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Economist Radio

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #42 in News category

News
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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

iTunes Ratings

1718 Ratings
Average Ratings
1208
237
107
59
107

Part of a balanced diet

By Dr. Sciolist PhDs - Dec 16 2019
Read more
Listen, consider, agree, disagree, repeat.

Consistently way above average

By Domic57 - Dec 05 2019
Read more
Sorts the wheat from the chaff and presents the truth of the matter with wit and style.

iTunes Ratings

1718 Ratings
Average Ratings
1208
237
107
59
107

Part of a balanced diet

By Dr. Sciolist PhDs - Dec 16 2019
Read more
Listen, consider, agree, disagree, repeat.

Consistently way above average

By Domic57 - Dec 05 2019
Read more
Sorts the wheat from the chaff and presents the truth of the matter with wit and style.
Cover image of Economist Radio

Economist Radio

Latest release on Jan 24, 2020

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Rank #1: The Economist asks: Could a woman oust Donald Trump in 2020?

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Final episode of a three-part series. Anne McElvoy explores the potential impact of the female vote in America's next presidential election. Democratic pollster Celinda Lake discusses how recent sexual-harassment allegations could shape future political contests. Mary Jordan, contributor to a biography about the role of women in Donald Trump's ascendancy, explains why Ivanka was so key to his success. And author Rebecca Traister on why women voting for Trump wasn't really surprising at all

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Nov 23 2017

20mins

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Rank #2: Money talks: Company politics

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We ask not whether companies will play a more political role but how expansive that role might be?  And, how cheese tells us all we need to know about the economics of trade.  Also, how giving your company a Chinese name is tricky business.  Simon Long hosts.

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Nov 28 2017

14mins

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Rank #3: Babbage: The whizz of Oz

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China’s rising demand for electric car batteries has produced a mineral boom in the Australian outback. But is there enough mined cobalt to go round? Also, how the European Union is working towards mitigating climate change. And why the humble fusebox could soon make your home more energy efficient. Tim Cross hosts.

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Nov 22 2017

19mins

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Rank #4: Money talks: Lessons from Norway

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10 years on, what can we learn from the Norwegian quota for female corporate directors?  Also: A tale of two chip-makers and a mammoth hostile takeover bid — Qualcomm and Broadcom.  And, what is threatening old-fashioned customer service in Japan? Simon Long hosts


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Feb 13 2018

14mins

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Rank #5: Editor’s Picks: June 7th 2019

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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the second half of humanity is joining the internet. Citizens of the emerging world will change the web and it will change them. Next, could the slaughter of pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum be Sudan’s Tiananmen? (7:43) And, why baseball reflects America’s desire to be different (14:39)

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Jun 07 2019

22mins

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Rank #6: The Economist asks: Have identity politics gone too far?

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Tribalism has always existed, but is now playing a far more pivotal role in society: from the rise of gender and ethnic affiliation, to nationalist parties in Europe and even the appeal of Donald Trump. Amy Chua, author of "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother" and "Political Tribes", explains why the politics of sharp-edged identities have become so powerful.

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Apr 12 2018

20mins

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Rank #7: The Economist asks: Anna Wintour

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For more than 30 years as editor-in-chief of Vogue, Anna Wintour has been the gatekeeper of high style. Anne McElvoy asks if the fashion business can genuinely deliver sustainability and shift catwalk stereotypes. They discuss why Wintour personally avoids social media and the consequences of Donald Trump’s tweets about non-white congresswomen. Also, she addresses why Melania Trump has not been asked to appear on Vogue's cover since becoming first lady

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Jul 19 2019

29mins

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Rank #8: Money talks: Feeding frenzy for 21st Century Fox

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As Disney and others eye up the sale of 21st Century Fox’s entertainment assets — our media editor Gady Epstein asks why Rupert Murdoch is breaking up his empire.  Are Millennials forcing a step change in socially-responsible investing? And a fishy story of herrings in Holland. Simon Long hosts.

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Nov 21 2017

16mins

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Rank #9: Futurewatch: The future of banking

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Futurewatch: The future of banking

Will the bricks and mortar of high-street banks be replaced by the silicon chips of data centres? Looking at the rise of "neobanks" around the world, The Economist’s finance editor Helen Joyce explores how technology is changing traditional banking


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

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Nov 11 2019

20mins

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Rank #10: Babbage: Insane in the methane

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What is causing the rising rates of methane in the atmosphere? Also, how an amphibious life for the Bajau people has led to unique evolutionary traits. And the excitement around the Gaia space probe’s latest data release. Hal Hodson hosts

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Apr 25 2018

16mins

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Rank #11: The World In 2018: Money makes the World In go round

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Anne McElvoy and Daniel Franklin return with another special looking forward to the year ahead. This week, they tackle business and economics. Patrick Foulis looks back at a prediction for last year, and looks ahead to the year for American firms; correspondents from across Asia make their predictions for emerging markets; investors weigh in on how Brexit looks from China and why it could be a big year for big cars

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Jan 16 2018

24mins

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Rank #12: The Economist asks: Is conservatism in crisis?

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Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author, George Will, and Adrian Wooldridge, The Economist’s political editor, debate whether the conservatism movement is reorienting into one that chooses populism over prudence and they dissect the challenges that conservatism faces around the world. Anne McElvoy asks them whether the next generation of conservative leaders will be made in the image of Donald Trump. And, can a baseball nation and a cricket nation unite over conservatism?

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Jul 12 2019

25mins

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Rank #13: The week ahead: Russia's disinformation machine

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What is being done to stop Russia interfering in western politics? The state of South Africa after Jacob Zuma. And: discovering the fortune-telling boom in South Korea. Christopher Lockwood hosts

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Feb 23 2018

16mins

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Rank #14: The Economist asks: Ben Shapiro

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Anne McElvoy asks the controversial podcast host, and author of “The Right Side of History”, why he thinks the West needs a revival of old-fashioned values. In the wake of the mass shootings in New Zealand, they debate whether individuals, platforms or governments are responsible for controlling extreme content online. Also, does Ben Shapiro ever regret having gone too far and which presidential hopeful gets his bet for 2020 and beyond?

Music by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)

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Mar 21 2019

30mins

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Rank #15: The week ahead: Looming war in Congo

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Robert Guest joins host Anne McElvoy to explain why war is once again threatening to ravage Congo. Also: young immigrants face uncertain futures in the USA and Al-Qaeda's foray into the world of women's magazines

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Feb 16 2018

19mins

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Rank #16: The Economist asks: Preet Bharara

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Anne McElvoy asks the former United States attorney for the powerful Southern District of New York whether the law can still do justice in America. He explains the failure to prosecute any Wall St executives after the financial crisis and his concern about how politicised the Mueller report has become. And, Mr Bharara reveals what crime he would be tempted to commit and why he loves mafia movies.

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Apr 12 2019

30mins

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Rank #17: The Economist asks: Is the military swaying Pakistan in the wrong direction?

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We talk to Imran Khan, star cricketer turned politician bidding to lead Pakistan in the upcoming election. Topics include Donald Trump and the war on terror, why Pakistani media is under pressure and the full-face veil - women's choice or imposition?

Hosted by Anne McElvoy and Edward McBride, our Asia Editor. Music by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK).

Geo denies all claims relating to it by Imran Khan in this interview. Similar claims are part of ongoing litigation against Mr Khan in Pakistan, in which Geo state that Mr Khan has failed, despite repeated opportunities, to produce any evidence to support his claims.

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Apr 26 2018

19mins

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Rank #18: The Economist asks: Where does power lie in America?

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Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams was the first African-American woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in 2018, narrowly losing to the incumbent she accused of suppressing non-white votes. Anne McElvoy asks what the fraught Georgia race taught her, whether identity politics is a benefit or drawback to her party -  and whether she would serve as Joe Biden’s vice-president. Also, who would Abrams, as spy novelist, like to see in the role of James Bond?



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Oct 25 2019

27mins

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Rank #19: Money talks: Netflixonomics

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Gady Epstein explores how Netflix has grown into a global entertainment network and asks Netflix’s CEO Reed Hastings about power and responsibility. Also, is government outsourcing a toxic model that can’t be rescued? And could you lead the country of Petronia after its discovery of oil? Helen Joyce hosts


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Jun 26 2018

21mins

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Rank #20: The week ahead: The three T’s of Trump

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Will the president who arrives at the NATO summit next week be Triumphant Trump, Tetchy Trump or Torpedo Trump? Also, how the discovery of a new gas field could mean a better economic future for Egypt. And the vegan attacks on boucheries in northern France. Simon Long hosts

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Jul 06 2018

17mins

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Ill-judged: Poland’s rule-of-law crisis

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Poland's government has been trying to nobble the courts for years. Now the European Union is intervening, and the outcome could undermine the union itself. Our obituaries editor looks back on the life of Nell Gifford, whose small, tight-knit circus brought a sense of community into the big top. And modern sensitivities reveal why gender is so tricky in German. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 24 2020

21mins

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Editor’s Picks: January 23rd 2020

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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Narendra Modi and the ruling BJP are sowing division in India. (10:06) Investors at home and abroad are piling into American government debt. (16:31) And, the similarities between Britain’s queen and Sir Alex Ferguson.

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Jan 23 2020

20mins

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The Economist Asks: Does the world need Davos?

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At the World Economic Forum, which celebrates its 50th anniversary, The Economist’s editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes, Anne McElvoy and Patrick Foulis debate the future of the annual alpine gathering. How did a young academic’s pet project come to be seen as the ultimate A-list bash for global CEOs, political leaders and celebrities alike? Anne McElvoy speaks to the CEO of Youtube, Susan Wojcicki, actress and activist Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Natalia Vodianova, a supermodel and philanthropist, about what they achieve at Davos and the mission behind the glamour. Is it a forum for effective decision-making—or just a week in the snow for the global elite? And finally, snowboots or stilettos?


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Jan 23 2020

32mins

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On the right track: a trend in diplomacy

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When conflict-resolution efforts falter in official channels, there are unofficial ones. We ask why “Track 2”—allowing well-meaning third parties to mediate—is on the rise. The prime minister of Lesotho has pledged to resign and his wife is on the run; we examine the high drama playing out in the African country. And some surprising truths about lie-detector tests. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 23 2020

22mins

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Babbage: The Wuhan plan

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The new coronavirus, which was discovered in December in the city of Wuhan China, is now causing a global scare. What are the symptoms of the Wuhan virus and how can it be contained? Also, a new biotech company is hoping to revolutionise the way drugs are brought to market. And, should countries around the world ban Huawei technology from their 5G network? Kenneth Cukier hosts.


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Jan 22 2020

25mins

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Justin time, again: Trudeau’s second term

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Canada’s prime minister now leads a minority government, and has lost support in the country’s west. We ask what he must do, and how, with his weakened mandate. Our correspondent travels across Ireland to discover how it swiftly switched from socially conservative to proudly progressive. And a look at the worrying numbers in our annual Democracy Index. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 22 2020

23mins

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Money Talks: Goldilocks economy

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America’s biggest banks posted record profits last week, despite falling interest rates. This week the attention turns to smaller lenders. Why might they not do so well? Also, why precious metals rhodium and palladium make gold look cheap. And, ganbei! The world’s biggest alcoholic-drinks company, finding success in doing everything… wrong. Simon Long hosts 


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Jan 21 2020

17mins

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Can I get a witness? Impeachment

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The rules are set, battle lines drawn and the outcome is all but assured. We ask why the Senate trial of President Donald Trump seems so sewn up. A decade after a devastating earthquake, Haiti is still a mess—and now a constitutional crisis is compounding the misery. And why gay women are more likely to divorce than gay men. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 21 2020

23mins

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Tripoli crown: the battle for Libya

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This weekend’s peace talks in Berlin were a good start, but the situation is still ripe for a longer, messier proxy war. More than a million people die each year on the world’s roads; solutions to the crisis are plain to see, if only governments would seize them. And how curators and conservators are bracing for climate change. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 20 2020

20mins

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The Economist asks: How to be a dictator

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The 20th century has become known as the “age of dictatorship”, for the horrors perpetrated by Hitler, Stalin, Mao and other despots from Chile to Cambodia. Anne McElvoy asks Frank Dikötter, a historian and professor at the university of Hong Kong, how these men rose to power and why some survived while others were brought down. They debate the limits of authoritarian power today, including China’s ability to act in Hong Kong. And what makes a true dictator—or is there something a bit dictatorial in everyone?


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Jan 17 2020

29mins

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Address the problem: the global housing blunder

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Badly run housing markets are linked to broader ills, from financial crises to the rise of populism. The first problem? The conviction that home ownership is an unambiguously good thing. While China clamps down on most religions, it encourages others; we meet the followers of a tenth-century sea goddess. And the decline of drinking a century after Prohibition began. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 17 2020

23mins

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Checks and Balance: Trailer

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US editor John Prideaux and his colleagues from across the US and around the world go beyond the headlines and the horserace to delve deeper into the race for the White House—and why it matters so much.

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Jan 17 2020

1min

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Editor’s Picks: January 16th 2020

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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the consequences of the West's obsession with homeownership. (8:58) Vladimir Putin’s power grab. (14:08) And, Harry, Meghan and Marx—why Brand Sussex represents the biggest threat to the monarchy so far


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Jan 16 2020

21mins

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Set for life? Putin’s power-grab

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After Russia’s president proposed vast constitutional change, the whole government resigned. It seems to be another convoluted power-grab by Vladimir Putin—and it seems likely to work. Our correspondent finds that the tired stereotypes European Union countries have about their neighbours are pervasive even at the heart of the European integration. And the surprising and nefarious world of sand-smuggling.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 16 2020

19mins

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Babbage: Starlight, star bright

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A giant star called Betelgeuse is behaving strangely. Could the dimming star be about to become a supernova? Also, a group of internet veterans are contesting the billion dollar sale of the “.org” domain registry. What’s their alternative? And, accidental stampedes can be deadly. How does a crowd turn into a crush? Kenneth Cukier hosts


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Jan 15 2020

18mins

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Going through a phase: US-China trade deal

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Negotiators will sign a “phase one” pact today—but the trickiest issues remain unresolved, and plenty of tariffs will stay in place. Will the deal repair trading relations? As more young people head online, “cyberbullying” is on the rise, too. But why are some kids bullying themselves on social media? And why quirky Las Vegas weddings are on the wane. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 15 2020

20mins

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Money Talks: Experiencing turbulence

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Boeing has a new chief executive. What does he need to do to restore faith in the world’s biggest aerospace company? Also, why some countries are trying to ditch the dollar and challenge America’s dominance of the global financial cycle. And, how can the economics profession solve its race problem? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. 


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Jan 14 2020

23mins

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A Biden by their decision? Democrats debate

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The race for the Democratic nomination looks much like it did a year ago—but previous contests prove that once voting starts, momentum can reshuffle the pack. Iran has been roiling with protests following the accidental downing of an airliner; what should Iranians and the wider world expect now? And we examine how Bogotá’s once-adored public-transport system went so wrong. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer

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Jan 14 2020

23mins

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Tsai of the times: Taiwan’s defiant election

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China has been getting more aggressive in its claims over the island, but voters have made it clear just how much they favour democracy. The relentless slipping of interest rates around the world isn’t recent: new research suggests it’s been going on since the Middle Ages. And why the language of scientific papers disfavours female authors.

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Jan 13 2020

21mins

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The Economist Asks: The Suleimani killing—masterstroke or madness?

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As America announces new sanctions and Iran threatens further revenge attacks, Anne McElvoy interviews Ambassador Ryan Crocker about what the killing of Qassem Suleimani means. The former US chief diplomat to Iraq, Syria, Kuwait and Lebanon explains why his reaction to the news was one of satisfaction and how the loss of its top general will reshape Tehran's influence in the region. They explore whether America can stop Iran from becoming a nuclear power. Or will the conflict become President Trump’s own endless war? 


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Jan 10 2020

29mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

1718 Ratings
Average Ratings
1208
237
107
59
107

Part of a balanced diet

By Dr. Sciolist PhDs - Dec 16 2019
Read more
Listen, consider, agree, disagree, repeat.

Consistently way above average

By Domic57 - Dec 05 2019
Read more
Sorts the wheat from the chaff and presents the truth of the matter with wit and style.