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Rank #191 in Medicine category

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science

SMACC

Updated about 9 hours ago

Rank #191 in Medicine category

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
Read more

Talks recorded live at the Social Media and Critical Care conferences. For more info go to smacc.net.au

Read more

Talks recorded live at the Social Media and Critical Care conferences. For more info go to smacc.net.au

iTunes Ratings

72 Ratings
Average Ratings
66
2
1
2
1

TMB

By timbenson1 - May 28 2018
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Great lectures; applicable and inspirational to everyone from the seasoned doc to me, the PA student.

Inspirational talks

By BiteyBunnie - Jul 26 2016
Read more
Amazing talks and cutting edge!

iTunes Ratings

72 Ratings
Average Ratings
66
2
1
2
1

TMB

By timbenson1 - May 28 2018
Read more
Great lectures; applicable and inspirational to everyone from the seasoned doc to me, the PA student.

Inspirational talks

By BiteyBunnie - Jul 26 2016
Read more
Amazing talks and cutting edge!
Cover image of SMACC

SMACC

Latest release on Jan 26, 2020

All 627 episodes from oldest to newest

Strategies for dealing with high emotion in the workplace - Session 4

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Jan 26 2020

10mins

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The Power of Peer Feedback in Medicine

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In order to be as good as you can be (self actualisation) you need to understand your own performance and how you are seen in the world. Sadly you cannot do this alone. Arguably all the beliefs about yourself, your actions, your performance and even your own image are skewed, biased and incorrect. You cannot reach your peak without help. Healthcare is complex though. In the resus room decisions are often time critical and information light such that we cannot apply a simple rule as to what is good and what is bad. Similarly, who can judge success? Only those who understand our systems, our aims and what the difference between process and outcome is. That's where Peer Review comes in. As a tool it is a way of gaining insight into how you really perform in the real world. This talk explores the why, the when and gives tips on the how you can maximise the power of peer review in your clinical and education practice.

Jan 25 2020

16mins

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Pacific Island Playlist track 3: Emergency Medicine in Fiji

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Jan 24 2020

5mins

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3 R’s of Sexual Assault in Critical Care

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Sexual assault affects 1 in 3 women and 1 in 6 men during their lifetime worldwide. It is more common than most medical issues we are trained to look for, despite this being a patient population we are going to see by virtue of the "anyone, anytime" nature of an emergency and critical care. Generous estimates find than only 20% of survivors present for medical care and may not disclose this initially in their visit. Look for it during public holidays, large parties or concerts, college or university frosh week, particularly in young women. Other scene awareness clues that a sexual assault may have occurred include sedation that does not match the substances taken or clinical level seen, ripped or missing clothing, or being separated from their group. Documenting your suspicions and findings is key - as this chart is more likely to go to court, but not for 2 years. Direct quotations of what was said by the patient or EMS, body diagrams for what was found, and your clinical decision making are the essentials. Physical findings may be absent or minimal; this does not mean that no assault took place! The discussion that you had with the patient around further treatment and legal options needs to be recorded. Care of a sexually assaulted patient is complex and can have long-lasting detrimental psychological effects if not done well. Referral to a specialized care program to bridge the gap between medical and legal in a patient-centred trauma-informed manner is best. Treating survivors with belief, support and humanity as you assist them with making an informed decision as to the next steps in their care is vital as the first step in healing.

Jan 24 2020

16mins

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The Psychology of Creativity Phil Dobson

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Creativity is a highly valued and sought after skill; we all need to solve problems, think in novel ways, and generate ideas, but can creativity be learned? This talk provides a practical framework to help you improve your creative thinking, enhance your problem solving and get greater access to your naturally creative brain. You'll discover how creativity follows a process that can be developed at every stage. You'll learn how to challenge your assumptions and reframe problems. You'll discover techniques to help you generate more ideas and think more laterally. You'll even learn why you have ideas in the shower and how to access more creative brain states. The talk will cover the following: Creativity is a process, and how to build the creative habit How questions help reframe problems and challenge your assumptions How to promote more lateral thinking using divergent thinking strategies Understanding convergent thinking The neuroscience of "A-ha moments" and how to access creative brain states The implications for improving creativity and problem solving The speaker is Phil Dobson, author of "The Brain Book" and Founder of BrainWorkshops. Phil turns insights from neuroscience and cognitive and behavioural psychology into applicable skills for the modern workplace. His learning programmes provide brain-based toolkits of practical skills, backed by scientific research, helping people apply what we know about the brain to improve their performance and creativity at work.

Jan 24 2020

17mins

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Dishing out opioids in ED

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The rising death toll from our nation‚ opioid epidemic has been rivalled in modern history only by that at the peak of the AIDS epidemic in the early 1990s. Consider, in 1995 at the peak of the AIDS epidemic, 51,000 Americans died from the disease. In 2015, 52,000 died from drug overdoses. Emergency departments have stood at the front lines of both crises. As a speciality that prides itself on rising to the occasion at times of great need, our time to lead on this crisis is now. As a response, EDs nationwide are expanding their roles in the care of patients with opioid use disorder (OUD), and many have begun ED-MAT programs. In December of 2017, we launched the Get Waivered Campaign which aimed to get our physicians the DEA X waivers needed to be able to prescribe ED-MAT(buprenorphine) to patients coming to our hospital seeking recovery. In May of 2018, our ED instituted its first ED-MAT protocol and while greater than 90% of our attending physicians had their DEA-X waivers and were able to prescribe buprenorphine, we found that there remained an opportunity to increase the rate of MAT initiation in our ED. Through semi-structured interviews, we set out to examine the barriers to providers, use of our MAT initiation protocol and patients‚ willingness to seek help in obtaining OUD treatment in our ED. Our work has identified multiple barriers, affecting both providers and patients, that have limited wide-scale early adoption of our protocol. The barriers identified from our ED-MAT program‚ first year of operation and the interventions aimed at making the use of our ED-MAT protocol as effortless as possible may serve as useful lessons as other hospitals seek to lead by operationalizing their own ED-MAT programs.

Jan 24 2020

13mins

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New Tricks in the Brain Cath Lab

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A case example of a large vessel obstruction of the brain and our current techniques available to treat it. How we make decisions on endovascular treatment and management points for emergency and intensive care colleagues.

Jan 24 2020

11mins

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How do be Mr Spock or Roger Federer with kids

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This talks gives some guidance on how to deal with your anxiety and fear when dealing with children. We will also cover some keytopic areas: sepsis, fluids, seizures, asthma and bronchiolitis

Jan 24 2020

16mins

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In the eye of the storm

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in March 2006, six healthy volunteers underwent cytokine-induced injury and multiorgan failure from a Phase 1 first-in-human drug trial with a novel monoclonal antibody. This talk describes the clinical and incident management ramifications, drawing connections to other non-conventional incidents which may pose a different pattern of clinical, operational and communications challenges to the 'classic' trauma-based model of major incidents.

Jan 24 2020

27mins

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Crit Care basics of EEG

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Jan 24 2020

21mins

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