausprobieren, wenn man die Wörter Mutter und Butter sagt. “
  • [Ping] „Toll, da können Sie ja international mit allen Gebärdensprache sprechen!“ [Buzzer] Es gibt nicht die eine internationale Gebärdensprache. Warum sollte es anders sein als bei den gesprochenen Sprachen. Was es allerdings sehr wohl gibt ist „International Sign, das ist quasi eine Form, die sich mehr auf so bildhafte Elemente der Gebärdensprache bezieht. Jeder hat vielleicht so ein Bild im Kopf von so zwei Händen am Lenkrad oder so zwei Händen, die so ein Spitzdach bieten, wie Haus. Das sind im Deutschen 30 Prozent, und es gibt halt einige Gebärden weltweit, auf die man sich so geeinigt hat und wo man so ähnliche Bilder draus bauen kann, so dass sie eben weltweit verstanden werden.“

[Musik]

„Ich glaube ganz oft kommt es sehr viel mehr auf das an was so zwischen den Ohren passiert, als das, was vorne rauskommt.“

[Pause]

Spannend ist aber auch, was IN die Ohren REINkommt. Musik zum Beispiel. Haben Gehörlose eigentlich was von Musik?

„Es gab irgendwann ein Seminar der Uni, das hieß ‚Alternative Formen der Gebärdensprachverwendung‘. Und eine oder zwei Wochen davon haben wir uns damit beschäftigt, wie man Musik gebärden kann, und jeder von uns sollte mal so gebärden. Laura war einfach sehr schlecht drauf. Ich fand alles doof, und dann war ich dran und musste mein Lied vorstellen, und das war Tim Bendzko.

[Musik: “Nur noch kurz die Welt retten“]

"Danach dachte ich, wenn ich jetzt irgendwen retten muss, der ist leider verloren, tut mir Leid. Und dann hab ich dieses blöde Lied gemacht, und war froh, als ich fertig war, hab noch alle angeblöfft, wie, ihr filmt das hier. Alle haben irgendwie gefilmt, und ganz toll, und auch ein schönes Projekt. Ging gar nicht. Wochen vorher fand ich es noch großartig; an diesem Tag einfach nicht. Und eine Woche später ruft mich meine Kommilitonin an, sagt: Du Laura, ich hab mal deine Adresse weitergegeben. Was, ja, OK. Dann kriege ich eine Facebook-Nachricht, eine Facebook-Nachricht, von einer Volontärin vom NRD, die sagte, ich bin hier NDR tralala. Und ich las das und dachte: bestimmt schreibt der Norddeutsche Rundfunk seine Leute per Facebook an! Das glaubste ja selber nicht. Und hab dann weitergelesen. Und dann waren die für den Tag der Gehörlosen - das ist immer am letzten Wochenende im September - haben die jemanden gesucht, der Musik in Gebärdensprache übersetzt, und meine Kommilitonen hatte mich empfohlen, weil sie Tim Bendzko so toll fanden von mir. Ich dachte bis zum Schluss, dass funktioniert nicht, aber eh wir machen das mal. Und innerhalb von einer Woche oder so hatten wir die ersten hunderttausend Klicks bei YouTube. Und ich war völlig so: was, Moment. Ah, das kann schiefgehen. Oh ja, ich verstehe, ich hatte das komplett unterschätzt, was für eine Reichweite einfach mal der Norddeutsche Rundfunk hat, und dann natürlich die ARD und so weiter. Klar. Und ich wurde komplett überfahren.“

Das war der Anfang von etwas ganz Großem. Inzwischen hat Laura mit dem Norddeutschen Rundfunk über 80 Videos produziert, in denen sie Musik nach Gehörlosistan bringt. Ein, zwei Mal im Jahr werden neue Clips gedreht. Laura bekommt vorher die Texte, kann sich damit intensiv vorbereiten. Und der NDR kümmert sich inzwischen darum, dass auch die Plattenfirmen mitspielen. Schaut euch die Videos einfach mal an - Links findet ihr in den Show-Notes für diese Podcast-Folge, auf www.langfm.audio. Aber zurück zum NDR. Und zur Musik. NDR? Musik? Eurovision Song Contest!

„Der NDR ist ja der zuständige Sender auch für den Eurovision Song Contest für Deutschland. Und die sind auf mich zugekommen und haben gesagt, Mensch Laura, du bist unsere Frau für die Musik. Mach mal! Hast du da Zeit? Wenn du keine hast, dann nimm dir mal welche! Es war echt ein unheimlich schönes Erlebnis. Wir hatten die Technikproben zusammen. Wir durften diese unendlich geheime Jury-Sitzung gucken, die immer freitagabends läuft, die durften wir zur Generalprobe nutzen. Und saßen da ganz andächtig im Studio und waren so: wow! Für den ESC habe ich, ich glaube vier Wochen vorher, so die offizielle Pressemappe bekommen. Da sind quasi die Infos drin, aus denen auch die Moderatoren ihre Teaser schneiden und so Sachen. Und alle Liedtexte, wenn sie nicht schon auf Englisch sind oder auf Englisch übersetzt, und eben auch in der Originalsprache, so dass man auch eine Vergleichsmöglichkeit hat. Zum Beispiel die Sachen auf Französisch - ich hatte Französisch in der Schule, das ging dann ganz gut, dass ich dann zumindest aus dem Hören auch wirklich noch mich orientieren konnte - es gab andere Songs da - keine Ahnung was sie gerade singen… Ich sage das, was im Text steht. Ich hoffe, ihr haltet euch an euren Text. Sonst erzähle ich gerade was anderes als ihr. Das wäre schlecht. Ansonsten war das vor allem ganz, ganz viel immer wieder Hören. Also, ich kann auch fast alle Texte immer noch auswendig. Wenn die so kommen, kann ich auch ohne Probleme mitsingen. Wir wussten bis Donnerstag Abend auch nicht, wer Samstag im Finale steht. Also, wir haben, ich vielmehr, hab halt 50 Lieder vorbereitet, hab dann Freitagabend noch den Song von Justin Timberlake und dieses Love Love, Peace Peace was sie da noch haben. Und es war echt echt schön. Und die haben halt auch einfach so coole Sachen gemacht wie: Es gab dann die Abschlussparty mit Jamie-Lee Kriewitz und so. Und wir waren einfach als Dolmetscher mit eingeladen und es war so eine Geste von: Ihr seid nicht irgendwie die komischen Leute, die da immer am Rand stehen und irgendwie so fuchteln und düdü machen und sieht schon ganz schön aus. Aber jetzt wissen wir, dass Gebärdensprache nicht international ist, und jetzt dürft ihr eigentlich auch gehen, sondern wir waren einfach Teil des Teams. Das war echt, also das war schöner als jede Rechnung stellen oder so. Es war einfach wirklich toll. Wenn mich meine Oma anruft, dann muss schon echt was passiert sein. Und Oma hat angerufen!

Ob Tommy Krångh im Jahr zuvor auch einen Anruf von seiner Oma bekommen hat, weiß ich nicht. Auf jeden Fall kam seine Gebärdensprachverdolmetschung des Eurovision Song Contest 2015 im schwedischen Fernsehen auch super an. (Wir erinnern uns: damals gewann Tommys Landsmann Måns Zelmerlöw mit „Heroes“.) Inzwischen gibt es aber auch viele andere Musikgenres, in denen sich Gebärdensprachdolmetscher engagieren: sei es beim Kölner Karneval, bei Hip Hop von Eminem, dem Musical Hamilton oder einfach nur bei Weihnachtsmusik. Jede Jeck ist eben anders!

Damit das mit dem Dolmetschen gut klappt, ist gerade bei Live-Konzerten gute Vorbereitung besonders wichtig:

"Also für ein Konzert ist für die Band die Vorbereitung sogar für mich eigentlich relativ simpel. Ich brauche einen Quadratmeter auf der Bühne - je mehr Platz, je schöner wird’s. Dann muss ich was hören. Am liebsten ist mir so ein In-Ear-Monitoring mit Kopfhörern und einem kleinen Kasten am Gürtel, und ein Scheinwerfer. Ansonsten brauche ich die Setlist, und wenn die Songs online sind oder man sie so einfach besorgen kann, dann funktioniert, dann reicht das eigentlich schon. Manche versorgen mich einfach mit so Alben und so. Es war total cool. Ann-Mai Kantareit hat mir einfach mal ein Paket geschickt mit ihrem kompletten Merchandising-Material inklusive aller Alben. Das war der Hammer! Ich habe dieses Ding von der Post abgeholt und war so: Was ist das? Schicken die den Sänger mit? Was ist da drin?“

So richtig angefangen mit dem Live-Musik-Dolmetschen hat das bei Laura mit der Band Keimzeit. Genauer gesagt mit einem Keimzeit-Fan:

„Da hab ich auch ne Nachricht einfach gekriegt: Hallo Laura, hier ist Maren, möchtest du mit Keimzeit auf Tour gehen? Ich kannte also von Keimzeit einen Song und Maren kannte ich gar nicht. Und Maren war letztendlich ein spät ertaubter Fan von Keimzeit, die gesagt hat: Ich würde gerne weiter mit meinen Freunden jedes Jahr zu eurem Abschlusskonzert kommen, aber alles was ihr neu komponiert habt, damit kann ich so gar nichts mehr anfangen. Und ihr seid nicht Rammstein. Es gibt nicht genug zu gucken, als dass es sich dafür lohnt. Macht mal was! Das ist eine Band die ganz, ganz stark über das Akustische funktioniert, und ist keine, die tanzen nicht, die machen keine Salti auf der Bühne, die klingen einfach sehr, sehr geil. Deswegen haben die dann gesagt: Gut, dann probieren wir es mal so. Und dann hat es aber nochmal zwei Jahre gedauert, bis es wirklich geklappt hat. Weil die ganz viele Veranstalter angefragt haben, die Veranstalter aber gesagt haben: Boah, geile Idee, aber vielleicht nicht bei mir. Die Konzerte waren ohnehin ausverkauft oder zumindest immer gut gefüllt. Warum sollten sie was am Konzept ändern? Und dann auch noch so jemand wie aus der Tagesschau. Das passt ja gar nicht. Und dann kommen da die Behinderten, und dann kommen vielleicht die Normalen nicht mehr. Wer weiß? Und dann war es irgendwann der Veranstalter aus dem Kesselhaus in Berlin, der gesagt hat: Ja, wenn euch das so wichtig ist, dann macht es halt, um Gottes Willen, aber sagt es vorher bloß keinem. Und dann habe ich ein Video gemacht, in Gebärdensprache, ohne Untertitel. Der Titel hat nicht verraten, worum es im Video ging. Und es war nicht vertont. Also, wer keine Gebärdensprache konnte, der hat es nicht verstanden. Und der Wandel war aber echt schon so nach den ersten zwei, drei Songs, dass dann der Veranstalter zum Management ging und sagte, ey, aber die bringt ihr nächstes Jahr wieder mit, oder?“

Ich wollte aber von Laura schon wissen, ob so viel Aufmerksamkeit nicht auch manchmal komisch ist?

„Das ist super, ist total großartig. Was besseres kann uns doch gar nicht passieren als Leute, die über den Beruf reden. Leute wissen nichts. Woher? Was man ihnen nicht erzählt, das können sie nicht wissen, und deswegen müssen wir einfach gucken, dass wir so viele Leute wie möglich haben, die Menschen Sachen erzählen; am besten Sachen, die stimmen und deswegen kann einem eigentlich nichts Besseres passieren als sowas wie, was weiß ich, die Mandela-Beerdigung in Südafrika. Die haben unendlich gute Kollegen vor Ort, die auch international ausgebildet sind. Aber da haben sie leider ein Exemplar erwischt… Das war doch etwas kurios. Es hat immer zwei Seiten, wenn der Dolmetscher selber im Mittelpunkt steht ist. Zum einen glaube ich, dass es für den Beruf total wichtig ist. Zum anderen muss es aber immer so eine Balance halten zu: Über was spreche ich? Also wenn ich als Dolmetscher übers Gebärdensprachdolmetschen erzähle, großartig, her damit. Aber wenn ich als Dolmetscher eingeladen bin, um über Gebärdensprache zu reden, ist das immer nur die Perspektive von mir auf meine Arbeitssprache. Aber dann ist es nie die Perspektive von mir auf meine Kultur, auf meine Muttersprache, auf meine Sicht auf die Gebärdensprache. Ich glaube, dass wir in dieser ganzen Debatte um Gebärdensprache nicht vergessen dürfen, dass es da Experten gibt, die das einfach schon ein bisschen länger machen als wir, und die einfach unheimlich gut Bescheid wissen. Klar ist es auch für den Veranstalter, ja es kostet Geld, einen Dolmetscher zu beauftragen, den ich brauche, damit ich mit einem gehörlosen Gast auf dem Podium diskutieren kann. Na klar, und ich muss erst mal einen Dolmetscher finden, und der Aufwand ist höher. Aber ich glaube letztendlich, dass der Output wesentlich beeindruckender ist, wenn da ein Gehörloser sitzt und einfach die Hände hebt und erzählt, als wenn da ein Dolmetscher sitzt und sagt, na ja, wir gestikulieren auch viel, aber es ist dann doch etwas anderes.“

[Musik: Ryan Andersen - Clarity]

Vielen Dank an Laura für ihren Bericht aus Gehörlosistan! Ich hoffe, euch hat das Zuhören bei dieser zweiten Folge meiner Miniserie übers Gebärdensprachdolmetschen so viel Spaß gemacht wie mir die Produktion. Ich habe jedenfalls unheimlich viel gelernt, auch über Inklusion.

„Ich glaube, das ist so der Spirit von Inklusion, den wir gerade haben, den ich total schön finde, das ist halt nicht mehr so: Das muss alles irgendwie ein gefördertes Projekt. Man muss einen Förderantrag stellen für die armen Behinderten, sondern lasst das mal machen, das ist echt. Da müssen wir hin. Inklusion muss ‚Ey, das ist cool, lass uns das mal machen’ sein.“

Dem gibt es nichts hinzuzufügen. Wir hören uns dann beim nächsten Mal - ich spreche mit Stephan Barrère, einem Gebärdensprachdolmetscher aus Frankreich. A bientôt !

„Dass sich der Sänger mal versingt, ich mal eine Vokabel umdrehe oder plötzlich doch mal im Dunkeln stehe, der Schlagzeuger irgendwie seinen Stick wegwirft - also darum geht's doch bei Live-Konzerten. Dass man im Publikum auch mal steht und denkt, höhö, du auch nur mit Wasser, das ist ja toll! Und ich bin irgendwann bei so einer Choreographie angekommen, die nichts mehr von diesem Live-Gefühl hat, dann kann ich darauf zum einen ganz ganz schlecht reagieren und zum anderen finde ich, ist es auch unfair den Gehörlosen gegenüber, weil, wenn die so'n vorbereitetes Ding kriegen, dann können sie sich ja auch 'n Musikvideo angucken. Deswegen bin ich Simultan-Dolmetscher geworden, die erste Übersetzung ist meistens eine schöne.“

Apr 26 2018

27mins

Play

Sign of the times I - Scotland

Podcast cover
Read more
The Story of the BSL (Scotland) Bill
This episode is part of a mini-series on sign language interpreting, a topic I have become increasingly fascinated by in recent years. In the same time, sign language interpreting has moved more into public awareness, including within our profession. AIIC, the international association of conference interpreters, now has members working with sign language. The European Parliament has become involved, as you heard in episode 28 of LangFM, about the EUsigns conference. And more and more countries are upgrading the status of their national sign languages.

Full transcript and further reading: https://www.adrechsel.de/langfm/the-story-of-the-bsl-scotland-bill

Feb 20 2018

45mins

Play

Der Einfluss der Digitalisierung auf das Konferenzdolmetschen (Vortrag)

Podcast cover
Read more
Am 11. Dezember 2017 habe ich bei der traditionellen Montagskonferenz des Heidelberger Dolmetscherinstituts (http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/neuphil/iask/sued/aktuelles/montagskonferenz.html) einen Vortrag über die Rolle von Technik und...
Am 11. Dezember 2017 habe ich bei der traditionellen Montagskonferenz des Heidelberger Dolmetscherinstituts (http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/neuphil/iask/sued/aktuelles/montagskonferenz.html) einen Vortrag über die Rolle von Technik und Technologie im Konferenzdolmetschen gehalten. Dies hier ist der Mitschnitt, ohne die anschließende Fragerunde.

Jan 15 2018

49mins

Play

Live at TC39: New Frontiers in Interpreting Technology

Podcast cover
Read more
On 17 November 2017, Danielle D’Hayer, Anja Rütten, Joshua Goldsmith, Marcin Feder, Barry Olsen and yours truly organised a panel discussion at the 39th “Translating And The Computer” Conference in London. We discussed many aspects of technology use...
On 17 November 2017, Danielle D’Hayer, Anja Rütten, Joshua Goldsmith, Marcin Feder, Barry Olsen and yours truly organised a panel discussion at the 39th “Translating And The Computer” Conference in London. We discussed many aspects of technology use in interpreting. More info here: http://adrechsel.de/dolmetschblog/tc39

Nov 29 2017

1hr 7mins

Play

35: Viva Las Vienna, mit Dagmar & Judy Jenner

Podcast cover
Read more
Konferenzschaltung mit Dagmar Jenner in Wien und Judy Jenner in Las Vegas - Ich plaudere mit den beiden über ihre Familiengeschichte, ihre Arbeit und vieles mehr. Show notes & Transkript:...

Links

Musik

Oct 17 2017

1hr 1min

Play

34: My Chat With Matt Baird, The Bolder Translator

Podcast cover
Read more
Matt Baird is a US-born and Germany-based translator and copywriter with many interesting stories to tell. Matt also hosts the podcast of the American Translators Association. Tune in to find out how Matt got interested in learning German, about his...
Matt Baird is a US-born and Germany-based translator and copywriter with many interesting stories to tell. Matt also hosts the podcast of the American Translators Association. Tune in to find out how Matt got interested in learning German, about his many hops across the pond and how he almost got sucked into the Washington beltway bubble.
Show notes: adrechsel.de/langfm/matt-baird

Jul 25 2017

31mins

Play

33: Exploring Irish with Susan Folan

Podcast cover
Read more
Irish is an old-fashioned language that nobody speaks? Wrong! Susan Folan, EU-accredited interpreter for English and Irish tells me about the role of that wonderful Gaelic language in Ireland and the EU.
Show notes and transcript:...
Irish is an old-fashioned language that nobody speaks? Wrong! Susan Folan, EU-accredited interpreter for English and Irish tells me about the role of that wonderful Gaelic language in Ireland and the EU.
Show notes and transcript: https://adrechsel.de/langfm/susan

May 03 2017

20mins

Play

32: Brian Fox, A Life In Interpreting

Podcast cover
Read more
This episode was special for me: I had the chance to sit down for a chat with Brian Fox. Just weeks after his retirement, Brian looks back at a long and rich career in SCIC, the interpreting service of the European Commission, both as an interpreter...
This episode was special for me: I had the chance to sit down for a chat with Brian Fox. Just weeks after his retirement, Brian looks back at a long and rich career in SCIC, the interpreting service of the European Commission, both as an interpreter and in various roles in administration. We chat about his personal background, how he got into foreign languages and interpreting, his various roles in SCIC, the development of interpreting (including remote) and the future of our profession.

Apr 05 2017

45mins

Play

31: Paola Gentile and the status of interpreters

Podcast cover
Read more
What do interpreters think about themselves and their profession? Do male and female interpreters have different opinions? And what do conference interpreters think about their public service peers? Italian interpreter and researcher Paola Gentile,...
What do interpreters think about themselves and their profession? Do male and female interpreters have different opinions? And what do conference interpreters think about their public service peers? Italian interpreter and researcher Paola Gentile, PhD has crunched the data and tells us all about it.

Feb 22 2017

18mins

Play

30: Voice, personality, vocal fry, as Rebecca Gausnell returns

Podcast cover
Read more
Rebecca Gausnell is back! After a wonderful chat in episode 23 (embedded below), we chat about what she's been up to since working on Berlin Station. And we dive deep into standard and neutral accents and debunk the "vocal fry" myth. Listen in!
Full...
Rebecca Gausnell is back! After a wonderful chat in episode 23 (embedded below), we chat about what she's been up to since working on Berlin Station. And we dive deep into standard and neutral accents and debunk the "vocal fry" myth. Listen in!
Full show notes at: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/rebecca2

Dec 08 2016

22mins

Play

29: Unterwegs nach Neuseeland - mit Karoline Spießl

Podcast cover
Read more
In dieser deutschsprachigen Folge von LangFM begleite ich meinen Gast, Karoline Spießl, auf ihrem Weg vom Studium in Deutschland nach Schottland bis auf die andere Seite des Planeten: Neuseeland, wo Karoline heute als freiberufliche Übersetzerin und...
In dieser deutschsprachigen Folge von LangFM begleite ich meinen Gast, Karoline Spießl, auf ihrem Weg vom Studium in Deutschland nach Schottland bis auf die andere Seite des Planeten: Neuseeland, wo Karoline heute als freiberufliche Übersetzerin und Dolmetscherin lebt und arbeitet.
Full show notes and credits: https://www.adrechsel.de/langfm/karoline-spiessl
[ u9gi7qyn35onb6byoq3jtf8rj79f4hxmiKsoN7v ]

Nov 14 2016

19mins

Play

28: EUsigns conference report

Podcast cover
Read more
28 September 2016 is a special day. Hundreds of deaf people and dozens of sign language interpreters from all over Europe and even Japan gather in Brussels for a truly unique event: a conference on "Multilingualism and equal rights in the EU: the role...
28 September 2016 is a special day. Hundreds of deaf people and dozens of sign language interpreters from all over Europe and even Japan gather in Brussels for a truly unique event: a conference on "Multilingualism and equal rights in the EU: the role of sign languages". This is my report.
FULL TRANSCRIPT and show notes: www.adrechsel.de/langfm/eusigns

Oct 06 2016

15mins

Play

27: Katerina Strani

Podcast cover
Read more
Katerina Strani was born in Thessaloniki, studied in Brussels and Moscow and now lives and works in Edinburgh. She translates and interprets from French and Russian into English and Greek. Oh, and not only does she hold a PhD on Communicative...
Katerina Strani was born in Thessaloniki, studied in Brussels and Moscow and now lives and works in Edinburgh. She translates and interprets from French and Russian into English and Greek. Oh, and not only does she hold a PhD on Communicative Rationality in the Public Sphere, she also managed to translate (!) her research into two comedy stand-up routines. Listen to the latest episode of LangFM to get the full picture!
Show notes and more at http://adrechsel.de/langfm/katerinastrani

Sep 28 2016

22mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

1 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
0
0
0
0

Great to have a podcast especially for interpreters

By Tesstranslates - Feb 25 2016
Read more
Love listening to the different experiences. Thank you!