OwlTail

Cover image of Divinity School (video)
(1)
Education
Religion & Spirituality
Society & Culture
Philosophy

Divinity School (video)

Updated 22 days ago

Education
Religion & Spirituality
Society & Culture
Philosophy
Read more

Divinity School (video)

Read more

Divinity School (video)

iTunes Ratings

1 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
0
0
0
0

iTunes Ratings

1 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
0
0
0
0
Cover image of Divinity School (video)

Divinity School (video)

Latest release on Jan 12, 2017

Read more

Divinity School (video)

Rank #1: The Pedagogical Challenge of World Religions: The Craft of Teaching

Podcast cover
Read more
For early-career and established faculty alike, a course in "World Religions" or the like can present a substantial pedagogical challenge. Often an inherited course rotating between faculty members, "World Religions" risks becoming a professor's nightmare: it presents to students an opportunity for global exposure to religious ideas, practices, and problems, seeming to be an all-in-one package; yet for the teacher, such a demand for coverage can seem to necessitate either a superhuman level of mastery or a subpar level of depth. Such a course, therefore, requires a different kind of pedagogical hand and a number of tough choices. At this panel workshop, area faculty with experience in the challenges of teaching "World Religions" (and analogous formulations) will help to bring clarity, flexibility, and confidence to a staple course in much of the field of religious studies.

Panelists:
Dov Weiss, Assistant Professor of Religion, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Catherine Benton, Associate Professor of Religion & Asian Studies, Lake Forest College

James Halstead, Associate Professor of Religion, DePaul University
Dov Weiss is currently an Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religion at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He completed his PhD at the University of Chicago Divinity School as a Martin Meyer Fellow in 2011 and was the Alan M. Stroock Fellow at Harvard University’s Center for Jewish Studies in 2012.

Catherine Benton has taught courses in Buddhism, Hinduism, Chinese religious traditions, and Islam at Lake Forest College, where she has chaired programs in Islamic World Studies, Asian Studies, and Religion. She has worked in India over the last thirty years studying religious rituals in communities in Maharashtra, directing study abroad programs, and, earlier in her career, working as a field officer for UNICEF in south India.

James Halstead, OSA, has taught “Religious Worlds in Comparative Perspective” in the liberals studies program and “Religious Worlds and Ethical Perspectives” in DePaul’s Honors Program for 28 years. For twelve of those years he was also chair of the Department for Religious Studies, observing others teach the introductory course in religion.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Oct 19 2016

1hr 55mins

Play

Rank #2: Wednesday Lunch: Dean’s Forum with Kevin Hector

Podcast cover
Read more
Quarterly Deans Forum with Kevin Hector, Associate Professor of Theology and the Philosophy of Religions. Professor Hector's recent book, “The Theological Project of Modernism: Faith and the Conditions of Mineness” (Oxford University Press, 2015), explores the idea of 'mineness,' in the sense of being able to identify with one's life or experience it as self-expressive, by tracing the development of this idea in modern theology. Professors Michael Fishbane and Angie Heo offer responses.
Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance.
Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School tradition started many decades ago. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance.

Sep 28 2016

56mins

Play

Rank #3: Income Inequality and Religion in the US Conference | part V

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part 5 includes an audio-only recording of the panel discussion amongst participants.
Dwight N. Hopkins, Professor of Theology (Moderator)
University of Chicago Divinity School

Evelyn Z. Brodkin, Associate Professor and Director of the Poverty and Inequality Program
University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Paola Sapienza, Donald C. Clark/HSBC Chair in Consumer Finance
Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management

William Schweiker, Edward L. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor of Theological Ethics
University of Chicago Divinity School

Amir Sufi, Bruce Lindsay Professor of Economics and Public Policy
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Luigi Zingales, Robert C. McCormack Distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance
University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 20mins

Play

Rank #4: John Cottingham : Transcending science: humane models of religious understanding

Podcast cover
Read more
John Cottingham delivers a public lecture, entitled "Transcending science: humane models of religious understanding."

John Cottingham is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at University of Reading, Professorial Research Fellow, Heythrop College, University of London, and Honorary Fellow of St. John's College, Oxford and former editor of Ratio: the International Journal of Analytic Philosophy (1993-2013). Prof. Cottingham is a world-renowned Descartes scholar who has has published extensively on issues in Early Modern Philosophy and Moral Philosophy. In recent years Cottingham has focused on the Philosophy of Religions with celebrated monographs on the nature, justification, and transformative power of religious devotion, including “Why Believe?” (Continuum, 2009) and “How to Believe” (Bloomsbury Continuum, 2016). His books also include “Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian and Psychoanalytic Ethics” (Cambridge, 1998); On the Meaning of Life (Routledge, 2003); “The Spiritual Dimension” (Cambridge, 2005); “Cartesian Reflections” (Oxford, 2008), and “Philosophy of Religion: Towards a More Humane Approach”(Cambridge, 2014).

Abstract: In many contemporary debates religion and science are cast as rivals, supposedly offering competing explanations of the origins and nature of the cosmos. Religion often appears at a disadvantage here: given the magnificent achievements of science in uncovering the workings of nature, theistic speculations about the activities of a supposed immaterial divine agent are apt to seem radically impoverished by comparison. This paper will argue that we need a more ‘humane’ model of religious understanding, one that is responsive to the actual role played by religion in the life of the believer. Understanding the world religiously is less about subscribing to explanatory hypotheses than about a certain mode of engagement with reality, requiring a moral and spiritual transformation of the subject. This has crucial implications for the appropriate way to philosophize about religion. Instead of an ‘epistemology of control’, based on the detached evaluation of evidence, we may need to substitute an ‘epistemology of receptivity’. In religion, as in many areas of human life, authentic understanding may require a process of attunement in order for the relevant evidence to become manifest.

This lecture is cosponsored by the Office of the Dean and the Philosophy of Religions Workshop.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 26mins

Play

Rank #5: Income Inquality and Religion in the US Conference | part I

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part I includes the Introduction and a presentation by Evelyn Z. Brodkin, Associate Professor and Director of the Poverty and Inequality Program, University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration
Evelyn Z. Brodkin's research interests include welfare state politics and policies at the level of the state and the level of the street, with a focus on political-organizational responses to poverty, inequality, and marginalization. She is one of the leading scholars of street-level organizations, the agencies at the frontlines of public policy delivery. She has published widely in books and journals, including her recent book Work and the Welfare State: Street-Level Organizations and Workfare Politics (2013, co-edited with G. Marston). Her work has been recognized by the American Political Science Association (Herbert Kaufman Award), the American Public Administration Association (Burchfield Award), and the Open Society Institute, where she was named a Fellow. Brodkin has served on the Policy Council of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management and the board of directors of the Chicago Jobs Council. On leave this year, Brodkin is Moses Distinguished Visiting Professor at Hunter College.

Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

27mins

Play

Rank #6: Income Inequality and Religion in the US Conference | part IV

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part 4 includes a presentation by Luigi Zingales, the Robert C. McCormack Distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance, University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Luigi Zingales' research interests span from corporate governance to financial development, from political economy to the economic effects of culture. He co-developed the Financial Trust Index, which is designed to monitor the level of trust that Americans have toward their financial system. In addition to his position at Chicago Booth, Zingales is a faculty research fellow for the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow for the Center for Economic Policy Research, and a fellow of the European Governance Institute. He also serves on the Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, which has been examining the legislative, regulatory, and legal issues affecting how public companies function. In July 2015, he became the director of the Stigler Center at the University of Chicago which he refocusing on promoting and diffusing research on regulatory capture and the various distortions that special interest groups impose on capitalism

Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

20mins

Play

Rank #7: Income Inequality and Religion in the US Conference | part III

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part 3 includes a presentation by William Schweiker, the Edward L. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor of Theological Ethics, the
University of Chicago Divinity School.

William Schweiker's research focuses on theological and ethical questions attentive to global dynamics, comparative religious ethics, the history of ethics, and hermeneutical philosophy. A frequent lecturer and visiting professor at universities around the world, he has been deeply involved in collaborative international scholarly projects. In addition to his position at the Divinity School, Schweiker is Director of The Enhancing Life Project, a two-year project dedicated to increasing knowledge in support of the aspiration by persons and communities for enriched lives. Schweiker's books include Theological Ethics and Global Dynamics: In the Time of Many Worlds (2004). He is also chief editor and contributor to A Companion to Religious Ethics (2004). He is working on a forthcoming book Religious Ethics: Meaning and Method and a second expanded edition of A Companion to Religious Ethics
Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

16mins

Play

Rank #8: Income Inequality and Religion in the US Conference | part II

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part 2 includes a presentation by Amir Sufi, the Bruce Lindsay Professor of Economics and Public Policy
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Amir Sufi's research focuses on finance and macroeconomics. In addition to his position at Chicago Booth, Sufi is also Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He serves as an associate editor for the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. He has written articles published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Finance, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. His recent research on household debt and the economy has been profiled in the Economist, the Financial Times, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. It has also been presented to policy-makers at the Federal Reserve, the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, & Urban Affairs, and the White House Council of Economic Advisors. He is the co-author, with Atif Mian, of House of Debt: How They (and You) Caused the Great Recession and How We Can Prevent It from Happening Again (2014

Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

17mins

Play

Rank #9: Jean Bethke Elshtain at “Augustine: Theological and Philosophical Conversations"

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

A conference honoring David Tracy, the Andrew Thomas Greeley and Grace McNichols Greeley Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Catholic Studies at the University of Chicago Divinity School.

Jean Bethke Elshtain (University of Chicago) on “Why Augustine? Why Now?”

Dec 17 2015

35mins

Play

Rank #10: Selection of Hindu Texts: Cosmogonic, Devotional, and Political by Wendy Doniger | Introducing Religion: A Swift Hall Colloquium

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Divinity School Professors Margaret M. Mitchell, Wendy Doniger, Richard Rosengarten, Jas Elsner, Dan Arnold, Kevin Hector, and Sarah Hammerschlag speak on “Introducing Religion.”

One of the most difficult, yet most important, tasks for the scholar of religion is thinking about how to teach the college-level introductory course in Religious Studies. How should you teach it -- as a "World Religions" class? A "Theory and Methods" class? What should you teach, given that most of us don't specialize in all religions, everywhere? At this full-day colloquium, seven members of the Divinity School faculty facilitate a richly textured conversation on the introductory course in all its complexity, taking as a starting point the notion that the academic study of religion should begin with its sources, broadly construed.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Aug 12 2015

56mins

Play

Rank #11: George Herbert, “Love (III)” by Richard Rosengarten | Introducing Religion: A Swift Hall Colloquium

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Divinity School Professors Margaret M. Mitchell, Wendy Doniger, Richard Rosengarten, Jas Elsner, Dan Arnold, Kevin Hector, and Sarah Hammerschlag speak on “Introducing Religion.”

One of the most difficult, yet most important, tasks for the scholar of religion is thinking about how to teach the college-level introductory course in Religious Studies. How should you teach it -- as a "World Religions" class? A "Theory and Methods" class? What should you teach, given that most of us don't specialize in all religions, everywhere? At this full-day colloquium, seven members of the Divinity School faculty facilitate a richly textured conversation on the introductory course in all its complexity, taking as a starting point the notion that the academic study of religion should begin with its sources, broadly construed.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Aug 12 2015

45mins

Play

Rank #12: Franz Kafka, “Before the Law” by Sarah Hammerschlag | Introducing Religion: A Swift Hall Colloquium

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Divinity School Professors Margaret M. Mitchell, Wendy Doniger, Richard Rosengarten, Jas Elsner, Dan Arnold, Kevin Hector, and Sarah Hammerschlag speak on “Introducing Religion.”

One of the most difficult, yet most important, tasks for the scholar of religion is thinking about how to teach the college-level introductory course in Religious Studies. How should you teach it -- as a "World Religions" class? A "Theory and Methods" class? What should you teach, given that most of us don't specialize in all religions, everywhere? At this full-day colloquium, seven members of the Divinity School faculty facilitate a richly textured conversation on the introductory course in all its complexity, taking as a starting point the notion that the academic study of religion should begin with its sources, broadly construed.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Aug 12 2015

46mins

Play

Rank #13: Ernst Troeltsch by Kevin Hector | Introducing Religion: A Swift Hall Colloquium

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Divinity School Professors Margaret M. Mitchell, Wendy Doniger, Richard Rosengarten, Jas Elsner, Dan Arnold, Kevin Hector, and Sarah Hammerschlag speak on “Introducing Religion.”

One of the most difficult, yet most important, tasks for the scholar of religion is thinking about how to teach the college-level introductory course in Religious Studies. How should you teach it -- as a "World Religions" class? A "Theory and Methods" class? What should you teach, given that most of us don't specialize in all religions, everywhere? At this full-day colloquium, seven members of the Divinity School faculty facilitate a richly textured conversation on the introductory course in all its complexity, taking as a starting point the notion that the academic study of religion should begin with its sources, broadly construed.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Aug 12 2015

39mins

Play

Rank #14: Flipping the Classroom: How Online Resources Enable Pedagogical Innovation with Christine Hayes

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Led by Christine Hayes (Yale University). The classic frontal lecture aimed at delivering content in real time is the mainstay of many university courses. How might classroom instruction be reimagined when content is delivered through online lectures in virtual time? This workshop explores the changing role of the instructor and the transformation of the classroom from lecture hall to learning laboratory in the digital age.

Christine Hayes is Robert F. and Patricia R. Weis Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. Her published works include several books and many articles in Vetus Testamentum, The Journal for the Study of Judaism, The Harvard Theological Review, and various scholarly anthologies. Her first book, entitled Between the Babylonian and Palestinian Talmuds (Oxford University Press, 1997) was honored with a Salo Baron prize for a first book in Jewish thought and literature, awarded by the American Academy for Jewish Research (1999).

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Jul 23 2015

47mins

Play

Rank #15: Angle of Vision: Then, Now, and The Arabic Novel - Gamal al-Ghitany on the Autobiography of Ibn Sina

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Join Gamal Al Ghitany and participants for discussions on the reception, transformation, and reiteration of classical Arabic biographical and autobiographical literature in modern Arabic fiction, as well as the process of translation and its relationship with the original text.

Gamal al-Ghitany is the fall quarter 2013 Mellon Islamic Studies Initiative visitor. He has been appointed visiting professor of practice. Practice professorships are reserved for those who have achieved distinction in the creative arts, such as musicians, choreographers, poets, or fiction writers. Al-Ghitany has published more than forty novels, collections of short stories, and works of literary criticism; and was the founder and, until recently, director of the Egyptian literary periodical Akhbar al-Adab, widely viewed as the most influential literary periodical in the Arab world.

Three of his works were translated by the late Farouk Mustafa Abdel Wahhab, the University of Chicago’s award-winner translator of modern Egyptian fiction: Zayni Barakat (1988); The Zaafarani Files (2009); and The Book of Epiphanies (2012).

Jun 05 2015

1hr 19mins

Play

Rank #16: 2015 Marty Center Senior Fellow Symposium with Betty M. Bayer

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Encountering When Prophecy Fails, Encountering Cognitive Dissonance: A Forum

When Prophecy Fails was published in 1956 and is considered a “classic” by many in the field of social psychology and, arguably, in religious studies (e.g., in history of religions, biblical studies) and other fields as well.
Like many such works, the book as its theory of cognitive dissonance has shaped numerous fields – and wider culture – in ways often unacknowledged. But how do the book and its theory speak to us today? How best to understand the long resonances of this book and its theory within academic study and in everyday life? Does the book’s popularity tell us anything about the book’s influence on religion, psychology and science? Did the book alter the object of knowledge in religion and/or in psychology? Does critical reflection suggest new ways to think about the religion, science and psychology relation that moves beyond applying psychological models to religious experience or using religious or spiritual experience to secure psychological concepts or evidence?

This symposium will begin with a brief talk on the history of the books' nearly sixty years. Several scholars will join Dr. Bayer to offer further reflection on their own use of the book in their teaching and research. Together these trackings and tracings lend themselves to what may be called an ethnography of encounters with the life-world of a book, its ideas,
culture, habitus of its catchy concept of cognitive dissonance, and spheres of action amongst religion, psychology and science.

FORUM PARTICIPANTS:

Lowell Bloss, Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies and of Asian Languages and Cultures, (University of Chicago Divinity School, History of Religion, PhD 1972)
W. Clark Gilpin, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of the History of Christianity and Theology in the Divinity School; also in the College; Interim Director of the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion

Susan E. Henking, President, Shimer College (University of Chicago Divinity School, Religion and Psychological Studies, PhD 1988).
Seth Patterson, MFA, a professional theater artist and current M.Div. student, will provide a dramatic reading.
Betty M. Bayer is professor of Women’s Studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY, where she teaches courses on notions of human nature in histories of women’s psyche, imagining peace, and debates amongst psychology, science, religion and spirituality. Most recently, she has published essays on spirituality and Enchantment in an Age of Occupy (2012). While a senior fellow at the Martin Marty Center she will be working on her book “Revelation or Revolution? Cognitive Dissonance and Persistent Longing in an Age Psychological.” This book entails a history and rethinking of the renowned 1956 book When Prophecy Fails by social psychologists Leon Festinger, Henry Riecken and Stanley Schachter.

Mar 25 2015

1hr 32mins

Play

Rank #17: Teaching the Undergraduate Research Paper | The Craft of Teaching

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Teaching the Undergraduate Research Paper (Arts of Teaching Series)

Teaching the research paper begins with understanding the tacit skills and knowledge needed for novice learners to move from passive reading to active engagement with sources. The difficulty for the instructor rests in being able to identify and then teach these to students of varying interests and abilities. Anne Knafl (PhD, Bible, 2011), Bibliographer for Religion and Philosophy, and David Frankel, PhD student in History of Judaism and Library Intern, will discuss strategies for teaching the research paper, drawing on their experience collecting, evaluating and teaching scholarly materials at the Regenstein Library. This workshop will address not only the how but the why of assigning research: Why should students write research papers? Do they know? Do you know?

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Mar 09 2015

1hr 14mins

Play

Rank #18: Part 1 - Paul Ricoeur: Retrospect and Prospect III (Culture) - A conference at the University of Chicago Divinity School

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

To attempt to capture something of his unique intellectual spirit, the sessions aim to think with Ricoeur toward an enhanced understanding of religion via the themes of ethics, philosophy, and culture.

Sponsored by the France Chicago Center and the Martin Marty Center at the University of Chicago Divinity School.
Participants: Pamela Anderson, Professor of Modern European Philosophy of Religion, University of Oxford; Fellow in Philosophy, Regent's Park College, and Richard A. Rosengarten, University of Chicago.
Chair: Sarah Hammerschlag, University of Chicago

Feb 23 2015

1hr 31mins

Play

Rank #19: "The Problem of Evil and the Relation between Heaven and Human in Classical Chinese Philosophy" - Part 2

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

Part two of "The Problem of Evil and the Relation between Heaven and Human in Classical Chinese Philosophy."

Franklin Perkins is Professor of Philosophy at DePaul University and former director of DePaul’s Chinese Studies Program. His main teaching and research interests are in classical Chinese philosophy, early modern European philosophy, and the challenges of doing philosophy in a comparative or intercultural context. Franklin is the author of “Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light” (2004), “Leibniz: A Guide for the Perplexed” (2007), and “Heaven and Earth are not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy” (2014), and was co-editor with Chung-ying Cheng of “Chinese Philosophy in Early Excavated Bamboo Texts” (Journal of Chinese Philosophy Supplement 2010). His books have been translated into Portuguese and Chinese, and he has been a visiting scholar at Peking University, Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the Leibniz Archives in Hannover (Germany). He is currently Visiting Professor in Philosophy at Nanyang Technological University (Singapore).

Professor Perkins lectured on November 11, 12, and 14, 2014.

See more at: http://divinity.uchicago.edu/franklin-perkins-lecture-divinity-school

Jan 06 2015

1hr 28mins

Play

Rank #20: Faculty Panel for Prospective Students Day at the Divinity School, 2014

Podcast cover
Read more
If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

A faculty panel convened for Prospective Students Day, 2014. Dean Margaret M. Mitchell, presiding; faculty members Dwight N. Hopkins,
Jeffrey Stackert, Daniel Arnold, and Sarah Hammerschlag.

Nov 14 2014

1hr 4mins

Play

The Enhancing Life Project – Berlin residency seminar 2016

Podcast cover
Read more
Scholars from The Enhancing Life Project, a joint venture of the University of Chicago and Ruhr University Bochum / Germany, funded by the John Templeton Foundation, discuss the public relevance of their research, in the vibrant city of Berlin as well as the beautiful setting of Liebenberg Castle outside Berlin, at their 2016 summer residency seminar.

Jan 12 2017

8mins

Play

Annual Wednesday Lunch Kick-off: Dean Richard A. Rosengarten, speaking on the work of the Divinity School

Podcast cover
Read more
Dean and Associate Professor of Religion, Literature and Visual Culture, Rosengarten pursues interests in genres of narrative (especially the novel), in hermeneutics, literary theory, and aesthetics, and in the development of religious thought through the "long" eighteenth century. His book Henry Fielding and the Narration of Providence: Divine Design and the Incursions of Evil locates Fielding's novels in the contexts of the debates about poetic justice in the drama, and the deism controversy's discussions of natural religion toward the claim that the eighteenth-century English novel engages broader theological questions about the security of classic notions of providential intervention in a post-Newtonian universe. He is completing a book on Roman Catholicism between the Vatican Councils under the title Styles of Catholicism: Flannery O'Connor, Frida Kahlo, Simone Weil, and plans to undertake a study of satire as a mode of apophatic language from Rabelais to Swift. Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School tradition started many decades ago. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance.

Nov 23 2016

1hr 4mins

Play

Wednesday Lunch with Stephanie Arnold

Podcast cover
Read more
Ms. Arnold, a television producer, suffered a rare but often fatal condition called an amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) during the birth of her second child. She died on the operating table. Her multi-award-winning, best-selling book on her experience, 37 Seconds, tells her story. She serves on the board of directors for the AFE Foundation, speaks on patient advocacy and served as the face for the legislative campaign When Seconds Count (ASA) and also for the mother’s day LifeSource program, helping to educate about blood donation. In addition she raises money for research and education into the leading cause of maternal death in the world. She will speak with us about her experiences before – during – and after death.

Nov 23 2016

56mins

Play

Francis Robinson, Mellon Islamic Studies Initiative Visiting Professor

Podcast cover
Read more
Professor of the History of South Asia at the University of London, Francis Robinson (Trinity College, Cambridge PhD, 1970), is one of the most prominent and influential voices among Western scholars of Muslim history and Islam in India. His research on Islam and Muslim history in South Asia focuses on Muslim responses to modernity, learned and holy families and their textual traditions, and religious and political change. His interest in the Muslim world, however, is not confined to the Indian subcontinent, but spans a much wider geographical region and discursive landscape.
The Mellon Islamic Studies Initiative is a three-year project, designed to support the expansion and enhancement of the study of Islam at the University of Chicago. Administered by the Divinity School, the initiative is a cross-divisional collaboration, intended to create a sustained campus conversation about the future of Islamic studies.
Funded by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the initiative brings to the University distinguished visiting scholars representing a wide range of topics in Islamic Studies, resulting in a substantive, sustained discussion about both specific topics in Islamic studies and the wider field of study.

Nov 23 2016

1hr 31mins

Play

Wednesday Lunch: Sumit Ray and Sara Popenhagen from the Office of Sustainability

Podcast cover
Read more
The Office of Sustainability works with campus and community partners to enhance a culture of sustainability using a data-driven, yet relationship-based approach that strives to connect students, faculty and staff into a cohesive University-wide network. Their philosophy: to achieve balance between environmental, social and economic sustainability in all decisions. Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School tradition started many decades ago. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance.

Nov 23 2016

43mins

Play

Studying Religion in Iran: The Craft of Teaching

Podcast cover
Read more
Studying Religion in Iran: Between University and Seminary
Iran is well-known for its centuries-old centers of Islamic scholarship where students from all over the world learn jurisprudence, sciences of hadith transmission, Qur'anic exegesis, theology, and philosophy. It is less commonly known that academic scholarship on religion has also been burgeoning outside the direct sphere of the hawzah (seminary) system. Join us for a conversation with visiting scholars from the University of Religions and Denominations in Qom who will discuss the philosophies, methods, and approaches these different institutions have adopted - not only in the study of Islam, but more broadly in comparative scholarship on religion.

Dr. Naeimeh Pourmohammadi is Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion at the University of Religions and Denominations.

Dr. Fatima Tofighi is Assistant Professor of Women and Religion at the University of Religions and Denominations.

Mahdi Salehi is a Ph.D. student in Comparative Theology and Director of International Relations and Cooperation at the University of Religions and Denominations.

Alireza Doostdar, Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies and the
Anthropology of Religion, will moderate the discussion.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Oct 19 2016

1hr 49mins

Play

The Pedagogical Challenge of World Religions: The Craft of Teaching

Podcast cover
Read more
For early-career and established faculty alike, a course in "World Religions" or the like can present a substantial pedagogical challenge. Often an inherited course rotating between faculty members, "World Religions" risks becoming a professor's nightmare: it presents to students an opportunity for global exposure to religious ideas, practices, and problems, seeming to be an all-in-one package; yet for the teacher, such a demand for coverage can seem to necessitate either a superhuman level of mastery or a subpar level of depth. Such a course, therefore, requires a different kind of pedagogical hand and a number of tough choices. At this panel workshop, area faculty with experience in the challenges of teaching "World Religions" (and analogous formulations) will help to bring clarity, flexibility, and confidence to a staple course in much of the field of religious studies.

Panelists:
Dov Weiss, Assistant Professor of Religion, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Catherine Benton, Associate Professor of Religion & Asian Studies, Lake Forest College

James Halstead, Associate Professor of Religion, DePaul University
Dov Weiss is currently an Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religion at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He completed his PhD at the University of Chicago Divinity School as a Martin Meyer Fellow in 2011 and was the Alan M. Stroock Fellow at Harvard University’s Center for Jewish Studies in 2012.

Catherine Benton has taught courses in Buddhism, Hinduism, Chinese religious traditions, and Islam at Lake Forest College, where she has chaired programs in Islamic World Studies, Asian Studies, and Religion. She has worked in India over the last thirty years studying religious rituals in communities in Maharashtra, directing study abroad programs, and, earlier in her career, working as a field officer for UNICEF in south India.

James Halstead, OSA, has taught “Religious Worlds in Comparative Perspective” in the liberals studies program and “Religious Worlds and Ethical Perspectives” in DePaul’s Honors Program for 28 years. For twelve of those years he was also chair of the Department for Religious Studies, observing others teach the introductory course in religion.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Oct 19 2016

1hr 55mins

Play

Spring 2016 Dean’s Craft of Teaching Seminar with Alum of the Year Peter Iver Kaufman

Podcast cover
Read more
The quarterly Dean's Craft of Teaching Seminar is the flagship seminar of the Craft of Teaching program, centered on issues of course design and institutional context.

Abstract: The humanities, scholars and educators continue to sense, are increasingly associated on college campuses with pre-professional requirements, a warm-up act to the real task of preparing students for a range of existing and tightly specified careers. The data suggest that the curricular presence of the humanities (core courses; gen-ed requirements; concentrations or majors) is being accordingly and considerably reduced. Yet it may be suggested -- not without controversy -- that preparation in the humanities serves not only its own edifying ends but also the formation of sensibilities and skills without which the professions are severely impoverished. In light of these problems, Prof. Peter Kaufman (Jepson School of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond) reinvented himself at the age of 63, leaving an R1 where he taught undergraduate courses in the history of Christianity and graduate courses in religious studies (from late antiquity to early modern Europe) to engage the issues represented in the materials included for this seminar, and to continue developing what could be called an extra-curricular avocation to promote the indispensability of the humanities to the practice of leadership in our changing society. This seminar confronts the formidable challenges facing the profession, in order to consider the role that Swift Hall graduates have the opportunity to play in stewarding the future of the humanities.

Peter Iver Kaufman (PhD, 1975) is the 2016 Divinity School Alumnus of the Year. He studies the political cultures of late antique, medieval, and early modern Europe and North Africa. He has written nine books and more than 40 articles on authority, religious conflict, and literary history, which have appeared in, among other journals, Leadership and the Humanities, Journal of Late Antiquity, Harvard Theological Review, Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte, and Journal of the American Academy of Religion. He is editor-in-chief of Religions and editor of a series of monographs on the religion around iconic figures from Dante and Dürer to Virginia Woolf, Billie Holiday, and Bob Dylan. He has also edited five books, ranging from studies of charisma to others on leadership and Elizabethan culture.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 21mins

Play

Marty Center Senior Fellow Symposium with Nancy Frankenberry

Podcast cover
Read more
Marty Center Senior Fellow Symposium 2015-2016 by Nancy Frankenberry

"Believing Scientists in America: Trials and Tribulations of Theistic Evolution."

Nancy Frankenberry is John Phillips Professor in Religion Emerita at Dartmouth College where she taught courses in philosophy of religion; women and gender studies and religion; and science and religion. Her research and writing have attempted to span all three areas. She is the author or editor/co-editor of five books, as well as over sixty scholarly articles, book chapters, and critical reviews. Most recently, she has completed a series of five papers in the general area of religious epistemology. With the completion of a book-manuscript tentatively titled “Pragmatism and the End of Religion,” she expects to wrap up her work in philosophy of religion

While a senior fellow at the Martin Marty Center Prof. Frankenberry turns to issues facing the wider public in connection with science and religion debates. Her new project, “Great Issues in Religion and Evolution,” investigates the intellectual challenge of Darwinism and evolutionary biology to religious belief and practice in the USA for the last 150 years.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 30mins

Play

Wednesday Lunch with David Travis

Podcast cover
Read more
David Travis (AB'71), Author, Curator, and former Chair of the Department of Photography of the The Art Institute of Chicago, speaking. A specialist in the modernist period, he has organized a number of significant shows and contributed scholarly essays to their catalogs, including Starting With Atget: Photographs from the Julien Levy Collection (1977), Photography Rediscovered: American Photographs 1900-1930 (1979), André Kertész: Of Paris and New York (1985), On the Art of Fixing a Shadow: One Hundred and Fifty Years of Photography (1989), Edward Weston: The Last Years in Carmel (2001), Taken By Design: Photography from the Institute of Design 1937-1971 (2002),Yousuf Karsh: Regarding Heroes (2008), and most recently Karsh: Beyond the Camera (2012). He has organized and presented more than 125 exhibitions of photography at the Art Institute of Chicago and has also been active as a guest curator for other major museums. His exhibitions have been shown at the National Gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art in Osaka, the Museo degli Innocenti (Florence), and for the Patrimoine photographique of the French Ministry of Culture, which inducted him as a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 1987. In December of 2002, he was named a “Chicagoan of the Year” by the Chicago Tribune Arts critics. A book of his lectures and essays was issued in 2003 by David R. Godine Publisher under the title: At the Edge of the Light: Thoughts on Photographers and Photography, on Talent and Genius.

Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School tradition started many decades ago. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance.

Sep 28 2016

58mins

Play

Wednesday Lunch: Dean’s Forum with Kevin Hector

Podcast cover
Read more
Quarterly Deans Forum with Kevin Hector, Associate Professor of Theology and the Philosophy of Religions. Professor Hector's recent book, “The Theological Project of Modernism: Faith and the Conditions of Mineness” (Oxford University Press, 2015), explores the idea of 'mineness,' in the sense of being able to identify with one's life or experience it as self-expressive, by tracing the development of this idea in modern theology. Professors Michael Fishbane and Angie Heo offer responses.
Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance.
Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School tradition started many decades ago. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance.

Sep 28 2016

56mins

Play

Income Inequality and Religion in the US Conference | part V

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part 5 includes an audio-only recording of the panel discussion amongst participants.
Dwight N. Hopkins, Professor of Theology (Moderator)
University of Chicago Divinity School

Evelyn Z. Brodkin, Associate Professor and Director of the Poverty and Inequality Program
University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Paola Sapienza, Donald C. Clark/HSBC Chair in Consumer Finance
Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management

William Schweiker, Edward L. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor of Theological Ethics
University of Chicago Divinity School

Amir Sufi, Bruce Lindsay Professor of Economics and Public Policy
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Luigi Zingales, Robert C. McCormack Distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance
University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 20mins

Play

Winter 2016 Dean’s Seminar in the Craft of Teaching with Meira Kensky

Podcast cover
Read more
"Building the Religion Major in the Era of the 'Death of the Humanities'"

This seminar will discuss the challenges of attracting students to the Religion Major in the contemporary climate. As students are inundated with talk of career preparation and are told over and over again that humanities majors only get jobs at coffee shops, departments worry about declining enrollments, consolidation, and justifying their programs to administrators, trustees, and even their faculty colleagues. Prof. Meira Kensky (PhD 2009; Associate Professor of Religion, Coe College) will talk about some of the strategies her department has employed in building a rigorous and flexible curriculum, recruiting and developing talented students, and acting as ambassadors to the college community at large for both the study of Religion and the Humanities in general.

The quarterly Dean's Craft of Teaching Seminar is the flagship seminar of the Craft of Teaching program, centered on issues of course design and institutional context.

Meira Z. Kensky is currently the Joseph E. McCabe Associate Professor of Religion. Kensky received her B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Biblical Studies (New Testament) from the University of Chicago. Her first book, Trying Man, Trying God: The Divine Courtroom in Early Jewish and Christian Literature, was published by Mohr Siebeck in 2010, and was the inspiration for a conference on "The Divine Courtroom in Comparative Perspective" at Cordozo School of Law in New York. Currently, she is working on her second book for Mohr Siebeck, an examination of the figure of Timothy in Early Christian literature. Recent publications include articles on Romans 9-11, Tertullian of Carthage's Apologeticum, and the figure of Timothy in the Pauline and post-Pauline epistles. Kensky has lectured widely around the Chicago and Cedar Rapids areas, and gave the 29th Annual Stone Lectureship in Judaism at Augustana College, IL, last May. She was the recipient of Coe College's C. J. Lynch Outstanding Teacher Award in 2013.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy

Sep 28 2016

1hr 52mins

Play

Peter Gregory on Bridging the Gap: Zongmi’s Strategies for Reconciling Textual Study...

Podcast cover
Read more
Professor Peter Gregory, the Jill Ker Conway of Professor Emeritus of Religion and East Asian Studies of Smith College, will present a public lecture on "Bridging the Gap: Zongmi’s Strategies for Reconciling Textual Study and Meditative Practice."

Abstract: There is a long-standing and deep-rooted tension between what could be characterized as meditative practice and textual study that runs through the Buddhist tradition. It emerges with the early com¬munities, is manifested in different forms throughout the history of the tradition, and is very much alive today. This lecture will examine some of the ways in which this tension plays out in Zongmi’s most ambitious, original, and systematically articulated work, “The General Preface to the Collected Writings on the Source of Chan” (禪源諸詮集都序), written in 833. This work is most famous for its multifaceted attempt to reconcile the doctrinal teachings of the different “philosophical” schools (such as Huayan) with the different traditions of Chan prevalent in his day. The lecture will interrogate this issue by offering a close reading of a critical passage at the beginning of the Preface, where Zongmi lays out his main, overarching reason for composing the text. This passage is of special interest because in it Zongmi gives an account of what might be called an “enlightenment experience” that he had, which provides the basis on which he claims unique authority to be able to resolve the central problem that the text addresses: to bridge the gap between textualists and meditators so as to make the tradition whole again.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 57mins

Play

John Cottingham : Transcending science: humane models of religious understanding

Podcast cover
Read more
John Cottingham delivers a public lecture, entitled "Transcending science: humane models of religious understanding."

John Cottingham is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at University of Reading, Professorial Research Fellow, Heythrop College, University of London, and Honorary Fellow of St. John's College, Oxford and former editor of Ratio: the International Journal of Analytic Philosophy (1993-2013). Prof. Cottingham is a world-renowned Descartes scholar who has has published extensively on issues in Early Modern Philosophy and Moral Philosophy. In recent years Cottingham has focused on the Philosophy of Religions with celebrated monographs on the nature, justification, and transformative power of religious devotion, including “Why Believe?” (Continuum, 2009) and “How to Believe” (Bloomsbury Continuum, 2016). His books also include “Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian and Psychoanalytic Ethics” (Cambridge, 1998); On the Meaning of Life (Routledge, 2003); “The Spiritual Dimension” (Cambridge, 2005); “Cartesian Reflections” (Oxford, 2008), and “Philosophy of Religion: Towards a More Humane Approach”(Cambridge, 2014).

Abstract: In many contemporary debates religion and science are cast as rivals, supposedly offering competing explanations of the origins and nature of the cosmos. Religion often appears at a disadvantage here: given the magnificent achievements of science in uncovering the workings of nature, theistic speculations about the activities of a supposed immaterial divine agent are apt to seem radically impoverished by comparison. This paper will argue that we need a more ‘humane’ model of religious understanding, one that is responsive to the actual role played by religion in the life of the believer. Understanding the world religiously is less about subscribing to explanatory hypotheses than about a certain mode of engagement with reality, requiring a moral and spiritual transformation of the subject. This has crucial implications for the appropriate way to philosophize about religion. Instead of an ‘epistemology of control’, based on the detached evaluation of evidence, we may need to substitute an ‘epistemology of receptivity’. In religion, as in many areas of human life, authentic understanding may require a process of attunement in order for the relevant evidence to become manifest.

This lecture is cosponsored by the Office of the Dean and the Philosophy of Religions Workshop.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 26mins

Play

Peter Iver Kaufman’s 2016 Alumnus of the Year Lecture

Podcast cover
Read more
Peter Iver Kaufman, (MA 1973, PhD 1975, History of Christianity), is the Divinity School’s 2016 Alumnus of the Year, will deliver the lecture. His lecture is entitled
“Giorgio Agamben, Meet Augustine (With an Extended Introduction to Augustine’s Statesmen)”

Kaufman is George Matthews and Virginia Brinkley Modlin Professor of Leadership Studies in the Jepson School of Leadership Studies at the University of Richmond, a position he has held since 2008. Previously he taught at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he is Professor Emeritus. Dr. Kaufman’s scholarly work focuses on the political cultures of late antique, medieval, and early modern Europe and North Africa; he teaches leadership studies courses as well as advanced courses on political, cultural and religious leaders in late antiquity and early modern Europe.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 14mins

Play

Dean’s Autumn 2015 Craft of Teaching Seminar with Trina Jones | The Craft of Teaching

Podcast cover
Read more
Trina Janiec Jones (Wofford College) had her dissertation colloquium in Swift Hall on September 12th, 2001. The events of the previous day not only impacted her colloquium, but eventually, also took her teaching career and scholarly interests in directions she never imagined while sitting in Regenstein working her way through Sanskrit declensions. Trained in Buddhist philosophy at the Divinity School, she soon found that every job for which she interviewed required that she create a course on Islam. Since her graduation from the Divinity School, she has taught at two liberal arts colleges, teaching courses that have required her to become more of a generalist than she anticipated. This seminar focused on an undergraduate course on interfaith engagement and religious pluralism that she recently co-taught, and used its syllabus as an entry point into broader questions related to the role of the teacher in the undergraduate religious studies classroom. How, for example, does one negotiate students’ desires to explore “religion” or “spirituality” with one’s own pedagogical desire to foster an atmosphere of academic rigor and critical thinking? What, ultimately, should the goals of an undergraduate religious studies course be?

The quarterly Dean's Craft of Teaching Seminar is the flagship seminar of the Craft of Teaching program, centered on issues of course design and institutional context.

Katherine (Trina) Janiec Jones (AM, 1993; PhD, Philosophy of Religions, 2002) is an Associate Professor of Religion at Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C., where she also serves as the Associate Provost for Curriculum and Co-Curriculum. She has won several teaching awards, served on a leadership team at the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion (for a workshop for Pre-Tenure Religion Faculty and Colleges and Universities), and has consulted at several schools seeking to examine their introductory religious studies curricula (also through the Wabash Center). She was a recipient of an American Academy of Religion/Luce Foundation Fellowship in Theologies of Religious Pluralism and Comparative Theology and participated in a Seminar in Teaching Interfaith Understanding, sponsored by the Council of Independent Colleges, the Henry Luce Foundation, and the Interfaith Youth Core. She is also a co-author of a rubric focused on pluralism and worldview engagement (https://www.ifyc.org/resources/plural...), the research for which was funded by the Teagle Foundation.

The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

Sep 28 2016

1hr 50mins

Play

Divinity School Diploma and Hooding Ceremony, Spring 2016

Podcast cover
Read more
The University of Chicago Divinity School's Diploma, Hooding, and Awards Ceremony at the 527th Convocation was held at Bond Chapel.

Sep 28 2016

33mins

Play

Income Inquality and Religion in the US Conference | part I

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part I includes the Introduction and a presentation by Evelyn Z. Brodkin, Associate Professor and Director of the Poverty and Inequality Program, University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration
Evelyn Z. Brodkin's research interests include welfare state politics and policies at the level of the state and the level of the street, with a focus on political-organizational responses to poverty, inequality, and marginalization. She is one of the leading scholars of street-level organizations, the agencies at the frontlines of public policy delivery. She has published widely in books and journals, including her recent book Work and the Welfare State: Street-Level Organizations and Workfare Politics (2013, co-edited with G. Marston). Her work has been recognized by the American Political Science Association (Herbert Kaufman Award), the American Public Administration Association (Burchfield Award), and the Open Society Institute, where she was named a Fellow. Brodkin has served on the Policy Council of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management and the board of directors of the Chicago Jobs Council. On leave this year, Brodkin is Moses Distinguished Visiting Professor at Hunter College.

Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

27mins

Play

Income Inequality and Religion in the US Conference | part IV

Podcast cover
Read more
This multi-disciplinary symposium brings together leading scholars who will share their research and engage in conversation about the role of religion in addressing rising income inequality—an issue that impacts millions of people.
During the 1960s and 1970s, 9-10% of total income went to the top one-percent of Americans. By 2007, this share had risen to 23.5%. Even before 2008 and the so-called Great Recession, the wages of the average worker in the U.S., adjusted for inflation, had been stagnant for three decades. How are the religions contributing to the complex mix of factors responsible for this state of affairs?

Part 4 includes a presentation by Luigi Zingales, the Robert C. McCormack Distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance, University of Chicago Booth School of Business
Luigi Zingales' research interests span from corporate governance to financial development, from political economy to the economic effects of culture. He co-developed the Financial Trust Index, which is designed to monitor the level of trust that Americans have toward their financial system. In addition to his position at Chicago Booth, Zingales is a faculty research fellow for the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow for the Center for Economic Policy Research, and a fellow of the European Governance Institute. He also serves on the Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, which has been examining the legislative, regulatory, and legal issues affecting how public companies function. In July 2015, he became the director of the Stigler Center at the University of Chicago which he refocusing on promoting and diffusing research on regulatory capture and the various distortions that special interest groups impose on capitalism

Sponsored by the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion.

Sep 28 2016

20mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

1 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
0
0
0
0