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Rank #136 in History category

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History

Military History Podcast

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #136 in History category

Education
History
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Bringing you the strangest anecdotes, innovative technology, and most significant events in Military History.

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Bringing you the strangest anecdotes, innovative technology, and most significant events in Military History.

iTunes Ratings

155 Ratings
Average Ratings
63
20
20
27
25

Good intentions, poor execution

By LuckeeD0g - Oct 20 2019
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The hallmark of any good podcast is being able to hold the listener’s attention, and especially for history podcasts, factual accuracy. This podcast needs more work in both areas. The speaking style is stiff, monotone, and halting. A more conversational approach would really help.

Wish u still podcasted!!

By johnsce - Sep 12 2012
Read more
Man you must be done with college now!!! How about some new podcasts

iTunes Ratings

155 Ratings
Average Ratings
63
20
20
27
25

Good intentions, poor execution

By LuckeeD0g - Oct 20 2019
Read more
The hallmark of any good podcast is being able to hold the listener’s attention, and especially for history podcasts, factual accuracy. This podcast needs more work in both areas. The speaking style is stiff, monotone, and halting. A more conversational approach would really help.

Wish u still podcasted!!

By johnsce - Sep 12 2012
Read more
Man you must be done with college now!!! How about some new podcasts
Cover image of Military History Podcast

Military History Podcast

Latest release on May 04, 2009

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Bringing you the strangest anecdotes, innovative technology, and most significant events in Military History.

Rank #1: The Fight for Iwo Jima

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The Battle for Iwo Jima, "sulfur island" of the Pacific, was a battle between the elite US marines and the stout-hearted Japanese defenders. The Japanese, after years of preparation, had created an extensive tunnel network that prevented them from being hurt by the naval bombardment.

Consequently, when the Fifth Amphibious Corps (VAC) landed, they had to fight 22,000 well-entrenched Japanese, complete with banzai charges and other intimidating tactics. In the end, the US death toll was 10% and the Japanese death toll was 99% (with the other 1% being captured).

For more information:
Military History Magazine (February 2003): Marine Private's Iwo Jima Memories
The Pacific War Companion by Daniel Marston

Nov 26 2005

11mins

Play

Rank #2: Sniper Warfare

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Throughout modern history, snipers have had a prominent role as the forward observers and marksmen of any army. They are trained to camouflage themselves, shoot a high-ranking enemy soldier, and extract themselves from the area without the enemy ever knowing they were there.

Snipers have a unique mindset in that they are highly solitary, must stay in the same position for hours, and must be able to kill an enemy without even giving them a chance. For these reasons, snipers have earned their fair share of medals and recognition.

Oct 30 2005

11mins

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Rank #3: Napoleon (Birth-Major General)

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This episode features an overview of the French Revolution, followed by Napoleon's teenage years as a member of the Brienne Military College and the Ecole Militaire Elite School in France. After his school years, Napoleon became a captain but soon became a general after he reclaimed the French city of Toulon and saved the government from 30,000 armed insurrectionists. For more information, read:

Military History Magazine (February 2002): Napoleon’s Haitian Guerilla War Military History Magazine (August 1999): Final French Triumph in Egypt Military History Magazine (December 2005): Austerlitz Military History Magazine (October 2005): Nelson at Trafalgar Armchair General Magazine (July 2005) The Oxford Book of Military Anecdotes by Max Hastings Extreme War by Terrence Poulos The Guinness Book of Military Blunders by Geoffrey Regan Dictionary of Battles by David Chandler World Book (1992): Napoleon

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Aug 20 2006

11mins

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Rank #4: Hannibal is at the Gates

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Hannibal Barca, commander-in-chief of Carthage during the Second Punic War, is famous for crossing the Alps with his entire army (which included War Elephants) in an attempt to invade Rome from the north. He also displayed military genius countless times by outsmarting and slaughtering the greatest soldiers in the world, the Roman legions, at the Battles of Cannae, Trebbia, and Ticino.

Later in the Second Punic War, Hannibal was recalled back to Carthage where he fought the Battle of Zama against Scipio of the Romans. Although he lost the battle and ended his life in shame, Hannibal was still respected in the Roman World (hence the phrase "Hannibal is at the Gates", which was used by mothers as a threat against misbehaving children).

Oct 04 2005

13mins

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Rank #5: 11 Unique Warriors

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Throughout history, there have been dozens of unique warriors that have each contributed something new to military history. This episode of Military History Podcast concisely profiles 11 of these unique warriors and explains what made them superior.

Samurai, Ninjas, Peltasts, Hoplites, Praetorian Guards, War Elephants, Mongol Mangudai, Chariots, Cataphracts, Berserkers, and Amazons are all featured in this episode. If you can think of any unique warriors that you would like to know more about, email me at geo47@graffiti.net

military history military history

Oct 14 2005

13mins

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Rank #6: Napoleon (Major General-First Consul)

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Napoleon's tactics and innovations (described in detail in this episode), allowed him to rule Europe for several years. This can be seen in his victorious Italian Campaign (against the First Coalition), as well as his victories in Egypt at the Pyramids and at Aboukir Peninsula. After these two great victories, Napoleon returned to France and participated in a coup which formed a consulate government with himself as the First Consul (the most powerful man in France). For more information, read:

Military History Magazine (February 2002): Napoleon’s Haitian Guerilla War Military History Magazine (August 1999): Final French Triumph in Egypt Military History Magazine (December 2005): Austerlitz Military History Magazine (October 2005): Nelson at Trafalgar Armchair General Magazine (July 2005) The Oxford Book of Military Anecdotes by Max Hastings Extreme War by Terrence Poulos The Guinness Book of Military Blunders by Geoffrey Regan Dictionary of Battles by David Chandler World Book (1992): Napoleon

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Aug 27 2006

18mins

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Rank #7: Valor in the Ancient World

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Today, awards like the Medal of Honor are presented to warriors who display valor on the battlefield. However, thousands of years ago in the Ancient World, there were no official medals. In no way does this mean that there was a shortage of valor. Far from it.

* Leonidas I of Sparta, for example, led 300 Spartans against 10,000 Persians and managed to hold them off for days.
* Mucius Scaevola saved the city of Rome via burning off his own hand
* Horatius Cocles held the entire Etruscan army at Sublican bridge

Sep 27 2005

10mins

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Rank #8: Knights Templar

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The Knights Templar was a Christian military order founded during the
Crusades in order to protect Christian pilgrims traveling to the Holy
Land.  These "Monks of War" were highly disciplined and they
participated at many major battles during all nine Crusades, including
the pivotal Battle of Hattin.  They also founded the first modern
checking/credit system, which made the organization wealthy enough to
buy the island of Cyprus. 

The Templars were exempt from all laws (except those given by the Pope)
and as a result, they were feared by the kings of Europe.  One king,
Philip the Fair, decided to deal with the problem and on Friday the
13th, he simultaneously betrayed and backstabbed all of the Templars. 
The Templars then disappeared from history, though many groups (such as
the Freemasons), have claimed that they are extensions of this famous
organization.

For more information, read:
http://www.sacred-texts.com/sro/hkt/index.htm http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14493a.htm http://www.templarhistory.com/index.html http://www.slate.com/id/2140307/?nav=tap3
Worlds Together, Worlds Apart
Military History Podcast is sponsored by the International Research and Publishing Corporation and Armchair General Magazine

Mar 03 2007

10mins

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Rank #9: Napoleon (Emperor-Death)

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This episode begins with
two victorious campaigns for Napoleon. The first was against the
Russians and the Austrians (the Third Coalition), whom he defeated at
the Battle of Austerlitz (which is considered his greatest tactical
masterpiece). Then, he defeated the Prussians and Russians in the War
of the Fourth Coalition at Friedland, Jena, and Eylau. However, this
marked the beginning of the end for Napoleon because he four major
cracks began to form within his empire: the failure of the Continental
System against Britain, the prolonged guerilla uprising in Spain, the
Austrian defense at the Battle of Wagram, and the failure of the long
and harsh campaign into Russia.Once Napoleon was weak, the
other nations formed a Sixth Coalition which finally defeated Napoleon
at the Battle of the Nations. Napoleon lost much of his army and was
forced to abdicate once Paris was lost. He was exiled to Elba but later
came back and formed another army during the period known as the 100
days. The 100 days ended with the Battle of Waterloo, in which the Duke
of Wellington (Britain) defeated Napoleon's inexperienced army.
Napoleon was once again exiled, this time to St. Helena, where he
stayed until his death. For more information, read:

Military History Magazine (February 2002): Napoleon’s Haitian Guerilla War Military History Magazine (August 1999): Final French Triumph in Egypt Military History Magazine (December 2005): Austerlitz Military History Magazine (October 2005): Nelson at Trafalgar Armchair General Magazine (July 2005) The Oxford Book of Military Anecdotes by Max Hastings Extreme War by Terrence Poulos The Guinness Book of Military Blunders by Geoffrey Regan Dictionary of Battles by David Chandler World Book (1992): Napoleon

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Sep 09 2006

22mins

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Rank #10: Area 51

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This episode was written by Brian Liddicoat, a real estate attorney in Northern California.

The words �Groom Lake�
and �Area 51� have achieved an almost myth-like quality thanks to
interest in UFOs and shows like the X-Files. But the real history of
this base is even more interesting than the fiction. The names �Area
51� and �Groom Lake� refer to a large flight test base in the Nevada
Desert, about 100 miles north of Las Vegas. The facility was originally
built by Lockheed in the 1950s to support early secret tests of the U-2
spyplane. It has hosted the first flights of some of America�s
most ground-breaking aircraft, including the F-117 stealth fighter. Now
operated by the US Air Force as a detachment of the Air Force Flight
Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base, the Groom Lake facility continues to secretly test America�s most secret aviation technology.

For more information, read:Dark Eagles by Curtis PeeblesLockheed Secret Projects: Inside the Skunk Works by Dennis JenkinsDreamland by Phil Pattonwww.dreamlandresort.com

May 03 2007

14mins

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Rank #11: Napoleon (First Consul-Emperor)

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As First Consul, Napoleon set out for Italy and again defeated the Austrians at the Battle of Marengo. Also, around this time, Napoleon became consul for life and soon after, he was crowned Emperor of France. However, as emperor, Napoleon still had problems, namely in Haiti (where a rebellion under Toussaint L'Overture had taken place). In addition to losing this war, Napoleon lost the key naval battle of Trafalgar to Lord Nelson of the British Royal Navy. This made it so that Britain would always remain a thorn in the side of Napoleon's Europe. For more information, read:

Military History Magazine (February 2002): Napoleon’s Haitian Guerilla War Military History Magazine (August 1999): Final French Triumph in Egypt Military History Magazine (December 2005): Austerlitz Military History Magazine (October 2005): Nelson at Trafalgar Armchair General Magazine (July 2005) The Oxford Book of Military Anecdotes by Max Hastings Extreme War by Terrence Poulos The Guinness Book of Military Blunders by Geoffrey Regan Dictionary of Battles by David Chandler World Book (1992): Napoleon

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Sep 01 2006

13mins

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Rank #12: Clausewitz's Principles of War

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Carl Von Clausewitz was a military philosopher during the time of
Napoleon.  His most famous contribution is the book, On War, which
outlines nine principles of war that are used in officer schools for
many Western armies including the United States Army.  They are:
  • Mass
    • "Get there first with the most"
    • Example: Mass-based armies of Russia (ex. infantry) and the US (ex. M4 Sherman Tanks) during WWII led to general victory
  • Objective
    • Choose an objective and stick with it
    • Example: Coalition troops maintained the
      objective in Operation Desert Sabre and didn't try to do too much by
      entering Iraq, which we now know would have caused major problems.
  • Offensive
    • Seize the Initiative
    • Example: General McClellan's Army of the Potomac in the American Civil War failed to seize the initiative
  • Maneuver
    • Move to more advantageous positions
    • Example: Hannibal's Army at the Battle of Cannae maneuvered around the larger Roman Army and defeated it
  • Unity of Command
    • Place your entire force under the command of a single entity
    • Example: Japanese defenders on Iwo-Jima wasted
      lots of time and effort by switching commanders halfway through the
      preparation effort
  • Security
    • Don't let the enemy rob you of your advantages
    • Example: Japanese Navy at Midway lost its element of surprise (because its communications were intercepted) and lost
  • Simplicity
    • Keep your plans clear and simple
    • Example: Guerrilla militiamen (ex. Aidid's
      militia in the Battle of Mogadishu) have a much simpler plan that the
      professional armies they have to fight
  • Surprise
    • Attack when the enemy least suspects it
    • Example: Germanic tribes slaughtered 24,000 professional Roman soldiers at the Battle of Teutoberg Forest
  • Economy of Force
    • Allocate your limited forces wisely
    • Example: Germany Army during WWII did not get immediately overrun despite a 13million-56million numerical disadvantage
For more information, read:
Armchair General: War
College
http://www.military-quotes.com/Clausewitz.htm
How to Make War by James Dunnigan
On War

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine and the International Research and Publishing Corporation

Feb 04 2007

17mins

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Rank #13: The Great Escape

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In 1944, Allied airmen interned at Stalag Luft III (the supposedly escape-proof POW camp run by the Luftwaffe) performed the greatest prison escape in history. Masterminded by Roger Bushell of the RAF, the prisoners used everything at their disposal to mask their escape operations. In the end, they created a tunnel 30 feet deep, 336 feet long, and 87 prisoners managed to escape.

Eventually, all but 3 escapees were recaptured or murdered by the Gestapo at Hitler's orders. A few dozen prisoners and history books are all that remains of this great escape from Stalag Luft III.

Oct 09 2005

12mins

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Rank #14: US Secret Service

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The United States Secret Service was originally founded (in 1865) as an
anti-counterfeiting unit in the Treasury Department.  However, once
President McKinley was assassinated, the Secret Service assumed
presidential protection duties.  As of 2002, the Secret Service
(Special Agents and the Uniformed Division) is part of the Department
of Homeland Security.  They are also part of Marine One, Air Force One,
and Cadillac One (all of which are described in this episode). 

Throughout their history, the Secret Service has witnessed and/or
foiled many assassination attempts including ones on: Teddy Roosevelt,
FDR, Truman, Kennedy, Ford, Reagan, Clinton, and Bush Jr. 

For more information, read:
http://www.secretservice.gov/ http://people.howstuffworks.com/air-force-one2.htm http://www.aboutfamouspeople.com/article1135.html http://www.trumanlibrary.org/trivia/assassin.htm http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4535911.stm http://www.guardian.co.uk/georgia/story/0,,1487041,00.html
The American Presidents by David Whitney
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine and the International Research and Publishing Corporation

Dec 18 2006

13mins

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Rank #15: Aircraft Carriers

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Aircraft Carriers are the ultimate tool of modern power projection. 
They are symbols of both naval strength and air superiority.  This
episode covers their history and their future:
  • 1840s: Balloon Carriers are invented
  • 1900s: Seaplane Carriers are invented
  • 1910s: Modern aircraft carriers are invented
  • 1930s-1940s: WWII (five major carrier battles)
    • Pearl Harbor: Japan's six carriers surprise the United States Navy
    • Coral Sea: Japan's three carriers engage America's two carriers (both lose one carrier)
    • Midway: America's three carriers engage Japan's four carriers
      and sink all four, with the help of codebreakers and reconnaissance. 
      Considered a turning point in the Pacific War
    • Philippine Sea: America's sixteen carriers destroy or disable all but 35 of the 500 Japanese carrier-based aircraft
    • Leyte Gulf: America's seventeen carriers decisively defeat the Imperial Japanese Navy in the largest naval battle in history
  • WWII-present: US Carrier Strike Groups control the seas
For more information, read:
http://www.sandcastlevi.com/sea/carriers/cvchap1a.htm http://www.navy.mil/navydata/ships/carriers/cv-list.asp http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/carriers.htm http://science.howstuffworks.com/aircraft-carrier.htm http://www.combatreform2.com/submarineaircraftcarriers.htm
The Pacific War Companion by Daniel Marston
Jane’s Warship Recognition Guide
Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carriers (1921-1945) by Mark
Stille
US Navy Bluejacket’s Manual
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Dec 08 2007

17mins

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Rank #16: Propaganda

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Propaganda has been used in war since the beginning of war itself. 
Alexander the Great used it, Genghis Khan used it, the Catholic Church
used it, the American Founding Fathers used it, Joesph Goebbels of Nazi
Germany used it, and the United States currently uses it.

There are three types of propaganda: white, grey, and black.

There are many techniques for propaganda, including: assertion,
bandwagon, card stacking, glittering generalities, lesser of two evils,
name calling, pinpointing the enemy, plain folks, testimonials, and
transfers.

For more information, read:
World Book (1992): P
Foreign Affairs (May/June 2006): Saddam’s Delusions
http://library.thinkquest.org/C0111500/proptech.htm http://en.thinkexist.com/quotations/propaganda/ http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Propaganda
Military History Magazine: June 2002
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General and International Research and Publishing Corporation

Nov 04 2006

15mins

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Rank #17: The Philosophy of War (1)

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According to Lawrence Keeley, "90-95% of known societies engage in
war". Why? What compels homo sapiens to kill each other? Why do we
fight? Part one will describe two hypotheses.War is Rational:Sun
Tzu argued that political struggles would eventually lead to armed
conflict. Clausewitz took this one step further by saying that "war is
a mere continuation of policy by other means". Machiavelli completed
this entire line of thought by saying that war was the most efficient
means of attaining any political goal.War is Inevitable:Hobbes
argued that humans are inherently violent. Raymond Dart and Robert
Ardrey found a scientific basis for this by claiming that homo sapiens
became the dominant humanoid through their martial prowess (and we have
kept this prowess ever since). Another group of philosophers believe
that war can be attributed to the reckless aggression caused by
testosterone in males.For more information, read:Sun Tzu's Art of WarClausewitz's On WarMachiavelli's The PrinceMao's QuotationsHobbes' LeviathanMilitary History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Mar 24 2008

14mins

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Rank #18: Falklands War (1982)

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The Falklands War is one of the few modern wars between two modern
adversaries (in this case, Argentina and Britain).  The war was over
the Falkland Islands, off of the southeastern coast of Argentina which
Britain held and Argentina claimed.

General Leopold Galtieri, leader of Argentina, decided to act because
he needed something to justify his military government.  He launched
Operation Azul to successfully capture the islands.  Margaret Thatcher,
leader of Britain, decided to respond militarily.
  • Air War: Operation Black Buck (UK) conducts air raids against
    Argentinean targets.  Argentina attempts to respond with its own air
    force but fails.
  • Sea War: ARA General Belgrano is sunk by the HMS Conqueror (the
    first and only nuclear submarine kill in history).  The HMS Sheffield
    is sunk by an Exocet missile.
  • Ground War: SAS conducts successful raid against Pebble Island
    Airfield.  Main Royal Marines force lands in East Falkland Islands and
    defeats Argentinean defenders at Goose Green, Top Malo, Mount Harriet,
    Two Sisters Ridge, Mount Longdon, Wireless Ridge, Tumbledown.  British
    retake capital city of Stanley.  Argentina surrenders.
For more information, read:
http://www.naval-history.net/NAVAL1982FALKLANDS.htm
Military History Magazine (April 2002): Blood and Mud at Goose
Green
http://www.falklandswar.org.uk/index.htm http://www.falklands.info/history/82timeline.html http://www.raf.mod.uk/falklands/sg1.html Telegraph.co.uk
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Jun 29 2007

18mins

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Rank #19: War in Bosnia

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After the fall of the Soviet Union, the former Yugoslavian countries
began to divide along ethnic lines.  Of the five states (Serbia and
Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, and Slovenia),
three of them began waging war:
  • Serbia (Orthodox Christians) under Slobodan Milosevic
  • Bosnia (Muslims) under Alija Izetbegovic
  • Croatia (Roman Catholics) under Franjo Tudjman
Initially, both Croatia and Serbia desired to take land from Bosnia. 
However, as the war progressed, Croatia took the side of Bosnia in
order to push Serbia out of the region.  Ethnic cleansing (especially
by the Serbs) was commonplace, and it wasn't until Croatian
intervention (on the ground with Operation Storm) and NATO intervention
(in the air with Operation Deliberate Resolve) that the war slowed
down.  Eventually, after a four-year long siege of Sarajevo (the
Bosnian capital), the Dayton Accords were signed.

However, the ethnic cleansing continued, most notably at Kosovo.  After
another NATO intervention led by General Wesley Clark, peace was
restored again.

For more information, read:
My Life by Bill Clinton
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/1280328.stm http://www.historyplace.com/worldhistory/genocide/bosnia.htm
The Statesman's Yearbook 2006

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Dec 02 2007

10mins

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Rank #20: French Foreign Legion

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The French Foreign Legion was founded in 1831 as France's non-citizen
military. Over the years, it consisted of many refugees, colonial
citizens, and people trying to start a new life. The training is hard
and only one in seven applicants makes it. After they complete their
tour of duty, a Legionnaire may receive a 10-year residential permit
and French citizenship.The Legion's most famous military action
was in the Battle of Camaron in the Maximilian Affair in Mexico in
1863. 62 Legionnaires were defending a convoy when they were attacked
by 2,000 Mexican troops. The Legion fended off wave after wave until
they eventually ran out of ammo. At this point, they charged with their
bayonets. Their heroic actions saved the convoy. Since then, the French
Foreign Legion has served with honor and distinction in many major
world conflicts including the Franco-Prussian War, WWI, WWII, Vietnam
War, and Desert Storm.For more information, read:http://french-foreign-legion.com/http://www.channel4.com/life/microsites/E/escape_to_the_legion/legion.htmlGalenet: French Foreign LegionMilitary History Magazine (September 2005): Intrigue Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Apr 20 2007

10mins

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US Special Operations Forces

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US Special Operations Command, or SOCOM, is divided up into the following. I will talk about each individual unit listed.
  • Army: 75th Ranger Regiment, Special Forces (Green Berets), 160th SOAR (Night Stalkers)
  • Navy: SEALs, and SWCCs (Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewmen)
  • Air Force: Pararescuemen (PJs), Combat Controllers (CCTs)
  • Marine Corps: Marine Force Recon
  • Joint: Delta Force, DEVGRU, 24th Special Tactics Squadron, Intelligence Support Activity
For more information, read:US Special Forces by Samuel SouthworthChosen Soldier by Dick CouchThat Others May Live by Jack BrehmLone Survivor by Marcus LuttrellBlack Hawk Down by Mark Bowden

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Audible (visit audiblepodcast.com/militaryhistory for a free audiobook download)

May 04 2009

12mins

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Planning the American Civil War

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This episode answers four basic questions:
  • Why were both North and South so unprepared for war?
  • Which side had the initial advantage?
  • Did the South have to secede?  Did the North have to respond with military force?
  • Was Northern victory inevitable?
For information on sources, email me.

Apr 24 2009

25mins

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Farragut and the Vicksburg Campaign

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Vicksburg was a Confederate fortress guarding the Mississippi River during the American Civil War.  It was the only thing stopping the Union from taking control of the all-powerful Mississippi waterway.  Although the Vicksburg Campaign is most famously associated with General Ulysses Grant (whose capture of the fortress is considered a major turning point in the war), there were many earlier Union campaigns to take control of Vicksburg.  One of these campaigns, led by Navy Admiral David Farragut, is the focus of this episode.The script for this episode was written by Jacob Bains from Texas.  If you would like to submit your own script, please send it to militaryhistorypodcast@gmail.com

Jan 29 2009

20mins

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Democracy in Iraq

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Why has democracy failed in Iraq?  Here are some potential theories, with their originators in parentheses:
  • Modernization (Rostow, Lipset): Iraq is not wealthy, urban,
    modern, or secular enough to support democracy.  It has not followed
    the same path to development that Western democracies have set out, and
    thus, it is not yet ready.
  • Cultural (Huntington, Weber): Iraqis are not inherently suitable
    for democracy, simply because their culture favors an authoritarian
    style of government.
  • Marxist (Moore, Marx): Iraq still has a strong landed elite and a
    weak bourgeoisie, meaning that it is not ripe for class conflict and
    thus, it is not ripe for social and political development
  • Voluntarist (Di Palma): Iraq lacks the strong leadership needed to usher the country into a democratic phase.
Each of these theories has its flaws and counterexamples, which will be
discussed in this episode.  This is not meant to define one theory as
better than the rest...it is simply meant to put all ideas on the table.

For more information, read:
Huntington's Third Wave
Di Palma's To Craft Democracies
Bellin's Authoritarianism in the Middle East
Colton's Putin and Democratization
Johnson's Political Institutions and Economic Performance
Lipset's Political Man
Marx's Communist Manifesto
Moore's Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy
Rostow's Stages of Economic Growth
Selbin's Revolution in the Real World
Skocpol's Social Revolutions in the Modern World
Varshney's India Defies the Odds
Weber's Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

Nov 21 2008

14mins

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Troop Surge in Iraq

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This episode focuses on the decision-making strategies that President
Bush used in December of 2006 before choosing to commit the troop
surge.  Things discussed include: the release of the Iraq Study Group
Report, the 2006 midterm elections, Bush's meeting with Generals Keane
and Downing, and Bush's relationship with General Petraeus and
Secretary Gates.  At the end of the episode is a recap on the success
of the troop surge, as well as an analysis of President Bush's
leadership during December 2006 and January 2007.

For more background information on Iraq, listen to: Iraq Study Group
Report Assessment, Iraq Study Group Report Recommendations, Invading
Iraq, Occupying Iraq, Iraq's Environment, and Medal of Honor in Iraq.

Oct 19 2008

14mins

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Forces of Nature (2)

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Whether they are seen as acts of God, or as simple climate-related
occurrences, natural events have always had a sizeable impact on
military operations. At the small end of the scale are the little changes in terrain or weather that may affect a battle or a small war. For
example, many armies have postponed their campaigns due to inclement
weather conditions, and many militaries have suffered from rampant
disease. On the other end of the scale are the
times when nature has so much of an impact that the fate of an entire
nation or civilization is decided upon it. In
the words of Charles Darwin, these are times when “the war of nature”
results in the downfall of one party and the rise of another.
  • Colonization Smallpox: Rampant disease severely weakened the
    Aztecs and Incas, allowing small bands of Spanish conquistadors (led by
    Cortez and Pizarro, respectively) to easily overthrow two great empires.
  • Revolutionary Wind and Fog: Heavy winds subsided after the Battle
    of Long Island, allowing American troops to evacuate and fight another
    day.  Their retreat was concealed by a dense fog.  Later, just before
    the Battle of Trenton, a heavy fog concealed the Americans long enough
    to conduct a surprise attack which greatly boosted the morale of the
    Continental Army.
  • Russian Winter: Cold temperatures forced Napoleon to retreat
    after he failed to conquer Russia and find accommodations in Moscow. 
    The lack of grass and unfrozen roads resulted in the destruction of up
    to 75% of Napoleon's Army as it marched back to France.
For more information, read:
Hopkins' The Great Killer
Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel
McCullough's 1776
Burton's Napoleon's Invasion of Russia
Tolstoy's War and Peace
George's Napoleon's Invasion of Russia

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

May 24 2008

15mins

Play

Forces of Nature (1)

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Whether they are seen as acts of God, or as simple climate-related
occurrences, natural events have always had a sizeable impact on military
operations.  At the small end of the
scale are the little changes in terrain or weather that may affect a battle or
a small war.  For example, many armies
have postponed their campaigns due to inclement weather conditions, and many
militaries have suffered from rampant disease. 
On the other end of the scale are the times when nature has so much of
an impact that the fate of an entire nation or civilization is decided upon
it.  In the words of Charles Darwin,
these are times when “the war of nature? results in the downfall of one party
and the rise of another.

  • Thales' Eclipse: Halted the epic Battle of Halys River, thereby
    saving one or both of the participants (Lydia and Media) from
    destruction.
  • Kamikaze (Divine Wind): Created a storm that destroying the invading Mongol fleets, thereby saving Japan from foreign conquest.
  • Athenian Typhoid: Wreaked havoc throughout Athens, contributing to its downfall in the Peloponnesian War.
  • Bering Land Bridge: Facilitated the "invasion" of North America.
  • Clouds over Kokura: Obscured the primary target for the "Fat Man"
    atomic bomb, thereby saving Kokura but resulting in the destruction of
    Nagasaki.
  • Legend of Quetzacoatl: Convinced the Aztecs that Cortez was the
    reincarnation of Quetzacoatl, thereby facilitating the Spanish conquest
    of Latin America.
For more information, read:
Darwin's Origin of Species
Herodotus' Histories
Mitchell's Eclipses of the Sun
Lamont-Brown's Kamikaze
Daniels' Almanac of World History

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

May 03 2008

10mins

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Occupying Iraq (2003-2007)

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This episode covers the period between Bush's declaration of "Mission
Accomplished" and the change in coalition leadership (from General
Casey to General Petraeus).  The following major events and topics are
discussed:

  • 2003: Deaths of Saddam's two sons (Qusay and Uday), capture of
    Saddam, Baathist Purge, National Museum looting, and Bremer's
    disbanding of the Iraqi Army.
  • 2004: Sectarian violence and displacement, Operation Vigiliant
    Resolve (1st Fallujah), Battle of Ramadi, Battle of Husaybah, Battle of
    Mosul, Operation Phanton Fury (2nd Fallujah), Blackwater USA, medals of
    honor.
  • 2005: January and December Legislative Elections, Battle of Haditha, Abu Ghraib.
  • 2006: Handing three provinces to Iraqi authority, death of
    Zarqawi, execution of Saddam, Al-Askari mosque bombing, Operation
    Together Forward (Baghdad), Battle of Ramadi.
  • 2007: Battle of Haifa Street (Baghdad), creation of the new Counterinsurgency Field Manual (3-24).
For more information, read:
Iraq Study Group Report
Counterinsurgency Field Manual 3-24
No End in Sight (film)
http://iraq.liveleak.com/ www.iraqstatusreport.com http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFijzDyJnVE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epfmuHr4_b8&feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cGQaPYzFZ8o
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Apr 19 2008

27mins

Play

The Philosophy of War (2)

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According to Lawrence Keeley, "90-95% of known societies engage in
war". Why? What compels homo sapiens to kill each other? Why do we
fight? Part one will describe two hypotheses.War is Necessary:Aristotle
says in Nicomachean Ethics that "we fight war so that we may live in
peace". This notion is echoed by many other famous thinkers including
Marx (an advocate of a final proletarian revolution in order to
establish a worker's paradise) and Zoroaster (the first monotheist to
discuss the final battle of judgment between good and evil).War is Logical:Using
Darwin's logic, mankind continues to fight wars because it is the means
through which our species survives. Thomas Malthus adapted this into a
population argument, stating that humans fight wars in order to keep
populations small and manageable. Samuel Huntington took this one step
further by saying that war negates massive youth bulges. Lastly, John
Nash (the economist) proved, through game theory, that war is a more
logical choice than peace.War is Accidental:AJP Taylor
argued that all wars are unintended and unhappy escalations of smaller
conflicts. Warmongering is neither inherent nor unavoidable. Taylor's
ideas link closely to the pacifistic ideas of Tolstoy and Gandhi.For more information, read:Nicomachean Ethics by AristotleCommunist Manifesto by MarxHoly Avesta, Holy Bible, Holy Qur'anOrigin of Species by DarwinAn Essay on the Principle of Population by MalthusEnvironmental Science by Richard WrightClash of Civilizations by Samuel HuntingtonMilitary History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Apr 07 2008

15mins

Play

The Philosophy of War (1)

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According to Lawrence Keeley, "90-95% of known societies engage in
war". Why? What compels homo sapiens to kill each other? Why do we
fight? Part one will describe two hypotheses.War is Rational:Sun
Tzu argued that political struggles would eventually lead to armed
conflict. Clausewitz took this one step further by saying that "war is
a mere continuation of policy by other means". Machiavelli completed
this entire line of thought by saying that war was the most efficient
means of attaining any political goal.War is Inevitable:Hobbes
argued that humans are inherently violent. Raymond Dart and Robert
Ardrey found a scientific basis for this by claiming that homo sapiens
became the dominant humanoid through their martial prowess (and we have
kept this prowess ever since). Another group of philosophers believe
that war can be attributed to the reckless aggression caused by
testosterone in males.For more information, read:Sun Tzu's Art of WarClausewitz's On WarMachiavelli's The PrinceMao's QuotationsHobbes' LeviathanMilitary History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Mar 24 2008

14mins

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Joan of Arc

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Joan of Arc (1412-1431) was a poor peasant girl from
Lorraine. One day, she had a vision in which three saints urged her to
lead the French to victory over the English in the Hundred Years' War.
She traveled to Charles VII's court and was appointed head of the
French Army (headed to relieve the besieged city of Orleans) because
her unlikely presence would inspire hope in the French forces. Upon
arriving in Orleans, Joan launched several counterattacks against the
English and broke the siege in only eight days. Then, she led a
campaign to clear the English out of the Loire River Valley, eventually
liberating the city of Reims.

During a later skirmish, Joan was captured and tried for heresy. She
was found guilty and burned at the stake. Later, she was exonerated and
made a saint. She has served a symbol of French nationalism and
feminist pride ever since.

For more information, read:.
Joan of Arc: Her Story by Regine Peroud
Joan of Arc: A Military Appreciation by Stephen Richey

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine and Audible

Mar 14 2008

9mins

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Frederick the Great

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Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, is considered the best commander
of the European Enlightenment.  Despite possessing relatively few
people and resources, he transformed the tiny Prussian state into a
great military power (which arguably wouldn't be brought down until
1945).  Strategically, he modernized the Prussian military into a
well-trained, well-disciplined unit.  He taught them to fire faster,
march with more precision, and deploy artillery quicker.  Tactically,
he employed oblique tactics which massed all units on one side of the
battle line in order to sweep through the enemy forces one at a time
(instead of all at once).  This allowed Frederick to achieve victories
against numerically-superior enemies at Hohenfriedberg, Rossbach, and
Leuthen. 

For more information, read:
Frederick
the Great by Gerhard Ritter
Frederick
the Great by Giles MacDonogh
Frederick
the Great by Christopher Duffy
Military Blunders by Geoffrey Regan
Dictionary of Battles by David Chandler
Extreme War by Terrence Poulos

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Mar 02 2008

15mins

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Lincoln's Assassination

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President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, a
southern sympathizer and a self-proclaimed modern-day Brutus, on April
14th, 1865 (five days after the end of the Civil War). Booth snuck into
Lincoln's viewing Booth at the Ford's Theater while Lincoln was
watching "Our American Cousin" and shot him in the back of the head.
Booth then jumped down onto the stage and ran out the back door. The
ensuing manhunt eventually caught up with him in the swamps of the
Potomac River. He was shot, and his co-conspirators were hanged.The event has many interesting stories associated with it:
  • Lincoln
    had a dream in which he walked into the East Room of the White House
    and saw a casket. He asked the soldiers why there was a casket and the
    soldiers told him that the President had been assassinated. He had the
    dream three days before being assassinated.
  • Robert Todd
    Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln's son, stood by his father's body as he passed
    away. Strangely, Robert Todd Lincoln would also stand by the sides of
    Presidents Garfield and McKinley (both shot by assassins) as they lay
    dying.
  • Robert Todd Lincoln once fell onto the train tracks but was saved by Edwin Booth, John's brother.
  • Boston Corbett, the soldier who fatally wounded Booth, shot him in the exact same spot that Booth shot Lincoln.
There are also several conspiracy theories about the Lincoln Assassination:
  • Vice
    President Johnson indirectly communicated with Booth on the day of the
    assassination. He stood to gain the most from the death of Lincoln.
  • Confederate
    Secretary of State Judah Benjamin might have ordered the assassination
    of the opposing head of state for tactical reasons. Benjamin destroyed
    all of his records after the surrender, and then fled to England and
    never returned.
  • Secretary of War Edwin Stanton disliked Lincoln
    for his moderate stance on many issues. Stanton prevented Ulysses Grant
    (and his military escort) from attending "Our American Cousin" with
    Lincoln (and potentially saving his life). He also lowered security on
    the bridge that Booth used to flee into Maryland. He also destroyed a
    few pages of Booth's diary before it was used as evidence in court.
For more information, read:The American Presidents by David WhitneyManhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer (The History Channel)The Greatest Presidential Stories Never Told by Rick Beyer

Feb 18 2008

12mins

Play

Crassus vs. Spartacus

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Crassus was the wealthiest man in Rome.  Before he joined the First
Triumvirate with Pompey and Caesar, he struggled to make a name for
himself.  His big break came with the outbreak of the Third Servile
War, when Spartacus led a slave rebellion throughout the Italian
Peninsula.  Spartacus and his men wreaked havoc throughout the region,
defeating several Roman legions.  Although his original plan was to
escape to Gaul and head home, Spartacus decided to head south towards
Sicily.  However, his transport (the Cilician Pirates) failed to arrive
in time, and Crassus was able to bring his legions in from behind to
trap Spartacus.  In the ensuing battle, Spartacus was killed and many
more slaves were crucified.  Crassus achieved some fame but in the end,
his career would pale in comparison to Pompey and Caesar.  He was
killed in Parthia after a failed showing at the Battle of Carrhae by
having molten gold poured down his throat.

For more information, read:
Plutarch’s Lives (http://classics.mit.edu/Plutarch/crassus.html)
http://www.livius.org/so-st/spartacus/spartacus.html
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazines.

Feb 09 2008

15mins

Play

The Anglo-Dutch Wars

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Today's episode's script was written by Andrew Tumath of Aberdeen,
United Kingdom.  To submit your own script, please send them to me at
militaryhistorypodcast@gmail.com

The Anglo-Dutch Wars were a series of the
distinct conflicts waged between England and the United Provinces (modern-day
Netherlands) in the middle years of the 17th-century. Fought for different
reasons, alongside different allies, and with different results, the wars
pitted the two great maritime powers of the period against each other, until
both came to realise that the real threat came from the France of Louis XIV.
Almost uniquely maritime in nature, there wasn’t a single action in the three
conflicts in which an English army faced a Dutch one. 

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Jan 26 2008

19mins

Play

Iraq's Environment

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This episode is an analysis of the environmental impacts of the current
war in Iraq.  There are several major categories, each of which will be
discussed.  This episode is meant to be an overview of the
rarely-discussed ecological situation in Iraq, rather than a persuasive
piece towards one viewpoint or another.  The entire episode will
revolve around environmental issues--political and strategic issues and
biases will not be included.
  • Negative Effects:
    • Oil Fires: Saddam lit oil wells on fire, resulting in
      extreme air pollution.
    • Oil Spills: the oil wells spilled into the
      surrounding ground and sea, ruining vast expanses of animal habitats.
    • Depleted Uranium: DU munitions used by Coalition
      forces have chemically wounded thousands of Iraqis and Americans.
    • War Machines: Military vehicles and structures
      wreak havoc through the fragile deserts of Western and Northern
      Iraq.
    • Munitions: Unexploded ordinances and explosion
      craters have wrecked acres and acres of potential farmland.
    • Water Pollution: Unnatural or unhealthy chemicals,
      such as oil and human biomass, have entered waterways in large
      quantities, thereby rendering them unusable.
    • Infrastructure Damage: The lack of leadership in Iraq
      means that significant environmental problems, such as broken sewage
      systems, never get fixed.
    • Fiscal Allocation: Funds allocated to defense could
      have been used to pursue environmentalist initiatives.
  • Positive Effects:
    • Iraq War is a major catalyst for the “alternative
      energies initiative?.
    • Saddam’s ecologically harmful policies will no
      longer devastate the Iraqi ecosystem.
    • Iraq’s
      relationship with the United Nations has improved, meaning that UN
      environmental agencies can now safely enter the region.
For more information, read:
Environmental Science by Richard Wright
The Gulf War Aftermath by Mohammed Sadiq
Desk Study on the Environment in Iraq by the United Nations Environment Program
The Iraq Quagmire by the Institute for Policy Studies
The Environment Consequences of the war in Iraq by the UK Green Party

Special thanks to: Captain Christopher Green, Corporal Trent Davis, and Master Sergeant Jonny Lung

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Jan 13 2008

28mins

Play

The John McCains

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John McCain Sr: Admiral, Commander of Fast Carrier Task Force in South Pacific during WWII
John McCain Jr: Admiral, Commander of Pacific Command during Vietnam War
John McCain III: Navy aviator, shot down in Hanoi, tortured as a
prisoner of war for 5.5 years, currently running for Republican
nomination for President of the United States

Other presidential candidates with military experience are:
  • Chris Dodd: Army Reserve
  • Mike Gravel: Lieutenant, Counter-Intelligence Corps (West Germany)
  • Ron Paul: Captain, Flight Surgeon (US Air Force)
  • Duncan Hunter: Lieutenant, US Army Rangers
For more information, read:
http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/198503/delenda.est.carthago.htm http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/jsmccain.htm www.realclearpolitics.com http://www.azcentral.com/news/specials/mccain/articles/0301mccainbio-chapter3.html http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/15/politics/15mccain.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&adxnnlx=1198992044-jBYur2uP0d4d90Hp7uLjtA
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Jan 01 2008

12mins

Play

Sports - War minus the Shooting

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The title of this episode comes from the following George Orwell quote: “Serious
sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred,
jealousy, boastfulness, disregard for all rules and sadistic pleasure
in witnessing violence: in other words it is war minus the shooting."
This is meant to be a fun episode on the similarities between football, chess, and war. Please take each analogy with a grain of salt.Football (two armies fighting to reach the opposing camp/end zone):
  • Kick-off Team: Skirmishers
  • Quarterback: Tactical Commander
  • Head Coach: Strategic Commander
  • Halfback: Light Infantry Reserves
  • Fullback: Heavy Infantry Reserves
  • Tight End: Heavy Cavalry
  • Linemen (offensive and defensive): Heavy Infantry
  • Wide Receivers: Light Cavalry
  • Cornerbacks: Light Cavalry
  • Linebackers: Light Infantry
  • Safeties: Heavy Cavalry
  • Kicker: Artillery
Chess (two armies fighting to defeat the opposing commander):
  • Pawns: Heavy Infantry
  • Rooks: Artillery
  • Knights: Light Cavalry
  • Bishops: Light Infantry
  • Queen: Heavy Cavalry
  • King: Tactical Commander

Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Dec 26 2007

13mins

Play

Food of WWII

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This episode is written by Russell Holman of Merrimack, New Hampshire. 
If you would like to submit a script to Military History Podcast,
please send me an email at militaryhistorypodcast@gmail.com

The mighty American military during WWII would have been nothing
without its surprisingly-important rationing system.  Food kept the
United States going, so therefore, it is well worth studying. 
Throughout WWII and the years beyond, the US entered/exited several
"eras" of rations:
  • A Rations
  • B Rations
  • K Rations
  • C Rations
  • LRRP Rations
  • MREs
For more information, read:
http://science.howstuffworks.com/mre.htm http://www.olive-drab.com/od_rations.php http://nsc.natick.army.mil/media/print/OP_Rations.pdf
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Dec 16 2007

19mins

Play

Aircraft Carriers

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Aircraft Carriers are the ultimate tool of modern power projection. 
They are symbols of both naval strength and air superiority.  This
episode covers their history and their future:
  • 1840s: Balloon Carriers are invented
  • 1900s: Seaplane Carriers are invented
  • 1910s: Modern aircraft carriers are invented
  • 1930s-1940s: WWII (five major carrier battles)
    • Pearl Harbor: Japan's six carriers surprise the United States Navy
    • Coral Sea: Japan's three carriers engage America's two carriers (both lose one carrier)
    • Midway: America's three carriers engage Japan's four carriers
      and sink all four, with the help of codebreakers and reconnaissance. 
      Considered a turning point in the Pacific War
    • Philippine Sea: America's sixteen carriers destroy or disable all but 35 of the 500 Japanese carrier-based aircraft
    • Leyte Gulf: America's seventeen carriers decisively defeat the Imperial Japanese Navy in the largest naval battle in history
  • WWII-present: US Carrier Strike Groups control the seas
For more information, read:
http://www.sandcastlevi.com/sea/carriers/cvchap1a.htm http://www.navy.mil/navydata/ships/carriers/cv-list.asp http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/carriers.htm http://science.howstuffworks.com/aircraft-carrier.htm http://www.combatreform2.com/submarineaircraftcarriers.htm
The Pacific War Companion by Daniel Marston
Jane’s Warship Recognition Guide
Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carriers (1921-1945) by Mark
Stille
US Navy Bluejacket’s Manual
Military History Podcast is sponsored by Armchair General Magazine

Dec 08 2007

17mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

155 Ratings
Average Ratings
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25

Good intentions, poor execution

By LuckeeD0g - Oct 20 2019
Read more
The hallmark of any good podcast is being able to hold the listener’s attention, and especially for history podcasts, factual accuracy. This podcast needs more work in both areas. The speaking style is stiff, monotone, and halting. A more conversational approach would really help.

Wish u still podcasted!!

By johnsce - Sep 12 2012
Read more
Man you must be done with college now!!! How about some new podcasts