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Society & Culture

American Academy of Religion

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Society & Culture
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The audio feed of American Academy of Religion (AAR), the world's largest scholarly and professional association of academics, teachers, and research scholars dedicated to furthering knowledge of religions and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. Featuring interviews with award-winning scholars and sessions recorded during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.

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The audio feed of American Academy of Religion (AAR), the world's largest scholarly and professional association of academics, teachers, and research scholars dedicated to furthering knowledge of religions and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. Featuring interviews with award-winning scholars and sessions recorded during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.

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American Academy of Religion

Latest release on Jun 18, 2020

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The audio feed of American Academy of Religion (AAR), the world's largest scholarly and professional association of academics, teachers, and research scholars dedicated to furthering knowledge of religions and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. Featuring interviews with award-winning scholars and sessions recorded during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.

Rank #1: Marty Forum: Wendell Berry

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November 24, 2013
Baltimore, Maryland

Panelists:
Wendell Berry, Port Royal, Kentucky
Norman Wirzba, Duke University
Michael Kessler, Georgetown University (Presiding)

(Audio File: 1 hour, 32 minutes)

Jun 30 2015

1hr 31mins

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Rank #2: AAR 2019 - Career Services for Non-Academic Careers

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When humanities scholars talk about exploring and pursuing “alt-ac” and “post-ac” careers, two concerns often dominate the conversation: 1) Graduate studies in the humanities don’t prepare us for or aren’t relevant to non-academic career paths, and 2) We don’t know where to look for or how to apply for non-academic jobs. Whether you are a scholar thinking about non-academic careers or a faculty member interested in supporting students engaged in such searches, join our panel of career services experts to discuss the many careers that are open to — and even looking for! — people with advanced training in the humanities. Panelists will discuss existing resources and where to find them, as well as ways that departments, universities, and professional organizations like the AAR can better support scholars in non-academic careers.
Amy Defibaugh, Temple University, Presiding

Panelists:
- Giulia Hoffman, University of California, San Diego
- Maren Wood, Beyond the Professoriate

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 25.

Mar 13 2020

1hr 56mins

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Rank #3: Judith Butler's Parting Ways (Columbia University Press, 2012)

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A panel discussion with Judith Butler about her book "Parting Ways: Jewishness and the Critique of Zionism" (Columbia University Press, 2012).

November 25, 2013
Baltimore, Maryland

Panelists:
Claire Katz, Texas A&M University
Samuel Brody, University of Cincinnati
Yaniv Feller, University of Toronto
Mark Lewis Taylor, Princeton Theological Seminary
Saba Mahmood, University of California, Berkeley
Martin Kavka, Lehigh University
Judith Butler, University of California, Berkeley (Responding)
Rebecca Alpert, Temple University (Presiding)

(Audio File: 2 hours, 28 minutes)

Jul 01 2015

2hr 27mins

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Rank #4: 2019 AAR Presidential Address by Laurie Patton - “And Are We Not of Interest to Each Other?”

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A Blueprint for the Public Study of Religion. In addition to its traditional goal of fostering excellence in the academic study of religion, the AAR’s recently revised mission statement includes a new goal of enhancing the public study of religion. But what is the public study of religion? How might we collectively (and inevitably imperfectly) define it? This AAR address will offer a blueprint. I suggest that such a public study of religion involves a renewed curiosity about, and disciplined and ethical reflection on, four things: 1) the nature of our scholarly contexts; 2) the nature of our scholarly publics; 3) the nature of power and privilege in the study of religion; 4) the nature of labor in the study of religion. I will use theory in the study of religion, philosophy of the public sphere, and poetry to draw the blueprint. As a way of gesturing to another kind of collective that moves beyond the “magisterial voice of the single leader,” our time together will involve AAR voices other than my own. I end with an exhortation to a newly energetic and different kind of curiosity as fundamental to our work as public scholars. In her poem, “Ars Poetica #100: I Believe,” Elizabeth Alexander ends with a query: “. . . and are we not of interest to each other?”

José I. Cabezón , University of California, Santa Barbara, Presiding

Panelists:
Laurie Louise Patton, Middlebury College

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Apr 23 2020

1hr 2mins

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Rank #5: 2016 Plenary Address: Michelle Alexander with Kelly Brown Douglas

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Michelle Alexander is a highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, and legal scholar. Alexander is a graduate of Vanderbilt University and Stanford Law School. Following law school, she clerked for Justice Harry A. Blackmun on the U.S. Supreme Court and for Chief Judge Abner Mikva on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. Prior to entering academia, Alexander served as the director of the Racial Justice Project for the ACLU of Northern California, where she coordinated the Project’s media advocacy, grassroots organizing, coalition building, and litigation. The Project’s priority areas were educational equity and criminal justice reform, and it was during those years at the ACLU that she began to awaken to the reality that our nation’s criminal justice system functions more like a caste system than a system of crime prevention or control. She became passionate about exposing and challenging racial bias in the criminal justice system, ultimately launching and leading a major campaign against racial profiling by law enforcement known as the “DWB Campaign” or “Driving While Black or Brown Campaign.” In addition to her nonprofit advocacy experience, Alexander has worked as a litigator at private law firms including Saperstein, Goldstein, Demchak & Baller, in Oakland, California, where she specialized in plaintiff-side class-action lawsuits alleging race and gender discrimination. In 2005, she won a Soros Justice Fellowship, which supported the writing of "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness" (The New Press, 2012), and that same year she accepted a joint appointment at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State University. She currently devotes much of her time to freelance writing; public speaking; consulting with advocacy organizations committed to ending mass incarceration; and, most important, raising her three young children—the most challenging and rewarding job of all.

In this plenary address from the 2016 AAR Annual Meeting, Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas (Goucher College) interviews Alexander, and the women converse in turn about racial (in)justice, the election, and religion's role in U.S. politics.

The session is introduced by 2016 AAR president, Serene Jones.

This plenary was recorded during the 2016 Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, on November 20.

Aug 03 2017

1hr

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Rank #6: Populism through the Lens of Religion and Race

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This discussion explores the impact of religion and race on American populism across the ideological spectrum. Papers explore the interplay of religious and secular forces on the #BlackLivesMatter movement, including a theological exploration of the death of Michael Brown and an examination of how Millennial activists are blurring secular/religious boundaries. The session juxtaposes these topics with examinations of white conservative populist expressions. Papers explore populist elements within the Southern Baptist Convention that laid the foundation for white evangelicals to throw their support behind Donald Trump and among Tea Party women whose rhetoric centered around a vision of white Christianity fighting the legality of abortion.

Robert P. Jones, Public Religion Research Institute, presiding

Papers:
- "The Reproductive Politics of Evangelical Tea Party Women and the Afterbirth of Trump’s America"
Larycia Hawkins, University of Virginia

- "Populism in the Southern Baptist Convention"
Adam Hankins, DePaul University

- "Critical Complexities: Religious-Secularity or Secular-Religiosity, and #BlackLivesMatter"
Seth Gaiters, Ohio State University

- "Seeing Jesus in Michael Brown: Theological Protest as the Performance of Purity in the Black Lives Matter Movement"
Rima Vesely-Flad, Warren Wilson College

This session was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 18, in Boston, Massachusetts.

May 24 2018

1hr 50mins

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Rank #7: "Goddess and God in the World": An Embodied Theological Conversation

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Taking off from their new book, Goddess and God in the World: Conversations in Embodied Theology (Fortress, 2016), Carol P. Christ and Judith Plaskow introduce their embodied theological method and explore their theological differences: Is Goddess a personal presence who cares about the world? Or is God an impersonal creative energy equally supportive of good and evil? Mary E. Hunt will moderate a conversation that includes Monica Coleman, Aysha Hidayatullah, Miranda Shaw, and Julia Watts-Belser, who will speak from Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Jewish, and Goddess perspectives. The panelists respond to the book, especially to its method, but also discuss their own theological positions, reflecting on what theological perspectives best make sense of and promote the flourishing of our common world.

Sep 21 2017

2hr 5mins

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Rank #8: Recolonizing the Academy Under a Trump Presidency

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This panel analyzes the intensified colonization of academic spaces—both intellectual and physical—under the current presidency. How do we accurately map these changes and negotiate these spaces in an era of national “whitelash” from peripheral ideological and embodied spaces? How do we contend with the increasing marginalization and targeting of vulnerable populations? What strategies might scholars use to contribute to the ongoing process of decolonizing the academy? What are the potential ramifications of our non-action or complicity in this academic landscape?

Munir Jiwa, Graduate Theological Union, presiding

Panelists:
- Hatem Bazian, Zaytuna College and University of California, Berkeley
- Jasmin Zine, Wilfrid Laurier University
- Mel Chen, University of California, Berkeley
- Shanell T. Smith, Hartford Seminary

This session was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 19 in Boston, MA.

Apr 19 2018

1hr 32mins

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Rank #9: AAR 2019 - How to Get Published in Religious Studies Journals

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This panel brings together five editors of religious studies journals to discuss the nuts and bolts of journal editing, with the aim of making the process more transparent. The panel will be of particular interest to graduate students and junior faculty who are new to the activities of scholarly publishing.

Andrea Jain, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, and S. Brent Plate, Hamilton College, Presiding

Panelists:
- Elizabeth Ann Pritchard, Bowdoin College
- Johan Strijdom, University of South Africa
- Jimmy Yu, Florida State University
- Marie W. Dallam, University of Oklahoma

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Mar 26 2020

1hr 50mins

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Rank #10: Contingency Possibilities: Career Options within and beyond the Academy

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This joint panel explores ways in which contingency may be constructive (and the ways contingent faculty work can be made more humane and viable) as part of a larger discussion about non-tenure-track and “alt-ac” paths.

Lynne Gerber, Harvard University, Presding

Panelists:
- Simran Jeet Singh, New York University
- Megan Goodwin, Northeastern University
- Hussein Rashid, Barnard College
- Matthew Bingley, Georgia State University

The session was recorded on November 19, 2018 in Denver, Colorado, during the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion.

Mar 07 2019

2hr 18mins

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Rank #11: Conversion in America: A conversation with Lincoln Mullen

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Lincoln Mullen, author of "The Chance of Salvation: A History of Conversion in America," joins Kristian Petersen in a conversation about the spectrum of religious identity in American history and how the phenomena of conversion is an opening which allows scholars to study a variety of religious groups—and their relationships to each other.

Mullen is the winner of the 2018 Best First Book in the History of Religions.

Apr 18 2019

21mins

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Rank #12: Black Liberation Theologies of Disability

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Building upon a 2015 conference on Black Liberation Theologies of Disability at Union Theological Seminary, organized by Kendrick Kemp, this session attempts to construct liberation theologies that take seriously the experiences of blackness and disability. Panelists explore the ways that racialized and disabled embodiment offers innovative readings of text, tradition, and theological frameworks. What resources for a black liberation theology of disability can be sourced from black religious traditions? From disability activism? From black protest movements? Can theology be more responsive to the presence of elders in black religious communities? How can theologies grapple with the disabling traumas, state and social violence, and the toll of activism in black experiences? How can black theologies support those living with mental health challenges, learning differences, and brain injuries? How do our theologies honor and celebrate black disabled bodies?

Panelists:
- Nyasha Junior, Temple University, presiding
- Monica A. Coleman, Claremont School of Theology
- Garth Kasimu Baker-Fletcher, Texas College
- Kendrick Kemp, Union Theological Seminary
- Pamela Lightsey, Boston University

This session was recorded during the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 21, in San Antonio, Texas.

Sep 08 2017

2hr 15mins

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Rank #13: “Normativity” and the Academic Study of Religion: Theology v. Religious Studies

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This conversation focuses on one of the most enduring and difficult issues facing the Academy: what is the relationship between theology and religious studies? 2015 AAR president Tom Tweed presides over the exchange between Ann Taves, a distinguished scholar of religious studies (University of California, Santa Barbara) and Graham Ward, a distinguished scholar of theology (University of Oxford), by asking each to identify the epistemic, moral, and aesthetic values that inform their work.

Jan 07 2016

1hr

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Rank #14: The Study of Religion and Responses to Terrorism: Paris, Beirut, and Beyond

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This panel session was added to the 2015 AAR program only a week before the Annual Meeting in response to the November 13 terrorist attacks in Paris, France. The panel of scholars, whose areas of focus range from interreligious dialogue to political Islam to French secularism to ancient Christianity. They discuss the media, Islamophobia, religious violence, geopolitics, rational actors, and activism. They engage questions including: what are the connections between the Paris attacks, other recent attacks in Europe, and ISIS-inspired attacks in Beirut and Baghdad? What should the role of scholars of religion be in contesting Islamophobia and debating appropriate responses to terrorism? How can scholars of religion help shape attitudes and conversations about Islam, religion and violence in the general public? How might the attacks in Paris, Beirut, and elsewhere open up classroom conversations about broader issues in the study of religion?

The panel discussion is followed by a Q&A with the audience.

Panel Participants:
Sarah Rollens, Rhodes College
Stephanie Frank, Columbia College, Chicago
Edward E. Curtis, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis
Jerusha Lamptey, Union Theological Seminary

Todd Green, Luther College, Presiding

This panel was recorded on November 21 at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Atlanta, GA.

Jan 21 2016

2hr 11mins

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Rank #15: Faculty Members on Preparing Scholars of Religion for Non-academic Careers

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In recent years as the job market for tenure-track academic positions has tightened and the use of contingent faculty has exploded, increasing numbers of graduate degree seekers are intending to pursue nonacademic careers. While some areas of study present obvious nonacademic options, for scholars in the humanities, nonacademic career opportunities and the best preparation for them may not be obvious and religious studies faculty are exploring how graduate programs can - and should - prepare all alumni for multiple employment outcomes. This panel brings together faculty members from a variety of institutions to discuss some of the problems confronting their students and their programs as more people turn - by necessity and by choice - to nonacademic career paths.

Cristine Hutchison-Jones, Harvard Law School, Presiding

Panelists:
- Molly Bassett, Georgia State University
- Jason C. Bivins, North Carolina State University
- Kathleen Moore, University of California, Santa Barbara

This session was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in Boston, Massachusetts, on November 19.

Jun 14 2018

1hr 23mins

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Rank #16: Reformation and Reformations

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The Reformed Theology and History Group and the Martin Luther and the Global Lutheran Traditions Group host a joint panel on the meaning of 'Reformation' and what implications the notion of 'Reformation' or 'reformations' has for us today—theologically or ecclesially. Panelists explore the relevance of 'reformation/s' for the contemporary context, including ways in which aspects of the Protestant Reformation deserve retrieval, reframing, or retraction today.

Panelists:
- Amy Plantinga Pauw, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
- Kristen E. Kvam, Saint Paul School of Theology
- Cornelis van der Kooi, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
- Evangeline Anderson Rajkumar, Lenoir-Rhyne University

Kirsi Stjerna, Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, presiding

The panel was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 20 in Boston, Massachusetts.

Mar 15 2018

2hr 33mins

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Rank #17: Protecting the Vulnerable on Campus - Academic Labor, LGBTIQ Persons, and Grad Students

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For many of us who study or work in colleges and seminary campuses today it may be easy to ignore the vulnerable at our institutions. Yet the most vulnerable are often at risk or subject to discrimination and exploitation based on inequities of power, money, lack of social net, or means to voice their concerns about campus life and work. This panel examines what needs attention and the strategies that vulnerable people and their allies can use to decrease vulnerability and increase solidarity. Special attention is paid to the status of, and strategies being deployed by, the LGBT+ community, graduate students, people of color, low paid workers, and non-tenured faculty.

Eddie S. Glaude, Princeton University, presiding

Panelists and Papers
- " 'Although the Doors Were Shut': Cultivating Courageous Community at the Borders of the Academy"
Cameron Partridge, Saint Aidan's Episcopal Church, San Francisco

- "It Doesn't Always Feel Good: Redefining Notions of Inclusion and Moving beyond 'Diversity' "
Prea Persaud, University of Florida

- "Solidarity within the Faculty"
James Keenan, Boston College

- "Ad Junk: Accounting for Different Vulnerabilities in Vulnerable Professional Positions"
Hussein Rashid, Islamicate LLC

- "Just Employment: Solidarity among Campus Workers"
Kerry Danner, Georgetown University

This session was recorded at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 18 in Boston, Massachusetts. It was organized by AAR Committees on Academic Labor and Contingent Faculty; Graduate Students; and LGBTIQ Persons in the Profession.

May 10 2018

2hr 27mins

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Rank #18: Preparing Scholars for Nonacademic Careers: What's a Faculty Member to Do?

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A companion to our last episode, which focused on what students can do to prepare for nonacademic careers, this podcast highlights how religious studies faculty and graduate programs can create a variety of career paths for their students. In recent years as the job market for tenure-track academic positions has tightened and the use of contingent faculty has exploded, increasing numbers of graduate degree seekers are intending to pursue nonacademic careers. While some areas of study present obvious nonacademic options, for scholars in the humanities, nonacademic career opportunities and the best preparation for them may not be obvious and religious studies faculty are exploring how graduate programs can—and should—prepare all alumni for multiple employment outcomes. This panel brings together faculty members from a variety of institutions to discuss some of the problems confronting their students and their programs as more people turn—by necessity and by choice—to nonacademic career paths.

Panelists:
- Cristine Hutchison-Jones, Administrative Director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School
- Martin Kavka, Professor of Religion, Florida State University
- Stephen Prothero, Professor of Religion, Boston University
- Kathryn McClymond, Professor of Religious Studies, Georgia State University
- Sarah E. Fredericks, Assistant Professor of Environmental Ethics, University of Chicago Divinity School

This panel discussion was recorded during the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 20, in San Antonio, Texas.

Jun 21 2017

1hr 14mins

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Rank #19: Existentialism, Authenticity, and Asceticism with Noreen Khawaja

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Noreen Khawaja talks to Religious Studies News about her book "The Religion of Existence: Asceticism in Philosophy from Kierkegaard to Sartre" (University of Chicago Press), which won the American Academy of Religion’s 2017 Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in Constructive-Reflective Studies.

Music is Dexter Britain, “Fresh Monday” (www.dexterbritain.co.uk)

Feb 15 2018

27mins

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Rank #20: Religion, Immigration, and Politics: North American and European Perspectives

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AM 2016: This panel provides some comparative insights on the current situation in Europe alongside experiences in the USA, exploring how religion is located within these debates, for instance as a foundation for appeals to national or civilizational identities that exclude certain groups, as well as a means for overcoming conflict and providing support and advocacy for vulnerable immigrant communities. What are the implications of defining refugees/immigrants in terms of their faith and ethnicity, including the ways in which this can fuel negative stereotypes? And how do we make sense of the ambiguous response of Christian churches/Christianity in both the USA and Europe in addressing issues around immigration? The panelists address these questions and others through comparative insights drawing upon the social and political sciences, as well as theological approaches.

Panelists:
- Emma Tomalin, University of Leeds
- Atalia Omer, University of Notre Dame
- Daniel Groody, University of Notre Dame
- Jocelyne Cesari, Harvard University
- Erin Wilson, University of Groningen
- Victor Carmon, Oblate School of Theology

This panel session was recorded at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on November 21, in San Antonio, Texas.

Jul 27 2017

1hr 58mins

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Jessica Vantine Birkenholtz on the Nepalese Hindu Goddess Svasthani

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Jessica Vantine Birkenholtz talks about the textual and limited iconographic history of the mysterious Nepalese Hindu goddess Svasthani. Birkenholtz's book documenting her research into the goddess and the puranic texts that develop around her, "Reciting the Goddess: Narratives of Place and the Making of Hinduism in Nepal" (Oxford University Press, 2018) won the AAR's 2019 Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in the category of Textual Studies. For a full transcript of this interview, visit https://www.aarweb.org/AARMBR/Resources-/Webinars-and-Podcasts-/Jessica-Vantine-Birkenholtz-on-the-Nepalese-Hindu-Goddess-Svasthani.aspx

Jun 18 2020

26mins

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Religious Studies and the 2020 Election: Tips for Sharing Scholarship with the Public

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Webinar recording from June 9, 2020.

The discussion focused on how scholars of religion can share work related to the study of religion and this election season. Co-presenters were David Campbell, professor at the University of Notre Dame; Iva E. Carruthers, general secretary of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference; Robert P. Jones, CEO and founder of the Public Religion Research Institute; Terrence Johnson, associate professor of religion and politics at Georgetown University; Vincent Lloyd, associate professor of theology and religious studies at Villanova University; and Melissa Rogers, visiting professor at Wake Forest University Divinity School. The webinar included a presentation and extended Q&A.

This webinar was hosted by the Public Scholars Project, a joint initiative of the Public Understanding of Religion Committee of the American Academy of Religion and the Religious Freedom Center of the Freedom Forum. Webinars feature scholars and practitioners who can provide tools, resources and recommendations for presenting in a variety of settings (e.g., social media, news, public events and community gatherings) about a range of topics. The Public Scholars Project created this webinar series to help scholars hone their skills at communicating with a variety of publics.

To view the complete webinar schedule for the 2019-20 academic year, including recordings of previous webinars, please visit our webpage: https://www.religiousfreedomcenter.org/resources/psp/

Jun 16 2020

1hr 29mins

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AAR 2019 - Making a Match: Finding the Right Publisher for Your Work

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This session brings together editors from scholarly and trade presses, both large and small, to share their perspectives on the acquisition and editorial processes that bring a book from its research stage to market. Editors will share how scholarly authors can find their best publishing fit, what acquisition editors are looking for, strategies for pitching a book, and how to identify audience(s). They also discuss how they build strong relationships with authors in order for their books to make the most impact.

Vincent Lloyd, Villanova University, Presiding

Panelists:
- Elisabeth Maselli, Rutgers University Press
- Elaine Maisner, University of North Carolina Press
- Philip Getz, Palgrave Macmillan
- Rebecca Shillabeer, Routledge

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 25.

May 28 2020

1hr 46mins

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AAR 2019 - The Art of Writing AAR Proposals

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Have you been struggling to get proposals accepted to the AAR Annual Meeting? Come to this session to get some tips and ideas about how to better frame your research to increase your chances of acceptance. The presenter, Elissa Cutter, has been reviewing proposals as part of the Religion in Europe Unit since 2012. As a current chair of that unit, she now has several years of experience in reviewing proposals and forming sessions. In this session, she will let you know some of the main pitfalls that people fall into in writing their conference proposals and how best to avoid them.

Panelist:
Elissa Cutter, Georgian Court University

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 24.

May 21 2020

31mins

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2019 Martin E. Marty Award for the Public Understanding of Religion Forum: Wade Clark Roof

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Wade Clark Roof is the 2019 winner of the Martin E. Marty Award for the Public Understanding of Religion. Having passed away suddenly on August 24, 2019, he will receive the award posthumously at this year's Marty Award Forum.

Roof was Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he founded and directed the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion and Public Life. Trained as a sociologist of religion, and the author of fourteen books, he was widely known for his scholarship on the cultural, civic, and political effects of religious pluralism in the United States, and in particular on the spiritual lives of the baby boomer generation. Under his leadership, the Capps Center consistently brought together multiple publics—scholars, students, Santa Barbara residents, journalists, scientists, elected officials, and more—for extended conversations about key matters of common concern. The Marty Award recognizes Professor Roof’s many contributions as a public scholar, institution builder, and advocate for religious studies and the humanities.

In this year’s Marty Award Forum, E.J. Dionne (University Professor in the Foundations of Democracy and Culture at Georgetown University, W. Averell Harriman Chair and Senior Fellow of Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, and syndicated columnist for the Washington Post) will join Roof's former colleague Kathleen Moore (chair of the Religious Studies department at UCSB and interim director of the Capps Center) and two former students, Julie Ingersoll (University of North Florida) and J. Shawn Landres (Jumpstart Labs) for an extended public discussion of Roof’s life and work. Contributions from the audience will be welcomed as well.

Erik Owens, Boston College, Presiding

Panelists:
- E.J. Dionne, Brookings Institute, Washington Post
- Julie J. Ingersoll , University of North Florida
- J. Shawn Landres , University of California, Los Angeles
- Kathleen Moore, University of California, Santa Barbara

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 24.

May 14 2020

1hr 25mins

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AAR 2019 - The 50th Anniversary of Black Theology and Black Power: Looking Back, Moving Forward

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This session celebrates the 50th Anniversary of James Cone’s Black Theology and Black Power, published March 1, 1969. This panel features prominent thinkers who address the significance of Cone’s first book, the relevance of black theology and the legacy of the James Cone.

Adam Clark , Xavier University, Presiding

Panelists:
- Eddie S. Glaude, Princeton University
- Gary Dorrien, Columbia University, Union Theological Seminary
- Eboni Marshall Turman, Yale University

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 24.

May 07 2020

1hr 24mins

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AAR 2019 - Conversation with Kate Bowler & Laurie Patton on Becoming a Public Intellectual

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After Kate Bowler’s 2013 book, Blessed: A History of the American Prosperity Gospel, became an unexpected public hit, she was diagnosed with stage IV cancer at the age of 35.

Kate was faced with the ironic situation of “being an expert on “health wealth and happiness while being ill.” Her 2018 memoir, Everything Happens for a Reason, is a memoir exploring that existential irony, and the ways in the American belief that tragedy is a test of character shaped her own response to illness. Now a speaker in high demand, Kate will engage with AAR President Laurie Patton on her transformation. Their conversation will focus on what it has meant for Kate to become a public intellectual in the midst of being a scholar, teacher, mother, wife, and cancer survivor. In her own “expansion of the public sphere,” Kate has explored questions of divine will and justice in contexts far outside of academe. What has shifted in her understandings of the role of the scholar in the world? How has her own thinking about public life in America changed since she has started writing for and speaking to larger audiences? Do the questions Kate raises about the American prosperity gospel changed public discourse about illness, divine will, and tragedy?

Laurie Louise Patton, Middlebury College, Presiding

Panelists:
Kate Bowler, Duke University

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 24.

Apr 30 2020

57mins

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2019 AAR Presidential Address by Laurie Patton - “And Are We Not of Interest to Each Other?”

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A Blueprint for the Public Study of Religion. In addition to its traditional goal of fostering excellence in the academic study of religion, the AAR’s recently revised mission statement includes a new goal of enhancing the public study of religion. But what is the public study of religion? How might we collectively (and inevitably imperfectly) define it? This AAR address will offer a blueprint. I suggest that such a public study of religion involves a renewed curiosity about, and disciplined and ethical reflection on, four things: 1) the nature of our scholarly contexts; 2) the nature of our scholarly publics; 3) the nature of power and privilege in the study of religion; 4) the nature of labor in the study of religion. I will use theory in the study of religion, philosophy of the public sphere, and poetry to draw the blueprint. As a way of gesturing to another kind of collective that moves beyond the “magisterial voice of the single leader,” our time together will involve AAR voices other than my own. I end with an exhortation to a newly energetic and different kind of curiosity as fundamental to our work as public scholars. In her poem, “Ars Poetica #100: I Believe,” Elizabeth Alexander ends with a query: “. . . and are we not of interest to each other?”

José I. Cabezón , University of California, Santa Barbara, Presiding

Panelists:
Laurie Louise Patton, Middlebury College

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Apr 23 2020

1hr 2mins

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AAR 2019 - Women and Publishing

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Submissions by women to journals and books series, including JAAR, are lower by percentage than the percentage of women in the field of religious studies. This panel brings together women successful as editors and authors to discuss the reasons for this and offer advice and support to women in the field for their publishing agendas.

Andrea Jain, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, Presiding

Panelists:
- Zayn Kassam, Pomona College
- Elaine Maisner, University of North Carolina Press
- Lisa Sideris, Indiana University
- Catherine Wessinger, Loyola University, New Orleans

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Apr 16 2020

1hr 27mins

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AAR 2019 - Book Panel: "Who Owns Religion?" by Laurie Louise Patton

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Laurie L. Patton is 2019 President of the American Academy of Religion, President of Middlebury College, and a scholar of South Asian history and culture. Her forthcoming book, "Who Owns Religion? Scholars and Their Publics in the Late Twentieth Century" (University of Chicago, December 2019), examines the cultural work of the study of religion through a discussion of extreme cases—the controversies of the late 80s and 90s—where the work of scholars was passionately refuted and refused by the publics they describe. The emergence of the multicultural politics of recognition during this decade created the possibility of “eruptive” public spaces, which were magnified by the emergence of the Internet, a development that changed the nature of readership for all involved in producing scholarship. Patton’s incisive analysis of the six cases leads to a series of reflections on the status of public scholarship today, and the self-critical work that scholars should pursue as they engage in their work. The book will be essential reading for religious studies scholars.

Mara Willard, Boston College, Presiding

Panelists:
- Leela Prasad, Duke University
- Erik Owens, Boston College
- Mark Juergensmeyer, University of California, Santa Barbara

Responding:
- Laurie Louise Patton, Middlebury College

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Apr 09 2020

1hr 22mins

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AAR 2019 - Death to the Term Paper! Building Better Assignments and Assessments

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The Teaching and Learning Committee facilitates an engaging, hands on workshop, helping participants build assignments that are creative, more plagiarism resistant, and, importantly, that also assess course outcomes. In this recorded workshop, participants identify the key components of a successful assignment; explore strategies for designing creative scaffolded and staged assignments; describe the purpose and features of a capstone project; discover how to effectively consider outcomes in assignment strategies; and demonstrate ways to buffer against plagiarism.

Panelist:
Amy Hale, Atlanta, GA

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Apr 02 2020

1hr 48mins

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2019 AAR Award-Winning Religion Journalists: What We Covered in 2018 and What's Next

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The American Academy of Religion presents its annual Journalism Award to recognize outstanding contributions to religion reporting in the previous year. This session celebrates journalistic excellence as it relates to the public understanding of religion, drawing insights from previous awardees, members of the award jury, and partners from the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting. Panelists will discuss partnerships and opportunities to advance the public understanding of religion amidst the changing media landscape and the different challenges faced by broadcast and print journalism. The discussion will engage the biggest religion news stories and religion topics of 2018. The 2019 recipients—Ian Johnson and Dawn Araujo-Hawkins—will be honored in absentia.

Joshua McElwee, third place winner, is the Vatican correspondent for National Catholic Reporter who often travels as part of the papal press pool. His articles covered some of the hottest topics of 2018 including Bishops' prosecutions may point to new phase in church's sex abuse crisis, Irish sex abuse survivors say Francis should admit to Vatican's cover-up, and Wuerl resigns, ending influential tenure in wake of abuse report.

Evan Berry, Arizona State University, Presiding

Panelists:
- Joshua McElwee, National Catholic Reporter
- Liz Kineke, Broadcast Journalist
- Jaweed Kaleem, Los Angeles Times
- Shirley Abraham, Documentary Filmmaker
- Jon Sawyer, Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
- Asma Afsaruddin, Indiana University

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Mar 27 2020

1hr 28mins

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AAR 2019 - How to Get Published in Religious Studies Journals

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This panel brings together five editors of religious studies journals to discuss the nuts and bolts of journal editing, with the aim of making the process more transparent. The panel will be of particular interest to graduate students and junior faculty who are new to the activities of scholarly publishing.

Andrea Jain, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, and S. Brent Plate, Hamilton College, Presiding

Panelists:
- Elizabeth Ann Pritchard, Bowdoin College
- Johan Strijdom, University of South Africa
- Jimmy Yu, Florida State University
- Marie W. Dallam, University of Oklahoma

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Mar 26 2020

1hr 50mins

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AAR 2019 - Aurora, a New E-Learning Platform: An Information Session with Co-Creator, Maren Wood

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AAR 2019 - Aurora, a New E-Learning Platform: An Information Session with Co-Creator, Maren Wood by American Academy of Religion

Mar 13 2020

1hr

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AAR 2019 - Career Services for Non-Academic Careers

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When humanities scholars talk about exploring and pursuing “alt-ac” and “post-ac” careers, two concerns often dominate the conversation: 1) Graduate studies in the humanities don’t prepare us for or aren’t relevant to non-academic career paths, and 2) We don’t know where to look for or how to apply for non-academic jobs. Whether you are a scholar thinking about non-academic careers or a faculty member interested in supporting students engaged in such searches, join our panel of career services experts to discuss the many careers that are open to — and even looking for! — people with advanced training in the humanities. Panelists will discuss existing resources and where to find them, as well as ways that departments, universities, and professional organizations like the AAR can better support scholars in non-academic careers.
Amy Defibaugh, Temple University, Presiding

Panelists:
- Giulia Hoffman, University of California, San Diego
- Maren Wood, Beyond the Professoriate

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 25.

Mar 13 2020

1hr 56mins

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AAR 2019 - Considering Careers and Success outside of Academy: A Book Discussion with Kelly J. Baker

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Not every PhD becomes a professor. Some never want to, but a growing number discover too late that there's little room in the academy for them or it's not a good fit for what they want their careers to be. They also might find that they are not prepared for a job hunt outside of the ivory tower. But religious studies scholars can shift into work outside the academy.
Join Kelly J. Baker, co-editor of the 2018 book Succeeding Outside the Academy: Career Paths beyond the Humanities, Social Sciences, and STEM (University Press of Kansas, 2018) for a discussion of the book, including the diverse career options for religious studies scholars. Panelists will also reflect on why scholars leave the academy, share their experiences on their own professional paths, and consider how we should be preparing grad students for diverse careers.
Shreena Gandhi, Michigan State University, Presiding

Panelists:
- Kelly J. Baker, Women in Higher Education
- Heidi Ippolito, University of Denver
- Sarah "Moxy" Moczygemba, University of Florida
- Hussein Rashid, Islamicate, LLC
- Mary Beth Yount, Neumann University

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Mar 13 2020

1hr 29mins

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AAR 2019 - Presenting at the AAR/SBL Annual Conference Made Easy

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Dr. Mary E. Hunt has authored guidelines entitled Be Brief, Be Witty, Be Seated for presenting a conference paper that are posted on the AAR website. Come hear Dr. Hunt review and update the guidelines in a digital age. Join in a brown bag discussion on best practices an engaging conference presentation that will showcase you and your work to best advantage.
Panelists:
- Elizabeth Ursic, Mesa Community College
- Mary E. Hunt, Women's Alliance for Theology, Ethics, and Ritual

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Mar 13 2020

35mins

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AAR 2019 - Housing, Health, and Equity: Government as a Site for Intersectional Justice

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In the face of increasing policy paralysis in Washington, regional and local governments have emerged as critical engines for progress on thorny issues from climate change and economic inequality to housing, homelessness, and racial equity. And despite the overall decline of religious affiliation in the United States, local policymakers increasingly are working closely with faith-based community partners and negotiating with multireligious and multiracial organizing coalitions. This panel, featuring distinguished political leaders who have placed justice at the core of their leadership, explores the relevance and influence of their training and expertise in religion, ethics, and religious history on policymaking and governing.
J. Shawn Landres, University of California, Los Angeles, and Sara Kamali, University of Oxford, Presiding

Panelists:
- Mark Ridley-Thomas, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors
- Lois Capps, U.S. Congress (retired)
- Sadaf Jaffer, Princeton University

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Mar 12 2020

1hr 49mins

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AAR 2019 - Preparing Scholars of Religion for Non-Academic Careers: What’s a Faculty Member to Do?

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In recent years as the job market for tenure-track academic positions has tightened and the use of contingent faculty has exploded, increasing numbers of graduate degree seekers are intending to pursue nonacademic careers. While some areas of study present obvious nonacademic options, for scholars in the humanities, nonacademic career opportunities and the best preparation for them may not be obvious and religious studies faculty are exploring how graduate programs can — and should — prepare all alumni for multiple employment outcomes. This panel brings together faculty members from a variety of institutions to discuss some of the problems confronting their students and their programs as more people turn — by necessity and by choice — to nonacademic career paths.
Annette Stott, University of Denver, Presiding

Panelists:
- Sylvia Chan-Malik, Rutgers University
- Gabriel Estrada, California State University, Long Beach
- Caroline T. Schroeder, University of Oklahoma
- Najeeba Syeed-Miller, Claremont School of Theology

This session was recorded at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego, California, on November 23.

Mar 12 2020

1hr 16mins

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The Aural Experience of the Hagia Sophia with AAR Book Award Winner Bissera Pentcheva

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Bissera V. Pentcheva, winner of AAR's 2018 Award for Excellence in Historical Studies for her book "Hagia Sophia: Sound, Space, and Spirit in Byzantium" talks about how digital technology, as applied to the ancient and medieval aural experience of the Hagia Sophia, makes it possible for historians to see, feel, and hear primary textual and liturgical sources in new ways.

Nov 07 2019

25mins

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