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Revisited

We return to places which have been in the news – often a long time ago, sometimes recently – to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9:10pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

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We return to places which have been in the news – often a long time ago, sometimes recently – to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9:10pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Massacre at the Munich Olympics, five decades on

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Palestinian militants took 11 members of the Israeli delegation hostage inside the Olympic village in Munich, Germany, on September 5, 1972. The terrorists, who claimed to be part of the Black September movement, were demanding the liberation of Palestinian prisoners held in Israel. After killing two hostages, they negotiated for a plane to take them out of the country. But a German police operation to rescue the Israelis went horribly wrong. In the end, all the hostages were killed, along with five of the eight attackers and a German police officer.

Sep 11 2022

16mins

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Eighty years after France’s Vél d'Hiv roundup of Jews, its last survivors recount ordeal

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This month marks 80 years since the Vél d'Hiv roundup, when French police detained 13,000 Parisian Jews, including 4,000 children, acting on orders from occupying German forces and their French allies in the Vichy Regime. Many were first sent to the Vélodrome d'Hiver stadium, which gave its name to this sinister chapter of French history, before being deported to Auschwitz, never to return. FRANCE 24’s Claire Paccalin and Stéphanie Trouillard met with survivors who managed to escape.

Jul 08 2022

17mins

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For France's Yellow Vest protesters, the fight goes on

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On November 17, 2018, French men and women gathered for the first time on the capital’s iconic Champs-Élysées and on hundreds of roundabouts throughout France to protest against the high cost of living. They were easily recognisable by their yellow high-visibility vests. The months-long demonstrations against the government of President Emmanuel Macron turned violent and were met with a fierce crackdown by security forces. Almost four years later, those who participated in the movement tell FRANCE 24’s reporters how the struggle has changed their lives.

Jun 24 2022

16mins

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Spirituality and ecological values: What remains of India's utopian city of Auroville?

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It's a utopian city without money, without a government, without religion and which welcomes all nationalities. Auroville was founded in southern India in February 1968 by Mirra Alfassa, a French woman nicknamed "the Mother". After her death in 1973, the city developed, despite being located in the middle of the desert, thanks to the work of its residents. Some 3,300 people from 52 different countries live there today. Half of the population is Indian and a fifth is French. Together, they dream of building a new humanity, where people live in peace and harmony. FRANCE 24's Marion Laouamen, Lucile Perrone and Navodita Kumari report.

Jun 10 2022

16mins

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Looking back at when Sicilian mafia Cosa Nostra assassinated Italian judges

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Created on the island of Sicily in the mid-19th century, Cosa Nostra soon became one of the most powerful branches of the Italian mafia. In 1986, the Italian justice system launched a counter-offensive, with the Palermo prosecutor's office leading the charge. Judge Giovanni Falcone became a symbol of the fight against the mafia but on May 23, 1992, he was killed in a car bombing, along with his wife and three bodyguards. His colleague and friend Paolo Borsellino was murdered less than two months later. Three decades on, our correspondents report on how these assassinations by Cosa Nostra sparked an awakening and an ongoing fight against the mafia.

May 27 2022

15mins

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The painful legacy of Angola’s civil war

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Twenty years ago, one of the longest, most brutal and deadliest wars of the last century ended in Angola. In 27 years, this conflict left nearly 1 million people dead and displaced 4 million. It has also left the country in ruins: In 2002, 60 percent of Angolans did not have access to drinking water and 30 percent of children died before the age of five. Has the West African country recovered from these dark years? We find out in this report by Clément Bonnerot, Dombaxi Sebastiao, Evan Claver and Juliette Dubois.

May 06 2022

15mins

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Three years after fire, a race against time to restore Paris's Notre-Dame Cathedral

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French President Emmanuel Macron has set a deadline of 2024 to reopen Paris’s Notre-Dame Cathedral to worshippers and visitors. FRANCE 24's Revisited show is following the progress of this ambitious project and brings you a fresh update, three years after the devastating fire that badly damaged the world-famous cathedral. Our reporter Mélina Huet met those who are involved in the restoration work, both inside the mediaeval edifice and elsewhere in France. They now find themselves in a race against time.

Apr 15 2022

17mins

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Cyprus's Varosha, where time came to a halt in 1974

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Occupied by Turkish soldiers for close to half a century, the former Cypriot resort town of Varosha lies in ruins. Known as Marash in Turkish, the town is situated in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, an entity only recognised by Ankara. It's also home to one of the two Turkish military bases on the island. According to a 1984 UN resolution, Varosha must be returned to its original owners. But neither the Greek Cypriot authorities, nor the Turkish Cypriot administration have taken steps to apply the decision. Our regional correspondents Shona Bhattacharyya and Ludovic de Foucaud report.

Apr 08 2022

16mins

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Romania's Iași pogrom, one of the worst massacres of Jews during World War II

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During World War II, one of the worst massacres of the conflict took place in Eastern Europe, in Romania's second city of Iași. A tenth of the city's population – more than 13,000 people – was murdered in the space of a few days, simply because they were Jews. More than 80 years after the Iasi pogrom, most people in Romania know little about these atrocities, and the country's far-right party is gaining in strength – as are those who want to rewrite history. FRANCE 24's Nadia Blétry, Thierry Trelluyer and Ruth Michaelson report.

Mar 25 2022

16mins

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Wounds of Sri Lanka's civil war remain impossible to heal

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In Sri Lanka, 13 years after the end of the civil war with the Tamil Tigers that lasted a quarter of a century, reconciliation appears elusive. Elected in 2019, President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, seen by the Sinhalese majority as a hero and accused by the Tamil minority ​​of war crimes during the conflict, embodies this divide. FRANCE 24's Thomas Denis reports, with Navodita Kumari.

Mar 11 2022

16mins

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Venezuela grapples with endless crisis

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An oil producer hard hit by the slump in global prices, Venezuela has seen its economy gradually deteriorate over the past decade, with international economic sanctions aggravating the crisis. The late former president Hugo Chavez, in power from 1999 to 2013, wanted to make his country the home of "21st century socialism". But despite this promise to eradicate inequality, the most vulnerable seem in a more precarious situation than ever. However, some economic indicators have recently improved. To take stock of the situation, our team reports from Caracas, a capital where cameras are not always welcome.

Feb 18 2022

17mins

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Brexit, one year on: Is life in the UK better without Europe?

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Is the United Kingdom better off without Europe? Did the country make a risky choice by leaving the EU one year ago? Our reporters Jonathan Walsh and Clovis Casali crossed the Channel to understand the consequences of Brexit on the daily lives of citizens. From London to Belfast, via Boston – the town with the highest pro-Brexit vote in 2016 – they report on how the UK has changed.

Feb 04 2022

17mins

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Victims of Storm Alex in southeastern France still struggling to recover

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For various experts, Storm Alex, which ravaged south-eastern France in October 2020, was a "weather bomb". In the area north of the city of Nice, torrential rain burst the banks of rivers. Entire houses were swept away in the current, sometimes with their owners inside. The 2,000 inhabitants of the village of Tende – perched high in the Roya valley – were cut off from the rest of the world, with no running water or electricity for several weeks. Supplies had to be brought in by helicopter. Since then, access has been restored. But not everyone has been able to return. More than a year later, Storm Alex has left catastrophic scars.

Jan 21 2022

15mins

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The fall of the Soviet Union, 30 years on

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The Soviet bloc officially collapsed in late December of 1991, leaving 14 independent republics in its wake in addition to the newly named Russian Federation. Three decades on, FRANCE 24's James André, Achraf Abid, Gulliver Cragg, Sylvain Rousseau and Elena Volochine bring us a series of reports from Russia, Estonia, Ukraine and Georgia on what remains of the Soviet era – and the relationship that these countries have with Moscow today.

Jan 07 2022

16mins

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In Russia, the battle for the memory of Soviet repressions

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In November, shortly before the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Soviet Union, the Russian authorities moved to close down one of the country's oldest and most influential NGOs, Memorial, which was dedicated to preserving the memory of Stalin-era repressions. Despite everything, the group's historians are determined to continue the fight to open up the archives of the Soviet secret services. FRANCE 24's Elena Volochine reports, with illustrations by Sofiya Voznaya.

Dec 17 2021

16mins

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Eighty years after Pearl Harbor, survivors of Japanese internment camps remember ordeal

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After Japan's 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the US forcibly displaced 120,000 people of Japanese origin into 10 internment camps in the western United States. Eight decades on, our correspondents went to meet survivors, who reflected on their ordeal.

Dec 10 2021

17mins

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A century after German rule, genocide compensation deal divides Namibia

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Despite being the first genocide of the 20th century, the 1904-1908 massacre of the indigenous Herero and Nama peoples by German colonial troops in Namibia remains a little-known chapter of history. It was not until May of this year that Berlin officially recognised its responsibility for the atrocities. Our regional correspondents report.

Nov 12 2021

16mins

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Attack on Black liberation group MOVE: The day Philadelphia bombed its own citizens

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The Black liberation group MOVE was founded in 1972 in the US city of Philadelphia. It combined a wide array of ideologies, including environmentalism, animal rights and an end to capitalism. The group's activities were closely watched by law enforcement, at times leading to armed confrontation. Tensions peaked on May 13, 1985, when the Philadelphia police bombed the MOVE house, killing 11 Black people. Despite two grand jury investigations and a civil suit, no one was ever criminally charged for the bombing. More than 35 years later, FRANCE 24's correspondents returned to Philadelphia to revisit the day the city bombed its own citizens.

Oct 29 2021

16mins

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Japan rediscovers Minamata ecological disaster through new film

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60 years before Fukushima, Japan was hit by an ecological disaster in the port city of Minamata. Forgotten by some, its memory is preserved by the illness that bears its name: Minamata disease, or severe mercury poisoning. Now, a new film about one of the worst cases of industrial poisoning in modern times is about to be screened in Minamata for the first time.

Oct 22 2021

16mins

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Two decades on, Sierra Leone still scarred by civil war

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Between 1991 and 2002, the small West African nation of Sierra Leone was ravaged by a decade of war, which left between 50,000 and 200,000 people dead. The conflict was also marked by rapes, mutilations and the forced use of child soldiers in both the rebel and regular armies. Twenty years on, the country is still trying to recover from the civil war, one of Africa's most brutal. Sierra Leone remains deeply divided and plagued by corruption. And despite its many riches, it is one of the poorest countries in the world.

Oct 08 2021

16mins

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Interesting Documentaries About The World

By Jack_McCoy - Dec 04 2018
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Revisited on France 24 takes you back to places that were in the news weeks, months, often years ago. These are really good, relatively short global documentaries. I have yet to watch a bad episode. It’s nice to have as a podcast on my phone, though France 24 puts them on other places like their website and YouTube as well.