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Nuestro South Podcast

Welcome to the Nuestro South Podcast! A five-part podcast series that explores the stories of Latina/o/x people in the U.S. South from the Jim Crow era on through to the present. Join the conversation as we unpack the experience of being Latina/o/x in Nuestro South. We control our narrative! This is for us y'all! This podcast is produced by Erik Valera, Julie Weise, and Elaine Townsend Utin with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and LatinxEd. Our podcast hosts are Axel Herrera Ramos, Bryan Mejia, Daisy Almonte, and Dorian Gomez. Edited by Dorian Gomez.

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Episode #5 - Las Trailas de NC

Now we enter the story! Today’s episode is about las trailas. Axel lived in one for a while growing up, and we know many of y’all did too. The trailas we’re talking about in today’s episode were around the corner from middle-class white housing developments near Charlotte in the early 2000s. This is when things started to go south (no pun intended). Not all the white people liked having us in their ‘hood, a strong anti-immigrant movement came here from California, undocumented immigrants lost their driver’s licenses… In today’s episode we meet Angelica, a Mexican woman trying her best to raise her family amid this shit - just like our parents did. We try to take on the fights that our parents can’t, but it’s not always easy. You too? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more, check out:https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-5/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

35mins

3 Jun 2019

Rank #1

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Episode #4 - Los campos de Georgia

In the 1960s through 1980s, millions of Latinos started traveling through the South as migrant farmworkers. Daisy has some personal experience with this since she grew up in a rural area and worked in the packing sheds before she became a college student. But the crazy thing is that unlike when we were kids, the South was really not that anti-immigrant back then. The white folks were both conservative and pro-immigrant (we found it hard to picture, too). In today’s episode, we meet Israel Cortez, who came to Georgia as a migrant worker during that time and worked hard to “fit in.” We totally get it. Do you? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more, check out:https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-4/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

41mins

3 Jun 2019

Rank #2

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Episode #3 - Getting help from La Patria (Los braceros de Arkansas)

Back in the 1950s, hundreds of thousands of Mexican men came to Arkansas to pick cotton, on contracts negotiated by the Mexican and U.S. governments. Today we meet Angel Cano, a licenciado Mexico sent over to protect them from wage theft, discrimination, and other troubles. Señor Cano even had some success, some of the time. It seems crazy to us that these migrantes trusted their patria enough to ask for help all the way from Arkansas. Qué opinas? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more about Mexicanos in Arkansas 1940s-60s, check out: https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-3/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

34mins

15 May 2019

Rank #3

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Episode #2 - Mexicans school Mississippi

You may think Mississippi was all black and white back in the day, but n’ombre - our gente were there too! Today we meet Rafael Landrove: A Mexican sharecropper in 1920s Mississippi who came from Mexico, called himself Cuban, and fought to send his kids to the white school. Our parents fought for our education in the South, too, but in a different way. What about yours? - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.To learn more about Mexicanos in Mississippi 1910s-30s, check out: https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-2/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

30mins

14 May 2019

Rank #4

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Episode #1 - A time Mexicans lived as Europeans in New Orleans

Vamos a New Orleans, nearly 100 years ago. Mexican immigrants arrived there by boat. Many, like a man named Robert Canedo, were able to “blend in” to whiteness -- something we couldn’t imagine being able to do today. Or could we?  - This podcast is produced by Ricky Hurtado, Erik Valera, and Julie Weise, with generous sponsorship from the Whiting Foundation, the University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, and Latinx Ed. Edited by Dorian Gomez.For more information on Mexicanos in New Orleans in the 1910s-30s:  https://corazondedixie.org/chapter-1/Subscribe to this channel for new podcast episodesiTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/nuestro-south-podcast/id1461953381Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1JYcA8LGDcpnO04HHRkxfEFollow us:Instagram: http://instagram.com/nuestrosouthTwitter: https://twitter.com/nuestrosouthFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NuestroSouth/

26mins

2 May 2019

Rank #5