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workshops work

As a workshop facilitator, you set the stage for success or failure of professional gatherings. It is in your hands whether the group achieves its goals and whether it translates challenges into solutions. It's a lot of responsibility to create safe space, integrate all participants and keep discussions on track and time. In her weekly show, Dr Myriam Hadnes interviews professional facilitators, trainers and coaches on their techniques that make workshops work. Her guests bring their unique perspectives from different backgrounds and cultures. Everyone shares hands-on advice, best practices and lessons learned. You will learn about moments of truth and failure, what can go wrong and how to deal with it when it happens. This show is for if you are a facilitator, trainer, team leader, manager. Tune in to learn tips & tricks on how to deliver workshops that are worth everyone’s time. If you deliver workshops that work and want to be featured on the show, let me know: myriam@idayz.nl

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035 - How to make virtual workshops work - with Wayne Turmel

On episode 035, I speak to Wayne Turmel, expert of virtual facilitation and co-founder of the Remote Leadership Institute about the struggles and challenges when it comes to virtual workshops. Wayne explains clearly what it takes to make the transition from the physical into the virtual space successful and what many of us still get wrong.You will learn what mistakes to avoid, how to practice and what features to use so that your next virtual meeting becomes as engaging and effective as if participants were physically present.   Don't miss the part when Wayne explains why hybrid meetings (when some participants join virtually) should be forbidden and how you can still make them work using the right techniques and toolsClick here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers [2:24] What is the magic skill a facilitator needs to master virtual workshops?[5:09] What would be your advice to get out of our own head and over that hump?[12:08] According to you, which is the most underused feature?[17:44] We spoke about virtual classrooms and meetings until now, to what extent are things different when we talk about virtual team meetings or workshops?[25:05] What is your favourite virtual workshop exercise to engage participants? [30:08] How can you create meaningful connections among the participants in a virtual space? [32:57] How can you facilitate this process? How can we make it easier for the participants? [35:11] How would you deal with workshops where only some participants join virtually? [38:27] How do you document a virtual workshop? [45:16] What ground rules do you set for a workshop and which do you consider most important? [47:35] What do you do if participants are late? [48:01] What are the ground rules you would define in session one? [49:40] What is the minimum equipment one would need to start an online workshop?  Links to checkWayne's business page https://www.remoteleadershipinstitute.com/Remote leadership certificate seriesWayne's book: Meet like you mean itOur sponsor Session Lab - An online agenda builder and exercise libraryOther episodes we mentionedEpisode 028 with Pam Hamilton on breakout roomsEpisode 030 with Mireille Beumer on workshop documentation Connect to Wayneon LinkedIn

54mins

20 Nov 2019

Rank #1

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026 - How to design meetings that we love to attend - with Gustavo Razzetti

In this episode, I talk to Gustavo Razzetti, a speaker, author, change facilitator and the founder of Liberationist. He is an active blogger and has written over 400 articles on change, on leadership and team development.We speak about organizational and behavioural change, about leadership and about meetings that are an integral part of a change process. We discuss the difference between meetings and workshops and how you stop having meetings on auto-pilot.  Gustavo shares his concept of workshops being a tool for experimenting and practising new behaviours. And along these lines, he shares some of his favourite exercises that you can apply in regular meetings and which will help to foster communication across hierarchies.  Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[3:23] What do you mean when you call yourself a “change instigator” and to what extent is it different from a “change consultant”?[4:34] How much will do you need from the organisation to really drive the change?[5:53] What do you think is the biggest misconception of change?[8:15] How do you help leaders to find comfort in this uncertainty? [10:16] What does it take for a leader to trust their team?[20:48] What is the key difference between a meeting and a workshop according to you?[23:39] If you could change one thing in the way how organizations meet, what would you change?[24:53] What is according to you, the best strategy to get out of autopilot?[26:28] How do you get everyone to speak? [29:58] How do you avoid auto-pilot in recurrent meetings that tend to follow the same structure every week?[32:16] Do you believe in virtual meetings?[36:48] Do you think this is related to the safe space? [38:11] What would be your advice to a new team leader to have meetings that matter?[41:15] How important do you consider courage for a team lead or for team leaders to be good meeting facilitators?[47:03] What makes workshops fail according to you?[49:19] What is your favourite exercise?[53:27] How do you build the pairs of two?[55:30] Anything you would like to share that we haven't touched upon?[56:09] Would you have this conversation with a team? [57:12] When did you start calling yourself a facilitator?[1:00:32] What do you want the audience to remember?Related links you may want to check out:Gustavo’s business page: https://liberationist.org/Gustavo’s ultimate guide to successful meetingsGoogle study on remote teamsGustavo’s blog post on increasing mistake tolerance.Exercise: Who are you?Template for accountability exercise.Our sponsor SessionLabConnect to Gustavo on LinkedIn  

1hr 2mins

18 Sep 2019

Rank #2

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001 - Getting it right by starting it right. The power of connection - with Patrick Cowden

In this episode, I talk to Patrick Cowden, founder of Beyond Leadership, an agency that helps organizations to unleash their full potential. By introducing a new way of leadership, Patrick empowers organizations to master future challenges. Patrick is a book author, TEDx speaker and enhancer of collaboration. In this episode, we talk about the importance of human connection in workshops. Patricks shares how facilitators can change the game and deal with egos and politics by kicking off working sessions with a simple check-in exercise.  Don’t miss the hands-on advice, tips and tricks and Patrick’s energy that will spill over and inspire you to deliver workshops that work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers[1:38]     What is wrong with the way we gather professionally at work?[4:08]     What can we do to combine joy and results in meetings and workshops?[8:06]     Can we achieve the same results when we meet remotely?[14:45] How can we create human connection in workshops?[17:20] Can you explain how the “connect exercise” works? [23:19] To what extend do you explain why you are doing specific exercises? Do you achieve the same results when you do the connect exercise in 3 minutes versus 30 seconds?[28:11] How do you shift from the connection exercise to the “real” business-related topic of the meeting?[33:45] How can you assure sustainable results of your intervention?[35:13] Can you adjust the “connect exercise” to other topics without compromising the effect? [38:19] What is your advice to facilitators to achieve results, foster connection and fight egos?    Related links you may want to check out:Patrick’s organisation: http://www.thebeyond.company Patrick’s Book “Neustart”Muhammad Yunus, founder of Grameen Bank and Nobel laureateFrom my desk on the value of check-ins: “You need one key to make meetings successful”Our sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link) Connect to Patrick:LinkedIn 

41mins

20 Mar 2019

Rank #3

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014 - What it takes to be an authentic facilitator - with Lily Gros

In this very-early morning and truly authentic show, I speak with Lily Gros, a facilitator, entrepreneur and youtuber. Lily started La Minute Facilitation, her business with which she facilitates workshops for (mostly non-profit) clients, trains facilitators on their mindset and runs her own workshops on authenticity and perfectionism.  In the show, we talk about “authenticity 360 degrees” which includes the facilitator and the participants. And, we talk about mindful facilitation which becomes crucial as soon as challenges come up. Don’t miss our very honest exchange on how we dealt with challenging situations. These lessons we learned will surely inspire you to anticipate problems so that you can make your workshops work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers[1:37] What are your different roles as a facilitator? [7:36] Authenticity became quite a buzzword. How do you define it and what does it mean to you? [10:54] How did you learn to be authentic?  [12:43] How did you come up with this topic?[15:16] How do get your groups to be more authentic? [16:27] You get to know your participants before the workshop? [17:30] What would be an icebreaker for a “cold” group of participants?[21:35] Why does it feel so scary to be authentic? [24:21] How do you approach the puzzle that a team might accept imperfection and vulnerability and still show high performance? [31:34] How do you test the water in terms of openness of your participants?[34:20] How did you manage to create the safe space after this tricky situation? [41:02] What is your way in dealing with such a difficult participant? [45:05] What makes a workshop work?[47:55] What shall the audience remember from the show?Related links you may want to check out:Lily’s business page: https://lilygros.co/The white paper (book) Lily wrote with Ze Change Makers (in French)Brené Brown’s TED talkLily’s interview with Peter Krishnan (summary)Jim Tamm on Radical Collaboration The five keys to a successful Google teamOur sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link) Shows we mentioned:Mindset Management – with Jeremy AckersGetting it right by starting it right – with Patrick CowdenConnect to Lily on LinkedIn Follow Lily: @laminutefacilitation

50mins

5 Jun 2019

Rank #4

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002 - How NLP can help you become a better facilitator - with Margreet Jacobs

In this episode, I talk to Margreet Jacobs, a master practitioner of neurolinguistic programming (NLP) and speaker’s coach. We talk about the similarities between speaking in front of an audience and hosting a workshop. How can we overcome the fear of speaking up? How can we make sure that our content resonates with the audience? How can we keep them engaged? Margreet runs Presentiv, a coaching agency that helps leaders to deliver talks that would change how their audience feels and acts. Margreet used to be a professional dancer and dance teacher. Today, she is a speaker herself and a constant source of wise inspiration. In the show, Margreet shares how speakers and facilitators can become more confident by making sure they start with the end in mind. By being clear about the purpose of a speech or a workshop we can shift our mindset and engage our audience.   Don’t miss the hands-on advice, tips and tricks and Margreet’s multiple ready-to-use value bombs that will inspire you to deliver workshops that work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[1:01] How did you shift from being a dancer to becoming a speaker’s coach?[8:52] How c.an you tackle workshop participants’ fear of speaking up?[12:00] How can we make sure that every participant is aware of their contribution?[17:19] How does the fear of success get into our way?[21:29] What was your “perfect failure”  in a workshop context and how did you fix it?[23:10] How can you make sure that a workshop is giving you positive enegergy instead of draining you? [[29:06] What can a facilitator do to create a safe space in which participants thrive?[30:39] How can we deal with “big egos” who would not like to share their vulnerabilities?[35:00] How can we create an anchor that workshop participants can relate to even time after the workshop?[37:17} What is the one thing our audience shall remember from this episode? Related links you may want to check out:Margreet’s business page: www.presentiv.nl/en Our sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link)  Connect to Margreet:LinkedIn 

38mins

20 Mar 2019

Rank #5

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009 - Make conflict your ally in workshops - with Meg Mateer

In this episode, I talk to Megan Mateer, former corporate strategy consultant and now founder, facilitator, and changemaker. She founded Empatiko, a movement that aims to be a catalyst for human connection in the workplace and therefore accompanies organizations through that cultural transformation. Meg and I talk about conflict in group settings and how to use conflict as an opportunity for insight, clarity and connection in the context of workshops. You will hear about the difference between healthy and unhealthy conflict and how to deal with the latter when it arises in different shapes. Also, we speak about another form of conflict in the workshop space: a conflict between the facilitator and the group. Don’t miss the part where Meg runs us through the process of avoiding conflict by using the example of someone coming late to a meeting. Tune in to learn tools to make healthy conflict your ally and avoid unhealthy conflict from derailing so that your workshops work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[1:20] How did you get from being a corporate strategy consultant to becoming the founder of Empatiko.[6:55] When you say that conflict can create a connection, what do you mean by that? [7:51] What are the elements that trigger conflict?[9:00] Would you say that we most often ignore conflict to then deny it when it comes up?[10:41] Since conflict is triggered by differences in assumptions, values and needs, how do you deal with conflict once it comes up?[11:53] Would you explicitly ask self-reflection questions in the workshop space when you feel that there is conflict?[16:52] At the moment you feel “an elephant in the room”, how would you deal with it? [19:28] Why don’t you walk us through the concept of non-violent communication? [24:45] As this doesn’t sound like “conflict” anymore to me, how would you actually define conflict and how do you avoid conflict to derail into something unhealthy? [27:32] How do you deal with what you call “explosive conflict”?[30:21] Would you then call a break when conflict arises and how would you then continue? [31:56] How can we deal with a situation when the conflict is about us as facilitators?[37:14] Coming back to the resolution of conflict among participants, how can you use the energy created by the conflict?[41:46] What is your favourite exercise that usually works?[43:17] For what kind of topic would you use the framework of the fishbowl?[44:34] How would you finish the sentence: “Workshops fail if…” [45:17] What would you like the listener to remember who fell asleep after minute one?[46:42] If someone wants to reach out, connect to or work with you, how can they find you?Related links you may want to check out:Meg’s business page: www.empatiko.orgNon-violent communication (Wikipedia)Liberating StructuresOur sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link) 

48mins

1 May 2019

Rank #6

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033 - Part 2: How to hear the unsaid in the workshop space - with Oscar Trimboli

This is part two of a double episode on deep listening. I speak and listen to Oscar Trimboli, the author of "Deep Listening & Breakthroughs", professional speaker, leadership coach and facilitator.In part two of the show, Oscar applies the topic of deep listening to facilitation. We explore what it means to listen deeply in a workshop context. Oscar elaborates how we can learn to hear the unsaid and how we can design for breakthroughs by giving the unsaid space to be addressed and expressed.   Don't miss the part when Oscar shares golden advice to all leaders and what he says that will avoid participants to come late to any future meeting.Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers (Part II) [2:12] How can we hear what is unsaid?[9:28] To what extent do you really need to sense the unsaid, couldn't you just 'fake it'?[11:10] What does it take to get participants to steak out what everyone thinks?[13:55] What reactions do you get from leaders when you instruct them to always reply last?[17:17] How do you facilitate the shift of energy before a breakthrough? [24:18] Would you divide them into smaller groups or leave the organisation up to them?[27:23] Do you still draft the afternoon agenda of any workshop?[32:32] What would be your advice to a team leader or manager to have better meetings? [39:50] What do you want the listener to take away from our conversation? Links to check Oscar's business website listeningmyths.comThe free guide of the five myths of listening Design and manage your workshop agenda with Session Lab (affiliate link) Check out our featured SessionLab user Rein Sevenstern from Experiential Learning Connect to Oscaron LinkedIn

43mins

6 Nov 2019

Rank #7

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003 - What facilitators can learn from story telling - with Christopher Marks

In this episode, I talk to Christopher Marks, a storyteller and branding specialist. We talk about the art of storytelling and what it taught him about workshop design and facilitation. We talk about the importance of conflict for telling a compelling story and how we can craft exercises that will spark creativity and generate novel ideas.  Christopher runs Story Sprints with companies and entrepreneurs and currently sets up the Creator’s Club. He helps brands to put their audience first and is a multi-talent, silver bullet when it comes to writing, scripting, filming, directing and editing content.Don’t miss the many practical advice on how to go through exercises and what mistakes to avoid. And don’t miss the great fun Christopher and I had to compare workshop participants to mini-volcanos! He has been my mentor and I am that he shares his knowledge in this episode to help you to deliver workshops that work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[1:25] Tell me what a storyteller is! [3:13] What did you learn from storytelling for designing story sprint workshops?[8:10] How do you create a safe space to get to the essence of the story your client wants to tell?[11:32] Can you guide me through the process after the silent brainstorming exercise? How do you guide the group through clarifying questions?[12:26] So, at this point there is no discussion about the individual ideas yet?[17:07] How are you making sure that everyone is on the same page about the decision-making process?[19:10] So, the heatmap kicks off a discussion on a deeper level? [20:03] Can you share with the audience how you capture the key ideas and create meeting minutes?[25:20] What is the one thing you do in your workshops that always works?[28:12] Is this exercise run in silence?[31:20] I wonder about the impact of the ritual of folding the paper together. What is your experience with that? [33:51] What is the nutshell you want the listener to take home from this show?Related links you may want to check out:Christopher’s webpages: www.christophermarks.nl | www.storysprint.nl | www.creatorsclub.nlSoftware to create transcript from recordings: www.trint.com (no affiliation)James Clear’s Blog post on Warren Buffet’s “avoid at all cost list” [29:10]: https://jamesclear.com/buffett-focus Our sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link) Connect to Christopher and follow him:LinkedIn Insta: @christophermarksTwitter: @chrismarks

37mins

20 Mar 2019

Rank #8

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038 - The silent power of visual facilitation - with Sam Bradd

On episode 038, I speak with Sam Bradd, graphic recorder and facilitator, change-maker and principal of Drawing Change. With his team, Sam contributes to positive change by helping their clients to solve complex problems and distil big ideas that promise to make the world a better place.Sam helps me and the audience to grasp the complexity of visual facilitation - we begin with the basics, such as the difference between visual facilitation and graphic recording, explore the concept of the graphic recorder being a "public listener" and dive deep into the concept of psychological safety.You will learn techniques to get the maximum impact from the visual recording - in terms of the connection between the participants, their engagement with the topic and their contribution. I was particularly intrigued by Sam's view on workshops and group dynamics - from the perspective of the graphic recorder, the observing facilitator. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers  [2:00] What is the story behind your company's name "Drawing Change"?[3:41] If you were a hashtag, what would you be?[7:09] What do you have in mind when you refer to visualisation as a translation? [8:58] How do you organise information in a visual?[10:54] What is the difference between a visual recorder and a visual facilitator? [15:02] How can you create a safe space for a group while your focus is on the drawing? [22:06] Are visual facilitators always working in duos? [22:55] Would you have a conversation about the visual with the participants during the session? [30:18] How long did it take you to stop overthinking everything you draw? [34:16] What is the best way to integrate the visual in the post-workshop process?[36:51] Do you have a story that showcases the impact of the visual?[39:53] From the perspective of the "public listener", what makes a workshop fail?[44:08] Which exercise provides you with the most insights for drawing?[50:31] Do you also work with corporate clients?[37:55] This means that you would first expose all the extreme differences in perspectives?[50:31] And then it comes to decision making in step 4?[54:13] What is the nugget to take away from our conversation?   Links to check Sam's business page: www.drawingchange.comAnthony Weeks on "Public Listening"Episode 033 with Oscar Trimboli on Deep ListeningKelvy Bird, levels of listening and generative scribing: kelvybird.com Sam's articles on how to use photo facilitation cardsOur sponsor Session Lab - An online agenda builder and exercise library Connect to Samon LinkedIn on Instagram or follow him on Twitter @drawing_change

55mins

11 Dec 2019

Rank #9

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007 - Mindset Management - with Jeremy Akers

In this episode, I talk to Jeremy Akers, an agnostic agile coach, trainer and public speaker. He accompanies businesses through their agile transformation with Wemanity and is associated with Instituut Core, an institute for management training programs. Jeremy and I speak about the facilitator’s mindset and what it means to be fully present in a workshop. He shares how he deals with his own discomfort and why it is important to share feelings of discomfort with the group. Tune in to hear about deep-democracy and techniques we can apply to decision-making processes that include everyone’s perspective without derailing into unproductive discussions. Don’t miss the part when Jeremy explains why he prefers hand-voting over dot-voting. This conversation will surely inspire you to explore your own areas of discomfort and will help you design workshops that work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers:[1:23] What does “agnostic agile” mean?[3:12] How did you become an agile coach?[7:19] How would you apply your concept of awareness to a group context?[7:35] How do you teach awareness?[12:40] What is the mindset according to you that you need as a facilitator?[15:30] How did you train for being able to be fully present with the group?[18:50] Would you apply a different method to provide a safe space when you work with individuals or with a group?[20:10] How can you become better in being fully present?[22:33] What reaction do you get when you share your discomfort with the participants?[27:11] What makes workshops fail?[28:44] How do you snap the group out of an unproductive back and forth of arguments?[34:26] How do you walk the thin line between providing safe space by agreeing and being the sparring partner who challenges the ideas of the group?[37:56] How can we get to a clear decision while “yes ending” each other?[40:43] How do you make sure that you get all concerns on the table?[43:35] When it comes to voting, what are the pros and cons of different techniques?[46:00] If our listener fell asleep and just woke up, what shall they take away? Links we mentioned along the conversation:Instituut Core Management Training: https://www.instituutcore.nl/en/Vipassana meditation: www.dhamma.orgRay Dalio’s “Principles” : Episode 7 on YoutubeChris Voss book “Never split the difference” and the concept of tactical empathySystems centred therapy: Functional subgrouping (Youtube)Deep democracy, Lewis method: https://deep-democracy.net/Liberating structures: http://www.liberatingstructures.comReach out to Jeremy via LinkedIn

47mins

16 Apr 2019

Rank #10

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018 - How to use scientific insights to design powerful workshops - with Myriam Hadnes

This is my first solo show and I speak about the science behind workshop design and facilitation. Namely, I share how I use evidence from behavioural economics to come up with ideas that will help participants to experience meaningful progress during their working session. Before founding idayz I had a career in higher education – as a researcher, lecturer and strategic advisor. From all these roles I learned about human behaviour and how to best facilitate their collaboration.  In the show, I share the rationale behind my workshop design and some of my favourite exercises and I answer my own questions: How can we help participants to open up and engage despite hierarchical differences? How can we use the energy of nay-sayers for creative ideation and is courage one of the most important skills of a successful facilitator? Don’t miss the part when I explain why I bring M&Ms to every meeting Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[1:59] What would I be if I was a hashtag?[3:30] Why do I call myself a “behavioural economist” and what does that mean?[6:33] What’s my story? How did I get from a career in higher education to become a facilitator? [10:59] Why did I call my business idayz?[15:21] What have I learned from my previous roles in workshop design and facilitation?[22:13] How do I use insights from behavioural economics to design workshops?[29:22] What’s my favourite exercise and how do I use behavioural insights to design exercises?[30:55] Why do I bring M&Ms to every meeting and workshop?[32:54] What are the most powerful check-in exercises I use and why do they work from a behavioural perspective?[41:45] Why do I brainstorm failures instead of successes?[43:00] How do I help participants to cluster their ideas after ideation?[45:41] Why do workshops fail?[46:26] What shall my listener who missed the entire show remember? Related links you may want to check out:My business page: www.idayz.nlDaniel Kahnemann: “Thinking fast and slow”Cognitive BiasesVipassana silent meditation retreatPat Flynn’s concept of “unfair advantage”Patrick CowdenJean Marc FandelMy blog post on check-in exercisesTeresa Amabile: The progress principleDan Ariely’s Lego experimentDixit board gameOur sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link)  Connect and follow me:LinkedIn @myriamhadnes on Instagram or Twitter

50mins

3 Jul 2019

Rank #11

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022 - Conversations matter! How to design group conversations - with Daniel Stillman

In this episode, I talk to Daniel Stillman, a conversation designer and host of the podcast “The Conversation Factory”. We talk about the difference and similarities between facilitation, conversation design and coaching. And, we talk a lot about power dynamics and how you deal with them and take them into account when designing group conversations that shall solve a problem. In the show, Daniel and I discuss a lot about the circumstances that determine our choices of exercises – depending on the purpose of a workshop, group dynamics, and stakeholder groups.   Don’t miss our arguments related to the “Fishbowl Conversation” that led us to explore how to evaluate which exercises were appropriate in specific situations. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[1:43] What’s your story? How did you turn from a BA in Physics into a conversation designer?[5:48] How did the experience of power dynamics impact you and your style of working in designing conversations?[10:43] Is there actually a line between being a conversation designer, a facilitator, moderator and a coach?[25:24] So what's according to you the most effective way to make a decision with a large group?[27:54] To what extent do you believe does the facilitator has a responsibility to protect the group from their decisions being highjacked by the p[roblem-owner?[29:43] What is the key skill according to you, since you are also teaching facilitating managers, what is the key skill that they should learn first?[30:46] Can you learn that? Can you teach that?[33:24] According to you, what makes a workshop fail?[37:48] So how much time do you usually spend on understanding the participants before him?[40:53] I would be curious to hear how you define the experience in the context of a conversation.[43:21] What’s your favourite exercise?[46:49] If someone fell asleep after a minute, just woke up and doesn't have time to listen to the entire show again. What do you want them to remember?Related links you may want to check out:Daniel’s conversation with Robert Bordone (Podcast,The Conversation Factory)Timothy Gallwey “The inner game of Tennis”Barry O’Reilly “Unlearn” Conversation OSThe Fishbowl Conversation (Exercise)Knowle’s principle of andragogy Daniel’s book: "The 30 Second Elephant and the Paper Airplane Experiment: Origami for Design Thinking"Our sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link) Other shows we mentioned: Rein Sevenstern on How to create experiences for your audienceConnect to Daniel: on LinkedIn or follow him on Twitter @dastillman

49mins

31 Jul 2019

Rank #12

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031 - Learnings from facilitating co-creation in the woods - with Meghan Preiss

In this episode, I talk to Meghan Preiss, a designer, researcher and corporate facilitator for RKS Design. Meghan works for corporate clients on service and product design and helps university students to use design thinking methods for finding their future career. She facilitates co-creation processes and supports groups in thinking outside the box.Meghan was part of a project that invited participants for a co-creation workshop into the woods. In this show, she will share what she learned from this experience and also from the interaction between students, children and executive managers. As Meghan used to be a shy person, we start our conversation on what it takes to become a facilitator when you have a shy personality. The core of the episode is Meghan's experience of hosting workshops in the woods, bringing together professionals, college students and school kids for a co-creation experience. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers [1:25] How did you get into co-creation and what fascinates you about it?[3:43] How did you grow into public speaking given your shy personality?[5:13] What would you advise a shy person who wants to become a facilitator?[6:08] How do you deal with shy participants in your co-creation sessions?[7:27] Would you give shy participants the opportunity to prefer beforehand? [8:12] If you had to summarise your vita into a hashtag - what would you be?[9:47] What's the magic ingredient of a co-creation process?[10:49] Would you invite students to workshops with clients? [14:56] What is the impact of low-tech set-up in nature on the co-creation process?[17:41] What is it about the woods that makes co-creation easier than in a creative room?[19:44] How would you bring the woods to the corporate world?[23:42] What is your favourite exercise?[25:42] How do you select the best ideas then?[28:53] What is the main difference in the way teams of students compared to professionals select ideas? [31:49] Doesn't this awareness of budget constraints limit the creative thinking of groups?[35:02] What can leaders learn from children in the co-creation process?[36:40] Do you have a technique in mind to get rid of that fear of judgement?[38:40] What makes a workshop work?[41:41] Would you define roles to facilitate the co-creation session?[45:00] Would you provide a group with guidelines on how to communicate?[45:46] What would be the optimal group size?[47:07] What would you like the listeners to remember from our conversation? Check out our sponsor Session Lab and send me a soundbite with your reason why you use SessionLab to be featured in one of my upcoming sponsor breaks!   Links to checkPodcast episode with Frans Scheepens Design and manage your workshop agenda with Session Lab (affiliate link) Connect to Meghanon LinkedInFollow Meghan on Instagram @meghanpreiss_

48mins

23 Oct 2019

Rank #13

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037 - How to facilitate group decisions in 4 easy steps - with Marjolijn de Graaf

Episode 037 is all about decision-making! On the show with me is Marjolijn de Graaf,  decision designer and change architect, and author of "Decisions by Design". On the show, Marjolijn guides us through the 4-step approach that she developed to assist organizations with complex decision-making. We speak about the art of decision-making and how a simple design process can lead to decisions that will be implemented. On the show, Marjolijn walks us through the 4-steps and uses clear analogies to explain that a decision-making process can take between 5 minutes and several days. ​​You will learn the importance of exploring differences before seeking agreement and what you have to do so that the final step of making the decision appears natural to the group.​Don't miss the part when Marjolijn explains how she uses the 4 steps approach to decide on the most suitable workshop format with her client!Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player. Questions and Answers  [1:47] When did you start calling yourself a decision designer?[3:32] What makes it so difficult to make decisions, why would we need a designer for that?[5:01] You have developed a multi-step process for effective decision-making. Could you guide us through this process?[8:35] Which would be the four steps?[9:31] What is your role as a facilitator in this process and what do you consider the biggest challenge for them to make a decision? [13:10] Who would you invite to that decision-making workshop? [14:20] Would you invite different people to the different phases? [17:03] How do you help groups to include perspectives that they wouldn't have thought about at first? [19:10] How do you sort these facts to help the group to make a decision? [26:01] Must the group be together for step 1, the fact discovery?[27:50] What is the time span you calculate for the first two steps?[31:47] How did you come to realise that you had to adjust the workshop format and how did the client react?[33:37] What happens after step 2?[35:02] How do you facilitate the step where you open the discussion to the group level?[37:55] This means that you would first expose all the extreme differences in perspectives?[40:45] And then it comes to decision making in step 4?[41:50] Are you seeking consensus?[42:53] What makes workshops fail? [46:24] Would delay the decision making when you feel the group isn't ready?[48:23] What is the nugget to take away from this episode?   Links to check Marjolijn's business page: https://www.impactcompany.nl/Her book "Decisions by Design" Download the free Decision Design Canvas. This strategic tool maps the entire route of group decision-making, in one handy overview.Episode 03 with Frans Scheepens on Brainstorming with huge groupsOur sponsor Session Lab - An online agenda builder and exercise library Connect to Marjolijnon Link

50mins

4 Dec 2019

Rank #14

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029 - Culture matters! How to apply Design Thinking across organisational cultures – with Bernhard Ferro

In this episode, I talk to Bernhard Ferro, a Senior Design Thinker and expert in user experience (UX) design with a background in behavioural sciences. We talk about Design Thinking and how its strict methodology can help us when dealing with difficult organizational cultures.Although Bernhard believes that "Design Thinking cannot fix a broken team", he shares how a Design Thinking workshop once contributed to the team-building process.  In the show, you will learn how you can prepare teams who have never experienced a co-creation workshop and what it takes to effectively manage expectations. Don’t miss the part in which Bernhard shares how a CEO turned into a "prototyping machine" and what exercise triggered the magical effect."Everything can be prototyped.Prototyping is a mindset."  Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers [1:16] What's your story? How did you get into Design Thinking?[3:50] How would you summarise your vita in one hashtag?[4:38] What have you learned from behavioural sciences that help you to design workshops?[5:38] What's your strategy to remove distraction?[8:17] Does the application of the Design Thinking methodology depend on the organisational culture? [12:13] Within the workshop process, when are you more designer and when are you more facilitator?[15:15] What is "interaction design"?[16:25] How do you use your knowledge in UX in the workshop design process? [18:29] Do you adjust your workshops depending on the group's culture? What would you do if you know the group tends to lengthy discussions?[19:40] Can you have a successful Design Thinking workshop with a toxic team?[21:33] Through the eyes of a behavioural scientist, what makes Design Thinking so favourable for team building?[22:57] With whom are you aligning in the workshop preparation process?[24:55] What's your role in terms of expectation management when it comes to expected results or outcomes?[29:02] What does it take for a team to have a successful Design Thinking workshop? [31:24] Why do workshops fail?[35:40] How would you prepare a participant for a potentially difficult workshop situation?[37:38] What's wrong about "group discussions"?[41:27] What's your favourite exercise to get groups become familiar with prototyping?[45:18] How do you prioritize ideas?[47:51] What advice would you give someone who wants to run Design Thinking workshops?[54:13] What shall a listener remember from our conversation? Check out our sponsor Session Lab and send me a soundbite with your reason why you use SessionLab to be featured in one of my upcoming sponsor breaks!   Connect to Bernhard on LinkedIn

53mins

9 Oct 2019

Rank #15

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017 - Master the room! How to create engagement with your audience - with Derek Bruce

In this episode, I talk to Derek Bruce. He is a Leadership Development Director, and has worked in HR, Learning & Development and is also an expert keynote speaker and event moderator and host.Derek and I speak about the importance of engaging the audience - whether it is in a workshop, meeting or at a conference. When our audience feels engaged, they will listen to us and interact, they will feel enabled to act upon the content we try to bring across.  Besides engaging the audience, Derek and I touch on a million other topics: the skillset of managers to survive the “future of work”, the impact of preparation on our mindset and the workshop atmosphere, and: why you may want to ask your audience to take a selfie. Don’t miss the part when Derek shares his lessons learned from facilitating a workshop where half the participants were physically present and the other half joined via video call. Tune in to learn how to assure that the virtual participants are as engaged as if they sat in the same room…. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[1:32] If you were a hashtag, what would it be?[1:53] What is your story? Where does your energy and your skill to engage the audience come from? [2:56] What have you learned from your roles in HR and Learning & Development about facilitation? [4:34] Where do you see the challenges and benefits of being a corporate versus an external facilitator?[8:02] What is your experience in collaborating with an external facilitator?[8:52] How do you measure success?[10:32] What does it take to engage an audience? [12:54] To what extent does seating matter and how do you set up the room?[14:06] Do you use different approaches to engage the audience depending on whether it is a meeting, workshop or conference? [19:50] When you say that engagement starts within the first minute and you often use humour. What have you learned from improv or stand-up comedy about engagement? [22:59] Stand-up is scripted whereas improv is not. Would you script your first joke when coming on stage?[24:41] So, does “humour” boil down to “authenticity”? [25:35] What makes for you a good facilitator? [28:26] Do facilitators of e.g. Design Sprints need different skills than facilitators who teach groups?  [31:18] How did you connect the virtual and physical participants in the beginning? What were the exercises? [33:41] For anyone who hasn’t facilitated a partly virtual workshop – what would you advise? [35:40] What is your opinion on the statement that in the future of work, every manager must develop facilitation skills?[38:22] What’s the difference between soft and emotional skills?[40:40] Are these emotional skills then also the ingredients you need to engage the audience? [47:59] What’s your silver bullet exercise? Related links you may want to check out:Our sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link) Other shows we mentioned:Episode 016 with Tamar Broadbent: Why every facilitator should take improv classes” Episode 007 with Jeremy Akers: Mindset Management Connect to Derek:

55mins

26 Jun 2019

Rank #16

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005 - Artistic Intelligence: The new Design Thinking? with Romas Stukenberg

In this episode, I speak with Romas Stukenberg, a graduate of the prestigious THNK school for creative leadership and founder of Artistic Intelligence, a creative consulting agency that helps leaders to tackle strategic challenges through artistic means. We talk about the difference between being creative and artistic. Our conversation dives deep into the topic of self-leadership and the role of individual courage for successful workshops.  Don’t miss Romas' practical advice on how facilitators can drive groups from creative exploration back to the strategic application. Romas’ artistic approach will inspire you to deliver workshops that work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group.Questions and Answers[00:56] If you were a hashtag. What would you be? [02:09] According to you, what is the biggest misconception about design and art?[03:33] According to you, what is the true value of a designer in the business world? [05:16] You started a project that you call “artistic intelligence” – AI. What is your story behind this project? [07:19] How difficult is it to get business people to answer “big existential questions” by using art as a tool? [08:35] The concept of “AI” addresses strategic questions with open ends - What are good examples?[09:18] What is the difference between artistic and creative?[10:55] To what extent does artistic intelligence differ from Design Thinking?[11:57] Is AI then about slowing down?[13:45] In your AI workshops, is it the mindset and philosophy of art you apply or do participants also get their “hands dirty”?[15:17] To what extent are business leaders ready for this jump?[18:08 How do you converge the group towards results after the artistic exploration?[22:17] What is the impact of the physical workshop space on the dynamics? [23:09] What do the artists who facilitate your sessions differently compared to facilitators from the usual business environment?  [24:49] In a review of one of your workshops I read that you ask participants to explore their fears. What can we find in our fears that would reveal our strengths? [29:30] How do you make sure to those who might judge themselves as not being creative enough?[32:28] What would be for you a “meaningful closure” of a workshop? [34:46] What can you do to avoid a “biased” group check-out? [36:07] What would be the transformation for a team due to artistic intelligence? [37:31] What makes a workshop work? [38:54] What can a facilitator do to assure that the quality of space is maintained? [41:30] What is the nutshell you would like the audience to take home?[42:04] How do you encourage courage? Related links you may want to check out:Romas' business page: www.artisticintelligence.de and www.namename.eu (German only)THNK School of Creative Leadership: https://www.thnk.org/Our sponsor Session Lab Connect to Romas:LinkedIn 

46mins

3 Apr 2019

Rank #17

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013 - How to make meetings better by using workshop techniques - with Alison Coward

In episode 013, I talk to Alison Coward, a founder, facilitator, book author and keynote speaker. Alison runs Bracket, a consulting agency that helps teams work better together. We talk about “workshop culture” and the fact that not every professional gathering must turn into a workshop. Instead, we can use workshop elements that will help boost team collaboration and creativity in meetings and everyday business. In the show, Alison shares how to create a workshops culture with groups who are not used to post-it notes and sharpie markers. Alison’s reflections on creativity at work will inspire you to design and deliver workshops that work. Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers[1:11] What’s the story behind your company name “Bracket”?[5:15] What did you learn from your time working with creatives about the facilitation of business meetings and workshops?[6:43] How do you get management teams to become more “creative”? [7:48] How do you facilitate creativity without getting into the “touchy-feely” zone and how do you turn the outcomes into something productive? [9:45] What will you then do with these ideas to get to the productive bit?[11:53] What is the timeframe you advise your clients to take for a workshop to tackle a specific problem?[13:21] What is the difference between a workshop, a group discussion and a meeting? [15:48] How can we bring the dynamic part of a workshop into a meeting? [19:30] How would you initiate this transformative process of introducing workshop culture into a team? [26:08] Do you have ground rules that come along with what you call “workshop culture”?[28:05] What are the ingredients you need to bring workshop culture into a “normal meeting”?[28:36] With what kind of exercises would you use for that?[29:38] Not every team can afford hiring a facilitator for a “normal” meeting. Could a team member take on this facilitation role? [34:33] Do you believe in taking mindfulness into meetings?[35:50] How do you deal with a situation where a check-in comment risks to take the meeting somewhere else? [36:54] What’s the magic that gets work done in a workshop?[38:06] To what extent is the facilitator responsible for the follow-through of workshop outcomes? [40:37] How can we bring the energy back up in a full day workshop – especially after everyone comes back from lunch? [45:03] Why are organisations today so much more aware of the benefits of collaboration compared to 10 years ago when you first started? What has changed?Related links you may want to check out:Alison’s business page: https://www.bracketcreative.co.ukHer book: “A pocket guide to effective workshops”Alison’s blog post on the creative process of workshop design New York Times article on 36 questionsOur sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link)

47mins

29 May 2019

Rank #18

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030 - The day after! How to effectively document to achieve results - with Mireille Beumer

In this episode, I talk to Mireille Beumer, an engineer by training and facilitator by passion and profession. In her different roles, Mireille facilitates the process of knowledge transfer between people. And, she trains facilitators to master the skill. On the show, we speak about the nitty-gritty bits of workshop documentation. The day after the workshop is the most difficult and most neglected one. What can we do to make it easy for groups and for workshop sponsors to keep the momentum and to follow up? Mireille shares valuable advice on what it takes to effectively capture the outcomes so that they translate into action. You will learn how to "write" workshop minutes that catch the recipient's attention. And Mireille shares how you can get the participants to create their own documentation in an effective and fun way! Do you want to know why you don't need a gym when working with Mireille? Then, stay tuned until the end and keep your pen and notebook ready: you'll surely need it! Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers [1:01] When did you start calling yourself a facilitator?[2:34] What is the difference between a facilitator and a coach?[4:11] How does your background in engineering impact the way you facilitate collaboration?[5:49] If you were a hashtag, what would you be?[7:10] What's your favourite exercise to "bring power to the meeting"? [10:20] How would you deal with the situation where too many participants state that they have a busy mind and don't want to be in that meeting?[11:48] Do you allow participants to join late?[14:33] What are the key skills of a professional facilitator? [19:54] How do you document your workshop results?[24:09] Do you use a template to capture the results in the form of a story?[27:01] How can you help teams to keep momentum? What comes after documentation?[28:46] Does the follow-up workshop need the facilitator or can it be done by the group/ manager?[29:04] What is the best timing for the follow-up session?[29:33] How do you prepare a follow-up with your client? [31:19] How much time do you plan for the closing?[35:02] What are the steps you need to take to make sure the follow-up becomes easy?[37:46] What's your responsibility in terms of follow-up? Where is the line between facilitator and project manager?[39:50] You refer to 4-hours workshops. Do you believe in 8-hours sessions?[45:16] How can we capture results that will be read?[48:31] From your experience what makes a workshop fail?[49:37] What would you like the listeners to remember from our conversation?Check out our sponsor Session Lab and send me a soundbite with your reason why you use SessionLab to be featured in one of my upcoming sponsor breaks!  Connect to Mireilleon LinkedInvia her website: https://mireillebeumer.nl/

51mins

16 Oct 2019

Rank #19

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023 - Create FOMO for yourself: how to increase your workshop’s visibility - with May King Tsang

In this episode, I talk to May King Tsang, a social media FOMO ("fear of missing out") creator and live tweeter. May King joined a live event I organised a day before recording the interview so that I could have first-hand insights on how she works and how FOMO works. In the show, we talk about how May King created visibility for a small and intimate event on social media.  In the show, May King shares the steps she took to create visibility: before, during and even after the event. She explains the key differences between the major platforms such as Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook and how we can use the algorithms to our advantage.  Don’t miss the part when May King explains why she doesn't directly refer to the event she creates FOMO for in her very first social media posts. And what she did to help me to increase my number of followers on Instagram by 6% and by 35% on Twitter without me even using my phone.  Click here to download the free 1-page summaryDon’t miss the next show: Subscribe to the show with your favourite podcast player.Feeling inspired by the conversation in this episode? We can have our own - take a seat at my virtual table as part of a Mastermind Group. Questions and Answers [2:00] If you had to choose a hashtag for yourself, what would it be? [3:08] Can you tell us a little bit more about your story, making tea and making FOMO while making mistakes. [6:05] What was your approach of creating pre-FOMO for the mastermind even? [13:08] How can we protect us against being tagged without consent? [13:49] We just covered the pre-FOMO strategy. What was then happening at the event itself? [22:42] If we want to be more strategic, what would be the differences of the different approaches on the three different platforms being Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook? [26:54] What is the ideal frequency of posting across platforms? [29:32] Why was it important that you used my phone during the event to create FOMO? [33:17] What is usually the result that you would hope for that you would bring forth? [40:45] From your outside perspective, observing the events you create FOMO for: What makes a workshop or conference fail? [47:09] How do you create post-FOMO? How can we keep the buzz alive after the event? [52:09] What would you like a listener to remember from our interview?  Related links you may want to check out: Neal Schaffer on influencer marketing Andrew and Pete Jannet Murray Our sponsor Session Lab (affiliate link)  Connect to May Kingon LinkedInFollow her @MayKingTEA

53mins

7 Aug 2019

Rank #20