Cover image of TriPod: New Orleans At 300
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History
Government

TriPod: New Orleans At 300

Updated 2 days ago

History
Government
Read more

Each episode of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 is devoted to a single story or subjects from New Orleans’ rich history.

Read more

Each episode of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 is devoted to a single story or subjects from New Orleans’ rich history.

iTunes Ratings

187 Ratings
Average Ratings
177
5
3
2
0

Awesome show about new orleans

By nolatolatonola - Dec 22 2018
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Well researched and interesting.

Great radio show!

By The jjjj - Jul 27 2017
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I adore this show. Learning so much about the city I love!

iTunes Ratings

187 Ratings
Average Ratings
177
5
3
2
0

Awesome show about new orleans

By nolatolatonola - Dec 22 2018
Read more
Well researched and interesting.

Great radio show!

By The jjjj - Jul 27 2017
Read more
I adore this show. Learning so much about the city I love!

Listen to:

Cover image of TriPod: New Orleans At 300

TriPod: New Orleans At 300

Updated 2 days ago

Read more

Each episode of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 is devoted to a single story or subjects from New Orleans’ rich history.

TriPod Xtras: Nathaniel Rich

Podcast cover
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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with writer Nathaniel Rich to talk about his newly released third novel, King Zeno .

Feb 01 2018

32mins

Play

NOLA vs Nature: Building The Industrial Canal

Podcast cover
Read more
Tripod’s NOLA versus Nature series returns with a story of the construction of the Industrial Canal. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson looks at the ways this massive infrastructure project was invasive, above and below ground. Hear the Part I on Sauve's Crevasse and Part II on Baldwin Wood .

Feb 15 2018

22mins

Play

NOLA vs Nature: The Blessing And Curse Of The Wood Screw Pump

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with its NOLA versus Nature series . This week: WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Travis Lux look at the city’s drainage pumps, and the man behind their design -- Albert Baldwin Wood. New Orleans is below sea level. You know this, and certainly, if you were here this past August, you really know this. Almost a foot of rain fell over a couple hours and parts of town were knee deep in water. The sewerage and water board caught a lot of flack for this, people lost a lot of faith when they found out that the city’s pumps, and generators -- things that were supposed to keep the city from flooding - were broken. Joe Becker worked for the sewerage and water board for thirty years, and was actually the superintendent. Becker retired last summer after the flood drama. You might have some feelings about him, or the Sewerage and Water Board. But Becker really knows his pumps. He recently took me on a tour of Pumping Station #1 - right in the neutral ground of

Jan 11 2018

12mins

Play

A Community Of Refugees In New Orleans East

Podcast cover
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You’ve probably heard of the James Beard Awarding-winning Duong Phuong Bakery out in New Orleans East, whether or not you actually got to taste their coveted King Cake. But today, high school students from Metairie Park Country Day take over TriPod to go beyond Duong Phong, and explore the larger Vietnamese community in the East. Not long after we celebrated New Years Eve 2018, an entire community in New Orleans East celebrated their new years eve. It’s called Tet. Tet is the Vietnamese New Year, and there’s a weekend long festival with food, music, dancing, and some of the loudest fireworks you’ll ever hear. Tet was our introduction to the New Orleans Vietnamese community in New Orleans East. Believe it or not, before this experience, we didn’t know this community existed. Yeah, one of us, Halley Phan, is Vietnamese and just moved here from Vietnam last year. Even she didn’t know about the community. To be honest: our teacher told us about it. This made us really curious to learn more

May 24 2018

14mins

Play

"The Mexican Band"

Podcast cover
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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode about a Mexican band that rocked the city in the 80s -- the 1880s. Long, long ago, a band in New Orleans swept the city off its feet, but it wasn’t a New Orleans Band. It was Mexican. There's this sort of mythical thing...it's like this band comes to New Orleans from Mexico and they've got military brass instruments and it gets pinpointed as the beginning of something, which is really interesting. Interesting because nearly a hundred and 50 years have gone by, and jazz musicians like my friend Byron Asher, are still talking about this one band. I mean, it's kind of like a legend,” Asher said. It’s 1884, and New Orleans is celebrating an anniversary, not the tricentennial. The one hundredth anniversary of the first shipment of U.S. cotton to Europe which went to London in 1784. Eric Seiferth is a historian at the Historic New Orleans Collection. He says, back then, New Orleans is hosting The World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial

May 10 2018

12mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: John Barbry Of The Tunica-Biloxi Nation

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new tripod xtra. Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with John Barbry of the Tunica Biloxi nation, to discuss the history of the tribe and its contributions to New Orleans and Louisiana. The Tunica Biloxi land is in Marksville, Louisiana, about three hours outside New Orleans. The conversation begins when the Tunica Biloxi made contact Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto. John D. Barbry is the director of development & programming, Language & Culture Revitalization Program for the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana. He is one of the authors of the new book from the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana: The Tunica Biloxi Tribe: Its Culture and People . Barbry spoke at the Historic New Orleans Collection last month, as part of programming for their exhibition, “New Orleans, the Founding Era.” The exhibition is on view through May 27, 2018, at 533 Royal Street . TriPod is a production of WWNO in collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection

May 17 2018

14mins

Play

Edmond Dédé: The Classical Composer You've Never Heard Of

Podcast cover
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I crashed an opera rehearsal the other day. A large group of vocalists, young, old, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, all the genders, belted out in long rows surrounding a piano. They were preparing for the 75th anniversary celebration of the New Orleans Opera Association. I was there to talk to a mother-daughter opera combo: Givonna Joseph and Aria Mason. “When she was little people would always say ‘Are you going to sing like your mom?’” Givonna told me. “It would drive her crazy. ‘Im so tired, no, I’m not gonna sing… And I said, ‘you’re going to be who you’re supposed to be. I’m not going to tell you what you are going to do.’ And at some point the bug bit her and by the time she got to college, all of a sudden she says ‘I’m going to major in voice.’ What?!” She did name her daughter Aria. “I did,” she confirms. “I took a chance. She could have been tone deaf. That wouldn’t have worked out so well.” Givonna’s been performing since she was a child. She was often the only black girl in

Jul 19 2018

22mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: “Arriving Africans And A Changing New Orleans”

Podcast cover
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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a tripod Xtra produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson. In this tripod xtra, we hear an abridged talk given by Dr. Erin Greenwald, curator of the Historic New Orleans Collection's 'The Founding Era' exhibit. Greenwald traces New Orleans' African roots -- from their kidnapping in Africa, through the middle passage, to the seminal role Africans played in the founding of our city. Dr. Erin M. Greenwald is the Curator of Programs at the New Orleans Museum of Art. Her talk was part of programming for the exhibition, New Orleans, the Founding Era, curated by Dr. Greenwald, for The Historic New Orleans Collection. The exhibition is on view through May 27, 2018, at 533 Royal Street . Carte particulière du Royaume de Juda [Detailed map of the kingdom of Ouidah] from Voyage du chevalier des Marchais en Guinée, isles voisines, et à Cayenne, fait en 1725, 1726, et 1727, vol. 2 Amsterdam, 1731 Credit Jean Baptiste Labat / The Historic New Orleans Collection, 2015

May 03 2018

13mins

Play

If These Pages Could Talk: Touro Infirmary's First Admission Book

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns to hunt down a rare artifact full of private, and personal information. Laine Kaplan-Levenson goes on the search. When you first walk into a hospital, before you can see a doctor, you walk up to a counter in a room that sounds like this The person at the desk asks you a bunch of questions, like who's paying your bill, where you come from, your date of birth. Touro Infirmary has been collecting this same information for over 150 years.

Aug 09 2018

22mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: Herlin Riley And Joe Lastie

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TriPod put out an episode on the legendary Lastie family — a family that holds generations of iconic musicians. I talked to drummers and first cousins Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie about their experience growing up in this musical family, what it was like to hear Professor Longhair and Dr John play in their living room, what it was like to have their introduce drums into the spiritual church, and what it was like to get yelled at by that same grandfather when they tried to play James Brown in that same spiritual church.

Apr 12 2018

1hr 17mins

Play

New Orleans: 300 // Bulbancha: 3000

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This is the final episode of Tripod. For these past three years, we’ve been telling stories about New Orleans. But, before it was ever called New Orleans, this place already had a name: Bulbancha . The people that host Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with for this episode use this name when they tell people where they live. They live in Bulbancha, and they are telling today’s story -- what it’s like living in present day Bulbancha, and what it’s been like, as a native person, seeing the city celebrate the Tricentennial… the city’s colonial beginning.

Dec 20 2018

29mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: Kiese Laymon

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Kiese Laymon is a Mississippi based writer, who’s just released a new book titled "Heavy: An American Memoir." In it, he writes about his struggles with eating disorders and addiction, abuse, and his relationship with his mother. TriPod’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with Laymon to talk about what his students at the University of Mississippi think about New Orleans, his memoir, and how his literary success fits into a growing trend of black writers from the south receiving national attention.

Dec 03 2018

25mins

Play

WWNO Presents: 'Sticky Wicket'

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 shares the first episode of WWNO's new series, Sticky Wicket

Nov 16 2018

31mins

Play

Desire, Louisiana

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Tripod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a look at the Desire community, then and now. If you've from New Orleans, or you’ve lived here for a minute, you know how often locals identify themselves by their neighborhood. Before Katrina, for thousands of New Orleans residents, these neighborhoods were public housing developments: the Magnolia, B.W. Cooper, C.J. Peete, the Calliope. All those developments are now gone, they’ve all been demolished, and so they’re not part of what’s been this ongoing citywide Tricentennial conversation. But these communities remain super important parts of thousands of people’s lives, and this city's history. So, for one of our final Tripod episodes we decided to hear from residents of the one of those neighborhoods: The Desire.

Oct 11 2018

22mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: Peter Marina (Podcast Edit)

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. As part of the New Orleans Museum of Art’s literary ‘Arts and Letters’ series, Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with sociologist Peter Marina in front of a live audience about his book ‘Down and Out in New Orleans.’ The two discussed the various informal economies in New Orleans, and alternative lifestyles people choose as a way to live outside of mainstream society. Laine starts the conversation with what Marina’s book is inspired by. You can hear the edited version of the conversation between Laine and Peter Marina here . TriPod is a production on WWNO in collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection and the Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies at UNO . Subscribe to the Tripod Podcast wherever you get your podcasts, and be sure to give it a review. You can also follow tripod on facebook, twitter, and Instagram at @tripodnola.

Sep 13 2018

46mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: Peter Marina (Radio Edit)

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. As part of the New Orleans Museum of Art’s literary ‘Arts and Letters’ series, Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with sociologist Peter Marina in front of a live audience about his book ‘Down and Out in New Orleans.’ The two discussed the various informal economies in New Orleans, and alternative lifestyles people choose as a way to live outside of mainstream society. Laine starts the conversation with what Marina’s book is inspired by. You can hear the unedited version of the conversation between Laine and Peter Marina here . TriPod is a production on WWNO in collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection and the Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies at UNO . Subscribe to the Tripod Podcast wherever you get your podcasts, and be sure to give it a review. You can also follow tripod on facebook, twitter, and Instagram at @tripodnola.

Sep 13 2018

17mins

Play

If These Pages Could Talk: Touro Infirmary's First Admission Book

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns to hunt down a rare artifact full of private, and personal information. Laine Kaplan-Levenson goes on the search. When you first walk into a hospital, before you can see a doctor, you walk up to a counter in a room that sounds like this The person at the desk asks you a bunch of questions, like who's paying your bill, where you come from, your date of birth. Touro Infirmary has been collecting this same information for over 150 years.

Aug 09 2018

22mins

Play

Edmond Dédé: The Classical Composer You've Never Heard Of

Podcast cover
Read more
I crashed an opera rehearsal the other day. A large group of vocalists, young, old, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, all the genders, belted out in long rows surrounding a piano. They were preparing for the 75th anniversary celebration of the New Orleans Opera Association. I was there to talk to a mother-daughter opera combo: Givonna Joseph and Aria Mason. “When she was little people would always say ‘Are you going to sing like your mom?’” Givonna told me. “It would drive her crazy. ‘Im so tired, no, I’m not gonna sing… And I said, ‘you’re going to be who you’re supposed to be. I’m not going to tell you what you are going to do.’ And at some point the bug bit her and by the time she got to college, all of a sudden she says ‘I’m going to major in voice.’ What?!” She did name her daughter Aria. “I did,” she confirms. “I took a chance. She could have been tone deaf. That wouldn’t have worked out so well.” Givonna’s been performing since she was a child. She was often the only black girl in

Jul 19 2018

22mins

Play

A Community Of Refugees In New Orleans East

Podcast cover
Read more
You’ve probably heard of the James Beard Awarding-winning Duong Phuong Bakery out in New Orleans East, whether or not you actually got to taste their coveted King Cake. But today, high school students from Metairie Park Country Day take over TriPod to go beyond Duong Phong, and explore the larger Vietnamese community in the East. Not long after we celebrated New Years Eve 2018, an entire community in New Orleans East celebrated their new years eve. It’s called Tet. Tet is the Vietnamese New Year, and there’s a weekend long festival with food, music, dancing, and some of the loudest fireworks you’ll ever hear. Tet was our introduction to the New Orleans Vietnamese community in New Orleans East. Believe it or not, before this experience, we didn’t know this community existed. Yeah, one of us, Halley Phan, is Vietnamese and just moved here from Vietnam last year. Even she didn’t know about the community. To be honest: our teacher told us about it. This made us really curious to learn more

May 24 2018

14mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: John Barbry Of The Tunica-Biloxi Nation

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new tripod xtra. Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with John Barbry of the Tunica Biloxi nation, to discuss the history of the tribe and its contributions to New Orleans and Louisiana. The Tunica Biloxi land is in Marksville, Louisiana, about three hours outside New Orleans. The conversation begins when the Tunica Biloxi made contact Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto. John D. Barbry is the director of development & programming, Language & Culture Revitalization Program for the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana. He is one of the authors of the new book from the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana: The Tunica Biloxi Tribe: Its Culture and People . Barbry spoke at the Historic New Orleans Collection last month, as part of programming for their exhibition, “New Orleans, the Founding Era.” The exhibition is on view through May 27, 2018, at 533 Royal Street . TriPod is a production of WWNO in collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection

May 17 2018

14mins

Play

"The Mexican Band"

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode about a Mexican band that rocked the city in the 80s -- the 1880s. Long, long ago, a band in New Orleans swept the city off its feet, but it wasn’t a New Orleans Band. It was Mexican. There's this sort of mythical thing...it's like this band comes to New Orleans from Mexico and they've got military brass instruments and it gets pinpointed as the beginning of something, which is really interesting. Interesting because nearly a hundred and 50 years have gone by, and jazz musicians like my friend Byron Asher, are still talking about this one band. I mean, it's kind of like a legend,” Asher said. It’s 1884, and New Orleans is celebrating an anniversary, not the tricentennial. The one hundredth anniversary of the first shipment of U.S. cotton to Europe which went to London in 1784. Eric Seiferth is a historian at the Historic New Orleans Collection. He says, back then, New Orleans is hosting The World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial

May 10 2018

12mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: “Arriving Africans And A Changing New Orleans”

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a tripod Xtra produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson. In this tripod xtra, we hear an abridged talk given by Dr. Erin Greenwald, curator of the Historic New Orleans Collection's 'The Founding Era' exhibit. Greenwald traces New Orleans' African roots -- from their kidnapping in Africa, through the middle passage, to the seminal role Africans played in the founding of our city. Dr. Erin M. Greenwald is the Curator of Programs at the New Orleans Museum of Art. Her talk was part of programming for the exhibition, New Orleans, the Founding Era, curated by Dr. Greenwald, for The Historic New Orleans Collection. The exhibition is on view through May 27, 2018, at 533 Royal Street . Carte particulière du Royaume de Juda [Detailed map of the kingdom of Ouidah] from Voyage du chevalier des Marchais en Guinée, isles voisines, et à Cayenne, fait en 1725, 1726, et 1727, vol. 2 Amsterdam, 1731 Credit Jean Baptiste Labat / The Historic New Orleans Collection, 2015

May 03 2018

13mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: Herlin Riley And Joe Lastie

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod put out an episode on the legendary Lastie family — a family that holds generations of iconic musicians. I talked to drummers and first cousins Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie about their experience growing up in this musical family, what it was like to hear Professor Longhair and Dr John play in their living room, what it was like to have their introduce drums into the spiritual church, and what it was like to get yelled at by that same grandfather when they tried to play James Brown in that same spiritual church.

Apr 12 2018

1hr 17mins

Play

The Legendary Lasties

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Tripod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode that spotlights a famous musical family, the Lasties. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with drummers, and cousins, Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie. This is the first in a series of episodes focusing on the rich history of New Orleans music. Listen to the full interview with Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie here .

Apr 12 2018

14mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: The Stranger Disease

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod xtra segment. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with Chris Kaminstein and Kiyoko Mccray, co-directors of a new play called 'The Stranger Disease' by local theater group Goat In the Road. The three met at the historic Madame John's Legacy home in the French Quarter, where the performance takes place. Laine begins the conversation by asking Chris Kaminstein to explain the play's title.

Mar 22 2018

12mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: Cokie Roberts On The Tricentennial, #MeToo And More

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Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with political commentator and New Orleans native Cokie Roberts. The two discussed everything from the Me Too Movement to the 2018 midterm elections, and started local, with the city's upcoming mayoral transition.

Mar 15 2018

22mins

Play

The Lost History Of Gay Carnival

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a look at the once secret history of Gay Carnival Krewes. Note: this episode contains a racially insensitive word that may offend some listeners. We have included it for context. Barrett Delong Church is showing me a giant flamingo Mardi Gras float that his husband will be riding on in the Krewe of Armenius den. Armenius is an all male, gay krewe, and it celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. I met Barrett, this year’s krewe captain, at their den the day before their big ball. This year’s theme?

Mar 01 2018

12mins

Play

NOLA vs Nature: Building The Industrial Canal

Podcast cover
Read more
Tripod’s NOLA versus Nature series returns with a story of the construction of the Industrial Canal. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson looks at the ways this massive infrastructure project was invasive, above and below ground. Hear the Part I on Sauve's Crevasse and Part II on Baldwin Wood .

Feb 15 2018

22mins

Play

TriPod Xtras: Nathaniel Rich

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with writer Nathaniel Rich to talk about his newly released third novel, King Zeno .

Feb 01 2018

32mins

Play

NOLA vs Nature: The Blessing And Curse Of The Wood Screw Pump

Podcast cover
Read more
TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with its NOLA versus Nature series . This week: WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Travis Lux look at the city’s drainage pumps, and the man behind their design -- Albert Baldwin Wood. New Orleans is below sea level. You know this, and certainly, if you were here this past August, you really know this. Almost a foot of rain fell over a couple hours and parts of town were knee deep in water. The sewerage and water board caught a lot of flack for this, people lost a lot of faith when they found out that the city’s pumps, and generators -- things that were supposed to keep the city from flooding - were broken. Joe Becker worked for the sewerage and water board for thirty years, and was actually the superintendent. Becker retired last summer after the flood drama. You might have some feelings about him, or the Sewerage and Water Board. But Becker really knows his pumps. He recently took me on a tour of Pumping Station #1 - right in the neutral ground of

Jan 11 2018

12mins

Play