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Celebrate Native American Heritage

Celebrate Native American Heritage

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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We Were Always Here

We Were Always Here, a contemporary art installation carved by artist Rick Bartow (Wiyot), stands at the northwest corner of the National Museum of the American Indian site. Commissioned by the museum in 2011 to honor its eighth anniversary, the work was crafted primarily from a single old-growth western red cedar tree.

5mins

8 Nov 2012

Rank #1

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Cosmology of the Milky Way

Douglas Herman, senior geographer at the National Museum of the American Indian, introduces “Stellar Connections: Explorations in Cultural Astronomy,” a symposium on ethno- or archaeoastronomy. In this first segment, Gary Urton, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian Studies at Harvard University, presents a richly detailed talk on the cosmologies of three South American cultural traditions: the Desana and Barasana of Colombia; the Quechua/Inka of the Andes, and Bororo of the Amazon Basin.

8 Nov 2012

Rank #2

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Fact or Fiction, Pt. 2

Since the first court decision to articulate Native American law back in 1823, our nation's courts have repeatedly invoked historical “facts” as a basis for fashioning judicial doctrines that have been prejudicial and harmful to Native Americans. This important symposium will reveal that many of our modern Native law doctrines are based in fiction, not fact. Join us as we explore the historical foundations of key court decisions impacting Native Americans. In Part 2 of the symposium, Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee) presents “Legal Fiction in Federal Indian Law” and Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee) speaks on “Standing Bear v. Crook: The Brown v. Board of Education of American Indian Law.” A Q&A session with all presenters of the symposium follows.

2hr 1min

8 Nov 2012

Rank #3

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David Boxley Totem Pole at the National Museum of the American Indian

Tsimshian carver David Boxley created a totem pole for the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Boxley, who grew up in Metlakatla, Alaska, and his son finished the work in the museum's Potomac atrium, where the Tsimshian dance group Git–Hoan (People of the Salmon) celebrated the unveiling. “There’s few of us,” Boxley said of the Tsimshian. “But we're alive and well. We wanted to let people know we’re alive and well.” The totem features a chief holding salmon, a group of villagers, and an eagle—the symbol of Boxley’s clan.

5mins

8 Nov 2012

Rank #4

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Get Your Music On! with Greg Analla

Native American artist and musician Greg Analla (Isleta and Laguna Pueblo) gives a workshop for families on making rattles with traditional Pueblo. His presentation includes personal knowledge and family stories on Pueblo communities, language, history, and music. A talented musician, Gregg also performs several traditional Pueblo songs during the workshop, which concludes with the participants joining in with their rattles in a Pueblo rain song.

8 Nov 2012

Rank #5