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Cover image of Today's Neuroscience, Tomorrow's History - Professor Roger Ordidge - Audio

Today's Neuroscience, Tomorrow's History - Professor Roger Ordidge - Audio

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

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1. Nottingham University – imaging research with Peter Mansfield

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

3mins

24 Jun 2009

Rank #1

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21. Reflections on a career - Lauterbur and Mansfield’s Nobel Prize

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

2mins

24 Feb 2009

Rank #2

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13. Detroit - applying MRI to visualise brain ischemia

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

3mins

24 Feb 2009

Rank #3

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9. Nottingham - the Birdcage Coil

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

2mins

24 Feb 2009

Rank #4

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7. Into industry - Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1982-86) applied to body

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

3mins

24 Feb 2009

Rank #5

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16. University College London – a new lab at Queen Square for Europe’s highest field

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

3mins

23 Feb 2009

Rank #6

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8. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1982-86) – revealing tissue biochemistry

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

1min

23 Feb 2009

Rank #7

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6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging – how it works: gradient echoes and K space

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

3mins

23 Feb 2009

Rank #8

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5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging – how it works: Fourier transform and use of contrast

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

4mins

23 Feb 2009

Rank #9

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4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance – how it works

Professor Roger Ordidge studied physics at the University of Nottingham, and went on to obtain his PhD in 1981 under the supervision of Professor Sir Peter Mansfield. He worked on echo-planar imaging, a high speed imaging technique which helped make Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possible, and was the first person to generate a moving image of the beating heart.After four years in industry working on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as related to body metabolism, Professor Ordidge briefly returned to Nottingham in 1986 before taking up a post in the US at Oakland University, Detroit, to study the process of stroke damage. In 1994, he became Joel Professor Physics Applied to Medicine, at UCL, a position which he still holds. His research focuses on the development and application to clinical research of MRI technology and he has patented several of the widely used methods currently used in MRI scanners such as improvements in radio-frequency (RF) slice definition using FOCI RF pulses. He is particularly interested in studying the brain in stroke and in neonatal birth asphyxia.Professor Ordidge was a founding member of the British Chapter of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and in 2006 was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

4mins

23 Feb 2009

Rank #10