Cover image of In the Studio
(23)
Society & Culture

In the Studio

Updated 8 days ago

Society & Culture
Read more

In the Studio takes you into the minds of the world’s most creative people, with unprecedented access.

Read more

In the Studio takes you into the minds of the world’s most creative people, with unprecedented access.

iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
0
2
1
0

Tim Marlow is a national treasure

By napostolides - Nov 12 2017
Read more
What makes this podcast terrific is the creative and artistic vision of Tim Marlow. He bookends each episode with insightful comments, and most importantly he curated the series to take us inside the creative process. Tim has created my go-to weekly arts podcast, and I’m always eager each weekend to discover the latest episode!

Always the Best

By mwesmak - Sep 05 2017
Read more
That's the backbone of the new dreamers trying to make it through books, and this podcasts shows just that.

iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
0
2
1
0

Tim Marlow is a national treasure

By napostolides - Nov 12 2017
Read more
What makes this podcast terrific is the creative and artistic vision of Tim Marlow. He bookends each episode with insightful comments, and most importantly he curated the series to take us inside the creative process. Tim has created my go-to weekly arts podcast, and I’m always eager each weekend to discover the latest episode!

Always the Best

By mwesmak - Sep 05 2017
Read more
That's the backbone of the new dreamers trying to make it through books, and this podcasts shows just that.
Cover image of In the Studio

In the Studio

Latest release on Jan 14, 2020

Read more

In the Studio takes you into the minds of the world’s most creative people, with unprecedented access.

Rank #1: Louise Penny: Inspiration for a murder

Podcast cover
Read more
Chief Inspector Gamache, the hero of Louise Penny's books, was based on a man she could marry, very like her husband Michael, a doctor who treated children with cancer and saw life and death every day.

When the Canadian crime fiction writer first began writing, she battled five years of writer’s block to bring her murder mysteries to life.

Jan 08 2018

28mins

Play

Rank #2: Marlon James: Novelist at work

Podcast cover
Read more
Creating his “African Game of Thrones”, the award-winning novelist reveals his notebooks. We join the Jamaican writer, Marlon James, as he works on his much anticipated Dark Star Trilogy. He won the prestigious Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2015 for his novel A Brief History of Seven Killings, based around the assassination attempt on Bob Marley in the 1970s. He is in his studio in Minneapolis in the US.

Sep 18 2017

27mins

Play

Rank #3: David Simon meets Kwame Kwei-Armah

Podcast cover
Read more
Behind the scenes access to a brand new play, as it is being developed. The award winning Kwame Kwei-Armah invites the creator of The Wire to rehearsals, days before the world premiere in Baltimore. Kwame is the Artistic Director at Baltimore’s Center Stage Theatre. We watch cast and crew, as they work on the stage version of Toni Morrison’s novel, Jazz.

Sep 11 2017

28mins

Play

Rank #4: World of Warcraft

Podcast cover
Read more
World of Warcraft is one of the most popular computer games on the planet and it’s managed to sustain that popularity for 15 years, outlasting countless rivals. The game is produced by creative artists, designers and programmers who work together to create the mystical land of Azeroth.

Presenter and gamer Alex Humphreys spends time with the sound department, who play a critical role in the development of the game. The key to the success of World of Warcraft is maintaining the desire of players to come back for more, day after day. They have to be immersed in the game and feel like they’re playing in a real place.

Following the team as they prepare for their next content update, Alex talks to writers, producers and sound designers to find out how each of them play their part in creating Azeroth. From the meeting room, to the recording studio and the edit suite, each step along the way contributes to the player experience and the success of the game.

Oct 15 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #5: Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford: Skating for gold

Podcast cover
Read more
Canadian Pairs skaters going for gold at the 2018 Winter Olympics. Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford call on choreographers, costume designers and their own artistry and physical endurance to prepare for their final competitive performance together.

Jan 22 2018

31mins

Play

Rank #6: Daniel Schoppen: Roller coaster designer

Podcast cover
Read more
Inside a simple, white walled office in one of the world’s smallest countries, Daniel Schoppen is busy designing roller coasters that will scare, excite and delight riders from all over the globe.

Swiss journalist, Sarah Fluck, travels to Liechtenstein to meet the German born roller coaster designer as he puts the finishing touches to his latest creation, ‘Taiga’, for Linnanmäki Amusement Park in Helsinki, Finland.

With the park located just north of the city centre on top of a rocky terrain, placing the coaster was always going to be a challenge. Have the limitations of a small footprint impacted on Daniel’s plans to create Finland’s longest and fastest ride yet?

Sarah then joins Daniel as they travel to Linnanmäki to experience his new creation for the very first time, questioning whether roller coaster design is mere mathematics, or indeed a piece of art?

Aug 20 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #7: A new MoMA

Podcast cover
Read more
On 15 June 2019 the Museum of Modern Art in New York closed its doors ahead of a four month refurbishment and the final stage of a $400 million overhaul. When it re-opens its doors in October, MoMA will not only have reconfigured its galleries but also rehung the entire collection on show.

In this special edition of In The Studio, Paul Kobrak follows Ramona Bronkar Bannayan, Senior Deputy Director of Exhibitions & Collections, and Lana Hum, Director of Exhibition Design & Production, as they oversee this epic feat of creativity and choreography.

This time, instead of moving to a temporary space as they did for MoMA's last renovation 15 years ago, they are deinstalling and reinstalling nearly 170,000 square feet of gallery space in just under 4 months. Roughly 10,000 art moves are being undertaken between conservation, storage, and the galleries; and around 2,000 individual works of art are going into the frame shop - with 1,550 new frames having to be constructed.

But it is not just the logistical nightmare that is keeping Ramona, Lana and the Museum’s curators and staff awake at night. With 40,000 square feet of additional space, as a result of expanding into a new residential skyscraper, they also aim to rethink the way the story of modern and contemporary art is presented to the public – balancing the presentation of Claude Monet’s crowd-pleasing Water Lilies and Vincent Van Gogh’s The Starry Night, with lesser known works covering the full range of MoMA’s massive collection, including photography, sound works, performance, moving image and art forms not yet imagined.

With exclusive access over an eight month period, Paul Kobrak traces the team's progress as they prepare for the Museum’s closure and the subsequent re-opening on 21 October 2019. Presented by Paul Kobrak. Produced by Paul Kobrak , Ella-mai Robey and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service. North/south section-perspective through the new gallery spaces at The Museum of Modern Art, looking east along Fifty-third Street.

Oct 22 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #8: Richard Curtis: Writing Yesterday - Part one

Podcast cover
Read more
This month a new film by the award-winning screenwriter Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, Love Actually) will be launched in cinemas across the world. Yesterday is inspired by the music of the Beatles, and although the germ of the idea was not his, the story, its construction and the characters created are all Richard Curtis originals.

Yasmeen Khan has been talking to Richard as the film developed over the last two years with the various drafts shaped, reshaped and edited.

In this, the first of a special two-part In the Studio, she hears how his first attempts failed to satisfy his fiercest critic, his partner Emma, who also operates as his script editor. There’s also been the addition of a director, the Oscar-winning Danny Boyle, who provides another set of ideas that need incorporating. All the while Richard strives to ensure that the music of the Beatles, that’s been so important to him throughout his life, should remain at the heart of the final film.

Jun 25 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #9: Junya Ishigami: Architect of London's Serpentine Pavilion

Podcast cover
Read more
Every year since 2000 London’s Serpentine Gallery has offered an architect who has never built in the UK a very special challenge - to design a boundary pushing temporary building to stand in the heart of Kensington Gardens, London. They have just six months, a sixth of the average amount of time it takes to design and construct a building.

Architect Maria Smith follows Junya Ishigami and the pavilion team as they use their experience and ingenuity to try to construct the design. It’s a forest of slender white columns supporting a 61 ton roof of Cumbrian slate, a structure Junya refers to as 'a black bird flying through the rain'. How can they realise such a technically demanding building in such a short time and what will the public and the critics think when it’s finally complete?

Featuring a diverse selection from the huge team which contribute to the building, including architect Sir David Adjaye, curator Amira Gad, Project Manager Ted Featonby, Engineer Michael Orr and Serpentine Head of Construction and Buildings Julie Burnell. With access to almost every facet of the project Maria takes us into the normally unseen corners of this complex, challenging and internationally unparalleled architectural event.

Aug 06 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #10: Seven Worlds, One Planet

Podcast cover
Read more
The coldest, driest, windiest and most daunting continent on the planet is Antarctica. This is home to Gentoo Penguins. When the chicks fledge and head to the water’s edge for the very first time, they can have little idea of what lies ahead. Not only do they have to navigate huge blocks of glacial ice to reach the open water where they can feed, but patrolling the bay are leopard seals. These are powerful, fierce predators and an encounter can be fatal for the young birds.

After Blue Planet and Dynasties we go behind the scenes of the BBC’s latest Nature blockbuster Seven Worlds, One Planet and join wildlife cameraman John Aitchison on location to discover how the dramatic story of the challenges facing these young penguins is filmed. This hugely ambitious series narrated by David Attenborough transports viewers around the globe to tell the remarkable stories of how the landscape and conditions of each continent have shaped the unique animal life found there.

Major wildlife series are some of the most ambitious programmes on television. Each six to seven minute sequence can take a year or two to plan and several weeks to film and edit. They are made by highly specialised teams which combine technical expertise with an artist's eye, natural history knowledge and the hardiness of old-time Antarctic explorers.

As we discover, it doesn’t matter how much preparation you do, the unexpected can and usually does happen and the Natural World can be thrilling, challenging and horrifying.

Oct 29 2019

34mins

Play

Rank #11: Lee Child: Writing Jack Reacher

Podcast cover
Read more
Tom Cruise starred as the ex-military investigator but how are the novels written? Millions have been sold worldwide. Author Lee Child allows us to join him as he creates his next story.

Image: Lee Child, Credit: BBC

Oct 30 2017

28mins

Play

Rank #12: Jeff Staple: Designing for Timberland

Podcast cover
Read more
Jeff Staple is an acclaimed American fashion and graphic designer, founder of New York Design agency Staple Design, Staple Clothing and Reed Space boutique. He has collaborated and released lines with brands such as Nike, Coca-Cola, Oakley, Uniqlo, PUMA and Clarks. He serves as Creative Director for TGS Holdings, Inc - an innovative group of retail outlets.

As a designer he is respected for his keen eye and his dynamic yet practical and diligent approach. We get an exclusive insight into Jeff’s design philosophy, approach and process, as we spend time with him in his studio in New York City, whilst he works on his collaborative release with leading footwear titan, Timberland.

In addition, we hear from key figures within the industry about what makes Jeff and his work so iconic. These contributors include Chris McGrath (Vice President, Timberland Global Footwear Design), Rob Stone (Co-Founder of Cornerstone and The Fader), Sophia Chang (Illustrator), Upscale Vandal (Consultant - Roc Nation / PUMA / Billionaire Boys Club) and Bernie Gross (Artistic Director, Extra Butter).

The show is presented by Bobbito Garcia, the New York based critically acclaimed author, award-winning film-maker, presenter and DJ.

Nov 12 2019

32mins

Play

Rank #13: Nii Obodai: Finding the image

Podcast cover
Read more
The acclaimed Ghanaian photographer Nii Obodai is renowned for his distinctive black and white hazy silhouettes of distant landscapes and his stark compassionate portraits. As a youngster he spent time in England and now he’s back as artist-in-residence in the East Riding of Yorkshire, where he’s working on a new exhibition on environmental themes.

Nii is spending time in the marshes and woodland of the nearby nature reserve, photographing wildlife and the people who tend the landscape. But he’s not using the latest digital camera to take his pictures – instead he’s interweaving the techniques of the past by learning to photograph with an old-fashioned large format Deardorff camera, shooting in black and white and making prints. The work is based on techniques used by one of the founding fathers of British photography, William Henry Fox Talbot.

Felicity Finch joins Nii as he explores the marshlands and prepares to take his pictures which will be displayed in the Beverley Art Gallery. She follows him through the process – which can take hours – of waiting for the birds to come into shot, pressing the shutter and reloading the films. She also watches as he takes portraits of the workers at the reservoir.

Later in the seaside town of Scarborough we hear how Nii develops the films in the total darkness of an ad hoc darkroom and uses the traditional method of salt printing to create images in a variety of monochrome tones of rich earthy browns. It’s a learning process for Nii and while most of the images turn out the way he wants, others are less successful. We hear how he begins to make his final selections and how he is influenced by the potency of memory and landscape.

Sep 03 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #14: Iris van Herpen: Wearable works of art

Podcast cover
Read more
This May the musical superstar Björk has been performing a series of concerts in New York, entitled Cornucopia. One of the costumes she appears in is a dress specially created for her by the pioneering Dutch designer Iris van Herpen. Iris is renowned for her fluid designs and pioneering use of techniques such as 3D printing and has dressed many international celebrities. This new dress for Björk will be made of many different parts, blending design, art and science to create something truly unique.

Anik See visits Iris in her Amsterdam studio to observe the garment being created and worked on. We also hear from Björk herself in a special interview for this episode.

Iris has worked with Björk several times before, but with this project, the pressure is on as there’s a tight timescale and logistics to sort out of getting the dress fitted and shipped in time. Anik watches as the different components are made separately and sees the team at work assembling and fitting. As well as being striking, the dress must be able to move in the way Björk requires for the show - and be durable enough to withstand many nights of wear.

May 28 2019

32mins

Play

Rank #15: Christian Louboutin: Ingenious wizard of shoes

Podcast cover
Read more
The world-famous shoe designer with the Oscar-nominated actress Dame Kristin Scott Thomas. The secrets behind the red-soled, stratospherically high-heeled shoes. Travelling the world for inspiration, anything that catches his eye can be transformed into a detail on a shoe: from a Parisian cake decoration to an exotic Portuguese rock garden. And he discusses what makes a high heel incontrovertibly sexy.

Nov 20 2017

28mins

Play

Rank #16: Lorna Goodison: Jamaica's history in poetry

Podcast cover
Read more
Jamaica's first female poet laureate writes about slavery and the cultivation of sugar. She says, "What went on on those ships is indescribable in so many ways. I know I'm going to have to write about that."

Dec 25 2017

30mins

Play

Rank #17: Alice Sara Ott: Leading concert pianist

Podcast cover
Read more
Barefoot, sitting cross-legged at the piano, sometimes even with her own blood streaked across the keys, German-Japanese pianist Alice Sara Ott believes everything should come from your hands.

We meet Alice in her rehearsal room at Steinway Haus on a hot day in Munich as she prepares for new live performances in France, Germany and the UK. Alice shares her sense of humour, explores how she interprets music, talks about the colours she adds, what kind of piano she favours, and why she always travels with a Rubik’s Cube.

And as Alice says; you don’t have to be educated to listen to classical music; you get educated by listening to it. T-shirts, flip flops, popcorn - all are welcome at a concert with Alice Sara Ott.

The pieces come from her new album Nightfall with piano music from Satie, Debussy and Ravel. The album is a personal project for Alice, the recording last year coinciding with her 30th birthday and a sudden illness in her family. The album has taken on an even stronger personal significance for Alice, following her recent diagnosis with Multiple Sclerosis.

Jun 18 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #18: Christopher Doyle: Master movie maker

Podcast cover
Read more
"Go beyond words." On set with the multi-award-winning cinematographer, as he creates his latest film. It is a love letter to Hong Kong, “The White Girl”. We watch as Christopher Doyle frames, shoots and muses.

Oct 16 2017

30mins

Play

Rank #19: The Frouds: Creating creatures

Podcast cover
Read more
Brian Froud is not just an artist and illustrator; he is the conceptual designer behind the 1982 movie, The Dark Crystal, the first ever to have an all-puppet cast.

Now decades later, Netflix return to the world of Thra where the film was based, with a new 10 part prequel series. Ahead of its release on 30 August, Clem Hitchcock joins Brian - who is back on board as Creature and Costume Designer for the new series - at his home in rural Southwest England, where his characters begin their lives on his drawing board. As he sketches, Brian explains how the brooding surrounding landscape of Dartmoor inspires his ideas for Thra and all its weird and wonderful inhabitants.

But turning his drawings into physical puppets is a family affair – on set at a secret London location Brian is joined by Wendy, his wife, and Toby, their son. Brian and Wendy first met on the original Dark Crystal and they have collaborated together ever since. Wendy is a sculptor and a doll maker and was part of the team that built the original Yoda for Star Wars. Whereas sculptor and fabricator Toby was literally born into the business, playing the baby in another cult classic the Frouds worked on – Labyrinth, starring David Bowie.

Working on their most complex creation to date – a creature with a human performer and several puppeteers to bring it to life as its filmed – the Frouds explain how they struggle to keep the spirit of Brian’s original designs – with all the quirks and imperfections of real life.

Aug 13 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #20: Ai-Da: Putting the art into artificial intelligence

Podcast cover
Read more
With the announcement of the world’s first A.I. robot artist, In the Studio also announces a ‘first’ as we follow non-human artist, Ai-Da - a humanoid A.I. robot named after Ada Lovelace, the first female computer programmer in the world.

Karl Bos gains exclusive access to the design and making of what is hoped will be the first robot capable of drawing people from real life. Using A.I. processes and algorithms, cameras in her eyes and a pen in her robotic hand, Ai-Da’s ability as a robot to draw from sight has never been achieved before, and could make Ai-Da an artist in her own right.

The project is the brainchild of Gallery Director Aidan Meller who talks Karl through her creation, along with the young engineers making her drawing arm and the team producing her head, face and body. And in the final moments, once she’s assembled, will Karl hear from the artist herself?

(Image: The world’s first robot artist, Ai-Da. Credit to Nicky Johnston)

Jun 04 2019

31mins

Play

Arwa Al-Ammari

Podcast cover
Read more
Saudi fashion designer Arwa Al-Ammari is one of a handful of haute couture designers to emerge in recent years. She has recently begun combining traditional Saudi design with striking modernity and elegant modesty. Her latest line reaches back into the textures, history and geography of her nation and fuses them with the catwalk elegance of Milan.

Arwa's journey into design began as a painter and sculptor and she brought those multimedia disciplines, and attention to detail, to the fashion scene with her brand ArAm Designs in 2013. In 2016 she won the international reality show Fashion Star and remains determined to put Saudi elegance on the fashion map.

Reporter Cyma Aziz visits Arwa at the design table in her workshop as she prepares a new range for the catwalk.

Jan 14 2020

34mins

Play

Superflex: Deep Sea Minding

Podcast cover
Read more
What do you get when you put a Danish artist group together with oceanographers, material scientists, and marine biologists? The answer is an idea which might just change the way we imagine and design our environments in response to rising sea levels.

As warnings about the effects of global warming escalate, Superflex – an art group founded by Jakob Fenger, Bjørnstjerne Christiansen and Rasmus Nielsen in 1993 – have been working on a long term project to imagine a world where the original function and aesthetics of our carefully designed world may be lost to the tide.

Commissioned by TBA21-Academy, the project is called Deep Sea Minding and it considers whether it’s possible to design and create structures that could serve the needs and desires of both humans and marine life.

So in their headquarters in Copenhagen, the team at Superflex are mixing concrete and amino acids together to see whether they can create bricks to make houses and schools which can be occupied by humans first and then fish. They’re also preparing a prototype structure to be placed on the seabed to test the responses of fish to this new material.

Over the course of nine months Laura Hubber joins Rasmus Nielsen from Superflex for one leg of their epic journey – taking in California, Copenhagen and Jamaica – and meeting a Mermaid along the way.

Jan 07 2020

34mins

Play

Singing for the Pope

Podcast cover
Read more
In this special festive edition of In The Studio, Glyn Tansley goes behind the façade of the Vatican to meet the members of the oldest choir in the world, as they prepare for the biggest night on their calendar.

The Sistine Chapel Choir has a history dating back 1500 years, but it’s still one of the most active cultural institutions at the very heart of the Vatican.

It also has the prestige of being the Pope’s personal choir, performing for him whenever he’s in St Peter’s Basilica. As the Holy Father’s personal choir, it is called upon to play an ecumenical role, contributing to bringing together in art what has been separated by history and politics.

In their rehearsal room, we meet the men and boys who make up the choir as they prepare for Christmas mass, an event watched around the world by millions of worshipers. We’ll come to understand why being in this choir so important to them, and the pressures of being always on display through the Vatican’s global TV and radio services.

This is a rare glimpse into the real lives at the heart of an ancient tradition.

Dec 31 2019

32mins

Play

Creating an Icon

Podcast cover
Read more
For this special Christmas episode, In the Studio goes on a journey with one of the world's most renowned iconographers. Not just to witness the creation of a beautiful painting - but to witness a transformation. The moment a physical image becomes a religious icon - a prayer in paint that, for the faithful, acts as a door between heaven and earth.

Aidan Hart, a former hermit and Greek Orthodox monk whose icons you will find all over the world in churches and private collections - including that of Prince Charles - will paint an icon to celebrate the season of Advent.

Phil Pegum joins Aidan in rural England for five days as he paints a Christmas icon, and shares the secrets of the art form by explaining their symbolism and strange perspectives.

Dec 24 2019

32mins

Play

Designing the new Aston Martin

Podcast cover
Read more
The makers of James Bond's car are entering new territory. Aston Martin, the British manufacturer usually associated with 007's sports car, are launching their first family motor - an SUV.

In The Studio has gained exclusive access to the design and manufacturing process. Presenter Andy Jaye joins Head of Design, Marek Reichman, in his studio, follows the car through rigorous testing, and finally, sees it launched to the public.

Dec 17 2019

33mins

Play

Adrian Smith: Reaching for the skies

Podcast cover
Read more
Architect Adrian Smith designs the world’s tallest towers. How does he use his creativity to develop new designs for each of these buildings, and how does he ensure each building fits within the cultural landscape of the city or land in which it will be constructed?

Adrian Smith’s name and company, Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill Architecture, is synonymous with tall buildings. Millions of people flock to the observation decks of Adrian’s buildings every year, desperate to get a glimpse of a city skyline from its highest point, and the Burj Khalifa in Dubai is now firmly in the top ten list of the world’s most popular tourist destinations.

In Adrian’s studio in Chicago, Eleri Llian Rees sets out to discover what motivates and inspires the man who has created modern day wonders of the world. Adrian describes how he is working creatively with his team at the moment to design a new building for Nanjing, China, incorporating the geography of the land into the design to make it unique.

Adrian tells us that collaboration is at the heart of the firm’s work, knowing that designs can change – sometimes significantly – throughout the construction process, and reveals the surprising part played by small chisels and super glue in creating the majestic art of the skyscraper.

Adrian is a fascinating character, a visionary at the cutting edge of his chosen field, pushing the boundaries of architectural possibility with awe-inspiring imagination.

Dec 10 2019

31mins

Play

Cecilia Paredes: Camouflage artist

Podcast cover
Read more
You might think the aim of most artists and performers is to stand out from the crowd, but not Peruvian-born Cecilia Paredes. Her aim is to blend in, quite literally.

In her series of ‘camouflage’ self-portraits, Cecilia’s body is painstakingly painted - during a ‘performance’ which lasts many hours - to precisely match a colourful and patterned wallpaper or fabric in the background.

The resulting photograph challenges the viewer gaze, to seek out Cecilia’s form from the scene behind. It is an idea which began 20 years ago, when Cecilia first arrived in the United States and found herself trying to blend in.

Céline Ottenburgh finds the camouflage artist amongst a crowded airport, and accompanies her as she goes in search of the perfect wallpaper for her latest project, amongst the walls of an 18th century castle in Belgium.

Dec 03 2019

31mins

Play

Pretty Yende: Taking on La Traviata

Podcast cover
Read more
Pretty Yende is a young South African opera singer at the top of her game. Having enjoyed a meteoric rise performing in opera houses internationally, this autumn she took on the lead role of Violetta in Verdi's 'La Traviata' at Paris Opera. In this ‘In the Studio’, the cellist Abel Selaocoe talks to her about her preparations for the role, follows her as the challenging production takes shape, and meets her after her triumphant first performance to find out what it means to her.

‘Even if I want to admit it or not, being the first black person to sing this role at Paris Opera is a huge deal’ Yende tells Abel after opening night. For someone who became interested in opera aged 16 after hearing the Flower Duet on a TV advert, success has come swiftly. She made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2013 when she was just 27, and released her first album in 2016.

Abel talks to Yende about her background in a Zulu speaking home in Piet Retief in South Africa, and asks what it took for her to get where she is. She reveals the way she approaches her work, and reflecting on the opportunities she has had, says: “I represent every person that was never given the chance to be here. Every one of my brothers and sisters with tremendous talent that never got here. I get to be entrusted with the honour of saying ‘it’s possible’.

Nov 26 2019

31mins

Play

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Border Tuner

Podcast cover
Read more
Imagine huge searchlights which can be seen over a ten mile, 15 kilometer radius talking to one another across two countries. This is exactly what electronic media artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer is creating this November between Ciudad Juárez in Mexico and El Paso in Texas.

Called Border Tuner, the project will see enormous bridges of light connecting the US-Mexico border for the first time.

When lights from the stations (three on each side) are directed at each other and they manage to make a connection, a massive bridge of light is formed. This activates microphones and speakers allowing participants to communicate with one another across the border. The “light bridge” flickers like morse code as the participants listen and speak to one another. If they don’t like what they are hearing they can retune to a different light beam.

This is not the first time Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has used search lights in his art but he’s never done anything on this scale or with this complexity before. Born in Mexico City in 1967, he first produced a remote-controlled searchlight project in 1999 for the Zócalo Square in Mexico City. Since then he has created installations in dozens of cities around the world where the public controls the searchlights using the internet, mobile phones, megaphones or heart rate sensors.

Nov 19 2019

33mins

Play

Jeff Staple: Designing for Timberland

Podcast cover
Read more
Jeff Staple is an acclaimed American fashion and graphic designer, founder of New York Design agency Staple Design, Staple Clothing and Reed Space boutique. He has collaborated and released lines with brands such as Nike, Coca-Cola, Oakley, Uniqlo, PUMA and Clarks. He serves as Creative Director for TGS Holdings, Inc - an innovative group of retail outlets.

As a designer he is respected for his keen eye and his dynamic yet practical and diligent approach. We get an exclusive insight into Jeff’s design philosophy, approach and process, as we spend time with him in his studio in New York City, whilst he works on his collaborative release with leading footwear titan, Timberland.

In addition, we hear from key figures within the industry about what makes Jeff and his work so iconic. These contributors include Chris McGrath (Vice President, Timberland Global Footwear Design), Rob Stone (Co-Founder of Cornerstone and The Fader), Sophia Chang (Illustrator), Upscale Vandal (Consultant - Roc Nation / PUMA / Billionaire Boys Club) and Bernie Gross (Artistic Director, Extra Butter).

The show is presented by Bobbito Garcia, the New York based critically acclaimed author, award-winning film-maker, presenter and DJ.

Nov 12 2019

32mins

Play

Dancing with the Stars in Myanmar

Podcast cover
Read more
Known in the UK as Strictly Come Dancing and across the globe as Dancing with the Stars, this BBC brand is known for pairing celebrities with professional dancers, having their performances scrutinised by a panel of judges and allowing the public to vote for their favourite. This autumn the show is being created for the first time in Myanmar. What does it take to bring this format to a new audience and create the programme from scratch?

The venture is the passion project of French brothers Henri and Benoit de Lorme. They’ve already brought formats like Masterchef to the country. But dancing is a very different proposition, and in Myanmar there are many cultural sensitivities to be aware of. One is around the design of the costumes, where the need to create something flamboyant which works for camera also needs to take into account local sensitivities around how much flesh can be exposed.

It’s also a challenging country to work in as the media companies are still in their infancy and there are shortages of people with the necessary skills to realise these big projects.

In addition there is the deadline to build the set, the process of getting the celebrities and new judges trained and the last minute cast changes. With so much to do in a short space of time, it’s going to be a challenge to get everything in place by the first broadcast.

Ali Fowle follows the show as it evolves and finds out how the de Lorme brothers work together - and what legacy they plan to create.

This is an updated version of the podcast - edited to correct a minor factual error.

Nov 05 2019

33mins

Play

Seven Worlds, One Planet

Podcast cover
Read more
The coldest, driest, windiest and most daunting continent on the planet is Antarctica. This is home to Gentoo Penguins. When the chicks fledge and head to the water’s edge for the very first time, they can have little idea of what lies ahead. Not only do they have to navigate huge blocks of glacial ice to reach the open water where they can feed, but patrolling the bay are leopard seals. These are powerful, fierce predators and an encounter can be fatal for the young birds.

After Blue Planet and Dynasties we go behind the scenes of the BBC’s latest Nature blockbuster Seven Worlds, One Planet and join wildlife cameraman John Aitchison on location to discover how the dramatic story of the challenges facing these young penguins is filmed. This hugely ambitious series narrated by David Attenborough transports viewers around the globe to tell the remarkable stories of how the landscape and conditions of each continent have shaped the unique animal life found there.

Major wildlife series are some of the most ambitious programmes on television. Each six to seven minute sequence can take a year or two to plan and several weeks to film and edit. They are made by highly specialised teams which combine technical expertise with an artist's eye, natural history knowledge and the hardiness of old-time Antarctic explorers.

As we discover, it doesn’t matter how much preparation you do, the unexpected can and usually does happen and the Natural World can be thrilling, challenging and horrifying.

Oct 29 2019

34mins

Play

A new MoMA

Podcast cover
Read more
On 15 June 2019 the Museum of Modern Art in New York closed its doors ahead of a four month refurbishment and the final stage of a $400 million overhaul. When it re-opens its doors in October, MoMA will not only have reconfigured its galleries but also rehung the entire collection on show.

In this special edition of In The Studio, Paul Kobrak follows Ramona Bronkar Bannayan, Senior Deputy Director of Exhibitions & Collections, and Lana Hum, Director of Exhibition Design & Production, as they oversee this epic feat of creativity and choreography.

This time, instead of moving to a temporary space as they did for MoMA's last renovation 15 years ago, they are deinstalling and reinstalling nearly 170,000 square feet of gallery space in just under 4 months. Roughly 10,000 art moves are being undertaken between conservation, storage, and the galleries; and around 2,000 individual works of art are going into the frame shop - with 1,550 new frames having to be constructed.

But it is not just the logistical nightmare that is keeping Ramona, Lana and the Museum’s curators and staff awake at night. With 40,000 square feet of additional space, as a result of expanding into a new residential skyscraper, they also aim to rethink the way the story of modern and contemporary art is presented to the public – balancing the presentation of Claude Monet’s crowd-pleasing Water Lilies and Vincent Van Gogh’s The Starry Night, with lesser known works covering the full range of MoMA’s massive collection, including photography, sound works, performance, moving image and art forms not yet imagined.

With exclusive access over an eight month period, Paul Kobrak traces the team's progress as they prepare for the Museum’s closure and the subsequent re-opening on 21 October 2019. Presented by Paul Kobrak. Produced by Paul Kobrak , Ella-mai Robey and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service. North/south section-perspective through the new gallery spaces at The Museum of Modern Art, looking east along Fifty-third Street.

Oct 22 2019

33mins

Play

World of Warcraft

Podcast cover
Read more
World of Warcraft is one of the most popular computer games on the planet and it’s managed to sustain that popularity for 15 years, outlasting countless rivals. The game is produced by creative artists, designers and programmers who work together to create the mystical land of Azeroth.

Presenter and gamer Alex Humphreys spends time with the sound department, who play a critical role in the development of the game. The key to the success of World of Warcraft is maintaining the desire of players to come back for more, day after day. They have to be immersed in the game and feel like they’re playing in a real place.

Following the team as they prepare for their next content update, Alex talks to writers, producers and sound designers to find out how each of them play their part in creating Azeroth. From the meeting room, to the recording studio and the edit suite, each step along the way contributes to the player experience and the success of the game.

Oct 15 2019

33mins

Play

Kadir López: Lighting up Havana

Podcast cover
Read more
As Cuba’s capital city Havana celebrates its 500th birthday, one artist has been making it his mission to recreate the famous neon signs that used to adorn buildings and light up the streets and squares.

Kadir López has had his multimedia work exhibited worldwide, but over the past few years he has been driven by a passion for neon and the concept of connecting Havana’s present with its colourful past. He and his small team of skilled craftspeople remake the signs in a workshop in the centre of Havana, often in searing heat and soaring temperatures. There are specialist procedures needed for the bending of the neon and the colouring and design. Then the signs have to be carefully re-positioned on buildings, using scaffolding and cranes.

Julia Galiano-Rios watches Kadir as he brings the signs to life and hears how the use of neon can throw new light – both physical and spiritual – on a city.

Oct 08 2019

32mins

Play

John Saunderson: The man who makes hit records

Podcast cover
Read more
He’s not a singer, writer or a musician but he’s earned a reputation as a Number 1 hitmaker across the globe with credits like “Bonkers” by Dizzee Rascal.

John Saunderson has been in the music business for over 40 years and has an uncanny knack of working with his team of songwriters and colleagues at Notting Hill Music to choose exactly the right song for the right artist. He’s had over 30 number 1 hits in 15 countries around the world and is always looking for the next big thing.

Anna Bailey follows John to find out what the different processes are in the life of a hitmaker. She watches as his team work on composing with the former Pussycat Doll singing star Melody Thornton and hears how a song is created, often in a very short space of time.

Anna also follows the initial steps of choosing a song for the South Korean pop phenomenon J.Fla who is looking for something to appeal to a Western audience. Her team have a very specific set of requirements, including wanting a “hook” or earworm that will be distinctive. Will John and the team be able to deliver?

Oct 01 2019

32mins

Play

The XYZ Show: Kenya’s satirical puppets

Podcast cover
Read more
Since 2009, the XYZ Show has been holding Kenyan politicians and other global figures to account, with a hilarious and cutting form of satire, starring... puppets! The brainchild of widely syndicated political cartoonist Gado, the XYZ Show aims to get people talking about issues through humour – in the tradition of famous satirical puppet shows like the UK’s Spitting Image and France’s Les Guignols. From President Uhuru Kenyatta to Donald Trump – a latex avatar is ready and waiting to spring into life.

After a break of over a year, the XYZ Show is back on air for its 13th season, and the BBC’s Anthony Irungu has gained exclusive access to go behind the scenes. Follow him as he meets the puppet masters and makers, scriptwriters, directors, producers and voice artists that create each carefully crafted episode from scratch in just 10 days – and asks why puppets are so effective in satire.

Sep 24 2019

33mins

Play

Andile Vellem: Hearing through movement

Podcast cover
Read more
Music and dance are so tied together, it might be hard to imagine how a profoundly deaf dancer can become an international star in the contemporary dance world - but South African Andile Vellem has done it. Vellem lost his hearing at the age of five, but that hasn’t stopped him from dancing, or becoming the Artistic Director of one of South Africa's leading integrated dance companies, Unmute.

Andile grew up in a house full of dance. His parents were famous ballroom dancers - one of the few professional dance genres open to non-whites - and as a small child he remembers his sister holding his hand to a speaker so he could feel the vibrations created by the music. As he grew older, inspired first by Michael Jackson, and later by the rich musical history of the Cape, he learned to sense music through vibration - creating his own style of dance, including sign dance.

Our presenter, British singer and musician Nathaniel Mann, travels to Cape Town for a close encounter with the talented dancer, as he embarks on a new production called Trapped Man, in which he and another dancer are bound tightly together, struggling for release.

Nathaniel follows Andile through the work’s creation, from the inspiration for the choreography, through rehearsals and the composition of its unique soundtrack – inspired by a century of South African music – as he builds towards the all-important public performance.

Sep 17 2019

32mins

Play

Steppenwolf Theatre Company

Podcast cover
Read more
Nick Duncalf follows Tina Landau and Tarell Alvin McCraney of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company as they rehearse their revolutionary new stage show, Ms Blakk for President.

In Chicago, Illinois, two of the ensemble’s key creatives, Tina Landau and Tarell Alvin McCraney, are bringing a theatrically daring and politically charged new show to life. Ms Blakk for President tells the extraordinary true story of an African-American drag queen who ran for president of the United States in 1992, at the height of the Aids crisis. Tarell is a critically acclaimed playwright who won an Oscar for his screenplay for the film Moonlight, based on his own childhood growing up in Miami, Florida. Not only has this show been created from scratch at breakneck speed, but Tarell is playing the lead role, after a 15-year absence from the stage. Inspired and supported by the company’s history and success, Tarell, Tina, and Steppenwolf’s artistic director, Anna D. Shapiro, are determined that this cultural institution must be theatrically and politically revolutionary in order to not just survive, but thrive in the 21st century.

Founded 45 years ago in a leafy suburb of Chicago, the Steppenwolf Theatre Company has forged a reputation as one of the world’s foremost producers of electrifying, actor-led theatre, from their breakthrough productions of Balm in Gilead and Sam Shepard’s True West, to the Pullitzer Prize-winning August: Osage County, written by one of their own ensemble members, actor-turned-playwright Tracy Letts. The ensemble, expanding over the years to include 50 members, has won Tonys, Emmys, Pullitzers and multiple Oscar nominations, and includes John Malkovich, Laurie Metcalf, Gary Sinise, Joan Allen, Bruce Norris, and many more.

Sep 10 2019

34mins

Play

Nii Obodai: Finding the image

Podcast cover
Read more
The acclaimed Ghanaian photographer Nii Obodai is renowned for his distinctive black and white hazy silhouettes of distant landscapes and his stark compassionate portraits. As a youngster he spent time in England and now he’s back as artist-in-residence in the East Riding of Yorkshire, where he’s working on a new exhibition on environmental themes.

Nii is spending time in the marshes and woodland of the nearby nature reserve, photographing wildlife and the people who tend the landscape. But he’s not using the latest digital camera to take his pictures – instead he’s interweaving the techniques of the past by learning to photograph with an old-fashioned large format Deardorff camera, shooting in black and white and making prints. The work is based on techniques used by one of the founding fathers of British photography, William Henry Fox Talbot.

Felicity Finch joins Nii as he explores the marshlands and prepares to take his pictures which will be displayed in the Beverley Art Gallery. She follows him through the process – which can take hours – of waiting for the birds to come into shot, pressing the shutter and reloading the films. She also watches as he takes portraits of the workers at the reservoir.

Later in the seaside town of Scarborough we hear how Nii develops the films in the total darkness of an ad hoc darkroom and uses the traditional method of salt printing to create images in a variety of monochrome tones of rich earthy browns. It’s a learning process for Nii and while most of the images turn out the way he wants, others are less successful. We hear how he begins to make his final selections and how he is influenced by the potency of memory and landscape.

Sep 03 2019

31mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
0
2
1
0

Tim Marlow is a national treasure

By napostolides - Nov 12 2017
Read more
What makes this podcast terrific is the creative and artistic vision of Tim Marlow. He bookends each episode with insightful comments, and most importantly he curated the series to take us inside the creative process. Tim has created my go-to weekly arts podcast, and I’m always eager each weekend to discover the latest episode!

Always the Best

By mwesmak - Sep 05 2017
Read more
That's the backbone of the new dreamers trying to make it through books, and this podcasts shows just that.