OwlTail

Cover image of The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief

A weekly round-up of top business and financial news from China's leading financial magazine, Caixin, produced and hosted by the Sinica Podcast's Kaiser Kuo, featuring full stories from Caixin and conversations with Caixin writers and editors.

Popular episodes

All episodes

The best episodes ranked using user listens.

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 60

Welcome to the 60th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We note that smartphone maker Xiaomi’s Hong Kong-listed shares fell last week, despite revealing in its first earnings report since its July listing that it had made a profit in the second quarter. We discuss the downfall of Chinese celebrity monk Shi Xuecheng 释学诚, who has resigned after two former colleagues accused him of sexually harassing female disciples. We learn that China’s decades-old hukou household registration system effectively shortens migrant workers’ careers by 15 years, according to a prominent legislator. We hear that LinkedIn’s Chinese competitor Maimai just closed a new $200 million fundraising round, putting it in so-called “unicorn” status — a startup with a valuation of at least $1 billion. We find out that a group of Chinese companies stole up to billions of pieces of user data from 96 tech companies — including from e-commerce giant Alibaba — in the country’s latest case of privacy violation. We analyze a new report suggesting that China’s online population surpassed 800 million this summer, with the number of people using the internet to manage their finances or hail rides expanding particularly quickly. In addition, we introduce a new segment called “Five Things.” This week, we chat about five things that you should know about next month’s sixth forum on China-Africa Cooperation, or FOCAC, in Beijing, where delegates from dozens of African countries are expected to meet Chinese officials. Finally, we talk with Coco Feng, business reporter for Caixin Global, about Australia banning Huawei and ZTE, China's leading telecommunications companies, from providing equipment for its 5G network and lotteries in China. We also chat with Doug Young, managing editor of Caixin Global, about Chinese tech giant Tencent’s abrupt removal of its highly anticipated game Monster Hunter: World from its WeGame digital game marketplace only days after it was released. We’d love to hear your feedback on this product. Please send any comments and suggestions to sinica@supchina.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

18mins

27 Aug 2018

Rank #1

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 75

Welcome to the 75th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We note that Yang Hengjun 楊恒均, an outspoken writer and former Chinese official who has been an Australian citizen for nearly 20 years, has been detained in Beijing for more than a week. We report that growth in China’s personal-consumption spending bounced back last year, as authorities stepped up efforts to encourage consumers to open their wallets. We hear that eight regions in China, including Beijing, are predicting slower economic growth this year, in the latest sign of a worsening economic outlook for the world’s second-largest economy. We learn the news that two Chinese farms housing tens of thousands of pigs have been blamed for mismanaging and attempting to conceal African swine fever cases. We discuss Beijing’s decision to name 10 of its largest state-owned firms “World Class Enterprises,” a designation that means the government will likely focus resources on them to make them more competitive at home and abroad. We analyze the rebranding of Chinese bike-rental company Mobike after it was bought by internet giant Meituan Dianping. We take a close look at the deal between Alibaba’s film unit and Huayi Brothers, one of China’s leading independent studios, which is the latest of a growing string of high-profile tie-ups as it tries to claw its way back to profitability. We dive into a recent study that reveals what the average Chinese person does every day. In addition, we talk with Doug Young, the managing editor of Caixin Global, about China's rapid growth in the retail industry. We also chat with Charlotte Yang, a reporter with Caixin Global, about zombie companies in China.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

28 Jan 2019

Rank #2

Similar Podcasts

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 64

Welcome to the 64th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We note that China stocks went for a wild ride last week, with the benchmark index hitting it lowest level in years Monday, then rebounding with its best weekly performance since 2016. We discuss how Nur Bekri (努尔·白克力), director of the National Energy Administration and a vice chairman of the country’s economic planning agency, was placed under investigation for suspected corruption. We hear that China canceled plans over the weekend to hold trade talks with the U.S. We learn that the Executives of Bank of China’s Guangdong branch may soon take a pay cut to compensate lower-income employees. We find out that Jack Ma said there is “no way” Alibaba will be able to meet an earlier pledge to create 1 million U.S. jobs due to deteriorating U.S.-China trade relations. We explore how China plans to ban foreign TV shows in prime time and to limit overseas content on streaming platforms. We report that China’s top film regulator has signaled it will ban companies from subsidizing online movie-ticket sales. We learn that China’s tobacco sales returned to near-record highs three years after a significant hike in tobacco taxes in the world’s largest producer and consumer of cigarettes. In addition, we talk with Caixin Global reporter David Kirton about the World Economic Forum in Tianjin, in particular how Premier Li Keqiang talked about the Belt and Road initiative at the forum. We’d love to hear your feedback on this product. Please send any comments and suggestions to sinica@supchina.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

12mins

24 Sep 2018

Rank #3

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 107

This week on the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: The groundwork is laid between Chinese and U.S. trade negotiators on a deal, Huawei wins a major stake in Germany’s 5G network, and car sales in China sputter, down 5.4 percent in November from a year earlier.In addition, we speak with Doug Young, Caixin Global’s managing editor, about Ucommune and its plans to IPO on the New York Stock Exchange.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

15mins

16 Dec 2019

Rank #4

Most Popular Podcasts

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 89

Welcome to the 89th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We note that Wal-Mart, Target, Macy’s, and hundreds of other companies and associations made a plea to President Donald Trump not to impose additional tariffs on Chinese goods, and to return to the negotiating table to strike a trade deal with Beijing. We discuss whether China’s baby-formula makers will ever overcome the melamine contamination scandal that killed six infants in 2008. We hear that the Hong Kong Stock Exchange will eliminate any “vermin” among its ranks, chief executive Charles Li has told reporters, referring to recent reports of internal corruption on the bourse. We find out that China’s credit reporting system now has data on nearly 1 billion citizens as well as 26 million businesses and other types of entities. We report how Didi is back on regulators’ watch lists again after a driver for the ride-hailing company hit four people in Shanghai last week, seriously injuring one, while rushing to avoid inspectors. We analyze a new report from BMW, which shows a 33 percent sales jump in China during May after a shift to local production of its X3 sport utility vehicle boosted deliveries, defying a yearlong pullback in the world’s largest auto market. In addition, we talk with Doug Young, managing editor of Caixin Global, about Chinese ecommerce juggernaut Alibaba and its proposed listing on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

17 Jun 2019

Rank #5

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 76

Welcome to the 76th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We discuss the seemingly never-ending trade talks between China and the U.S., which made what both sides called progress last week in Beijing. We report that China’s trade surplus more than doubled in January, driven by stronger exports, as businesses rushed to fill orders before the Lunar New Year holiday at the beginning of February. We learn the news that Lai Xiaomin 赖小民, the former chairman of China Huarong, one of the nation’s four largest distressed-asset managers, has been formally charged with corruption and bribery. We hear about the death of Yu Min 于敏, one of the major contributors to the development of China’s hydrogen bomb. We note that China's ride-hailing leader, Didi Chuxing, announced mass layoffs in a meeting at the company’s Beijing headquarters on Friday morning. We take a close look at Huawei, a telecom equipment maker that has been embroiled in several scandals lately. We analyze Hong Kong’s push to stop the rising trafficking of endangered species through its territory. In addition, we talk with Doug Young, the managing editor of Caixin Global, about the wine scene in China. We also chat with David Kirton, a reporter with Caixin Global, about China’s major audit of companies in the country’s opaque power grid.  See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

17mins

18 Feb 2019

Rank #6

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 103

This week, on episode 103 of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: Beijing’s former vice mayor pleads guilty to taking $19 million in bribes, Alibaba inches toward a second IPO in Hong Kong, and an update on the tepid and tentative trade agreement being hashed out between Beijing and Washington. In addition, we talk with Caixin-Global managing editor Doug Young on the travails of Didi’s carpooling service, Hitch.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

11 Nov 2019

Rank #7

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 102

This week on episode 101 of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: China rolls out 5G service, Switzerland gives Huawei the green light, and Alibaba eyes a second IPO after a glowing earnings report. In addition, we talk with Tanner Brown, head of breaking news at Caixin Global about the findings of a climate change report and the potentially catastrophic effects on southeastern China. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

13mins

4 Nov 2019

Rank #8

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 101

This week on episode 101 of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: sluggish third-quarter GDP growth in China, African swine fever ravages the domestic pork supply in China, and with the help of a Tencent-backed company, Star Wars novels will be translated into Chinese for mainland audiences. In addition, we talk with Caixin Global managing editor Doug Young about the rising concerns in Congress surrounding TikTok and censorship on the platform. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

21 Oct 2019

Rank #9

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 66

Welcome to the 66th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We find out that China’s economy grew at its slowest pace in nearly a decade in the third quarter, as top officials sent a slew of rarely seen coordinated messages to stem a stock-market sell-off driven by worries over a deepening trade war with the U.S. and weakening domestic activity. We note that Science and Technology Daily, the official newspaper of China’s Ministry of Science and Technology, called an interview published in a Heilongjiang Province newspaper “seriously misleading” because of the interviewee’s opposition to genetically modified organisms. We hear that banking giant HSBC could become the first foreign company to list its shares in China under an initiative to link the London and Shanghai stock exchanges, giving the 153-year-old lender an opportunity to return to its roots. We learn that JD.com will launch a flagship online store on Google’s shopping platforms to sell directly to American consumers by the end of the year, hoping to carve out a bigger U.S. footprint even as trade tensions between the U.S. and China grow. We discuss a Beijing couple’s discovery of a hidden camera in an apartment leased from rental agency Ziroom, which has prompted public anger at a time of widespread anxiety over skyrocketing urban rents and poor protection of tenants’ rights. We report that China’s soccer authority is considering caps on investment, player salaries, and transfer fees for the soccer season beginning in 2019. We analyze a flurry of corruption-related developments in Chinese banks. In addition, we talk with David Kirton, reporter for Caixin Global, about why Beijing’s recent embrace of “competitive neutrality” may not be enough to ease the concerns of G-20 countries that SOEs aren’t playing fair. We also chat with Doug Young, managing editor at Caixin Global, about a few stories this week on energy in China. We’d love to hear your feedback on this product. Please send any comments and suggestions to sinica@supchina.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

19mins

22 Oct 2018

Rank #10

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 100

On this 100th episode of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: The trade deal that will pause the U.S.-China trade war, the Hong Kong protests and the NBA, the backlash against Blizzard Entertainment, and more. In addition, we talk with Caixin Global managing editor Doug Young on Apple’s pulling of the app HKmap.live and the fallout of a tweet supporting Hong Kong sent by Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

15mins

14 Oct 2019

Rank #11

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 83

Welcome to the 84th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We discuss new data that shows China’s economic growth stabilized in the first quarter of 2019, as market confidence recovered on the back of policy support and progress in Sino-U.S. trade war negotiations. We analyze a recent report that says China's stimulus measures may increase corporate debt and reverse progress made in deleveraging the economy. We hear that despite a stimulus cooling, China is still considering new subsidies to encourage household purchases of home appliances as part of a policy package designed to expand domestic consumption. We report that China’s pension system is expected to run dry well before that generation retires in 2035. We note that more details have emerged in the new civil lawsuit brought against Chinese billionaire Richard Liu by the woman who accused him of rape last year. We learn that Lei Jun 雷军, the CEO of phone and home-electronics maker Xiaomi, may have received compensation worth over 330 times of that handed to Tencent’s head last year. In addition, we talk with Jing Xuan Teng, reporter for Caixin Global, about the child modeling industry in China. We also chat with Doug Young, managing editor of Caixin Global, about the ecommerce titan Amazon, one of the world’s biggest companies, and what’s going on with it in China.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

22 Apr 2019

Rank #12

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 80

Welcome to the 80th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We report that China’s local governments are short on funds this year. To plug gaps in their budgets, local governments are looking at different solutions, including tapping rainy day funds and leftover budget surpluses, as well as slashing spending on travel, official banquets, and even some proposed social welfare programs. We discuss the new Foreign Investment Law passed by China, which is designed to improve the openness, transparency, and predictability of the investment environment for foreigners, establish equal treatment for all investors, and address concerns of foreign investors around technology transfers — a focal point of trade tensions with the U.S. We note that Vietnam has benefited as multinationals have accelerated moving their production out of China amid the trade war with the U.S. We hear the news that China became a net importer of several rare earth elements last year for the first time since 1985 — a trend that may continue as the government reduces mining. We chat about a new food safety scandal at a private school in Chengdu, which has dropped its food supplier in response to students’ complaints about spoiled cafeteria food. We learn that the World Anti-Doping Agency is reopening a case that cleared Chinese swimmer Sun Yang 孙杨, a three-time Olympic champion, of wrongdoing after he destroyed a doping control sample in September. We analyze some controversial remarks by a spokesman for the National Bureau of Statistics, who said that the revision of China’s economic growth data for 2017 was not a move calculated to make China’s 2018 growth data look better. We find out that increasing demand and uncertain supply may imperil the source of the water that Beijing receives from the south of the country. In addition, we talk with Caixin Global reporter Zhao Runhua about a Chinese television show that’s sparked a lot of conversation online about social issues.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

17mins

18 Mar 2019

Rank #13

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 88

Welcome to the 88th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We note that China struck back this week in the trade war with the U.S., releasing a white paper outlining its stance and taking several moves against American entities. We explain why we expected China’s manufacturing to slip into contraction in May, but things were worse than anticipated, as export orders fell sharply amid continuing U.S.-China trade war pressures. We analyze Ma Chaoqun 马超群, a former deputy Party secretary at a state-owned water company in the resort city of Qinhuangdao, who has been accused of accepting bribes worth over $14 million. We hear that cheaper Tesla cars set to hit the Chinese market soon could lure price-sensitive buyers away from budget-friendly domestic brands, but local electric-vehicle makers Nio and Xpeng say they aren’t fazed by the change. We report that China’s rapidly growing short-video industry is threatening to overtake its long-video peer due to its social-media friendliness and the vast number of Chinese mobile users. We find out that shares in companies that make electronic tolling systems — which allow cars to whiz past unmanned tollbooths without stopping — have begun soaring. In addition, we talk with David Kirton, reporter for Caixin Global, about Chinese rare earth elements. We also chat with Doug Young, managing editor of Caixin Global in Beijing, about a Hong Kong restaurant that’s in the news.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

3 Jun 2019

Rank #14

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 82

Welcome to the 82nd installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We discuss some vague progress in the seemingly never-ending U.S.-China trade war. At the Boao Forum for Asia, Premier Li Keqiang 李克强 said the trade frictions between the two countries shouldn’t even be called a war, stating, “The purpose of trade is to avoid war. If you were doing business with a knife, then it wouldn’t be business anymore.” We chat about a recent report from a U.K. watchdog, which said that further issues have been identified in Huawei’s engineering processes that pose additional risks to Britain’s telecom networks. We analyze a new report from Huawei, which released data for its performance last year. It hit a sales record of $100 billion in 2018, up 20 percent year-on-year, with net profit climbing 25 percent. We hear the news that top Chinese liquor brand Kweichow Moutai’s Shanghai-listed stocks closed at a record high of $128 last Friday as the company reported strong profit growth in its 2018 earnings report. We report that China will issue 5G wireless communications licenses by year-end as the country pushes aggressively into the cutting-edge technology that could power everything from self-driving cars to telemedicine. We learn that JPMorgan Chase and Nomura Holding won approval to set up new securities joint ventures in China with majority foreign ownership as regulators followed through on a promise to open up the country’s financial markets. We note that shares of Chinese companies linked to growing cannabis plunged last week after several firms were asked to disclose progress on industrial cannabis projects. In addition, we talk with Caixin managing editor Doug Young about the IPO of a Chinese online education company and a string of recent news in the auto industry in China.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

15mins

1 Apr 2019

Rank #15

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 85

Welcome to the 85th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We hear that China Unicom has become the first Chinese carrier to offer 5G wireless telecom services to the public in selected cities, putting China among the global frontrunners in rolling out the super-fast mobile technology. We discuss China’s securities regulators’ plan to ease profit requirements and speed up the review process for IPOs. We analyze a new report that says Chinese consumers are increasingly willing to pay for quality content online, including music and video. We note that profits have tumbled by three quarters at a pair of suppliers to China’s top two bike-sharing operators. We learn that the fast-growing but little-known chain Coffee Box 连咖啡 has received $31 million in new funding — jointly raised by its founders and local VC firms Qiming 启明 Venture Partners and Gaorong 高榕 Capital. In addition, we talk with Fran Wang, economics reporter for Caixin Global, about the outbreak of swine fever in China. We also chat with Doug Young, managing editor of Caixin Global, about China-based private coffee chain Luckin Coffee, which has filed to raise $100 million in a U.S. IPO.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

15mins

1 May 2019

Rank #16

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 83

Welcome to the 83rd installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We note that U.S.-China trade talks are trickling along with few public disclosures. Meanwhile, there is no big movement on Huawei’s house-arrested Meng Wanzhou or the detained Canadian citizens. And Trump keeps tweeting about how much he cherishes Kim Jong-un, but we’ve yet to see real progress there. We discuss the relaxation of hukou rules. Under new regulations, all restrictions for household registration are eliminated in cities with an urban population of 1 million to 3 million. We hear the news that Hong Kong again topped this year’s most expensive housing market list, in a ranking done by U.S. real estate services and investment company CBRE Group. We analyze Didi’s valuation, which hit the skids when the company came under pressure as a growing number of its partners, many of them car makers, set up rival ride-sharing services. We report that the website of Visual China Group, a partner of Getty Images, has been down since Friday after it made a copyright claim to the world’s first photograph of a black hole. We chat about a libel case filed by developer SOHO China, which accused a WeChat blogger of raising false claims about its building’s feng shui. We learn that prompted by so much official corruption in China, an underground industry has emerged in which chiefs target officials, who cannot report the crimes to authorities, because the officials themselves have gotten the items illicitly. In addition, we talk with Caixin managing editor Doug Young about some IPO news from China.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

15 Apr 2019

Rank #17

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 62

Welcome to the 62nd installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We discuss how China said it will control the total number of online games and new titles in operation, explore establishing an age-reminder system, and take measures to restrict the amount of time that minors spend on the games. We note that top plastic surgery app, SoYoung, has emerged as the country’s latest billion-dollar startup. We hear that the number of crimes committed in Chinese schools has officially seen a two-year decline, but experts say the problem continues to be serious. We find out that Japanese automaker Suzuki announced that it is bowing out of the race for the Chinese market as its more-compact car models are increasing being left in the dust by hulking domestic rivals. We analyze the controversy caused by a mandatory-to-watch educational show produced by the Ministry of Education and state broadcaster CCTV. We chat about the most bizarre thing to possibly ever happen at a kindergarten: the principal pole-dancing in a midriff-baring outfit.  In addition, we talk with Fran Wang, Economics Reporter with Caixin Global, about Chinese stocks' downward trend. We also chat with Doug Young, managing editor of Caixin Global, about the sexual misconduct allegations against Richard Liu, and the impact of those accusations on his company, JD.com. We’d love to hear your feedback on this product. Please send any comments and suggestions to sinica@supchina.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

18mins

10 Sep 2018

Rank #18

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 86

Welcome to the 86th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We discuss how the U.S.-China trade war is dragging on after Trump raised tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods. We hear that investors have shown greater-than-expected interest in China’s Starbucks challenger Luckin Coffee, oversubscribing the company’s U.S. IPO several-fold. We learn that Netflix is acquiring the rights to another show from Alibaba’s Youku video service, increasing efforts to serve Chinese viewers around the world. We analyze the shutdown of the Melbourne office of China’s second-largest online seller, JD.com, as it has come under growing pressure to show investors it can be profitable. We note that China is beefing up control of the deadly pig contagion ravaging its mammoth pork industry, ordering mandatory testing for African swine fever at more than 10,000 slaughterhouses nationwide. We learn the news that China’s rural migrant worker population grew at a decade-long low last year. We chat about the removal of Chinese liquor-maker Moutai’s chairman from his post, with a source saying that the dismissal may have been related to him abusing his power and manipulating the market. In addition, we talk with Tanner Brown, co-producer of this podcast and head of real-time news at Caixin Global, about a case of corruption.  See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

14mins

13 May 2019

Rank #19

Podcast cover

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 87

Welcome to the 87th installment of the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, a weekly podcast that brings you the most important business stories of the week from China’s top source for business and financial news. Produced by Kaiser Kuo of our Sinica Podcast, it features a business news roundup, plus conversations with Caixin reporters and editors. This week: We analyze the latest updates on the U.S.-China trade war. We chat about a new study that has estimated the economic cost of air pollution in China’s smoggy northeast. We hear that a think tank suggested Beijing steer Chinese cities toward clean air by banning the sale of new fossil-fuel-powered vehicles by 2030. We note that China and Japan are making it easier for investors to put money into each other’s stock markets through so-called exchange-traded funds (ETFs), with the two countries approving six such funds. We learn the news that a massive graft network surrounding the former Party chief of Shaanxi Province surfaced as investigations took aim at more family members and associates of the disgraced official. We discuss the arrest of Yuan Renguo 袁仁国, who was the former chairman of Kweichow Moutai, the world’s most valuable liquor maker. We find out that Baihang 百行 Credit Scoring, a central bank credit bureau, has been struggling in its first year to collect the quality data that it needs to meet China’s goal of revamping its patchy credit-reporting system. We report that Chinese smartphone and appliance maker Xiaomi has fired a vice president for “obscene” behavior. In addition, we talk with Doug Young, managing editor of Caixin Global, about what’s going on with Baidu and the tough times it’s going through. We also chat about Luckin Coffee, the ambitious Chinese coffee chain that's going after Starbucks and went public on Nasdaq this month.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

18mins

28 May 2019

Rank #20