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(819)

Rank #68 in Politics category

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Politics

The Reason Roundtable

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #68 in Politics category

News
Politics
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Every Monday, the libertarian editors of the magazine of “Free Minds and Free Markets”—Matt Welch, Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, and Peter Suderman—discuss and debate the week’s biggest stories and what fresh hell awaits us all.

Read more

Every Monday, the libertarian editors of the magazine of “Free Minds and Free Markets”—Matt Welch, Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, and Peter Suderman—discuss and debate the week’s biggest stories and what fresh hell awaits us all.

iTunes Ratings

819 Ratings
Average Ratings
677
75
24
12
31

Good enough

By lgcduubcfg - Nov 13 2019
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This is a very good podcast that would be great without Nick Gillespie and his interruptions.

Excellent dialogue

By Coz33 - Nov 05 2019
Read more
More Libertarianism and less of everything else!

iTunes Ratings

819 Ratings
Average Ratings
677
75
24
12
31

Good enough

By lgcduubcfg - Nov 13 2019
Read more
This is a very good podcast that would be great without Nick Gillespie and his interruptions.

Excellent dialogue

By Coz33 - Nov 05 2019
Read more
More Libertarianism and less of everything else!

Listen to:

Cover image of The Reason Roundtable

The Reason Roundtable

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

Every Monday, the libertarian editors of the magazine of “Free Minds and Free Markets”—Matt Welch, Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, and Peter Suderman—discuss and debate the week’s biggest stories and what fresh hell awaits us all.

Are Billionaires a Policy Failure?: Podcast

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FRANCES M. ROBERTS/Newscom

Leading 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.) proposes an "annual wealth tax on the tippy-top 0.1%." Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D–N.Y.) maintains that "a system that allows billionaires to coexist with poverty is immoral." Billionaire Starbucks magnate Howard Schultz declares that he's "seriously considering running for president" as an independent. President and purported billionaire Donald Trump announces the end of the partial federal government shutdown. In the wake of widespread media layoffs, journalists fantasize about "benevolent billionaire backers not fixated on maximum growth." And one such billionaire, Jeff Bezos, saves The Expanse from cancellation.

What do these seemingly disparate stories have in common? BILLIONAIRES, THAT'S WHAT. And also, theyall get discussed on this week's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, starring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me. The conversation also covers U.S. policy toward turbulent Venezuela, the hero's journey of Rep. Walter Jones (R–S.C.), and a certain generational culture-chasm between the podcast's participants.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'The 3rd' by Anitek is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump Announces Deal to End Government Shutdown," by Joe Setyon

"The Government Will Always Be Shut Down," by Matt Welch

"If You Still Think the Shutdown Proves Government Is Important, You're Seeing What You Want to See," by J.D. Tuccille

"Air Safety Is Important. We Shouldn't Let Politics Put It at Risk," by Robert W. Poole, Jr.

"Venezuelan Crisis Boils Over as Opposition Leader Declares Himself President," by Eric Boehm

"Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Calls Climate Change 'Our World War II,'" by Nick Gillespie

"Rep. Walter Jones, Who Supported and Then Denounced Iraq War, Is Dying," by Nick Gillespie

Don't miss a single Reason Podcast! (Archive here.)

Subscribe at Apple Podcasts.

Follow us at SoundCloud.

Subscribe at YouTube.

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Jan 28 2019

1hr

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How Libertarians Should Respond to Mass Shootings

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A pair of horrific mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, this weekend left at least 30 people dead. Politicians are jockeying to place the blame on everything from immigrants to guns to the news media. 

The Media has a big responsibility to life and safety in our Country. Fake News has contributed greatly to the anger and rage that has built up over many years. News coverage has got to start being fair, balanced and unbiased, or these terrible problems will only get worse!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 5, 2019

What should politicians do when these awful events when they occur? Why have mass shootings increasingly led to people raising First Amendment issues as well as Second Amendment questions? And how do libertarians react to both the events themselves and the misguided policy responses that inevitably result?

On the latest Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, Peter Suderman, Nick Gillespie, and Katherine Mangu-Ward are joined by special guest Eric Boehm to discuss all of these questions, as well as last week's Democratic presidential debates, the no-good-very-bad budget deal, and the latest front in the trade war. Plus: a special China-focused recommendations segment, featuring Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw, The Farewell, The Three-Body Problem, and more from the Bobiverse. 

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Ghosts I, 02' by Nine Inch Nails is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0

Aug 05 2019

57mins

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What's So Funny About Tulsi Gabbard?

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Is there something kind of, I dunno, off about Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D–Hawaii)? Certainly the can't-quit-us Clinton Machine thinks so, as do some supposedly skeptical news organizations. People a tad more serious, like former Reasoner Kerry Howley, have grappled honestly with Gabbard's unusual personality, life history, and issue set (including some off-putting enthusiasms for aggressive nationalists like Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi). Check out John Stossel's full interview with Gabbard right here, and see for yourself.

Regardless of whether Gabbard floats their particular boats, the Reason Roundtable crew of Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and special guest star Stephanie Slade have some withering things to say about this latest Hillary World attempt to smear U.S. foreign policy dissenters (including two-time Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein) as Rooskie "assets" or as the witting recipients of "grooming." The gang also gives some takeaways from last week's Democratic presidential debate, including the long, bad sections about regulating political speech and the companies providing platforms thereof. And there are the usual references to Nick Cave, Peter Criss, Norm MacDonald, the Adverts, and so on.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

Music credit: "The Gunfight" by Everet Almond

Relevant links from the show:

"Tulsi Gabbard Conspiracy Theories Go Mainstream as Hillary Clinton Accuses the Candidate of Being Groomed by Russia," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Hillary Clinton Says Donald Trump Is an Illegitimate President and Tulsi Gabbard Is a Russian Tool," by Robby Soave

"Tulsi Gabbard Called Out Mainstream Media, Both Parties, Democratic Candidates for Supporting Disastrous Regime Change in the Middle East," by Robby Soave

"The New York Times Wonders Aloud If Tulsi Gabbard's Anti-War, Anti-Establishment Message Makes Her a Stooge for Nazis and Russian Bots," by Christian Britschgi

"Stossel: Tulsi Gabbard Full Interview," by John Stossel and Maxim Lott

"Tulsi Gabbard Blames Both Sides for Waging 'These Wasteful Wars,'" by John Stossel

"Tulsi Gabbard Is Anti-War but Not Pro-Peace," by Shikha Dalmia

"No, Jill Stein Did Not Cost Hillary Clinton the White House," by Matt Welch

"Medicare for All Is All Democrats Want To Talk About," by Peter Suderman

"On Medicare for All, Elizabeth Warren Is Fundamentally Dishonest," by Peter Suderman

"Kamala Harris Demands That Warren Promise To Ban Trump From Twitter," by Billy Binion

"The Big Tech Boogeyman Took Another Unfair Beating in the Democratic Debate," by Robby Soave

"Nick Cave Slams 'Woke' Culture as 'Self-Righteous' and Suppressive," by Nick Gillespie

"Review: Parasite," by Kurt Loder

Oct 21 2019

55mins

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How Socialist Are the Democrats?

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Last week, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) gave a long-awaited speech about the meaning and import of his preferred ideological label, "democratic socialism." Also last week, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.) began eclipsing Sanders in some polls, Joe Biden and other presidential candidates stepped up their critiques of President Donald Trump's trade policies, and the Democratic National Committee announced the 20 participants in the campaign's first debate. So what does that tell us about the beating heart of the country's major left-of-center political party?

Lots of different things, argue Katherine Mangu-WardNick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch on today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast. The ensuing discussion covers trade, immigration, minimum wage laws, Social Security, and Suderman's new Unitary Theory of Health Care Politics. The podcast also chews on Robby Soave's new book, the awfulness of Sen. Tom Cotton (R–Ark.), and the awesomeness of Martin Scorsese's new Bob Dylan sorta-documentary.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Rags 2 Riches Rag' by Audionautix is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Democrats Are Fighting Over Socialism, and the Socialists Are Winning," by Peter Suderman

"Elizabeth Warren Is Starting to Beat Bernie Sanders in the Polls," by Matt Welch

"Biden Is Turning Trump's Trade War Into a Major Campaign Issue. More Democrats Should Follow His Lead." By Eric Boehm

"Democrats Have Never Been More Pro-Immigration, Thanks to Trump," by Shikha Dalmia

"Perils of 'Democratic Socialism,'" by Ilya Somin

"Bernie Sanders Thinks Medicare for All Would Solve America's Health Care Problems. It Would Make Them Worse." By Peter Suderman

"Iran Will Exceed Nuclear Stockpile Limit in Response to U.S. Sanctions," by Robby Soave

"If Trump Doesn't Want a War With Iran, He Should Stop Pushing Iran Towards War," by Daniel DePetris

"Here Are 5 Times Donald Trump Warned Against Going to War With Iran," by Eric Boehm

"Campus Radicals Against Free Speech," by Robby Soave

Jun 17 2019

57mins

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National Conservatism and the American Identity Crisis

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"Today we declare independence…from neoliberalism, from libertarianism, from what they call classical liberalism. From the set of ideas that sees the atomic individual, the free and equal individual, as the only thing that matters in politics," said Yoram Hazony, author of The Virtue of Nationalism and chairman of the Edmund Burke Foundation, in a speech at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington, D.C. The conference also featured Tucker Carlson, Peter Thiel, and Sen. Josh Hawley (D–Mo.).

But do libertarians really view atomized individuals as the "only thing that matters in politics"? This week's roundtable of Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Eric Boehm, and Zach Weissmueller try to grapple with that question and discuss the increasingly common tendency on the right and left to accuse one's political opponents of being anti-American, whether it's Trump senior adviser Stephen Miller telling Fox News that Democrats will turn the U.S. into Venezuela or it's #RandPaulHatesAmerica trending on Twitter after the Kentucky senator questioned the budgeting specifics of a 9/11 compensation program. They also discuss the trade war, Elizabeth Warren's wealth tax, Peter Thiel's suggestion that the FBI probe Google for possibly providing material support to the Chinese military, and the enduring wisdom of Albert O. Hirschman's Exit, Voice, and Loyalty.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music Credit: Kaiser Friedrich March played by the United States Marine Band

Relevant links from the show:

"The New Conservative Nationalism Is About Subverting Individual Liberty," by Stephanie Slade

"American Manufacturing Is Growing, but Trump's Tariffs Aren't the Reason Why," by Eric Boehm

"Why Elizabeth Warren's Wealth Tax Won't Work," by Peter Suderman and John Osterhoudt

"What HBO's Veep Gets Right About Politics," by Zach Weissmueller

Jul 22 2019

1hr 3mins

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Debate Dems Wage Intergenerational Warfare and We Are Here for It

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In a post-debate quickie podcast, Reason's resident millennial/xennials Peter Suderman, Stephanie Slade, and Katherine Mangu-Ward slice and dice the two nights of Democratic Debates. We discuss the surprisingly fast escalation of the health care debate and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard's shining anti-interventionist moment. And since Matt Welch and Nick Gillespie weren't on the podcast, we join tonight's Democratic hopefuls in fomenting a little intergenerational warfare. We also pick winners and losers. (Hint: Suderman and Slade think Kamala Harris won, but she's still a cop.)

Jun 28 2019

28mins

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Interesting New York Times Slavery Project Hobbled by Anti-Capitalism

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It has been a helluva weekend for national conversations about race. There was the Proud Boys vs. Antifa street theater in Portland. There was a campaign-pivoting Beto O'Rourke declaring that "Our country was founded on racism—and is still racist today." There was Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.), in the midst of unveiling a sweeping new criminal justice plan, offering this vow: "We will go to war against white nationalism and racism in every aspect of our lives." And as always, there was a Trump tweet.

The Failing New York Times, in one of the most devastating portrayals of bad journalism in history, got caught by a leaker that they are shifting from their Phony Russian Collusion Narrative (the Mueller Report & his testimony were a total disaster), to a Racism Witch Hunt…..

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 18, 2019

What was the president referring to? Perhaps the Paper of Record's sweeping and controversial new 1619 Project, which aims "to reframe American history, making explicit how slavery is the foundation on which this country is built." In the back half of today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch offer a mixed preliminary verdict about the package, praising its ambition, agreeing with the importance of the topic, and disagreeing strenuously with its King Cottonesque take on capitalism.

Other items that come up for discussion: the potential impending global recession and its perceived culprits, where Democrats are at on trade, how ancient aliens did the prehistoric cave-paintings, and which podcaster has two thumbs and watched the key-changingest Ron Paul supporter this weekend (hint: this guy!!!).

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Railroad's Whiskey Co' by Jahzzar is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Slavery Did Not Make America Rich," by Deirdre McCloskey

"White Supremacy Is Alien to Liberal and Libertarian Ideals," by J.D. Tuccille

"White Identity Politics, Not Trump's Racist Tweets, Is National Conservatism's Real Problem," by Steven Greenhut

"Libertarianism, the Anti-Slavery Movement, and Black History Month," by Damon Root

"Classical Liberalism and the Fight for Equal Rights," by Damon Root

"Proud Boys and Antifa Playact Protest in Portland," by Nancy Rommelmann

"Beto's Reboot: So You're Saying There's Still a Chance?" by Matt Welch

"Bernie Sanders Introduces Bill to Eliminate Cash Bail," by Scott Shackford

"Sanders Suddenly Becomes Pot-Friendliest Major-Party Candidate," by Jacob Sullum

"Bernie Sanders Calls for 'Automatic' Federal Investigations of Deaths in Police Custody," by Anthony Fisher

"Why Bernie Sanders Is Wrong About Private Prisons," by Leonard Gilroy and Adrian Moore

"Beto vs. Warren Is the Trade Policy Debate Democrats Need To Have," by Eric Boehm

"Biden Is Turning Trump's Trade War Into a Major Campaign Issue. More Democrats Should Follow His Lead," by Eric Boehm

"Elizabeth Warren Wants to Make Your Life More Annoying and More Expensive," by Peter Suderman

"Is Deregulation to Blame?" by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Is Barry Manilow a Closet Libertarian? (He Gave $2,300 to Ron Paul's Campaign)," by Nick Gillespie

Aug 19 2019

1hr 11mins

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Will Democrats Really Grab Your Guns?

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As has been the case with the Trump administration after a mass shooting event, the president and key legislative leaders are discussing in the wake of Saturday's Odessa, Texas, shoot-out a series of possible measures, including expediting the death penalty. As is also the case during a long presidential primary season, Democratic candidates are one-upping one another with gun-control proposals, with Texan Beto O'Rourke and Sen. Kamala Harris (D–Calif.) both suggesting "mandatory buy-backs" of "weapons of war." So what will and should actually be done?

So kicks off a lively discussion on the latest Editors Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, feauring Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman and Matt Welch. Other topics include: Reflections on back-to-school week and the state of education policy/politics, ideas from both the Trump administration and the Democratic presidential field about getting U.S. troops the hell out of Afghanistan, plus the latest social-commentary comedy from Dave Chappelle

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Scapes' by Steve Combs is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Should It Be Easier to Put Mass Shooters to Death? Trump's Justice Department Thinks So," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Texas Is Executing a Man Tonight for a Murder and Rape Experts Say He Didn't Commit," by Zuri Davis

"March For Our Lives Calls for Confiscating Guns, Investigating the NRA, and 'Reforming' the Supreme Court," by Christian Britschgi

"How to Create a Gun-Free America in 5 Easy Steps," by Austin Bragg

"New York's New 'Red Flag' Law Illustrates the Due Process Problems Posed by Gun Confiscation Orders," by Jacob Sullum

"Do These 21 Mass Shootings That Did Not Happen Show the Benefits of California's 'Red Flag' Law?" by Jacob Sullum

"James Alan Fox: There Is No Evidence of an 'Epidemic of Mass Shootings,'" by Nick Gillespie

"For Many Pro-Gun Republicans, Gun Ownership Is Skin Deep," by Zuri Davis

"Trump Caves to Lindsey Graham; U.S. Troops To Stay the Neverending Course in Afghanistan," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Trump Just Can't Quit Afghanistan," by Matt Welch

"Americans Voice Growing Support for School Choice," by J.D. Tuccille

"De Blasio Advisory Group Wants To Abolish Gifted Classes in NYC Public Schools," by Matt Welch

"Ten Years After Katrina, New Orleans Charter Schools Have Made Real Improvements," by Savannah Robinson

"Watch Dave Chappelle Eviscerate Cancel Culture," by Robby Soave

Sep 03 2019

1hr 1min

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Welcome to the Busing Election!

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Who had school busing in the betting pool for poll-moving Democratic presidential debate controversies? And yet here we are.

Well, if it's racial discord and school choice that you want to talk about, then that's exactly what you'll get on today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast. Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch talk about their own personal histories with school integration, preferred remedies for helping disadvantaged students receive a better education, and what these debates mean for the modern Democratic Party.

Also under discussion today are shake-ups to the Beltway foreign policy consensus, the beating of Quillette writer Andy Ngo, whether it's healthy for restaurants to deny service to Trumpites, and why Yoko Ono was the most underrated Beatle.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Forgiven not Forgotten' by Jahzzar is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Some Democrats Ditch Biden After First Round of 2020 Debates," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Harris-Biden Busing Spat Shows Democrats Can't Have an Honest Conversation About Racial Issues," by Jacob Sullum

"Joe Biden Is Probably Running for President. He's Got a Lot of Baggage," by Christian Britschgi

"Booker Expresses Tepid Support for Charter Schools While Sanders Seeks To Stifle Them," by Billy Binion

"Teachers Union President Thinks You're a Racist if You Yank Your Kids from Their Crappy Schools," by Scott Shackford

"How to Fix 'One of the Most Segregated Public School Systems In the Nation,'" by Jim Epstein

"Charles Koch, George Soros Help Fund Think Tank Opposed To 'Endless War,'" by Nick Gillespie

"Antifa Mob Viciously Assaults Journalist Andy Ngo at Portland Rally," by Robby Soave

"A Social Media Platform Has Banned Support of Trump," by Katrina Gulliver

Jul 01 2019

1hr 6mins

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Democrats' Anti-Scientific Climate Dystopias

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Judging by last week's six-hour CNN presidential candidate town hall on climate change, the rough Democratic consensus is that we've got 12 years until DOOM—and that we should probably ban the greenhouse-gas-reducing energy technologies of nuclear power and hydraulically fractured natural gas. Nonsense on stilts, argue Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch on the latest Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast.

The gang previews this week's Democratic presidential debate, notes the tension between an increasingly crowded Republican race and the GOP's decision to call off state primaries, analyzes President Donald Trump's move to call off withdrawal talks with the Taliban, and gives the moderator an earful about his WrongThink on West Side Story.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music Credit: 'Song of Mirrors' by Unicorn Heads

Relevant links from the show:

"Four Memorable Moments from CNN's Climate Town Hall," by Nick Gillespie

"Dems to Talk for 6 (!) Hours About Climate Change on CNN Tonight," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Despite What Democrats Said at Their Debate, We're Not Heading Toward Climate Apocalypse," by Ronald Bailey

"Democrats Debate To Determine Who Will Spend Us Into Oblivion," by Steven Greenhut

"Warren Wants 'Big, Structural Change' That Goes Beyond Anything Previous Democratic Administrations Have Proposed," by Ira Stoll

"Kamala Harris Is a Cop Who Wants To Be President," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Biden's Age Matters, Even if Democrats Want To Ignore It," by Ira Stoll

"Former S.C. Congressman Mark Sanford Launches Longshot Primary Bid One Day After GOP Cancels S.C. Primary," by Eric Boehm

"The GOP Deals With Trump Competition by Canceling Elections," by Matt Welch

"Joe Walsh Isn't Running on the Issues," by Billy Binion

"Mark Sanford Gives Himself Two Weeks to Decide if He Wants to Be Trump Roadkill," by Matt Welch

"Bill Weld Raises a Pathetic $688,000 in Second Quarter," by Matt Welch

"Trump Caves to Lindsey Graham; U.S. Troops To Stay the Neverending Course in Afghanistan," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

Sep 09 2019

59mins

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Does Tucker Carlson Get Anything Right About Libertarians?: Podcast

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Fox News Channel

It's rare that a 15-minute cable news spiel gets talked about even one day later, let alone five, but here we are with Fox News host Tucker Carlson's headline-making monologue asserting that "market capitalism is not a religion, it's a tool," warning that "any economic system that weakens or destroy families is not worth having," and serially calling out libertarians by name.

So Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch and Peter Suderman begin today's Reason Podcast, editors' roundtable edition, with an extended conversation about what Carlson gets right and (mostly) wrong, and how his critique overlaps both with modern reformoconism and some elements of Elizabeth Warren-style populism. The discussion also ranges across Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the "military version of eminent domain," and best practices for purging children's toys.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Valse in D-flat major "Minute Waltz" by Chopin, played by Muriel Nguyen Xuan is licensed under CC BY SA 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Tucker Carlson Thinks the Problem With America Is Market Capitalism," by Timothy Sandefur

"Conservatives Are Wrong to Call for Government 'Trust Busting,'" by Steven Greenhut

"Ivanka and Conservatives Want to Raid Social Security to Pay for Parental Leave," by Shikha Dalmia

"Increasing Top Tax Brackets Is Easier Than Increasing Revenue Over Time," by Nick Gillespie

"How Payday Lenders and Check Cashers Help the Poor," by Todd Krainin

"What the Hell Is the 'Military Version of Eminent Domain'?" by Joe Setyon

"Trump's Terrible Record on Property Rights," by Ilya Somin

"Legal or Not, Trump Shouldn't Declare a 'National Emergency' To Build His Wall," by Joe Setyon

Don't miss a single Reason Podcast! (Archive here.)

Subscribe at Apple Podcasts..

Follow us at SoundCloud.

Subscribe at YouTube.

Like us on Facebook.

Follow us on Twitter.

Jan 07 2019

1hr 4mins

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Does the Demise of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and his Caliphate Vindicate 2014 Rand Paul?

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In September 2014, in the wake of the beheading of two American journalists by the Islamic State, the usually intervention-skeptical Sen. Rand Paul (R–Ky.), then preparing a run for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, came out in favor declaring war to "destroy ISIS militarily." This was, to put it mildly, controversial among libertarians, particularly though not only those who are fans of his famously anti-interventionist father. More hawkish libertarians, meanwhile, were still going on about Paul's allegedly "fatal pacifism." (Reason's interview with the senator at the time is at this link.)

Many have argued that Paul's tiptoeing through the political minefield created by the alarming rise of ISIS was central to his candidacy's failure to launch, thus clearing the way for another, albeit far less consistent, intervention skeptic to eventually win the nomination in an otherwise typically hawkish GOP field. But now that the U.S. has, well, destroyed ISIS military (or come as close as you can) while also refraining from launching big new interventions in Syria or elsewhere, is this at least a partial vindication for a thoroughly unloved Rand Paul straddle?

So begins today's Reason Roundtable podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and Katherine Mangu-Ward. The gang also argues about impeachment, the deficit, bad metaphors, and the new Yeezy. The usual, in other words.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

Music credit: "March to Victory" by Silent Partner

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump Makes Baghdadi Death About Humiliation, not Human Rights," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Rand Paul Wants to 'Destroy' ISIS Yet 'Stay the Heck Out of Their Civil War,'" by Jacob Sullum

"Rand Paul: Conservative Realist?" by Matt Welch

"The Case for Foreign-Policy 'Realism,'" by Rand Paul

"In Search of Libertarian Realism," by Matt Welch, Sheldon Richman, Christopher Preble, William Ruger, and Fernando Tesón

"When House Republicans Act Like Campus Leftists," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Is William Taylor the John Dean of Ukrainegate?" by David Post

"Trump's Cronies Meddling in Ukraine Undermined U.S. Goals, Says Ambassador Taylor," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Federal Deficit Hit $984 Billion Last Year—a Nearly 50 Percent Increase Since Trump Took Office," by Eric Boehm

"The Mind of Mike Judge," by Jesse Walker

"Kanye West Is Misunderstood," by Brian Doherty

Oct 28 2019

1hr 8mins

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Pro-Life and Pro-Choice Libertarians Calmly Discuss Abortion

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The debate over the "heartbeat bill" signed into law in Georgia last week has been both hyperbolic and vitriolic. Of course, stakes are high in the debate over the legality of abortion and the potential for reconsideration of the Supreme Court precedent set in Roe v. Wade (1973).

But at Reason, we believe calm, rational discussion is possible even between people who strongly disagree. So Editor in Chief Katherine Mangu-Ward sat down with Managing Editor Stephanie Slade, who is pro-life, and Associate Editor Liz Nolan Brown, who is pro-choice, to talk about the present state of abortion politics and the ways in which reasonable libertarians can disagree on this issue.

Further reading:

Stephanie Slade on Why I Am a Pro-Life Libertarian and Why Is the ACLU Targeting Catholic Hospitals?

Elizabeth Nolan Brown on how A Post-Roe World Would Pave the Way for a New Black Market in Abortion Pills and Doctors Call for Decriminalization of Self-Induced Abortion.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

May 14 2019

44mins

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Trump's Mexican Standoff and the New Illiberal Right

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Donald Trump's latest tariff brinksmanship has ended more with a set of whimpers than with a bang, for which those of us who favor and participate in mutual gains from trade can breathe a sigh of relief, if only temporarily.

But what have we learned from this most recent round of applied mercantilism, and how does it overlap with the ongoing Deplatforming Wars, Tucker Carlson's crush on Elizabeth Warren, and the nationalist/classical-liberal spat on the right? Such are the topics on today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, featuring Katherine Mangu-WardNick Gillespie, Peter Suderman and Matt Welch. Along the way we also discuss reclaiming the word "liberal" (really!), Late Capitalism's learned helplessness, and the many prophecies of Neal Stephenson.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump's Claim That Mexico Will Buy More American Agricultural Goods Is Fake News," by Eric Boehm

"Trump's Threatened Tariffs on Mexican Imports Might Not Happen. They Have Costs Anyway," by Eric Boehm

"Trump's Tariffs on Mexican Imports Would Be Biggest Tax Increase in Decades," by Eric Boehm

"Trump's Trade War Turns 1. Here's What We've Lost," by Eric Boehm

"Trump's Legal Authority to Impose Tariffs," by David Post

"Will Senate Republicans Revolt Over Trump's Mexico Tariff Threats?" by Eric Boehm

"Becoming the Libs to Own the Libertarians: Tucker Carlson Praises Elizabeth Warren," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"The Fight Conservatives Are Having Over Theocracy and Classical Liberalism Obscures How Beaten Their Movement Is," by Nick Gillespie

"The New Theocrats Are Neither Conservative Nor Christian," by Stephanie Slade

"David French Is Right: Classical Liberalism Is the Best Framework for Protecting Religious Freedom," by Robby Soave

"YouTube Punishes Steven Crowder for Homophobic Speech, a Confused Approach to an Unsolvable Problem," by Robby Soave

"To Fight 'Extremism,' Journalists Are Praising Online Censorship," by Nick Gillespie

"White House Seeks Social Media Sob Stories from Conservative Snowflakes," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"No, the Government Shouldn't Break Up Facebook," by Nick Gillespie

"'Nobody Wants To See a Government Speech Police': Senate Republicans Threaten To Regulate Facebook and Twitter," by Billy Binion

"Elizabeth Warren's Plan to Break Up Big Tech Would Be Bad for America," by David Harsanyi

"If We Told You Neal Stephenson Invented Bitcoin, Would You Be Surprised?" by Peter Suderman

Jun 10 2019

1hr 4mins

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Did Andrew Yang Win Last Night's Democratic Debate?

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Last night's Democratic debate was the first to feature all the major contenders on a single stage. They spent much of the evening sparring over health care issues before moving on to talk about gun control, the environment, immigration and more.

Despite the presence of former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.), and Sen. Kamala Harris (D–Calif.), it was tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang who made the biggest impression. Reason's Austin Bragg, Peter Suderman, and Eric Boehm talk about the evening and what it means in a special post-debate podcast.

Photo credit: Heidi Gutman/ZUMA Press/Newscom

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Sep 13 2019

32mins

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The Future of Science: Podcast

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Reason

In the September 1968 issue of the newly created Reason magazine, founding editor Lanny Friedlander dreamed up a scenario of individualized telecommunications beyond just about anyone's contemporary imaginations. "Our man sits down to his telephone," Friedlander wrote. "It is a deluxe model, with a television screen, television camera, teletype outlet, electronic writing pad, copier, and, yes, a handset. He flips on the machine and speaks towards the television screen (there is a mike and speaker next to it). He identifies himself and asks for his "mail.'"

Forward-looking and occasionally prescient writing about the wonders of science is baked right into this magazine's DNA. So it was altogether appropriate at our 50th anniversary celebration in November to convene a panel, which I was fortunate to moderate, on where the future is taking us. Giving us that glimpse were Science Correspondent Ronald Bailey, Reason TV Managing Editor Jim Epstein (who talked about blockchain), and legendary skeptic Michael Shermer.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes.

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Dec 28 2018

49mins

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Democratizing Gun Production, Education, and Media: Podcast

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What happens when individual consumers—not government bureaucrats, not corporate chieftains, not elite gatekeepers—own the means of their own production? For a half-century, Reason has been giving variants on a five-word answer to that question: Unpredictable and mostly wonderful things.

At our 50th anniversary celebration in Los Angeles this November, we summoned to discuss the democratization of everything an eclectic panel composed of columnist J.D. Tuccille, lover of DIY weaponry and illegal black markets; Reason Foundation Education Director Lisa Snell; and TV showrunner/podcast pioneer Rob Long. I was the moderator.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Photo credit: Lannis Waters/ZUMA Press/Newscom

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes.

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Dec 26 2018

49mins

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(We Didn't) Bomb Bomb Bomb, Bomb Bomb Iran…Yet

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We don't know what will happen next in Iran. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo today is in Riyadh—rarely a happy portent for U.S. foreign policy—talking up a "global coalition" against Iran, as President Donald Trump vows to enact new "hard-hitting" sanctions and, you know, warns of "obliteration like you've never seen before."

And yet! Trump last week did what too few U.S. presidents do, which was a) call off a military strike, b) do so in the name of disproportionality, and c) say as much in public. And so the first chunk of today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, featuring Katherine Mangu-WardNick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch, includes praise and analysis of the president's reticence. The gang also talks about this tweet

When our Country had no debt and built everything from Highways to the Military with CASH, we had a big system of Tariffs. Now we allow other countries to steal our wealth, treasure, and jobs - But no more! The USA is doing great, with unlimited upside into the future!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 23, 2019

…and foreshadows the staggering amount of check-writing that will be promised in this week's opening round of Democratic presidential debates.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Ghosts, 18' by Nine Inch Nails is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump Is Right: Killing Innocent Iranians Would Be a 'Not Proportionate' Response to Downed Drone," by Eric Boehm

"War With Iran May Have Been Avoided Due to Trump's Fondness for Fox News," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"If Trump Doesn't Want a War With Iran, He Should Stop Pushing Iran Towards War," by Daniel DePetris

"Will Today's Global Trade Wars Lead to World War III?" By Daniel Drezner

"Nationalism and Socialism Are Very Bad Ideas," by Deirdre McCloskey

"Deficit Politics May Have Gone Away, but Debt and Deficits Are Worse Than Ever," by Peter Suderman

"Bernie Sanders Wants To Cancel All Student Debt and Make College Free, at a Cost of $2.2 Trillion," by Robby Soave

"Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren Unveil Dueling Trillion-Dollar Climate Policies," by Christian Britschgi

"Elizabeth Warren's Budget Math Still Doesn't Work," by Alex Muresianu

"Reparations Are More Likely to Divide the Nation Than Heal It," by Steven Greenhut

"How to Build Infrastructure During an Age of Sequester: Reason Foundation's Robert W. Poole," by Nick Gillespie

"With Toy Story 4, the Toy Story Series Is Now Hollywood's Greatest Franchise," by Peter Suderman

Jun 24 2019

55mins

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Is Rand Paul Right About Special Prosecutors Being Wrong?: Podcast

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NBC News

There are Friday news-dumps and then there are Friday Trump/Russia/Mueller court-filing ka-BOOMs. So on the Monday editors' roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch spend the first half of the show reacting to the latter. Particularly to the controversial contention over the weekend by Sen. Rand Paul (R–Ky.) that special counsel investigations are essentially "banana republic"-style expeditions to pin a crime on a preset perp.

Also up for discussion: the social media troll game (and ludicrous policy proposals) of Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D–N.Y.), old-media dredging exercises through high schoolers' tweets, and as many Suderman nerd-jokes as can fit comfortably into one hour.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Flying pea v.1' by Daddy_Scrabble is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Prosecutors Recommend Prison for Cohen, Say He Paid off Women on Trump's Behalf," by Scott Shackford

"Rand Paul: Trump/Russia Is 'Overplayed,' and 'Distracting us From Everything Right Now,'" by Matt Welch

"Rand Paul Doesn't Want a Special Prosecutor on Russia," by Mike Riggs

"Putin's Potential Penthouse in Trump Tower Moscow Launches Investigation," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Trump Ex-Lawyer Cohen Pleads Guilty to Lying to Congress About Russian Negotiations," by Scott Shackford

"Ignorance Is Trump's Excuse," by Jacob Sullum

"With an Erroneous Tweet, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Inadvertently Reveals That Medicare-for-All Proponents Still Don't Have a Plan," by Peter Suderman

"Can the Democrats Really Win 2020 with a New Green Deal?" by Ronald Bailey

"Media Attacks Heisman Trophy Winner Kyler Murray for Homophobic Tweets He Sent as a 14-Year-Old," by Robby Soave

"Kevin Hart Quits Oscars Hosting Gig Over Past Homophobic Tweets, Social Media Mobs Win Again," by Robby Soave

"This Is What a Weatherized Economy Looks Like," by Matt Welch

Don't miss a single Reason Podcast! (Archive here.)

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Dec 10 2018

1hr 4mins

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Everybody Wants to Regulate the Internet Except Ajit Pai: Podcast

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Matt Welch

Sometimes it's worth divining lessons from a news story in which man stubbornly refuses to bite dog. Such is the case with the one-year anniversary of the Federal Communications Commission ending the set of regulations misleadingly known as "net neutrality." The predicted ensuing clampdown never materialized, and instead way too much of the political spectrum has moved on to calling for other sectors of the federal government to…uh, clamp down on internet-related companies.

So kicks off the discussion on the Monday editors' roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me. We delve into social media hearings, Section 230 semiotics, and (sadly!) stupid Donald Trump tweets. The gang also gets in a bit of contentious funerealism over the demise of The Weekly Standard, so do stick around until the end.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Shake It!' by Jahzzar is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"One Year Ago Today, the FCC Killed the Internet," by Eric Boehm

"California Imposed Its Own 'Net Neutrality' Law. The Feds Aren't Happy About It," by Declan McCullagh

"Net Neutrality Is Officially Dead. That's a Victory for Free Speech," by Nick Gillespie

"Internet Cop," by Peter Suderman

"Google Hearings Force the Question: Do We Really Want 'Regulation by Federal and State Governments' of 'Today's Disruptive Technologies'?" by Nick Gillespie

"Guess Which Congressman Thought a Malfunctioning iPhone Was Google CEO Sundar Pichai's Fault," by Robby Soave

"Are You Ready for the 'Inevitable' Clampdown on Tech and the Media?" by Nick Gillespie

"Expect More Conservative Purges on Social Media If Republicans Target Section 230," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Senator Ron Wyden (Co-Author of § 230) Trying to Pressure Internet Companies to Restrict "Indecent" Ideas?" by Eugene Volokh

"Donald Trump Suggests Unfair Media Coverage of His Presidency Could Be Illegal," by Robby Soave

"Making the Fairness Doctrine Great Again," by Thomas Winslow Hazlett

"The Weekly Standard turns 10," by W. James Antle, III

"The Weekly Standard's case against laissez faire," by Walter Olson

Don't miss a single Reason Podcast! (Archive here.)

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Dec 17 2018

1hr 4mins

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You Asked Reason Editors Anything. Listen to How We Answered!

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We have many fun traditions that have arisen during the decade-plus of running annual Reason webathons, none funner than having our editorial brass respond directly to the brain-tickling queries, insults, and philosophical problems posed by you, our very favorite audience. How many other magazines of opinion allow not only for an open comments section (legal exposures notwithstanding), but annual AMAs? Not bloody many, I'd wager.

Won't you please encourage such responsiveness by donating to Reason right the hell now?

Well, this year we asked for questions as part of our weekly Reason Roundtable podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Katherine Mangu-Ward, and Matt Welch, and man, did you people deliver. In a special bonus Webathon dispatch that tests the outer limits of the Non-Agression Principle by taping in the same room, your humble Roundtableists give their own reasons for the giving season, then tackle all the important, listener-generated questions. Such as:

Which editor can fire the others? How many black leather jackets does Nick own? What's the best outcome for impeachment? What are recommended books, recommended political strategies for Rep. Justin Amash (I–Mich.), and recommended cocktail ingredients from Suderman? Why does Katherine hate ownership, why does Nick hate libraries, why does Reason hate people who talk to Richard Spencer? When are we going to get our fancy debt crisis and why don't people talk more about New Zealand? What is the most libertarian musical genre? Which fictional character would make the best president? And most importantly, who is the best baseball player who does not belong in the Hall of Fame?

Those are just some of the questions you can listen to us try to answer below, from around the ping pong table of Reason's D.C. office. Enjoy! Then remember to subscribe to Reason podcasts, and of course…donate to Reason right the hell now.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Dec 06 2019

1hr 34mins

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The Free Trade Dream of the '90s Is Dead

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The Reason Roundtable podcast quartet of Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and Katherine Mangu-Ward are taking your questions for a special bonus-cast to be aired during our annual Webathon, which begins tomorrow. Please email any/all queries, for the group or for an individual, to podcasts@reason.com, and we shall do our best to address them.

Addressed on today's edition: President Donald Trump's latest tariff lunacies vis-à-vis Brazil and Argentina, and what they tell us about the current and previous administrations, as well as the broader currents in global opinion about trade, immigration, and multilateral institutions. As is the custom, the co-hosts have…different opinions. Other questions discussed: Which Democratic presidential candidate will drop out next? Is Ted Cruz's beard hot or not? How many four-letter words can one fit in a negative review of The Irishman?

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music credit: "White Hats" by Wayne Jones

Relevant links from the show:

"New Tariffs Scheduled for December 15 Won't Pressure China Into Making a Deal. Trump Should Cancel Them," by Eric Boehm

"Trump's Farm Bailout Has Cost Over $10 Billion This Year," by Eric Boehm

"Bryan Caplan Says Milton Friedman Is Wrong About Open Borders," by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Trump Weaponizes the Bureaucracy Against Naturalized Citizens," by Shikha Dalmia

"Kamala Harris 2020 Staffer Says She Never Saw Campaign Staff Treated 'So Poorly,'" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Martin Scorsese Is a Grumpy Old Fart—and Wrong About the State of 'Cinema,'" by Nick Gillespie

"Reviews: The Irishman and Terminator: Dark Fate," by Kurt Loder

"Who Am I?" by Reason staff

"Support Reason While Doing Your Amazon Holiday Shopping," by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"The Reason Podcast Is Now 3 Great New Podcasts. Subscribe!" by Katherine Mangu-Ward

Dec 02 2019

59mins

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Does It Matter That Impeachment Enthusiasts Are Lousy on Foreign Policy?

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What have we learned after the second week of the House impeachment inquiry, aside from the fact that President Donald Trump abuses power and says crazy things while pretty much everybody else rationalizes one way or the other? One persistent peculiarity, argue Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Katherine Mangu-Ward, and Matt Welch on the Reason Roundtable podcast, is that so, so many of the president's greatest antagonists are—like many in the permanent foreign policy apparatus—more interventionist on foreign policy than your average Joe. So how exactly should that color our opinion of the proceedings?

In addition to disagreeing about that, the quarrelsome quartet bickers over best and worst in the Democratic presidential field, discusses the origin-story theology of The Fantastic Four, makes an uncomfortable menstruation metaphor, and ponders just how many of Sacha Baron-Cohen's anti–social media ideas should be thrown down the well.

SPEAKING OF HOLES: A final reminder that with our annual Webathon lurking around the corner, The Reason Roundtable is soliciting your questions, queries, praise, and abuse, for the purpose of a special bonus Webathon AMA episode. Email your queries to podcasts@reason.com, por favor!

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

Music credit: 'Russian Dance' by Joey Pecoraro

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump Team Plotted Post-Hoc Justification for Withholding Ukraine Aid, Emails Suggest," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"The Evidence That Trump Abused His Powers Is Clear and Convincing," by Jacob Sullum

"Judge Napolitano: Enough Evidence 'To Justify About Three or Four Articles of Impeachment,'" by Nick Gillespie

"As Impeachment Moves Forward, Trump's Story Changes," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"House Republicans Are Spreading 'Fictional Narrative' on Ukrainian Election Interference, Says Former Top White House Adviser," by Billy Binion

"'We Followed the President's Orders': Gordon Sondland Says There Was a Quid Pro Quo," by Billy Binion

"Kurt Volker Revises Testimony and Says Corruption Allegations Against Biden Are 'Not Credible,'" by Billy Binion

"White House Adviser: Trump Didn't Actually Seem to Care About Fighting Corruption in Ukraine," by Billy Binion

"Wanted: A Dem Presidential Candidate Who Defends Individualism, Capitalism, Non-Interventionism," by Nick Gillespie

"Cory Booker Just Crushed Joe Biden Over His Tepid Support for Marijuana Legalization," by Eric Boehm

"Booker Says Warren's Wealth Tax Would Destroy Economic Growth," by Billy Binion

"Cory Booker Pushes for Greater Democratic Support for Charter Schools," by Scott Shackford

"The Anybody-but-Warren Primary," by Peter Suderman

"Sacha Baron Cohen's Anti-Facebook Rant at the ADL Summit Was Pure Moral Panic," by Robby Soave

"Martin Scorsese Is a Grumpy Old Fart—and Wrong About the State of 'Cinema,'" by Nick Gillespie

"Reviews: The Irishman and Terminator: Dark Fate," by Kurt Loder

"Nobody Knows What Television Is Anymore," by Peter Suderman

"The Reason Podcast Is Now 3 Great New Podcasts. Subscribe!" by Katherine Mangu-Ward

Nov 25 2019

1hr 3mins

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Of All the Things To Impeach a President for, They Chose This?

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Who's ready for Week Two of the impeachment show (not to be confused with The Impeachment Show)? Well, ready might be a strong word, but the Reason Roundtable quartet of Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and Katherine Mangu-Ward have many thoughts about comparative presidential corruption, the Sixth Amendment, how politics keeps getting stuck in our government, and whether "bribery" is the right word for the job. The important thing is that it's all going to get worse.

Speaking of which, so are the Democrats' semi-phony yet heartfelt Centrism Wars, which get a thorough examination on the podcast as well. Is Pete Buttigieg a blank slate for the politically gullible? Does Michael Bloomberg's understanding of capitalism outweigh his enthusiasm for regulation? Is it time to blow the whole thing off and spend the weekend tripping balls on ayahuasca? All, and much more, are discussed.

SPEAKING OF DISCUSSION: Ever feel like harassing the Reason Roundtableists with individual or group questions? With our annual Webathon around the corner, the time to do so is right the hell now. Email your queries to podcasts@reason.com, and we shall do our best to answer them in a forthcoming video release during the Webathon.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

'Confused State' by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under CC BY 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"The Reason Podcast Is Now 3 Great New Podcasts. Subscribe!" by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Far From Avoiding 'Quid Pro Quo' Talk, Calling Trump's Conduct Bribery Requires It," by Jacob Sullum

"Justin Amash to Trump: Let Bolton, Giuliani, and Mulvaney Testify," by Billy Binion

"Democrats Cry Corruption, Republicans Denounce Hearsay at First Impeachment Hearings," by Christian Britschgi

"U.S. Diplomat Bill Taylor: It Was 'Crazy' To Freeze Aid to Ukraine 'for Help With a Political Campaign,'" by Billy Binion

"Ambassador Changes Testimony, Admits Giving Quid Pro Quo Message to Ukraine," by Billy Binion

"Impeachment and the Sixth Amendment," by David Post

"Steve Calabresi Responds and Updates His Arguments on Impeachment Hearings," by Jim Lindgren

"Barack Obama Slams Woke Scolds and Hashtag Activism," by Robby Soave

"Pete Buttigieg Has a $1 Trillion Plan to Drive Up Housing, College, and Labor Costs," by Scott Shackford

"Glamour and the Art of Persuasion," by Virginia Postrel

"If Biden Won't Support Legalization Until We Know Whether Marijuana Is a 'Gateway Drug,' He Will Never Support Legalization," by Jacob Sullum

"The Democratic Primaries Get a Last-Minute Addition," by Zuri Davis

"'We Vape, We Vote' Crowd Got Through to Donald Trump, Advisors Say," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Michael Bloomberg's Anti-Vaping Crusade Is Objectively Pro-Tobacco," by Jacob Sullum

"Michael Bloomberg's Centrism Combines the Worst Instincts of the Right and Left," by Jacob Sullum

"Couldn't You Choose a Sacrament That's Less Fun and More Nauseating?" By Jacob Sullum

"Review: Parasite," by Kurt Loder

Nov 18 2019

59mins

Play

Democrats Can't Quit Fantasizing About What They'd Do to Billionaires

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.) tells Amy Goodman that "Markets without rules are theft." Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) tweets that "billionaires should not exist." The conversation gets people so excited that soon former cabinet secretaries are tweeting that there are no honest ways to accumulate a billion dollars, commentators are warning that "these fortunes will destroy our democracy," and The New York Times is publishing entire news articles taking at face value the numerical fantasies of Warren's economic advisers.

It was just another week in the 2020 Democratic presidential primaries, in other words, albeit with one main exception—the race saw the entrance of a brand new (though also old) billionaire! All of which gets a thorough round of yakking from Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and Katherine Mangu-Ward on today's Reason Roundtable podcast. The gang also talks about the latest impeachment dramedy, the best arguments in favor of capitalism, and the life well lived of the late libertarian philanthropist and financial-markets investor Don Smith.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

'Amazing Plan—Distressed' by Kevin Macleod is licensed under CC BY 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"The Reason Podcast Is Now 3 Great New Podcasts. Subscribe!" by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Democratic Wealth Tax Proposals Demonstrate Economic Ignorance," by Veronique de Rugy

"Elizabeth Warren Wants To Raise Taxes by $26 Trillion," by Peter Suderman

"Elizabeth Warren's 'Wealth Tax' Is Punishment, Not Taxation," by Ira Stoll

"Leftist Tax Schemes Bash the Rich, but Depend on Their Success," by Steven Greenhut

"Warren's Presidential Bid Aims to Blame 'the Rich' for America's Problems," by Ira Stoll

"Are Billionaires a Policy Failure?" by Matt Welch

"Are Billionaires Immoral? Democrats Are Staking Out Aggressive Anti-Wealth Platforms Ahead of 2020," by Ira Stoll

"Michael Bloomberg's Centrism Combines the Worst Instincts of the Right and Left," by Jacob Sullum

"Michael Bloomberg's Chances of Becoming President: Slim, None, and Fat," by Matt Welch

"Reason.tv: Investor Don Smith on the Economy," by Nick Gillespie

Nov 11 2019

1hr 2mins

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Elizabeth Warren Is Lying About Her Own Medicare Plan

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.), the Democratic presidential contender, used the following words over the weekend to defend her plan to pay for Medicare for All: "It doesn't raise taxes on anybody but billionaires….Understand this. This is no increase in taxes for anyone except billionaires….Period. Done." Non-billionaires will not pay "a penny more."

This claim is a straight-up lie, says Reason features editor and resident health care policy specialist Peter Suderman in today's Reason Roundtable podcast. Co-roundtableists Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch, and Katherine Mangu-Ward dive into the weeds of Medicare policy and politics, jump into the fray of the latest social media panicking, and leave time enough for Ed Clark references and a bit of Libertarian Party presidential news.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

Music credits:

'Evil Plan' by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under CC BY 3.0

'ok boomer w/jedwill' by Peter Kuli

Relevant links from the show:

"The Reason Podcast Is Now 3 Great New Podcasts. Subscribe!" by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Elizabeth Warren Wants To Pay for Medicare for All With a $9 Trillion Tax That Will Hit the Middle Class," by Peter Suderman

"Aaron Sorkin, Mark Zuckerberg Feud Over Political Ads. Here's Why Sorkin's Wrong," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"'We Can Fact Check Your Ass,' but Not When It Comes to Political Ads," by Nick Gillespie

"Twitter's Ban on Political Ads Will Help Incumbent Politicians Maintain Power," by Scott Shackford

"Can Big Tech Save Us From the Power of Government?" by Scott Shackford

"Former Time Editor and CEO of Constitution Center (!) Wants To Cancel First Amendment, Pass Hate Speech Laws," by Nick Gillespie

Nov 04 2019

57mins

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Does the Demise of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and his Caliphate Vindicate 2014 Rand Paul?

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In September 2014, in the wake of the beheading of two American journalists by the Islamic State, the usually intervention-skeptical Sen. Rand Paul (R–Ky.), then preparing a run for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, came out in favor declaring war to "destroy ISIS militarily." This was, to put it mildly, controversial among libertarians, particularly though not only those who are fans of his famously anti-interventionist father. More hawkish libertarians, meanwhile, were still going on about Paul's allegedly "fatal pacifism." (Reason's interview with the senator at the time is at this link.)

Many have argued that Paul's tiptoeing through the political minefield created by the alarming rise of ISIS was central to his candidacy's failure to launch, thus clearing the way for another, albeit far less consistent, intervention skeptic to eventually win the nomination in an otherwise typically hawkish GOP field. But now that the U.S. has, well, destroyed ISIS military (or come as close as you can) while also refraining from launching big new interventions in Syria or elsewhere, is this at least a partial vindication for a thoroughly unloved Rand Paul straddle?

So begins today's Reason Roundtable podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and Katherine Mangu-Ward. The gang also argues about impeachment, the deficit, bad metaphors, and the new Yeezy. The usual, in other words.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

Music credit: "March to Victory" by Silent Partner

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump Makes Baghdadi Death About Humiliation, not Human Rights," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Rand Paul Wants to 'Destroy' ISIS Yet 'Stay the Heck Out of Their Civil War,'" by Jacob Sullum

"Rand Paul: Conservative Realist?" by Matt Welch

"The Case for Foreign-Policy 'Realism,'" by Rand Paul

"In Search of Libertarian Realism," by Matt Welch, Sheldon Richman, Christopher Preble, William Ruger, and Fernando Tesón

"When House Republicans Act Like Campus Leftists," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Is William Taylor the John Dean of Ukrainegate?" by David Post

"Trump's Cronies Meddling in Ukraine Undermined U.S. Goals, Says Ambassador Taylor," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Federal Deficit Hit $984 Billion Last Year—a Nearly 50 Percent Increase Since Trump Took Office," by Eric Boehm

"The Mind of Mike Judge," by Jesse Walker

"Kanye West Is Misunderstood," by Brian Doherty

Oct 28 2019

1hr 8mins

Play

What's So Funny About Tulsi Gabbard?

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Is there something kind of, I dunno, off about Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D–Hawaii)? Certainly the can't-quit-us Clinton Machine thinks so, as do some supposedly skeptical news organizations. People a tad more serious, like former Reasoner Kerry Howley, have grappled honestly with Gabbard's unusual personality, life history, and issue set (including some off-putting enthusiasms for aggressive nationalists like Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi). Check out John Stossel's full interview with Gabbard right here, and see for yourself.

Regardless of whether Gabbard floats their particular boats, the Reason Roundtable crew of Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and special guest star Stephanie Slade have some withering things to say about this latest Hillary World attempt to smear U.S. foreign policy dissenters (including two-time Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein) as Rooskie "assets" or as the witting recipients of "grooming." The gang also gives some takeaways from last week's Democratic presidential debate, including the long, bad sections about regulating political speech and the companies providing platforms thereof. And there are the usual references to Nick Cave, Peter Criss, Norm MacDonald, the Adverts, and so on.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

Music credit: "The Gunfight" by Everet Almond

Relevant links from the show:

"Tulsi Gabbard Conspiracy Theories Go Mainstream as Hillary Clinton Accuses the Candidate of Being Groomed by Russia," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Hillary Clinton Says Donald Trump Is an Illegitimate President and Tulsi Gabbard Is a Russian Tool," by Robby Soave

"Tulsi Gabbard Called Out Mainstream Media, Both Parties, Democratic Candidates for Supporting Disastrous Regime Change in the Middle East," by Robby Soave

"The New York Times Wonders Aloud If Tulsi Gabbard's Anti-War, Anti-Establishment Message Makes Her a Stooge for Nazis and Russian Bots," by Christian Britschgi

"Stossel: Tulsi Gabbard Full Interview," by John Stossel and Maxim Lott

"Tulsi Gabbard Blames Both Sides for Waging 'These Wasteful Wars,'" by John Stossel

"Tulsi Gabbard Is Anti-War but Not Pro-Peace," by Shikha Dalmia

"No, Jill Stein Did Not Cost Hillary Clinton the White House," by Matt Welch

"Medicare for All Is All Democrats Want To Talk About," by Peter Suderman

"On Medicare for All, Elizabeth Warren Is Fundamentally Dishonest," by Peter Suderman

"Kamala Harris Demands That Warren Promise To Ban Trump From Twitter," by Billy Binion

"The Big Tech Boogeyman Took Another Unfair Beating in the Democratic Debate," by Robby Soave

"Nick Cave Slams 'Woke' Culture as 'Self-Righteous' and Suppressive," by Nick Gillespie

"Review: Parasite," by Kurt Loder

Oct 21 2019

55mins

Play

Is Everyone Wrong About NBA/China/Hong Kong Except South Park and…Ted Cruz?

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Who ya gonna believe when it comes to the omni-faceted NBA/China/Hong Kong/censorship/whatever controversy, Gregg Popovich, Donald Trump, Steve Kerr, South Park, or…Sen. Ted Cruz (R–Tex.)?

That's the first of a seemingly endless number of perhaps unanswerable questions on this week's Reason Roundtable podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch. Other queries include: Does Red China's exportation of censorship disprove the hypothesis that trade and capitalism make people freer? Is President Trump's abandonment of the Syrian Kurds a welcome clarifying agent to the U.S. body politic or a haphazard atrocity-enabler cloaked in the insincere language of imperial withdrawal? Which Democrats are most set to embarrass themselves in this week's debate? Are Tom DeLay's hips capable of lying? And can Nick's enthusiasm for Columbus Day be contained, let alone stopped?

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

'Duet Musette' by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"The NBA's China Problem Gets Worse After 2 American Arenas Eject Hong Kong Supporters," by Eric Boehm

"Activision Blizzard Sided With Chinese Communists Against a 21-Year-Old Star Player," by Robby Soave

"China Banned South Park After the Show Made Fun of Chinese Censorship," by Robby Soave

"The NBA Cares More About Making Money in Mainland China Than Supporting Freedom in Hong Kong," by Mike Riggs

"Hong Kong Protesters Combat the Surveillance State," by Zach Weismueller

"Searching for New Atlantis in China," by Michael Gibson

"Ted Cruz Wants To Punish Google Because Execs Didn't Vote for Trump," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"We Can Learn 3 Lessons From Trump's Partial Syria Withdrawal," by Bonnie Kristian

"Bringing Them Home? Trump Commits 1,800 More Troops to the Middle East," by Eric Boehm

"Let the Kurds Come to America," by Shikha Dalmia

"Trump Brushes Off the Threat of Free ISIS Militants Because 'They're Going to be Escaping to Europe,'" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"U.S. Consents to a Turkish Invasion in Syria; Kurdish Forces Call It 'A Stab in the Back,'" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Democratic Candidates Promise LGBT Voters They'll Punish All the Right People," by Scott Shackford

"Inside the Pro-Trump Conference Where a Violent Meme Made National News," by C.J. Ciaramella

"Summer TV Season Launches with HBO's Murdoch-esque Succession," by Glenn Garvin

"You Know All Those Stories About The Apocalypse Being Nigh? Well, Now That Tom DeLay Is Going To Be On Dancing With The Stars, I Believe Them," by Nick Gillespie

Oct 14 2019

1hr 10mins

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You Will Die If You Vape While Watching Impeachment Porn

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As the nation gets more paranoid about vaping, we bring in e-cigarette expert Jacob Sullum to talk us down. Sullum digs into the real risks of vaping versus smoking, what teens who like cotton candy have to do with the recent deaths associated with vaping, and whether you should toss those vape cartridges you have sitting around.

He joins the usual Reason Roundtable crew of Nick GillespieKatherine Mangu-Ward, and Peter Suderman for an in-depth chat about tainted THC, flavored nicotine, and more. We also sprint through this weekend's impeachment, corruption, and treason-accusation news (which is now breaking at a faster rate than we can podcast about it), and we round out our chat with an inquiry into why banning porn is so hot again on the right. Reason editors also have some thoughts about Joker and Frederick Douglass. (Because of course we do.)

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music credit: 'Touch Tone' by Mini Vandals

Oct 07 2019

1hr 6mins

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Who's Right on Impeachment: Rand Paul, Justin Amash, or Jeff Flake?

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Sen. Rand Paul (R–Ky.) says it's a "fake witch hunt" ("BASTA!"). Rep. Justin Amash (I–Mich.) is in the same "impeachable conduct" camp he's been in since May; adding such recent commentary as "Nearly every Trump ally's defense has been an effort to gaslight America." And now-retired Rep. Jeff Flake (R–Ariz.), from the much-hated temperamental center, has in this morning's Washington Post charted out a third way between those two poles, arguing that "the president's actions warrant impeachment," but that Flake still has "grave reservations" about launching those proceedings, so instead wants elected Republicans to not endorse the president's re-election because Trump is "manifestly undeserving of the highest office that we have."

So which of these libertarian-leaning legislators, current and former, has the better argument? That's the subject of this week's editors' roundtable edition of Reason Podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman and Matt Welch. Is it possible or meaningful to separate out impeachment proceedings from articles of impeachment from a Senate conviction thereof? Are there important differences between Trump's conduct and that of previous administrations? What is the role/position/rooting interest for those outside of the two corners? We talk through all of this and more, while fighting a losing battle against profanity, invoking Inception, and explaining how all art is basically a primer on management.

Audio production by Ian Keyser and Regan Taylor.

'Rocking Forward' by XTaKeRuX is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump's Civil War Tweet Is Bad. This Other Tweet May Be Unconstitutional." By Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Whether Trump Stays or Goes, We Need To Rein in Presidents and Congress," by Nick Gillespie

"Did Trump Commit a Crime by Seeking a Ukrainian Investigation of Joe Biden? And Does It Matter for Impeachment Purposes?" By Jacob Sullum

"Evidence Increasingly Indicates Trump's Ukraine Pressure Tactics Usurped Congress' Power of the Purse—and that he may have Committed a Federal Crime in the Process," by Ilya Somin

"Did the President Commit Witness Tampering?" By David Post

"Is Impeachment a 'Constitutional Duty'?" By Keith Whittington

"Trump's Ukraine Call Was an Abuse of Power—and This Time, He Can't Claim Ignorance or Inexperience," by Peter Suderman

"John Yoo Warns That Impeachment Would Undermine Presidential Power. That's the Point." By Jacob Sullum

"Whistleblower Report Alleges Trump Used Presidential Power for Personal Gain," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Congress Should Not Be Satisfied With Ukraine Call Transcript, Given the Trump White House's History of Fiddling With Records," by Eric Boehm

"Nancy Pelosi Announces Trump Impeachment Inquiry Over Ukraine Scandal," by Billy Binion

Sep 30 2019

55mins

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Are We Really Doing the Impeachment Thing Again?

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Forget mere impeachment, let's talk treason! Punishable by execution!

That's where longshot GOP presidential challenger Bill Weld found himself on Morning Joe this morning, and it's more or less where we start this week's Editors Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, which features Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch. Have we learned nothing from the past two-plus years? Is the tension between legislative-branch duty and political needs resolvable? Are either President Donald Trump or Democratic frontrunner Joe Biden even capable of not acting like jackasses, and is asking the question that way part of the problem? These are among the questions.

Also discussed: The super-terrible national rent control proposal from Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.), the lengths Mitt Romney went to as presidential candidate to never propose cutting any piece of government, and what reading 1990s issues of Seventeen can tell you about "sluts." Don't say you haven't been warned.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music credit: 'TipToes' by Myuu

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump's Bizarre Meeting With Corey Lewandowski Suggests a Consciousness of Guilt," by Jacob Sullum

"Corey Lewandowski, House Democrats Clash During Wild Trump Impeachment Prelude Hearing," by Robby Soave

"Creeping a Little Faster Toward Impeachment," by Keith Whittington

"Trump Thinks His Critics Are Traitors, and They Sling the Charge Back at Him," by Jacob Sullum

"Vice President's Son Joins Board of Directors of Ukrainian Gas Company," by Ed Krayewski

"Partisan Hackery, Supreme Court Confirmations, and the Decline of Public Trust," by Nick Gillespie

"The Idiocracy Candidate," by Matt Welch

"Consultant in Chief," by Peter Suderman

"Bernie Sanders' Housing Plan Calls for $2.5 Trillion in New Spending and Nationwide Rent Control," by Christian Britschgi

"California Passes Statewide Rent Control Despite a Massive Housing Shortage," by Christian Britschgi

"Minneapolis Doesn't Want Landlords to Check Tenants' Criminal History, Credit Score, Past Evictions," by Christian Britschgi

"New York Passed Sweeping, Progressive Rental Regulations. Now It's Getting Sued," by Christian Britschgi

"Elizabeth Warren Wants to Make Your Life More Annoying and More Expensive," by Peter Suderman

"Reviews: Ad Astra and One Cut of the Dead," by Kurt Loder

Sep 23 2019

1hr 1min

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No War for Saudi Arabia

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For your because-2019 files:

.@realDonaldTrump

Trump awaits instructions from his Saudi masters. Having our country act as Saudi Arabia's bitch is not "America First." https://t.co/kJOCpqwaQS

— Tulsi Gabbard (@TulsiGabbard) September 16, 2019

So what fresh hell is this "locked and loaded" nonsense? That's what kicks off this week's Editors Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch. The quartet also discusses highlights and lowlights from last week's Democratic presidential debate, rages against the dying of the vape, and tries to fix Katherine's bad movie-watching instincts.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music credit: 'Complicate Ya' by Otis McDonald

Relevant links from the show:

"Yemen, Iran, and the War Powers Act," by Ilya Somin

"Is the U.S. Stumbling Towards an Accidental War With Iran?" by Christian Britschgi

"War With Iran May Have Been Avoided Due to Trump's Fondness for Fox News," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Democratic Candidates Agree—Let's Get Out of Afghanistan," by Scott Shackford

"The Corruptions of Power," by Matt Welch

"Kamala Harris Does Not Understand Why the Constitution Should Get in the Way of Her Gun Control Agenda," by Jacob Sullum

"Andrew Yang Is the Anti–Elizabeth Warren," by Shikha Dalmia

"Vicious Scapegoating Is the Whole Point of Beto O'Rourke's Gun Grab," by Jacob Sullum

"On Trade, Democrats Continue Struggling To Differentiate From Trump," by Eric Boehm

"There's Only 1 Democrat Talking About the Constitution, and It's (Shudder) Joe Biden," by Matt Welch

"Banning Flavored E-Cigarettes Has Nothing to Do With the Hazards of Black-Market Cannabis Products," by Jacob Sullum

"The Ban on Flavored E-Cigarettes May Lead to More Smoking by Teenagers As Well As Adults," by Jacob Sullum

"Trump's Ban on E-Cigarette Flavors Endangers Public Health," by Jacob Sullum

"The Great Lost Rolling Stones Documentary Is Now a Museum Piece," by Kurt Loder

"Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and To Rome with Love," by Kurt Loder

Sep 16 2019

53mins

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Did Andrew Yang Win Last Night's Democratic Debate?

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Last night's Democratic debate was the first to feature all the major contenders on a single stage. They spent much of the evening sparring over health care issues before moving on to talk about gun control, the environment, immigration and more.

Despite the presence of former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.), and Sen. Kamala Harris (D–Calif.), it was tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang who made the biggest impression. Reason's Austin Bragg, Peter Suderman, and Eric Boehm talk about the evening and what it means in a special post-debate podcast.

Photo credit: Heidi Gutman/ZUMA Press/Newscom

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Sep 13 2019

32mins

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Democrats' Anti-Scientific Climate Dystopias

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Judging by last week's six-hour CNN presidential candidate town hall on climate change, the rough Democratic consensus is that we've got 12 years until DOOM—and that we should probably ban the greenhouse-gas-reducing energy technologies of nuclear power and hydraulically fractured natural gas. Nonsense on stilts, argue Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch on the latest Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast.

The gang previews this week's Democratic presidential debate, notes the tension between an increasingly crowded Republican race and the GOP's decision to call off state primaries, analyzes President Donald Trump's move to call off withdrawal talks with the Taliban, and gives the moderator an earful about his WrongThink on West Side Story.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music Credit: 'Song of Mirrors' by Unicorn Heads

Relevant links from the show:

"Four Memorable Moments from CNN's Climate Town Hall," by Nick Gillespie

"Dems to Talk for 6 (!) Hours About Climate Change on CNN Tonight," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Despite What Democrats Said at Their Debate, We're Not Heading Toward Climate Apocalypse," by Ronald Bailey

"Democrats Debate To Determine Who Will Spend Us Into Oblivion," by Steven Greenhut

"Warren Wants 'Big, Structural Change' That Goes Beyond Anything Previous Democratic Administrations Have Proposed," by Ira Stoll

"Kamala Harris Is a Cop Who Wants To Be President," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Biden's Age Matters, Even if Democrats Want To Ignore It," by Ira Stoll

"Former S.C. Congressman Mark Sanford Launches Longshot Primary Bid One Day After GOP Cancels S.C. Primary," by Eric Boehm

"The GOP Deals With Trump Competition by Canceling Elections," by Matt Welch

"Joe Walsh Isn't Running on the Issues," by Billy Binion

"Mark Sanford Gives Himself Two Weeks to Decide if He Wants to Be Trump Roadkill," by Matt Welch

"Bill Weld Raises a Pathetic $688,000 in Second Quarter," by Matt Welch

"Trump Caves to Lindsey Graham; U.S. Troops To Stay the Neverending Course in Afghanistan," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

Sep 09 2019

59mins

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Will Democrats Really Grab Your Guns?

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As has been the case with the Trump administration after a mass shooting event, the president and key legislative leaders are discussing in the wake of Saturday's Odessa, Texas, shoot-out a series of possible measures, including expediting the death penalty. As is also the case during a long presidential primary season, Democratic candidates are one-upping one another with gun-control proposals, with Texan Beto O'Rourke and Sen. Kamala Harris (D–Calif.) both suggesting "mandatory buy-backs" of "weapons of war." So what will and should actually be done?

So kicks off a lively discussion on the latest Editors Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, feauring Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman and Matt Welch. Other topics include: Reflections on back-to-school week and the state of education policy/politics, ideas from both the Trump administration and the Democratic presidential field about getting U.S. troops the hell out of Afghanistan, plus the latest social-commentary comedy from Dave Chappelle

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Scapes' by Steve Combs is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Should It Be Easier to Put Mass Shooters to Death? Trump's Justice Department Thinks So," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Texas Is Executing a Man Tonight for a Murder and Rape Experts Say He Didn't Commit," by Zuri Davis

"March For Our Lives Calls for Confiscating Guns, Investigating the NRA, and 'Reforming' the Supreme Court," by Christian Britschgi

"How to Create a Gun-Free America in 5 Easy Steps," by Austin Bragg

"New York's New 'Red Flag' Law Illustrates the Due Process Problems Posed by Gun Confiscation Orders," by Jacob Sullum

"Do These 21 Mass Shootings That Did Not Happen Show the Benefits of California's 'Red Flag' Law?" by Jacob Sullum

"James Alan Fox: There Is No Evidence of an 'Epidemic of Mass Shootings,'" by Nick Gillespie

"For Many Pro-Gun Republicans, Gun Ownership Is Skin Deep," by Zuri Davis

"Trump Caves to Lindsey Graham; U.S. Troops To Stay the Neverending Course in Afghanistan," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Trump Just Can't Quit Afghanistan," by Matt Welch

"Americans Voice Growing Support for School Choice," by J.D. Tuccille

"De Blasio Advisory Group Wants To Abolish Gifted Classes in NYC Public Schools," by Matt Welch

"Ten Years After Katrina, New Orleans Charter Schools Have Made Real Improvements," by Savannah Robinson

"Watch Dave Chappelle Eviscerate Cancel Culture," by Robby Soave

Sep 03 2019

1hr 1min

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Can #NeverTrump GOP Presidential Wannabe Joe Walsh Run on Deficit Reduction and Win?

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One-term Tea Party congressman and current political talk show host Joe Walsh announced Monday that he will challenge President Donald Trump in the Republican primaries. The policy component of Walsh's pitch is about debt, deficits, and tariffs, though the main thrust is about Trump's deficient character and fitness. So, uh, about that.

Let's hope that when the Islamists next strike they first behead the appeasing cowards at CNN, MSNBC, etal who refused to show the cartoons.

— Joe Walsh (@WalshFreedom) January 14, 2015

Well, now Walsh confesses that "I said some ugly things about President Obama that I regret," and that "I think that helped create Trump." Can a reformed blowhard make a dent in the unreformed fella sitting in the Oval Office? So begins today's Editors Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, feauring Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman and Matt Welch.

The gang also discusses the rest of the #NeverTrump primary field, the president's latest trade bleatings, the chaotic G7 meeting in France, the Amazon forest fires, the passing of David Koch, and plenty besides.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Relevant links from the show:

"The 2020 Race Is Completely Unpredictable Because Politicians Are Awful," by Nick Gillespie

"Mark Sanford Gives Himself Two Weeks to Decide if He Wants to Be Trump Roadkill," by Matt Welch

"Bill Weld Raises a Pathetic $688,000 in Second Quarter," by Matt Welch

"Donald Trump, Scaredy-Cat," by Matt Welch

"Don't Be Fooled by Polls Showing GOP Interest in Challenging Trump," by Matt Welch

"Trump Announces Higher Tariffs. At Least He Called Them 'Taxes.'" By Eric Boehm

"As Trade War Escalates, Trump Has Impotently 'Ordered' American Businesses Out of China," by Eric Boehm

"The Trade War Is Going So Well That Trump Might Bail Out Apple," by Eric Boehm

"Don't Panic: Amazon Burning Is Mostly Farms, Not Forests," by Ronald Bailey

"Elizabeth Warren's Plans Don't Add Up," by Peter Suderman

"David Koch, R.I.P.," by Brian Doherty

"The Libertarian Life and Legacy of David Koch," by Nick Gillespie

"Media Notices Bernie's Nonsense Conspiracies When They're About Media," by Matt Welch

"Charles Koch, George Soros Help Fund Think Tank Opposed To 'Endless War,'" by Nick Gillespie

Aug 26 2019

52mins

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Interesting New York Times Slavery Project Hobbled by Anti-Capitalism

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It has been a helluva weekend for national conversations about race. There was the Proud Boys vs. Antifa street theater in Portland. There was a campaign-pivoting Beto O'Rourke declaring that "Our country was founded on racism—and is still racist today." There was Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.), in the midst of unveiling a sweeping new criminal justice plan, offering this vow: "We will go to war against white nationalism and racism in every aspect of our lives." And as always, there was a Trump tweet.

The Failing New York Times, in one of the most devastating portrayals of bad journalism in history, got caught by a leaker that they are shifting from their Phony Russian Collusion Narrative (the Mueller Report & his testimony were a total disaster), to a Racism Witch Hunt…..

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 18, 2019

What was the president referring to? Perhaps the Paper of Record's sweeping and controversial new 1619 Project, which aims "to reframe American history, making explicit how slavery is the foundation on which this country is built." In the back half of today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch offer a mixed preliminary verdict about the package, praising its ambition, agreeing with the importance of the topic, and disagreeing strenuously with its King Cottonesque take on capitalism.

Other items that come up for discussion: the potential impending global recession and its perceived culprits, where Democrats are at on trade, how ancient aliens did the prehistoric cave-paintings, and which podcaster has two thumbs and watched the key-changingest Ron Paul supporter this weekend (hint: this guy!!!).

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Railroad's Whiskey Co' by Jahzzar is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Slavery Did Not Make America Rich," by Deirdre McCloskey

"White Supremacy Is Alien to Liberal and Libertarian Ideals," by J.D. Tuccille

"White Identity Politics, Not Trump's Racist Tweets, Is National Conservatism's Real Problem," by Steven Greenhut

"Libertarianism, the Anti-Slavery Movement, and Black History Month," by Damon Root

"Classical Liberalism and the Fight for Equal Rights," by Damon Root

"Proud Boys and Antifa Playact Protest in Portland," by Nancy Rommelmann

"Beto's Reboot: So You're Saying There's Still a Chance?" by Matt Welch

"Bernie Sanders Introduces Bill to Eliminate Cash Bail," by Scott Shackford

"Sanders Suddenly Becomes Pot-Friendliest Major-Party Candidate," by Jacob Sullum

"Bernie Sanders Calls for 'Automatic' Federal Investigations of Deaths in Police Custody," by Anthony Fisher

"Why Bernie Sanders Is Wrong About Private Prisons," by Leonard Gilroy and Adrian Moore

"Beto vs. Warren Is the Trade Policy Debate Democrats Need To Have," by Eric Boehm

"Biden Is Turning Trump's Trade War Into a Major Campaign Issue. More Democrats Should Follow His Lead," by Eric Boehm

"Elizabeth Warren Wants to Make Your Life More Annoying and More Expensive," by Peter Suderman

"Is Deregulation to Blame?" by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Is Barry Manilow a Closet Libertarian? (He Gave $2,300 to Ron Paul's Campaign)," by Nick Gillespie

Aug 19 2019

1hr 11mins

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Should You Boycott Your $42 SoulCycle Bike Ride To Stick It to Trump?

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Is absolutely everything politics now?

Anti-Trumpers are boycotting pricey stationary bike rides at Equinox-owned SoulCycle after major Equinox investor Steven Ross held a fundraiser for Donald Trump. "Steve Ross got into a little bit of trouble this week," Trump joked. "I said, 'Steve welcome to the world of politics!'"

Regular Reason podcasters Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Nick Gillepsie are joined by Elizabeth Nolan Brown to discuss the morality of boycotts and campaign finance disclosure laws, plus conspiracy theories, sex trafficking, political photo ops gone awry, and much more.

The hashtags #ClintonBodyCount and #TrumpBodyCount were both trending after disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein committed suicide in jail on Saturday, and both sides claimed victory in a large immigration raid on a Mississippi meat processing plant that rounded up more than 600 alleged illegal immigrants and left their children weeping in the streets after their first day of school.

As usual, the podcasters make recommendations for stuff to read, watch, and listen to, plus Mangu-Ward asks whether she should take a mysterious red pill with an "X" on it that she found on her desk this morning.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Songe D'Automne' by Latche' Swing is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 FR

Aug 12 2019

1hr 4mins

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How Libertarians Should Respond to Mass Shootings

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A pair of horrific mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, this weekend left at least 30 people dead. Politicians are jockeying to place the blame on everything from immigrants to guns to the news media. 

The Media has a big responsibility to life and safety in our Country. Fake News has contributed greatly to the anger and rage that has built up over many years. News coverage has got to start being fair, balanced and unbiased, or these terrible problems will only get worse!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 5, 2019

What should politicians do when these awful events when they occur? Why have mass shootings increasingly led to people raising First Amendment issues as well as Second Amendment questions? And how do libertarians react to both the events themselves and the misguided policy responses that inevitably result?

On the latest Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, Peter Suderman, Nick Gillespie, and Katherine Mangu-Ward are joined by special guest Eric Boehm to discuss all of these questions, as well as last week's Democratic presidential debates, the no-good-very-bad budget deal, and the latest front in the trade war. Plus: a special China-focused recommendations segment, featuring Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw, The Farewell, The Three-Body Problem, and more from the Bobiverse. 

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Ghosts I, 02' by Nine Inch Nails is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0

Aug 05 2019

57mins

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