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Dear Art Producer

Dear Art Producer connects the photography and video community with art producers in the advertising community. This podcast introduces you to different art producers, share the stories of their diverse career paths, explore what it means to stay relevant and examine industry topics such as marketing, estimating, directing, websites and more.

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036: Monica Zaffarano, Photoshoot Producer and Founder of Trybe Production Collective

Today’s episode is an expansion on the Dear Art Producer format! Monica Zaffarano, Photoshoot Producer and Founder of Trybe Production Collective comes on the podcast to share her experience on the importance of relationships, the growing prevalence of motion, and how to stay relevant in a changing industry. Key Takeaways [:32] Heather introduces Monica Zaffarano and asks her to share how she made her way into production from ballet, musical theater, and acting. [5:45] Monica speaks about how Trybe Production Collective came about, the constantly evolving industry and why she ended up having to also do some freelance art buying! [11:15] Heather touches on a public collaboration idea she has been toying with regards to producers — but she has her hands full! [12:39] Monica and Heather speak to having a second person. [14:44] How does Monica keep it all together? Balance and boundaries are important, don’t say yes to too many things. [18:47] Most jobs have motion in them now, Monica details what that means operationally with her photographers and their DPs and crews. [21:13] Monica talks about the estimating process and breaks down the things reps and photographers can do to make the process smoother! [26:02] Reduce your rate or reduce shoot days? Monica shares how she chooses to share and show discounts. [27:30] Bidding multiple photographers on the same project happens, Monica learned some early lessons from those. [30:25] Monica speaks to fostering creativity on set and with her photographers — listening comes first and have lots of food. Heather and Monica open a parenthesis on treatments: they are super informing and good ones have clarity and a good balance of visuals and approach. [36:48] On the impetus for the drop/ocean quote on Monica’s website, the Trybe logo, and the recurring theme of “us” and relationships on the podcast and in this industry. [41:23] What do photographers need to do to stay relevant? [44:12] If not production, what would Monica do? [45:24] Heather thanks Monica for coming on the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Trybe Production Collective “Individually we are one drop, together we are an ocean.” — Ryunosuke Satoro More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Monica Zaffarano on LinkedIn

46mins

11 Nov 2019

Rank #1

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003: Heather Church, Arnold Worldwide/NY- Part 1 - How She Got Into The Business and How to Get Her Attention

Part 1, how Heather Chutch got into the business and how to get her attention. This is Part 1 of a 2 part interview with Heather Church of the New York office of Arnold Worldwide. Listen in for a fun dive into what got Heather into art production as well as some insider tips on how best to grab her attention. Key Takeaways [:30] Heather introduces Heather Church from the Arnold Worldwide New York office for Part 1 of two podcasts covering how she got into the business and how to get her attention. [1:15] What was the path that took Heather C. into advertising and ultimately art production? [3:40] Heather C. talks about her previous jobs, but more specifically the skills those experiences imparted that she uses as an art producer. [4:24] Heather E. asks if there were any influences that were instrumental in shaping Heather C.’s path and interest in photography. [7:23] How do photographers get Heather C.’s attention? [8:14] If Heather C. Likes someone’s work, will she visit their website or social media accounts? [9:08] Heather E. touches on the importance of photographers building their own relationships with art producers and the reasons she encourages it. [11:23] On website design, scrolling, thumbnails, organization, etc. [14:38] How does Heather C. introduce an artist’s information to her team when she’s found an interesting candidate? [15:54] “Somebody has worked really hard on this project, this is their baby.” Heather E. highlights the reasons why it’s important for photographers to show appreciation for the work that was put in. [17:11] Heather C. shares an anecdote on the importance of creative call chemistry. [18:25] Does Heather C. encourage specific conversations or ask specific “chemistry gauging” questions on creative calls? [20:48] The tables are turned: the art producer asks the rep a question! [21:16] Heather E. invites listeners to tune in for Part 2 of this episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com, visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Arnold Worldwide More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about our guest Heather Church’s Bio Heather Church’s website Heather Church on LinkedIn Heather Church’s Beauty Smarts program on Instagram Heather Church’s Beauty Smarts program on Twitter Heather Church’s Beauty Smarts program on Facebook Heather Church’s Beauty Smarts program on Pinterest

21mins

20 Mar 2019

Rank #2

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038: Michael Bilbrey, Senior Production Consultant at Leo Burnett

Mike Bilbrey has been with Leo Burnett for 28 years; he comes on the show today to share an enormous wealth of experience and share his tips and advice on subjects ranging from bidding to ideal website maintenance. Tune in for an in-depth discussion with Mike, the unflappable industry veteran! Key Takeaways [:32] Heather introduces Michael Bilbrey and asks him to share the story of how he made his way into the advertising industry. [7:02] Leo Burnett was taken over by a holding company; Mike shares how it affected the company — knowing that once you’re a Burnetter you’re always a Burnetter! [8:43] Mike shares something surprising about himself, and what it taught him that he uses in his career, he also touches on what it takes to be a good producer. [14:17] Leo Burnett wrote the book on bidding — and they wrote it well — Mike and Heather dive into the details of the firm bid process. [26:17] Email blasts are a great way to keep in touch with Mike, and he explains how to time them appropriately. He speaks to the importance of meeting people in person and keeping your e-file cabinet up to date. [34:00] Mike shares his thoughts and tips on how to maintain a good website. He also shares a suggestion for photographers that have clients who don’t give showing permission. [37:29] Mike touches on the bidding process, creative calls, his advice on delivering a good treatment and what it takes to get a job approved. He also stresses the importance of talking to the people who didn’t get the job. [48:08] Michael shares a story on honesty when it comes to bidding — and please make sure your math adds up. [57:42] Heather thanks Mike for coming on the podcast and takes a moment to thank listeners for tuning in for 38 wonderful episodes and signs off until the new year! Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Leo Burnett More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Michael Bilbrey on LinkedIn

58mins

2 Dec 2019

Rank #3

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034: Jamie Zimmermann, Art Producer, FCB Chicago

Jamie Zimmermann is new to art producing; she joins the show to give a fresh perspective. Having been a rep, she shares how having seen both sides of the fence impacts how she tackles the job. Key Takeaways [:55] Heather introduces Jamie Zimmerman and asks her to share the path that took her from studying photography in college, production, and repping, to where she is today. [4:45] Having been a rep, Jamie shares how she chooses to handle letting people know when they haven’t made the cut. Heather and Jamie also discuss what to do with large bid discrepancies. [8:13] Jamie touches on the budget differences she sees working with younger photographers as well as how social shoots manage to work with scrappier budgets. [11:44] Finding photographers for Jamie primarily goes through reps, because of the support system. [12:29] What advice does Jamie have for unrepped photographers looking to get hired? [14:27] Jamie will check a photographer’s Instagram to get a feel for their personality, but the creative calls are the biggest opportunity for photographers to shine: do make sure you talk! [18:55] Treatments are one way for photographers to show images they might not otherwise have had the opportunity to share, but they should always keep the client in mind: their vision needs to be readable by non-creatives as well (read almost literal). [23:06] Once the creative calls and treatments are in, Jamie finds that most of the time a clear front-runner will have appeared. [25:46] On sharing who bid, Jamie and Heather share their points of view and some interesting personal experiences. [32:35] Motion is an increasing ask — especially cinemagraphs — if motion doesn’t appear on a photographer’s website, she will move on to the next. [36:24] What does her team say about her? Jamie’s answer leads to a discussion on building strong relationships, transparency, and trust. [40:54] If not art production, what would Jamie do? [41:30] Heather thanks Jamie for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode FCB Chicago Sandra Ann Sanchez More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Jamie Zimmermann on LinkedIn

42mins

28 Oct 2019

Rank #4

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005: Jacqueline Fodor Freelance Art Producer, Previously at Venables Bell & Partners

The single frame narrative of Jacqueline Fodor’s life, the cadence of certain types of work (including art production), and the rapid evolution of the role of photographers — tune in to this dynamic discussion to hear about all of this, and more! She started her career in LA as a film wardrobe stylist before moving to the San Francisco Bay Area to produce content for infomercial visionaries. She has built production departments, along with viable content studios at agencies like Venables Bell and Partners and Duncan Channon. She was also the lead producer at Google’s Brand Studio creating content to launch the Google Store. Key Takeaways [:30] Heather introduces Jacqueline Fodor, a freelance Art Producer. [1:24] Jacqueline talks about her nontraditional path to art production. [6:02] Has the single hero image disappeared? Jacqueline dives into some key differences between what the clients want and what they actually ask for. [9:04] Heather asks if Jacqueline developed skills at other jobs that transfer well to art production. [13:32] Photography had a kind of monopoly on advertising but things have evolved massively; what is different today in agencies? Jacqueline and Heather unpack the evolution of the creative role of multidisciplinary photographers in this context, which is more and more of a DA and partner role. [21:36] On the financial aspects entailed for photographers to offer a wider variety of services. [24:33] Broadcast producers are beginning to call on photographers to fill some of their needs as well, but the relationships being so new, comes with their own set of challenges! [28:50] Heather asks how a photographer or producer can get Jacqueline’s attention. [30:24] Does Jacqueline think photographers need to be more of a brand today? [34:07] Heather thanks Jacqueline for coming onto the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com, visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Venables Bell & Partners Shepard Fairey More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about our guest Jacqueline Fodor on the Web Jacqueline Fodor on LinkedIn

34mins

1 Apr 2019

Rank #5

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027: Shari Goetz, Freelance Art Producer

Shari Goetz comes on the podcast today to talk about what being a freelance Art Producer means in today’s advertising market and she shares important tips on how to be hired back by an agency. Key Takeaways [:31] Heather introduces Shari and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, how she found her way into art production, and how much technological evolution and industry changes have shaped the way we work and the kind of work she does today. [6:13] Shari shares that the relationship with the client today is very different: there is a lot more client contact and they want a lot of assets and material for all sorts of usages with more and more limited budgets. So, an important part of her job today is communication to establish priorities. [8:05] Heather and Shari touch on greay areas in terms of roles and responsibilities that were created by this new client proximity which the client accounts people used to take on. [12:34] Heather emphasizes the importance of communication and prioritizing, especially when you have a client on siteon-site asking to add shots as you go! Shari shares some tips on how she handles these kinds of situations. [16:52] The producer hired by the photographer should Iideally be Shari’s complement, but depending on the person this doesn’t necessarily happen,; it’s not always what she calls a “magical shoot.”. [19:35] Shari walks us through the different ways the process can go from finding a photographer to getting a bid approved on her side. [22:11] Grabbing her attention primarily goes through agents and reps, but she still does use sourcebooks. Photography is very emotional and subjective so it’s often about how the images make her feel. [25:39] Heather and Shari share on what it means to be a professional photographer today, doing client service and managing teams…  How many “B” people you can have without ruining your “A” team. [27:40] Shari talks about the defining influence of broadcast on the escalation of photographers’ workload, notably treatments which she finds to be an enormous time expenditure. [32:14] Shari will share who is bidding but it does make her uncomfortable sometimes: she tries to get all of the bids equal so that it’s only a creative call. [34:45] Shari asks Heather a question about talent agencies which leads to a discussion on usage and NDA’s and union and labor laws. [39:18] Is freelancing difficult? Shari touches on some of the challenges as well as the perks of freelancing. [41:20] Shari shares a tip for photographers — meet everybody from the agency that you can and make sure you make magic shoots happen: they will want you back again. [42:48] Heather thanks Shari for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Shari Goetz on LinkedIn

43mins

9 Sep 2019

Rank #6

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022: Jodi Morrison, Managing Art Producer, Starbucks

Today’s episode is one of the few ones Heather has tackled with an art producer on the client’s side of things! Key Takeaways [:31] Heather introduces Jody and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, and how she found her way into art production. [7:50] Jodi dives in deeper into her role at Starbucks and highlights the differences between working for a brand and working in an agency. [11:27] Starbucks does use advertising agencies and a lot of the work that shows up outside of the stores come from partner agencies. [13:16] Jodi does find that work flows freakishly fast on the in-house side, but it does lead to expectations becoming more and more intense. [16:26] The main way of grabbing Jodi’s attention is through her network — the agents and reps she knows, but she does recommend that the bulk of a photographer’s focus be on digital presence: Instagram, website, emails, and links, etc. [22:31] In terms of motion, some education still needs to occur internally with regard to photographers doing motion; it’s not necessarily a two-for-one! [25:48] Jodi walks us through the estimating process on her side and she shares that the concept isn’t always nailed down at that time, so she is required to explore estimates without knowing the scope of the creative! [29:10] Jodi does have a creative call, but she isn’t contractually obligated to triple bid, she touches on how working client-side offers a lot of flexibility. [31:42] The treatment is nice to have but for smaller contracts, it isn’t required. Jodi shares how she treats telling people when they didn’t get the contract. [35:33] Heather asks where the Starbucks creatives — who need to be trendsetters — find their inspiration. [37:39] Jodi shares some advice for photographers who are interested in being noticed by Starbucks. [40:30] Heather ask Jodi a few personal questions, and thanks her for coming on the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Starbucks More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Jodi Morrison on LinkedIn

43mins

5 Aug 2019

Rank #7

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037: Sandra Sanchez, Senior Art Producer, FCB Chicago

Sandra loves partnering with creatives to weave visual stories. She is energetic, insightful, and generous and comes on the show today to shares her experience as well as a heap of invaluable tips. Tune in for a very dynamic episode! Key Takeaways [:32] Heather introduces Sandra Sanchez and asks her to share how she made her way into art production from studying journalism and PR. She shares a surprising fact about herself. [7:45] Having worked under a decade in the industry is still enough time for Sandra to have seen changes. [10:37] It seems to be more difficult for broadcast producers to learn art production than the other way around, Heather and Sandra share their thoughts on why that may be. [15:20] Motion is a frequent ask, and more of it comes with bigger productions. Sandra speaks to how she chooses trustworthy people for her larger projects. [18:40] Sandra Shares a bunch of tips for photographers’ websites and talks about what makes a good site for an art producer. [20:39] On getting Sandra’s attention — she details part of her filing system both on and offline. Instagram is something Sandra will visit, but it’s not a primary tool. [27:04] The estimating process begins with Sandra as early as possible (sometimes with the brief); she walks us through the steps necessary from there. [33:07] Who should choose a producer? Heather shares her recent challenges. [36:44] Sandra and Heather talk about the creative call imperatives. Heather shares a question she would like to hear on creative calls. [44:18] Facetime, Zoom, Google Hangouts are things Sandra would like to try to get a feel for body language! [45:07] What makes a good treatment? [47:50] If Sandra wasn’t doing art production, she would work with animals — in a very specific place! [49:10] Heather thanks Sandra for coming on the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode FCB Chicago More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Sandra Ann Sanchez on LinkedIn

49mins

18 Nov 2019

Rank #8

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018: Dave Lewis, Senior Content Producer, Carmichael Lynch

Dave has been a freelance art producer and has done photo production before becoming a content producer. Today, he shares his experience and along with Heather, gives you some actionable tips as well as some good insight on the merging of the life and work silos. Key Takeaways [:31] Heather introduces Dave Lewis and asks her guest to talk about who he is, where he is from, and how small towns are the best! [2:35] From photo production to art production to content production: what skills has Dave garnered that are most important and how did he come to work in advertising? [5:25] Dave has found that a lot of the things he produces are now destined for the Internet and that the clients are getting more and more specific. [7:00] Creatives need to be more and more nimble and a lot of content is now produced in-house but the variety of sources for the material Dave needs has multiplied in the past years. [9:48] Heather asks about the ins-and-outs of working with influencers — a frequent listener question: Is the pricing structure different? [12:45] Considering the increasing amount of resources available to advertising agencies, Heather shares a tip for photographers: Add to your arsenal! [14:40] How do you get Dave’s attention? Personalized emails — show you’ve done your research and that you’re interested and note that mail is making a comeback! [20:48] Heather and Dave discuss how everything you do in life informs everything else: Life silos and work silos are breaking apart. [23:30] When a photographer has an Instagram account, should they show only their work (personal and commercial) or should they curate some of their life as well? Dave has both a professional and personal opinion on the matter! [26:14] Dave shares one thing he likes to see people do on their Instagram page — show you love your work and show what you love, tell your story. [29:30] Dave’s estimate approval process is pretty straightforward; he walks us through a usual bid and shares what use he makes of treatments — it is always shared with the client! [34:55] How does Dave let a photographer know they didn’t get the job? [39:22] If he wasn’t an art producer, Dave you probably do something with food! [41:16] Heather thanks Dave for coming on the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Carmichael Lynch Fallon Martin Williams Art Gallery 801 More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Dave Lewis at Carmichael Lynch Dave Lewis’ website Dave Lewis on LinkedIn Dave Lewis on Instagram

41mins

1 Jul 2019

Rank #9

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025: Ilona Siller, Art Producer at BBDO

Ilona started as a receptionist and worked her way up to art production — a position she has now worked in for 17 years. She shares quite a few practical tips and a lot of insights on her experience. Key Takeaways [:31] Heather introduces Elena and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, how she found her way into art production, and what important skills are required for this line of work. [7:43] The biggest change Ilona has seen on the agency side of the industry is that the amount of work and assets that are produced has increased exponentially over the course of the last 10 years. [9:37] Shooting print only simply does not exist anymore, and Ilona understands the client’s side of things in terms of getting more for your money and time — especially on shoots abroad — but it does require everyone to be a little more knowledgeable. [11:08] Broadcast is separate in the way that they create the ad spots, but in terms of social media videos, that is more integrated into Ilona’s shoots. [12:01] When it comes to print shoots with motion components, Ilona looks for photographers that can serve as a DP and work closely with a videographer. [14:46] Heather and Ilona discuss the challenges of photographers having to work a video component, the real differences between the two media, and how it all plays out on a client account. [16:44] Choosing a producer for a shoot is something Ilona has done before but it’s more important for the photographer to be comfortable working with a producer so she generally lets them pick. [19:43] Getting Ilona’s attention can go through mailers and some website referral but mainly it’s about people doing their research before reaching out: look at what the producer is working on, how you can be relevant to their work. [24:30] Ilona suggests that you put your name and your specialty in the subject line of the email, it’ll leave its mark! [26:38] The hardest thing about bidding for Ilona is the ever-changing creative list, the client will add as they go without realizing that it may add a day.  A lot of the time, there is a favorite before the bid starts, however it can be changed with a weak or strong creative call. Finally, always leave something for the cost consultant. [29:52] Heather shares the “hairy arm” story — it also works well in a marriage! [33:32] Sharing who is bidding against whom is something that Ilona will do, but it all depends on her relationship with the agent — her fear is that the artist would change their art to please, and lose their uniqueness. Heather shares her own view on the subject, providing Ilona with the agent perspective. [38:46] What would Ilona do if she wasn’t an art producer? [39:35] Heather thanks Ilona for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode BBDO PDN More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Ilona Siller on LinkedIn Ilona Siller on Instagram

41mins

26 Aug 2019

Rank #10

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007: Lisa Oropallo: Freelance Art Producer most recently at Digitas in NY

“If you’re not prepared for that creative call, don’t take it.” Lisa Oropallo has been at Digitas for the last 18 years and was always an advocate for the best practices in the industry. Tune in for an interesting episode that covers industry changes as well as some seriously practical tips on online presence and how to show up for creative calls. Key Takeaways [:30] Heather introduces Lisa Oropallo and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from and how she stumbled into art production. [3:26] Lisa talks about how technology advances have reshaped the way work is done in the industry and what impact it has had on the work. [6:56] Lisa turns the tables and asks Heather how a bid monopolizes a photographer’s time. [7:16] Heather and Lisa discuss the evolving role photographers are asked to play in the creative process and the time requirements that have not been increased to accommodate for this additional workload. [10:22] The creative call and the treatment make or break a bid. [12:06] With the fierce competition out there, what are some important things that will factor into the decision process and what does Lisa look for in a photographer. [15:31] Promos? Portfolio reviews? Meetings? How does one grab Lisa’s attention and she talks about what she thinks Instagram is for! [18:35] Long loading websites is a no-no but a build your own .pdf function is great! [20:43] Once the three bids are in, what is Lisa’s agency process? Heather and Lisa talk about how they prefer tackling budget issues and how cuts in one area can affect every aspect of a job. [26:22] Lisa remembers a time she asked a photographer to pick up a local crew to limit the budget, and how she came to regret this decision. [29:53] Heather asks what the process is for letting the losing bids know they weren’t picked, and how much information she will share in the context. Heather asks if it is at all an opportunity for constructive criticism. [34:44] When to disclose the budget, or a range or nothing at all, Lisa and Heather share their perspectives. [38:39] Does Lisa have advice for a person who would become an art producer: communication, getting more knowledgeable about today’s market, etc., most of it is really good for current art producers! [41:31] Aside from all of the previous advice — which is good for photographers as well — is there anything she would tell photographers: thinking out loud and looking prepared. [42:40] If you [the photographer] don’t have everything ready for the creative call, you shouldn’t take it now. [44:19] Heather thanks Lisa for coming onto the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Digitas Jim Galante Studio Barrett Zinderman Young and Rubicam Dan Bannister Tim Tadder Debra Weiss Marianne Campbell More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about our guest Lisa Oropallo on LinkedIn Lisa Oropallo on Instagram

45mins

15 Apr 2019

Rank #11

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035: Melanie Trombly, Senior Art Producer at VSA Partners in Chicago

Melanie Trombly shares a healthy dose of energy and experience, both production and agency side; tune in for an interesting discussion covering the creative call, snail-mail, and serendipitous dogs on Instagram! Key Takeaways [:55] Heather introduces Melanie Trombly and asks her to share how she made her way into art production from touring and selling t-shirts to catalog houses — Melanie includes some tidbits about her stint in New Zealand working in a warehouse and as a tiler! [6:04] Melanie touches on the changes she has been seeing in the industry starting with the introduction of CGI, which leads to a conversation on the benefits of knowing the many facets of production in your agency. [11:42] Melanie speaks to the importance of communication when it comes to bids; she shares the process at her agency and touches on the client education she has to do. [17:30] The creative call is so important, Melanie shares her experience of a bad one as well as how she tries to make sure everyone has the right information in hand. She also shares if and when a rep should be on the creative calls. Heather and Melanie share what they each think is critical to happen in a call. [25:] What catches a creative’s eye? Treatments are something Melanie tries to only use if absolutely necessary, but she will ask for mood boards and additional images to share with her creative. [30:30] Melanie is one of those people who love snail-mail. Her experience with agency firewalls and important emails getting put in the spam folder has been terrible! She touches on portfolio shows and other resources she uses to research photographers. [36:14] Instagram is a tool that Melanie loves but make sure it’s interesting and updated. She will accept follows if she has met you — and meeting in person is super important. [40:43] If Melanie wasn’t doing this, what would she be doing? [41:15] Heather thanks Melanie for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode VSA Partners, Chicago BlinkBid More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Melanie Trombley on LinkedIn

41mins

4 Nov 2019

Rank #12

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017: Eden Alaxanian, Senior Art Producer at MullenLowe in Boston

From one side to the other: Eden Alexanian went from being a producer for a photographer to Senior Art Producer and four years in art production is enough to see changes in the industry! Tune in for an interview on integrated campaigns, the importance of treatments and how your rep keeps you up to date! Key Takeaways [:31] Heather introduces Eden Alaxanian and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, and how she found her way into art production. [5:35] Getting to know people is one aspect of getting better at your job, but getting to know what a job means to a person is something that Eden learned while working as a producer and tries to remember each time she treats a new project. [9:00] Eden touches on the questions she fields after a bid is turned down. [10:11] In the name of transparency and to save everyone some time, Eden tries to share the budgets up front. [13:03] Eden walks us through her side of the process once she’s received an estimate, from the cost consultants to the treatments and the client meetings. [16:35] On the evolution of treatments in the past years — photographers are gearing their work more and more towards director treatments; Eden explains what that is. Heather touches on the time required for good treatments to happen. [19:46] Clients are never on the creative call, the treatment is your way of speaking directly to them! [21:05] Getting Eden’s attention starts with a good up-to-date website, even if promos and mailers and Instagram are great. [24:08] Heather touches on self-promotion restrictions which prevent photographers from updating their books and places them in a strange position. [24:54] Eden’s sourcing go-tos are mostly reps but she does use her own categorizing system! [27:08] Even in the last four years, Eden has seen the increased integration of campaigns which requires really nimble photographers that can do more than just shoot video. [31:22] Heather and Eden discuss how rare it is to see their work out in the real world nowadays! [32:48] What is Eden known for on her team? [34:01] We are content producers in a time when what everybody wants is content! [35:41] Heather asks if Eden has advice for the Advertising 101 class! [37:00] Heather thanks Eden for coming onto the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode MullenLowe Boston University Sienna College Jacqueline Fodor More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Eden Alaxanian on Instagram Eden Alaxanian on Facebook Eden Alaxanian on LinkedIn

37mins

24 Jun 2019

Rank #13

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040: Milagros DeLaRosa, Senior Producer, Leo Burnett

Milagros has been in the industry for 30 years and she comes on the show to share her advice on the importance of relationships, what we should see on your website, and team synergy, as well as her best tips on the estimating process. Key Takeaways [:32] Heather introduces Milagros and asks her to share the story of how she made her way into the advertising industry from a political major as well as the people that shaped her path and propelled her forward. [4:04] Heather shares her own start as an account person when everything was so brand new and Milagros touches on the industry’s hay day — but come to terms with it ’cause it’s gone! [9:45] Getting Milagros’ attention goes primarily through email, but she does enjoy the moments at Leo Burnett when the reps come in and share the recent work they have on their roster. She shares her e-classification system! [12:25] Milagros touches on how her team finds photographers for specific projects, it usually starts with six to seven photographers. [13:40] Websites are so very important and everybody has more than enough things to do in a day so ease of navigation is paramount! Milagros also enjoys seeing the more personal side of a photographer — showcase some of your personal work too! She also touches on the importance of reps. [18:08] The creative teams also play a role in the types of photographers they look for; personalities have to agree! So pay attention to the conversations you have with the prospective teams, they are more important than you know. [20:45] Milagros will still consider a photographer who has no motion on their site, and in any case, it sometimes needs to be two separate people. She speaks to how much education she still has to impart to clients surrounding motion. [23:50] Leo Burnet’s firm bid structure provides a lot of positive aspects, Milagros touches on the flexibility that is still required once you arrive on set. [27:25] Heather asks Milagros to break down the estimating process on her side — from initial reviews to cost consulting to client meetings — and though there may sometimes be a front-runner, Milagros’ team always presents three candidates they would be happy working with. [30:30] Milagros’ tips for the estimating process are simple but important: be clear, take notes, and speak up if something seems off to you. [31:35] Treatments are more important for projects that include motion and about 60% of the projects she bids require them, but when they are in play, it’s critical to give it all you’ve got and make a mark for yourself. [37:20] The worst part of Milagros’ job is letting people know they didn’t get the job. Heather and her guest discuss the importance of having that conversation after the fact, all the while keeping in mind that everyone is just so crazy busy! [41:59] Who am I bidding against is a question best answered after the fact. [45:03] Would you have guessed that Milagros is shy, focused, and kind — maybe the last two! [47:50] If she wasn’t an art producer, Milagros would be a location photographer. [48:50] Heather thanks Milagros for coming on the podcast! Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Leo Burnett More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Milagros DeLaRosa on LinkedIn

49mins

13 Jan 2020

Rank #14

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013: Renee Jean, Freelance Art Producer — Apple

Tune in for some insights we’ve not heard on this podcast before as Renee shares some of the experience she has gathered over her 12-year career. Key Takeaways [:41] Heather introduces Renee Jean and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she came from, and how she found her way into art production. [7:00] Heather and Renee share their thoughts on what freelancing offers in terms of diversity of opportunities in the rapidly evolving advertising industry. [9:50] Renee believes that the multitude of different ways of producing still media has already equipped art producers to tackle other kinds of production: traditional print experience is translatable to other media. [11:04] Is integrated production the future? Renee shares a really interesting perspective we haven’t heard before! [13:05] In Renee’s experience, photographers also doing motion and broadcast rarely pans out — she has seen a lot of still production having to piggyback on the broadcast shoots. But ultimately as a photographer, it’s important to have some sort of motion solution. [16:45] “The cool factor” is when the creatives want to hire people just because they’re popular and cool, as opposed to being right for the project. [20:17] User-friendly websites are the first very important step — have thumbnails — and Instagram has become huge, but when looking for a photographer, it’s about reading the room; it depends on what the creatives are looking for and finding that chemistry. [25:33] Renee and Heather talk about the importance of the creative call and recognizing that sometimes when the chemistry isn’t there, it’s no one’s fault — even if not getting the job hits hard. [30:06] The creative call is important enough that everyone should take the time to be well prepared. [33:29] How can a photographer or director grab Renee’s attention? Have an up to date, simple, straightforward, easy-to-read website. Reps, Behance, and Instagram are two of the tools Renee does late-night deep dives into, searching for new talent. [40:15] Sometimes you want the new hotness but you need the experience, it all depends on the project. [42:17] Being a woman in this industry has meant that Renee is more vocal now for both moral reasons and safety reasons because there are the “Weinsteins” of the advertising industry. [49:47] Heather and Renee also touch on the access of female and minority artists have to projects — the men tend to get more of the projects. [54:25] The pathways to creative careers need to be multiplied for women and minorities, but this is an aspect that Renee has seen positive evolution on, with the democratization of technology. [56:42] Renee asks if Heather has seen artists be more competitive than collaborative, and they talk about being thick-skinned optimists. [59:37] Getting the job, not getting the job: Renee knows she should always call and when she can. Heather convinces Renee of the value of sharing who a photographer was bidding against, post-fact! [1:06:22] Heather thanks Renee for coming onto the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Goodby Silverstein Venables Bell Apple Behance More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about our guest Renee Jean on LinkedIn Renee Jean on Squarespace

1hr 4mins

29 May 2019

Rank #15

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021: Angela Harken, Senior Art Producer previously at Upshot in Chicago

Angela shares her breadth of experience, her love of the creative process, the shifting landscape of the industry, and the paramount importance of building trusting relationships and building for the long term. Key Takeaways [:31] Heather introduces Angela Harken and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, and how she found her way into art production. [5:17] Angela talks about being a connector, hiring hybrids and the changing landscape of the industry and its impact on the role of art producer, which requires a wide set of skills. [8:59] In terms of client expectation, Angela has seen their need for cost efficiencies… ask about bundling and streamlining processes. But more and more, she sees clients coming in with their own photographer recommendations! [10:22] Heather asks how it is that Angela believes those clients come to hear about photographers they recommend? [12:35] Angela explains what the days of usage were and how it has been changing. [17:04] Getting an estimate approved for Angela always starts with the same question: Do we have a budget? — which never used to be necessary! — and sharing the budget information is important. [24:28] Asking the photographer who their team is something Angela will do in order, she will sometimes also suggest a producer depending on the type of production it is. [26:15] Who bids against who is a well-guarded secret for Angela. [27:39] Travel expenses have become somewhat unpopular and a lot of clients ask for photographers to work as locals. Also, putting the crew through payroll is something that also happens more and more! [30:42] Motion components and bundled services are more and more common; Angela shares her personal experience working with photographers who do motion. [34:05] Heather offers that the first step towards motion should be to think about how to make still images move. She explains how thought-out the motion component actually needs to be. [35:19] Treatments that have specific ideas on what the photographer would do for that particular brand, in terms of stills, motion, and locations are the most well-received ones. [37:52] Angela dovetails the treatment discussion with an emphasis on how important the creative call is. Heather shares her recent thoughts on having the person running the creative call prepare some questions for the photographer in order to facilitate deeper discussions. [44:45] Heather asks Angela what her favorite thing to do on a Sunday is, and thanks her for coming on the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Upshot More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Angela Harken’s LinkedIn Angela Harken’s Instagram Angela Harken on Freelance Art Producer

46mins

29 Jul 2019

Rank #16

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014: Justine Barnes, RPA Santa Monica

Justine Barnes shares her 12 years of industry experience with some very actionable tips on websites, email blasts, and bidding, as well as the importance of honesty in relationships and organizations. Key Takeaways [:31] Heather introduces Justine Barnes and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she came from, and how she found her way into art production. [6:58] Justine talks about how long she has been doing art production for and if she would see herself doing anything else. [7:43] Justine and Heather talk about the changes in the industry and Justine touches on what her department has done, in terms of remaining relevant, including opening a gallery for showcasing artwork and “art talks.” [11:06] Getting Justine’s attention can come through printed promos, especially if you put a unique, even collaborative twist on your work. [17:24] Marketing to Justine and her agency: Have a solid website — clean, user-friendly, fast loading, easy to navigate, thumbnails, skip the intrusive features like auto full screen, music, fade-ins and -outs, etc. Have clear email promos — title your subject lines properly: who are you, what do you do, what’s the project. Mind the time of day at which you send your emails: for Justine, afternoon works best. [22:25] Justine walks us through the estimate approval on her side of things. Her firm adds pre-bids to the process: bids, creative calls, treatments, negotiations, cost consultant reviews and then clients and sometimes third party approvals. [25:34] Justine typically watches the process until the end, even when there are favorites, she will also reach out to a bidder to ask if they can modify the bid to better their chances. [26:55] Heather asks if treatments — which are a lot of work — are treated seriously on her side of the fence. [29:26] No, Justine does not share who bids against who. What about after the job? [32:50] When you don’t get the bid, Justine’s advice it to ask for the feedback you need. Always go for honesty. Heather and Justine talk about the importance of having the tough, post-award conversations. [35:54] On the bidding process, Justine shares her biggest pet peeves: The spec sheets are thorough, read them; most of the questions you have will be answered. If we ask for something to be included, include it. [38:07] Heather shares her own appreciation of detailed spec sheets! [41:00] Heather asks what Justine is known for on her team and what the most challenging aspect of her job is. [42:56] What is Justine’s favorite thing to do on a Sunday and what would she do if not art production. [44:57] Heather thanks Justine for coming onto the podcast and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode. Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Rubin Postaer and Associates (RPA) Martien Mulder More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about our guest Justine Barnes on LinkedIn Justine Barnes’ website

45mins

3 Jun 2019

Rank #17

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048: Hannah Soto, CEO Grey House Productions (recorded pre CV-19)

Hannah is Founder and CEO of Grey House Productions, a very value-driven human-centric company, she comes on the show to share an enormous wealth of information on the business as it unfolds in a production house. Key Takeaways [:30] Heather introduces Hannah and asks her to share how she made her way from studying photography to founding Grey House Productions [6:11] Hannah explains how she keeps it all together — business and life — and it’s all about the team! But she also touches on the automation aspects that Grey House has been integrating to streamline operations. [8:21] Salsa dancing as a follower will help you turn off your ‘Type A’ personality for a while! [9:43] Clients come from three main avenues and Hannah details all of the ways brands come to work with the Grey House team. [11:37] Brands are getting smarter about creating and diversifying their shorter-lived content, and this may explain the increase in brand-direct work found at production houses. [12:37] Heather shares her perspective on the evolving client/agency relationship which opens up the floor for Hannah to ask her own follow-up question! [14:17] Hannah and Heather discuss the increasing creative control that brands are requiring as well as their requesting for creative input and guidance from photographers as opposed to agencies. [17:40] Client service might be the differentiating factor in a world where lines are blurred. [18:45] Hannah also talks about how she selected the company’s core values as well as the name. But Team Grey House has recently come up with a ‘top ten non-negotiables’ and Hannah breaks down the interesting and profoundly human way this came about. [23:10] Hannah explains the estimating process at Grey House as well as how she keeps an eye on all the moving parts. [25:53] Sometimes, more than one photographer will be bidding for Grey House, and Hannah is adamant about not sharing any information during the bidding process. [28:11] Hannah asks Heather what the bidding process looks like on her side from estimates to treatments. [32:09] How does Hannah foster creativity in the bidding process? It turns out that the estimating process may be super creative in itself! [36:35] Motion is something that is only surprising to Hannah when it is absent! She talks about the lack of a solid motion understanding among photographers. [39:28] Hannah’s secret sauce is strategy and Heather shares what “Elder silence” means. [42:12] Hannah answers Heather’s two closing questions: favorite thing to do on a Sunday, and if you weren’t a producer what would you be? [43:29] Heather thanks Hannah for coming on the podcast! Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Elizabeth Ernst Paul Elledge Leasha Overturf Grey House Productions’ Top Ten Non-Negotiables Tim Tadder’s blog post on taking on the Director title More about our guest Hannah Soto at Grey House Productions Hannah Soto on LinkedIn More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook

44mins

16 Mar 2020

Rank #18

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019b: Part 2 of 2, Producers from Facebook, Old Navy and Uber Eats are guests on this special episode recorded live, sponsored by the ASMP with guests Suzee Barrabee, Ken Zane , and Shayla Love.

Today’s episode is Part 2 of a special two-part interview with three brand-side art producers; jump back in for the rest of this awesome conversation with Ken, Suzee, and Shayla. Key Takeaways [:31] Heather welcomes listeners back to this special two-part live recording of Dear Art Producer and picks up the conversation with her three guests. [1:12] Motion came into photographer’s arsenal only a few years ago so some are now already directors and some are still figuring out the basics. Heather asks her guests what requirements they have as it pertains to motion. [2:07] Suzee explains that there are many configurations that depend on the client and project and that there is a learning curve since it’s a growing field. [3:38] Ken finds that it’s really easy to sell a photographer taking care of motion because it guarantees an aesthetic uniformity. [6:17] Shayla always needs some motion component. When the brief requires some video but the bulk is stills, she will look for photographers who are apt at motion or turn the stills into a GIF. [9:00] Heather speaks to the difficulties she encounters when agencies ask for ‘motion’ estimates without the client having any clear idea of what they want. [9:53] Ken is guilty of exactly that with Heather! [10:55] Everyone shares their perspective on and experience with ‘behind-the-scenes’ videos… Q.A. [14:23] Audience question: When looking at a photographer’s website for motion, what is the best format? Condensed reel? Finished products? And what about photographer/directors? [14:40] Ken, Suzee, and Shayla all say that raw, edited, and finished products should be on your website. [16:44] Heather’s advice for photographers looking to start with motion: Have a motion solution for your client. [19:22] Heather moves the conversation to treatments to ask how they are used, and what they should include and exclude. [20:00] For Shayla, treatments are a luxury that happens if time permits, and it does introduce the approach the photographer is going to take, which is really helpful if you’ve not worked together often and really useful for pitching the estimate. [21:22] Suzee echoes Shayla’s answer and adds that it helps drive the creative as well as logistics conversations around the project. But she does underscore how the number one most important driver for the final choice is the creative call. [23:49] Ken touches on what he expects from a creative call and treatments and how important they both are in terms of showcasing your vision, passion, confidence, and appreciation for the project. [26:36] Shayla speaks to the opportunity for “extra credits” that treatments and creative calls offer. [27:32] Heather reiterates the critical importance of being ready for the creative call — if you haven’t read the brief, say no and set a different date! Q.A. [29:43] Audience question: It sounds like there is no right way to do treatments, but ultimately what is a good treatment? Is it showcasing your experience to do a shoot? The research? [31:02] All of the above says Ken; he shares a couple of professional stories. Q.A. [34:44] Audience question: Have people ever charged for a treatment? [34:56] Suzee explains that it’s the cost of doing business and they would not pay for a treatment — but if you feel like you’re being taken advantage of, ask yourself questions. [36:08] Heather steers the conversation towards estimating and what it takes to get a job approved on the art production side. [36:56] Decks, decks, and more decks are Shayla’s constant work for relaying the information and data to the creative team in order to get to the unbiased best option for that project. But the speed of it depends on the company: Uber Eats is lightning fast at making those decisions. [39:08] Facebook has a very clear but rigorous process and Suzee does find that larger companies tend to have heavier red tape to wade through. [40:25] Cost consultants will add about four days to the whole process. [41:56] Suzee will call you if you didn’t get the job but the way she is able to articulate the why of that decision, or not, has gotten Heather thinking about how she asks for that information! [43:53] Ken chimes in with the idea that anyone who is bidding is the winner — among hundreds of possible portfolio. And Shayla shares the most common reasons you didn’t get the job, it’s the creative call… Q.A. [47:01] Audience question: So you bid for a new client and lost, how do you follow up with that relationship productively? [47:27] Heather offers some ideas, the door is open; gently foster the relationship, some new work updates, and count on the timing. Q.A. [50:08] Audience question: What are the macro trends in advertising budgets recently? Is photography shrinking in the face of motion? [50:46] Motion still takes up the biggest portion of the budget pie and there is a marked increase in the demand for motion within stills projects. However there are channels that always require stills, so the days of shooting stills are more numerous than motion. Q.A. [53:42] Audience question: A lot of the stuff up on client sites is not relevant to what they are currently doing, how do we get that information? [54:35] Heather offers that you should ask the person that gave you the meeting in the first place, they will be a great source of information. [56:15] Ken offers up a tip wrapped in a personal story, show the work that is relevant, but show the work you love to do, it’s who you are. [57:53] Heather thanks everyone for this awesome experience and invites listeners to tune in for future episodes. Thanks for listening! In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode ASMP Create Space, Nicola Sottorio Media One Audio and Visual, Dan McGonagle Facebook Gap/Old Navy Uber Eats More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guests Suzee Barrabee’s website Kenneth Zane’s LinkedIn Shayla Love’s LinkedIn

58mins

15 Jul 2019

Rank #19

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039: Kelly Montez, CEO and Agent at Apostrophe Reps

Today on the podcast, we welcome superstar agent Kelly Montez, CEO of Apostrophe reps. She’s been an agent for 18 years and has been a first-hand witness to the many changes affecting our industry. Tune in for our first in-depth conversation with a rep on the importance of community, exciting industry changes, and the need for law degrees! Key Takeaways [:32] Heather introduces Kelly and asks her to share the story of how she made her way into the advertising industry and the people and businesses that shaped her path and propelled her forward. [6:18] Find out what advice Heather gave Kelly when she was starting out that she still finds worth sharing in both professional and personal settings! [9:40] Kelly shares how motion and brand direct conversations are the most exciting changes she is currently fielding in the industry. She touches on how it affects working relationships, the photographers and the entire creative process. [11:44] 80% of the bids that come in have some motion aspect to them, and as a result, all of Kelly’s photographers do motion at differing levels. [13:33] Kelly shares some interesting feedback she’s been getting from agencies with regards to 2020! [14:50] Listeners have been asking for Heather to talk to a rep, wondering what different roles they perform. Kelly obliges and dives right into the meat of what it is to rep for photographers. [18:00] Kelly shares the one thing that will most predictably lead to new and recurrent work. [21:20] The rep job has changed at the same pace as the industry, Kelly shares what her work used to be like as well as the aspects that have remained the same. [24:22] Heather and Kelly discuss the ever-growing contracts and legal requests and their implications, and both ladies have come to think they should have gotten law degrees! [29:40] How does a photographer define success? Kelly touches on the professional and personal growth of her artists, which leads to a discussion on treatments and creativity. [36:35] If we’ve never worked together, be upfront about the budget! Heather and Kelly discuss the differences between working with new brands or inexperienced brands and big established companies. [40:50] Getting Kelly’s attention is difficult! But when she looks into new artists, they often come up through the agency’s styling division. However, they work with a lot of off-roster artists. [49:15] Being part of a bigger community. [51:20] Heather thanks Kelly for coming on the podcast! Thanks for listening. In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work. Mentioned in this episode Apostrophe Reps More about your host Heather Elder’s Bio Heather Elder’s Blog Heather Elder on Instagram Heather Elder on Twitter Heather Elder on LinkedIn Heather Elder on Facebook More about today’s guest Kelly Montez on LinkedIn

52mins

7 Jan 2020

Rank #20