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Rank #49 in Investing category

Business
Investing

HerMoney with Jean Chatzky

Updated 9 days ago

Rank #49 in Investing category

Business
Investing
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Anyone who tells you women don’t need financial advice specifically for them is wrong. Women, whether they’re the caretakers, the breadwinners, or both, face a unique set of financial challenges. That’s where Her Money comes in. In her frank, often funny, but always compassionate way, Jean Chatzky takes every audience of women through the steps they need to take today to live comfortably (and worry-free) tomorrow, offering the latest research, expert tips and personal advice.

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Anyone who tells you women don’t need financial advice specifically for them is wrong. Women, whether they’re the caretakers, the breadwinners, or both, face a unique set of financial challenges. That’s where Her Money comes in. In her frank, often funny, but always compassionate way, Jean Chatzky takes every audience of women through the steps they need to take today to live comfortably (and worry-free) tomorrow, offering the latest research, expert tips and personal advice.

iTunes Ratings

785 Ratings
Average Ratings
691
46
16
14
18

A Concise Podcast

By Cindyk8086 - Jan 15 2020
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I love every episode of HerMoney. I learn something on each one, and I love the 30-40 minute length. The content is presented in a concise way and I can fit it in my morning routine. Thanks for all you do!

Her Money

By BF@MG - Oct 03 2019
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This is the financial podcast I listen to every week. I always learn something new. Great job!

iTunes Ratings

785 Ratings
Average Ratings
691
46
16
14
18

A Concise Podcast

By Cindyk8086 - Jan 15 2020
Read more
I love every episode of HerMoney. I learn something on each one, and I love the 30-40 minute length. The content is presented in a concise way and I can fit it in my morning routine. Thanks for all you do!

Her Money

By BF@MG - Oct 03 2019
Read more
This is the financial podcast I listen to every week. I always learn something new. Great job!
Cover image of HerMoney with Jean Chatzky

HerMoney with Jean Chatzky

Latest release on Jan 22, 2020

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Anyone who tells you women don’t need financial advice specifically for them is wrong. Women, whether they’re the caretakers, the breadwinners, or both, face a unique set of financial challenges. That’s where Her Money comes in. In her frank, often funny, but always compassionate way, Jean Chatzky takes every audience of women through the steps they need to take today to live comfortably (and worry-free) tomorrow, offering the latest research, expert tips and personal advice.

Rank #1: Ep 90: You’re The CEO Of Your Body And Your Life. Own It With Robin Arzon.

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“Know your worth and then add tax.” Our final show of 2017 is filled with empowering statements — and new life mantras — courtesy of our new girl crush Robin Arzon. Successful lawyer-turned-health-and-wellness-influencer, Arzon is the bestselling author of “Shut Up And Run,” and the Head Instructor and Vice President of Fitness Programming for Peloton. (I first met her on my bike.) As we shift gears for 2018, she gets us focused on our health and wealth so that we can make this year our best one yet. Then, Kelly and I answer your questions on 401(k) rollovers, financial considerations for caregivers and how to prioritize credit card debt with building emergency savings. Thank you for another fantastic year of HerMoney. We’ll talk soon…in 2018!

Dec 27 2017

29mins

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Rank #2: Ep:171 The Master Cleanse For Your Money

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Today, most of us are taking better care of our health. We’re more active, get more Vitamin D, and stress a little less. As for our finances, sometimes these feel-good vibes — including summer vacations — cause us to amp up our spending. If your wallet is starting to sweat (like ours), then Ashley Feinstein Gerstley, author of The 30-Day Money Cleanse, is here to whip our finances back into shape. We also have a candid discussion on the divisive latte — you don’t want to miss it. In Mailbag, is it smarter to pay additional money toward the principal on a home mortgage or to invest that money in an index fund? Plus: In case you hadn’t heard, there’s lots of good news for borrowers on the horizon — fixed mortgage rates and interest on federal student loans are heading down. We discuss.

Jul 24 2019

32mins

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Rank #3: Ep 128: New And Different Ways To Save For Retirement — That Actually Work

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The fear that you’ll run out of money in retirement is big and real and daunting. Which is why we’re always excited to hear about it when someone — somewhere — has a new idea to help us conquer the challenges of making our money last. This week’s hero: Morningstar’s Head of Behavioral Science, Dr. Stephen Wendel. He outlines how a handful of modest (and specific!) changes, when made simultaneously, can amount to much bigger nest eggs. So, calm your retirement anxieties — and geek out on the research — with us. Then, in Mailbag, we’re discussing 401(k) rollovers, the 5-year rule on Roth IRAs and having a dedicated savings account for healthcare. And in Thrive, how to budget with a cash-only diet.

Sep 26 2018

35mins

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Rank #4: Ep 103: How To Do The Ultimate Shopping Ban And Save Thousands

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No matter where you are in your financial life, you’ll be able to relate to Cait Flanders’ story. After paying off $30,000 of consumer debt in two years — and upping her savings game — she found herself shopping, and shopping, and shopping some more, because she never addressed why she got into debt in the first place. Her solution? A two-year shopping ban during which she discovered her spending was more emotional than anything else. In her book, The Year of Less: How I Stopped Shopping, Gave Away My Belongings, and Discovered Life Is Worth More Than Anything You Can Buy in a Store, she chronicles her journey and teaches us to hack our shopping habits for the better. Also, Kelly and I answer your questions on short-term and long-term investment decisions — and how to lower your credit card’s interest rate. Stick around for Thrive, because it’s spring cleaning season. We’ll talk about what you need to keep and what you need to shred as you declutter this tax season.

Mar 28 2018

33mins

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Rank #5: Bonus Mailbag #16: Retirement and Investing

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In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around.

In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around saving for retirement and investing for the long-haul. Listen in as Jean advises a woman on how much she really needs to save for retirement... Is $1.7 million per person the right amount, or perhaps 25 times your annual expenses? Jean also shares her thoughts with a woman who's debating where to put an extra $4,000 she has annually to invest for retirement. 

Jean guides a mother of twins who is saving for retirement in a 401(k) and also considering investing in real estate and putting money into an HSA, in an effort to maximize her money for herself and her girls. Lastly, we tackle the question of investing worries that are rooted in a fear of losing money, and a question about selling stock in order to pay off the mortgage early.  

From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

Dec 27 2019

19mins

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Rank #6: Ep 186: Lighting The Path To Savings and Security With The FIRE Movement

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Are you ready to cozy up by the warm glow of the FIRE movement? The acronym stands for Financial Independence, Retire Early, and it’s a topic we love covering here at HerMoney. Over the years we’ve broken it down with some incredible guests including Jamila Souffrant, Grant Sabatier, Jonathan Mendoza, Brad Barrett, and Vicki Robin

This week, we sit down for some one-on-one time with Scott Rieckens, author of Playing With Fire, and producer of the recent documentary by the same name. Scott walks us through his journey into the FIRE movement, and how he learned to prioritize his spending and saving goals. As an Emmy-nominated film and television producer and entrepreneur, Scott was inspired to explore the FIRE movement on the big screen when he discovered there was a lack of educational videos on the topic. 

Retiring early was a goal for Scott (as it is for many of us) but the FIRE movement goes well beyond that — it's about taking control of your finances once and for all, and reducing the stress that can arise when we feel like we aren't in control of our money.

The concepts around FIRE are simple, Scott tells Jean — and you don’t have to be an investing expert (or even the biggest fan of the FIRE movement) to get something out of the basic lessons. "Whether it’s the absolute best way to go or not isn’t really the point,” he says. “To me, it was just a matter of, ‘Okay, now I have the framework on how to get started.’” Scott cites Mr. Money Mustache, and Vicki Robin as major influences on his journey, along with the book, The Simple Path to Wealth by JL Collins

Scott tells Jean that he was led to explore the FIRE movement when he began to feel like he was squandering the money he was earning. “We were working so hard for our money, but we weren’t letting our money work hard for us,” he says. “We have a responsibility to our money, and I didn’t feel like I was doing my part with my daily Starbucks, or buying the latest ‘new shiny object.’ I knew these things weren’t the path to happiness, but I didn’t know any other way.” 

When they first joined the FIRE movement, Scott says he and his wife were out to see how far they could push their savings rate. Then, they decided to see what was “uncomfortable,” and that took them to the next level. “All of a sudden we realized we could live off one income, we could invest, and we had an emergency fund saved,” he says. 

In Mailbag, Jean advises a woman on credit card usage and selection, and answers a question about taking a job you're overqualified for in order to get your foot in the door at a good company. Jean also advises a woman who’s between jobs on health insurance options, including COBRA and short-term health plans that can be purchased from the marketplace. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean dishes on why people aren't checking their credit score as often as they were in years past, and why that could be a big mistake. 

Nov 06 2019

42mins

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Rank #7: Ep 72: Five Simple Life-Changing Rules Of Investing With Alice Finn

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It took a former rocket scientist to figure out that investing isn’t all that complicated after all. Alice Finn’s career has taken her from NASA to wealth management to author. In her new book, Smart Women Love Money, and in our conversation, she lays out the only five things you need to do to guarantee financial success — and why embracing your inner investor is feminism’s final frontier. Then Kelly and I dig into your questions about maximizing a post-divorce nest egg and the either/or of investing your savings or paying off debt. And we ponder this biggie: How much money is enough? Please leave us a review and share us with your loved ones!

Aug 23 2017

31mins

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Rank #8: Episode 4: All-Star Investor Karen Finerman On The Costly Money Mistakes Many Women Are Making – And How Multitasking Is A Huge Waste Of Time

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They call her “The Chairwoman” on CNBC’s Fast Money, but hedge fund manager Karen Finerman also manages life at home including two sets of twins. Learning to balance work and life, Karen has come to a number of surprising conclusions – including her belief that working from home is “the worst.” She tells us why. Driven to make a lot of money since she was a teen, Karen talks bluntly about why women must be financially independent, and how many women get in the way of their own success. She also fills us in on how being risk-averse is a double-edged sword. We also answer your financial questions about saving for college, paying off your mortgage and crafting a will. And, in this week’s Thrive segment, we explain how to safely make mobile payments. Plus: We have five of Karen’s best-selling book, Finerman’s Rules: Secrets I’d Only Tell My Daughters About Business and Life, to give away. Tweet us your favorite tip from #HerMoneyPodcast @JeanChatzky.

May 01 2016

38mins

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Rank #9: Episode 2: Co-Creators Of Criminal, Phoebe Judge and Lauren Spohrer, On Turning A Passion Into A Business

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It’s Criminal! I’m hooked on the hit podcast “Criminal”, so I am thrilled to have the show host and producers Phoebe Judge and Lauren Spohrer join me for this week’s episode of HerMoney. P and L proudly tell us how they had the courage to take a huge risk many women fear, using their own money to pursue their passion and start their own business. We talk about their struggle to juggle two jobs, recording at night after their day jobs in a closet full of clothes to save money (and because – surprise – the acoustics are great) and how it feels now that they are a huge success. We share advice about how they should visit their money, yes, visit their money, now that they have some, and why you should too. We answer your financial questions, and in our Thrive segment, we tell you what to do when you make less than your male colleague for doing the same job!

Apr 17 2016

29mins

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Rank #10: Ep 107: A Candid Conversation On Death, Grief And Money With The Authors Of Modern Loss

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Talking about money can be awkward. Talking about death can be awkward. Talking about them in the same conversation? Don’t even get us started. That’s why we invited Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner, authors of the website and now book, “Modern Loss: Candid Conversation About Grief. Beginners Welcome.” And that’s exactly where we start. We discuss grief, family dynamics, inheritances, wills, the importance of having good executors and what to say to people when it feels like there are no right words. Kelly and I answer your questions on HSAs, post-divorce retirement considerations and preparing college grads for managing money in the real world. We close with the importance of protecting the stay-at-home spouse — financially, of course. We tell you how. Have you tried listening to HerMoney on your Amazon Alexa yet? Get the skill enabled here, rate, review and then let us know in the Mailbag entry on JeanChatzky.com. Kelly will add you to the invite list for our *Private* HerMoney Facebook group.

Apr 25 2018

43mins

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Rank #11: Ep 165: From A Penny In Savings To A Millionaire In Five Years. Meet Grant Sabatier.

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What's your most limited resource? Money? We get how it can feel that way, but the real answer is time. You can earn more money. You can't get more hours or minutes or seconds...or years.  The latter — particularly as it relates to compound interest, giving your money time to grow — is just one of the things we dive into with the inspiring Grant Sabatier, a proponent of the "Financial Independence, Retire Early" (FIRE) movement, and author of “Financial Freedom: A Proven Path to All the Money You Will Ever Need.” (Note: If you're catching up, we've talked about FIRE in Episodes 145 and 146.) Sabatier shares his recent journey with FIRE and how he went from broke — literally $2.26 in his checking and $0.01 in his savings — to millionaire to financially independent in roughly five years. Oh yeah, and he's in his early 30s. Then, in Mailbag, does going to a more expensive college mean more success? Plus: How to tackle (what feels like) crippling credit card debt. And since we also discuss how to increase our incomes with Grant, we thought it’d be a good time to review some best practices for asking for a raise. Dos and don’ts in Thrive.

Jun 12 2019

43mins

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Rank #12: Episode 3: Eyes Wide Shut! Arianna Huffington Teaches Us How To Sleep Our Way To Success

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Arianna Huffington, one of the most influential women in the world, was falling apart at work because she was – literally – exhausted. This week she shares her inspirational wake-up call with us. Her new book, The Sleep Revolution, is based on science-based secrets that can help us all sleep our way to success. Arianna says lack of sleep costs the U.S. economy $63 billion a year and takes a huge toll on us as individuals hitting us in our financial, physical and emotional lives. No surprise, it’s more of a problem for women! On this week’s episode of HerMoney, we teach you how to take back the night. Of course, we all sleep more soundly when we are not worried about money, our family, our jobs or our relationships. But, Arianna says, we need to think of that problem in reverse. Being well rested is the key to regaining control. So, we’ll tell you how. We also answer your financial questions and Arianna offers us her best advice for women to Thrive. So, don’t brag about how little sleep you get. Take a few minutes for yourself, join us and tune in to HerMoney now.

Apr 24 2016

36mins

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Rank #13: Ep 61: Make More Money With The Penny Hoarder’s Kyle Taylor

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This week, we’ve got a ramen-to-riches story for you. Kyle Taylor, founder and CEO of The Penny Hoarder (a booming personal finance site) had a spending addiction and could not, would not, ask his parents to bail him out one more time. So he started gigging (i.e. beer auditing, movie preview auditor). Then he started blogging about how you could do the same. And that blog has now become big business. If you’ve ever wanted to earn some extra money on the side — or write (profitably) about your passion, we’ve got the skinny. Plus, Kelly and I answer your questions on inheritance, saving for a down payment and retirement planning for the self-employed. And, finally, meet Hayden Field from the HerMoney team! Hayden explains the money-saving art of app stacking. As always, please share us with your girlfriends and leave us a review.

Jun 07 2017

29mins

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Rank #14: Ep 91: Take Charge Of Your Health, Finances And Closet In 2018 With TODAY’s J Team

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Happy New Year, and welcome to the very first show of 2018! When I was thinking about who I wanted to have on this show, it took me maybe all of two minutes to decide — my NBC TODAY sisters Jill Martin and Joy Bauer. For the past few years, we’ve teamed up for segments at the start of the year to help all of you kick off your money, health and organization-related resolutions. And that’s exactly what we’re doing in this episode. From skinny cocktails to fatter wallets to creating a closet that has you feeling and looking like a 10 — we’re covering it all. In our first Mailbag of the year, we discuss how to broach the subject of estate planning with a parent and how to handle your 401(k) when your company goes Roth. And then, finally, back by popular demand, we run through a handful of services for selling or donating your unwanted goods.

Jan 03 2018

32mins

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Rank #15: Ep 146: One Woman’s Journey To Financial Independence

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Building on last week’s episode on the FIRE movement, this week we sit down with Jamila Souffrant, creator of the blog and podcast, Journey To Launch, in which she chronicles her and her family’s experience towards financial independence. “For most people who hear about FIRE movement it seems overwhelming,” says Jamila. “I like to modify it and say it [financial independence] can mean anything you want it to mean. In my case, it meant I wanted to retire from my corporate job to do work I love.” Jamila is candid on how she and her husband increased their savings rate, modified their investments and managed their accounts together to make this happen. In fact, we all might want to take a lesson in financial togetherness (and respect) from this couple. In Mailbag, we answer your questions on maxing out 401(k)s without compromising your short-term goals, protecting your finances when buying property with a future spouse and funding HSAs. And Jamila’s story has us wondering: Do you feel engaged in what you’re doing at work? If not, we discuss new research that can help in Thrive.

Jan 30 2019

34mins

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Rank #16: Ep 190: Why Everyone Makes Mistakes With Money (And How To Get Better!) 

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At HerMoney, we’re always interested in hearing about the psychology of money and why we make the choices we make: Why do people continually fail to take action on things that are difficult or uncomfortable for them? Why do we all talk about earning money and spending money, but not saving it? 

These are just a few of the questions that Jeff Kreisler, author, comedian, and Editor-in-Chief of People Science, will tackle with Jean on this week’s episode. Jeff is the author of “Get Rich Cheating: The Crooked Path To Easy Street” and co-author of "Dollars and Sense: How We Misthink Money And How To Spend Smarter.” (His co-author for that one is behavioral economist Dan Ariely, who you can catch in episode 85 if you missed it!) Jeff has traveled the world to talk about sunk cost fallacy, solution aversion, and all the ways in which we allow ourselves to make poor financial decisions — despite knowing that we’re doing it. He says that while we can’t change human nature, thankfully we can build systems that will enable us to use our human nature for our own good. 

Jeff says there’s a “certain sense of shame” when you feel like you aren’t making all the right financial choices in life, but not knowing what to do with your money is an incredibly common thing — not something to be ashamed of. We all have complex emotions and uncertainty around our financial decisions, but when we face those big questions, the best thing we can do is seek advice from experts, and get on a path towards making changes in our systems and environments and how we do things. 

Thankfully, there are some easy behavioral science “tricks and habits” that can help us get out of our own way and conquer our personal finances, Jeff says. One suggestion is to go through your credit card statement — line by line — with someone else and articulate what each expenditure is for. When you have to explain your spending to an objective third party, it forces you to dig deep into questions like, “Did I really need this?” Another strategy is to split your paycheck into two accounts to essentially “trick” yourself into thinking you have less to spend than you really do. “You’re basically hiding money from yourself,” Jeff says. No matter how small the change you make, the important thing is that you’re giving yourself mental nudges to make lifelong changes. 

Then, in Mailbag, Jean tackles questions surrounding HYSAs (high yield savings accounts) and where to find the best rates. She also advises a woman who is just dipping her toes into the waters of investing for the first time, and counsels a woman who is just starting her career at 45 after having worked as a stay at home mom for the last 20 years. And lastly, in Thrive, Jean dishes some real talk on Facebook’s new dating platform, “Facebook Dating,” and whether or not you should consider putting yourself out there on the world’s largest social network. 

Dec 04 2019

40mins

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Rank #17: Ep 167: Build Better Habits With Charles Duhigg

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You’re trying to save more money, but can’t find the spare change. You’re trying to exercise more, but end up making monthly donations to your gym. You’re trying to stop snacking at 4:00pm, but reach for the cookie like clockwork. That last one was exactly what was happening to Charles Duhigg. Intrigued by his personal frustration with breaking certain habits for himself, the Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist went on to become an expert on habits — and how to change them — writing two bestsellers, “The Power of Habit” and “Smarter Faster Better,” along the way. With his help, we explore the psychology behind habit formation and discuss his research-backed solutions for long-term behavior change. In Mailbag, we go over how to choose a Roth IRA, a financial planner and how to start investing with your kids. And finally, in Thrive, we’re talking about women rocking it in all professions.

P.S. We’re giving away two floor seats to almost every stop in the Rolling Stones No Filter Tour this summer, and we want you to win! Enter at https://www.hermoney.com/rolling-stones/!

Jun 26 2019

37mins

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Rank #18: Ep 143: For More Wealth, Freedom & Peace Of Mind in 2019, Practice The Art Of Abundance

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We’re in the second week of 2019 — and with our New Year’s resolutions fresh in our minds — we thought it’d be an opportune time to talk about abundance. Or rather, the art of abundance with Leisa Peterson. Leisa is a wealth coach, business strategist, podcaster and author, who is known for her ability to quickly identify the exact issues that are holding us back from achieving our goals. She’s helped thousands of people (including us) develop practical skills for attracting greater wealth, freedom and peace of mind. In Mailbag, we cover your questions on refinancing student debt, aligning your budget with your ethics and exploring career opportunities in the financial services industry. Finally, have you heard of the FIRE movement? We’ve mentioned it on the show before and we have a podcast dedicated to it coming up soon. In the meantime, a FIRE 101 in Thrive.

Jan 09 2019

35mins

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Rank #19: Episode 15: How To Put $500 A Month Back In Your Pocket And Jump-Start Your Savings Plan!

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All those tips come courtesy of PureWow editor Jillian Quint. If you’re not familiar with PureWow, it’s a newsletter written like a note from your smartest girlfriend, who is always ahead of what’s trending when it comes to lifestyle, parenting and, yes, money. With Jillian, we take on sticky situations like splitting the check at a group dinner and talking with your parents about their retirement plans. And play along with us as we get down and dirty about when to save and when to splurge. Organic milk? Chicken? Car seats?

Kelly joins me to answer your questions about IRAs, and — since so many of you have asked how to choose a financial planner — we decided to invite Liz Davidson of Financial Finesse to give us some expert advice.

We hope you are enjoying HerMoney. Please share with one friend you think will like it, leave us a review and let us know what you think!

Jul 20 2016

39mins

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Rank #20: Ep 154: Invest Like A Woman

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Building off of last week’s “Women With Money” episode that focused on how and why more of us should be investing in addition to our retirement accounts, we’re with investing expert Manisha Thakor. She’s VP of financial wellbeing at Brighton Jones and host of the “true WELLth podcast.” We discuss the psychology of investing, the difference between active versus passive investing styles and best practices for working with financial advisors. In Mailbag, we answer your questions on closing credit cards without hurting your credit, whether it’s a smart move to help a boyfriend’s family with student loan debt and the complications that can ensue come tax time. Plus: Our Thrive segment is courtesy of one of our amazing listeners, Pam, who emailed us a few weeks back after Episode 149, in which we talked about the new rules of resume writing. Her advice will help your resume get seen!

P.S. Jean’s new book, “Women With Money,” hits stands this week! Order yours today at WomenWithMoneyBook.com.

Mar 27 2019

33mins

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Ep 197: Living Childfree And Making Empowered Decisions Around Motherhood

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We live in a world where women can choose to do and become anything we want… CEOs, engineers, cops, military generals, second-act career-starters, the list goes on. And in the same way that women are intentionally choosing and celebrating the things they want to become, they’re also intentionally avoiding what they don’t — and one of those things is motherhood. 

The birthrate in the U.S. hit a 30-year low in 2018, dropping to 3.8 million births, according to The National Center For Health Statistics, but that number just punctuated what many of us have known anecdotally for years — that there is a growing chorus of women who are happily choosing the childfree life. This week’s guest, Maxine Trump, is an award-winning writer, producer and director of the feature film, “To Kid or Not To Kid,” which confronts the societal expectations around motherhood. 

Maxine explains how, in 2020, more women than ever are able to “consider what makes us happy and pursue that.” Jean and Maxine tackle why society may be so late in approaching motherhood as a choice, and why the choice of motherhood may still feel like a taboo subject in some circles. 

The pair also dive into when “childfree” came into the vernacular, and how it compares to “childless.” They also discuss the growing number of women who are choosing to live childfree, including the women who are part of the #birthstrike movement, who have concerns about bringing children onto a warming planet. They also touch on how financial questions are coming into play for many would-be mothers who have decided that they simply can’t afford the monetary commitment of raising children, as well as women for whom their careers are the priority. “Fundamentally, it’s about what you want. Every woman should be allowed to choose what they want, to have children or not. It should be a decision that we’re all empowered to make,” Maxine explains. 

The duo also explore the life cycle of childfree women, and how we can best prepare for retirement and beyond, and leave a legacy behind. Maxine explains how one of her reasons for not having children was her passion for filmmaking, and how she didn’t want to have to sacrifice her ability to make movies in order to have a child. 

Maxine explains how, in our society, it seems we’re always congratulating women for their decision to have children (at baby showers, gender reveal parties, and more) but never do we think to congratulate women on their decision not to have kids. But this is something we should adopt in order to be more inclusive to the growing number of women who are childfree. 

Then, in Mailbag, Jean and Kathryn tackle questions about investing while keeping required minimum distributions in mind, making catch-up contributions, and the decision as to whether to pursue home renovations or move. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean dives into the secret “consumer score” that many of us have, which is the score that takes into account our consumer activity and may impact our customer service experiences in future. 

Jan 22 2020

39mins

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Ep 196: How To Successfully Take A Career Break 

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While care-taking for those we love most can be a beautiful, wouldn’t-have-it-any-other-way experience, we often pay a substantial price. Our time out of the workforce reduces our earning power by an average of 18%, and that number goes up to 37% when our breaks last three years or longer. While those numbers are sobering, they don’t change the realities of life. According to the Harvard Business Review, 43% of women with children leave their careers or take a career break, and 24% of women duck out of the workforce at some point to care for an aging parent.

In other words, sometimes we have to take a step back, or step out, but there are ways to do it that can lessen the blow to our careers, according to Stacey Delo and Jennifer Gefsky, co-authors of “Your Turn: Careers, Kids and Comebacks — A Working Mother’s Guide. Together, they run Apres, a digital career platform for women who are returning to the workforce, or who may be pivoting within the workforce.

Jean, Stacey and Jennifer dive into a discussion around what it means to step out of the workforce completely, transition to part-time, or simply ask for more flexibility in your schedule. The trio break down the cost of stepping out, how to weigh the expense of daycare against your salary, and how to determine what you might be losing out on in terms of salary and retirement savings if you do take a break.

Stacey and Jennifer break down some of their favorite strategies for returning to the workforce, and how to move past the guilt that may go along with decisions to either stay in a job or leave it. They also discuss the disturbing trend of women rejecting promotions for fear of what it may mean for their home life, and what we can all do to change that conversation.

We also discuss what you can say to prospective employers when you’re ready to get back to work, and how to tell your “gap story.” Hint: Explain it quickly and concisely, because employers just want to know that you’re ready, and that you’ll be a committed employee. Then we explore how to maintain your network while you’re out of the workforce so that when you’re ready to ignite your job search, you won’t feel out of touch.

Lastly, in mailbag, Jean answers a question from a listener wondering if she should be paying her financial advisor $3,000 a year to manage her IRA. She also tackles a question about HSA contributions and income level, and reviews some of the best investment options for Gen-Y. In Thrive, we look at the trend of companies enabling employees to save for retirement at the same time they’re paying down student loans.

Jan 15 2020

35mins

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Ep 195: Selling A Home, Moving, Renovations, Downsizing And More

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If you're looking to move, sell a home, buy a home, renovate, downsize or even rent, then this episode is for you. We're tackling all of the above, and diving into the emotional ties we all have to the four walls that surround us, and to the possessions we have inside them. Why do we make decisions with our hearts that should be made by the financial part of our brains?

To answer that question, Jean is joined by Caroline Carter, founder and CEO of Done in a Day, a Washington, D.C. based home transition and move management company. Caroline is also the author of the book "Smart Moves: How To Save Time And Money While Transitioning Your Home And Life."

Caroline was inspired to start her career when she recognized her own passion for "creating organization out of chaos." Moving is one of the most stressful life events we go through, and every year approximately 40 million Americans move. Caroline dives into how we can all bring the stress levels down when embarking on a move, and dishes on some of her favorite tips she’s learned from helping more than 2,000 families over the last 14 years.

Caroline talks about how sellers should package their homes to sell so that the buyer sees the value, and offers a checklist of things for people to do before they put their homes on the market. One trick: You can never go wrong by going to your local home depot and snagging a gallon of paint. (Neutralizing your personal space is always a good move, because you have to turn your home back into a house in order to sell it, she says.)

Caroline also dives into ways we can de-clutter our space, and how best to ignore the temptation to put everything into storage when what we really need is a trip to the dump... Oftentimes it's not worth the cost of moving and storing things just because of the emotional implications they may have.

She also offers a step-by-step guide for how to tackle the moving process in the most efficient way possible. Hint: Start with the things that only you can do, and then plan to hire help for the things that you can't do yourself. Also, Caroline shares her thoughts on what people regret most after a move, and how to decide how much space you'll really need if you're downsizing.

Then, in Mailbag, Jean advises a mom who is concerned about saving for her son's college education, and guides a woman who's considering putting all her investments into a target date fund. She also counsels a listener who's worried about timing the markets while recession fears are looming. Lastly, in Thrive, we dish on allowances for kids, and how much they should really be getting.

Jan 08 2020

36mins

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Ep 194: How To Be More Productive Than Ever In 2020 

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Will 2020 be the year you secure that promotion, land a new job, or finally get your side hustle off the ground? Maybe you just want to be better about knocking things off your to-do list each day, or perhaps you're ready to become that ultra-productive, ultra-accomplished version of yourself you've envisioned in the movie montage of your life?

Thankfully on this week's episode, Julie Morgenstern is here to tell us all exactly how we can get there. Julie is one of the world's leading experts on organization, productivity and time management, and is the New York Times bestselling author of several books, including 'Organizing From The Inside Out,' 'Time Management From The Inside Out,' and 'Never Check Email In The Morning.' Her books have been turned into a popular executive training program that empowers individuals to ramp up their productivity and get the absolute most out of their hours in the day.

Julie says if you've been feeling like you're treading water, you're not alone. Many people feel like they accomplish less as they get older, because time seems to go faster. But, she stresses, while there's great joy in racking up accomplishments, there's also great joy in a life well-lived; you have to make time for important life connections and experiences along the way.

Julie offers her tips for how to get the absolute most out of the limited hours you have in your work day, and shares her favorite tricks for avoiding getting caught up in a false sense of urgency with all of the day's email notifications, IMs, text messages, and Slack pings. She also dives into the importance of to-do lists, and the need to have a road map of where you're going on any given day. She says lists are "a simple tool with incredible power to help you be fully present in what you do," and cautions that too many of us don't have a single consistent place where we keep a record of our necessary tasks. Unfortunately, those of us who have our to-dos scattered amongst many systems can spend 30% of our day trying to figure out what we might be missing. She shares her thoughts on the very best place to keep your to-do list to ensure the conversation shifts from "when" you're going to do something to, "how long is it going to take me?"

If you're struggling with feeling like you can't get anything done during the work week, Julie recommends blocking out time on your calendar at work so that you're always in control of your schedule. Yes, blocking time even for the most mundane of tasks is recommended — that way you'll be sure to get it done! When it comes to email, IMs and Slack, Julie recommends "batch processing" these messages every 2-3 hours. Many of us feel a false sense of satisfaction simply from checking a screen, when in reality, we'd be much better off (and more productive) if we disconnected from our devices several times a day.

Julie also talks about how we can use some of her most tried and true strategies in our personal lives, and dives into how taking time off can actually make you a better leader and a better colleague. "Really renewing and recharging is one of the best professional investments you can make in yourself. Stepping away gives you perspective and lets your whole brain work on any problems you might be having," she says. Along those same lines, she talks about the importance of self care, and why sleep, exercise, and the pursuit of our hobbies and passions is so very important to leading a rich and fulfilling life.

Lastly, in mailbag, Jean counsels a woman who was turned down for a credit increase she requested, and offers guidance on credit utilization. She also guides a listener who is considering participating in her company’s employee stock purchase program. We also dive into a debate on buying cars vs. leasing cars. In Thrive, Jean tackles the often tricky, often sticky group birthday dinner, and  how we can all improve our group outings (and the impact they have on our wallets) in 2020.

Jan 01 2020

37mins

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Bonus Mailbag #18: Credit, Credit Cards and Debt

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In honor of a very happy holiday season, we’re celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (tomailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around.

In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around credit, credit cards, and debt. Jean answers a question about how business credit cards can impact your personal credit, and what it means for your credit score when you close a business account.We also dive into a question about adding a child to your credit card as an authorized user to help them build credit. (Note: Not every credit card company reports credit history of authorized users.)

Additionally, Jean guides a listener who is wondering if she should claim bankruptcy, see a credit counselor, get a side gig, or cash out a retirement annuity in order to get back on track. Lastly, we advise a woman who is looking to pay down debt with personal loans, while also working to improve her credit score, and to stay motivated to pay down her debt.

From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can’t wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

Dec 29 2019

23mins

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Bonus Mailbag #17: College, Education And Student Loans

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In honor of a very happy holiday season, we’re celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around.

In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around college, education, and student loans. Listen in as Jean advises a woman who co-signed for her daughter's student loans and is now struggling to repay the debt because her daughter hasn't taken responsibility for the loan.

We also hear from a woman who is getting a divorce, and her husband has told her he won't be contributing to their two children's college funds once they turn 18. She's looking for a way to ensure her money grows as quickly as it can, and is debating an ESA (Education Savings Account) for her son who is in college.

Jean also guides a listener on how the 529 accounts she has for her nieces might impact their ability to get financial aid, and what to do with those accounts before they head to college. Lastly, Jean tackles a question about the best ways to refinance $180,000 in student loans while still being eligible for income-based repayment plans.

From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can’t wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

Dec 28 2019

21mins

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Bonus Mailbag #16: Retirement and Investing

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In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around.

In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around saving for retirement and investing for the long-haul. Listen in as Jean advises a woman on how much she really needs to save for retirement... Is $1.7 million per person the right amount, or perhaps 25 times your annual expenses? Jean also shares her thoughts with a woman who's debating where to put an extra $4,000 she has annually to invest for retirement. 

Jean guides a mother of twins who is saving for retirement in a 401(k) and also considering investing in real estate and putting money into an HSA, in an effort to maximize her money for herself and her girls. Lastly, we tackle the question of investing worries that are rooted in a fear of losing money, and a question about selling stock in order to pay off the mortgage early.  

From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

Dec 27 2019

19mins

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Ep 193: Missing Loved Ones This Time Of Year? An Expert Helps Guide Us Through

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We all experience loss in our lives, and dealing with grief while also honoring and remembering our loved ones can be incredibly challenging. Particularly around the holidays, those who were closest to us who have passed on are often at the forefront of our minds.

This week, Jean sits down with Allison Gilbert, an Emmy-award winning journalist, and the author of "Passed and Present: Keeping Memories of Loved Ones Alive." Her book has been described as a "how-to" manual for remembering our loved ones, and contains 85 practical ways to remember, honor, and celebrate those who have passed. "There is more that we can do than just going to a cemetery or lighting a candle," Allison says, adding that she wanted to find a way to make her parents real for her two children who didn't have their maternal grandparents. "I wanted them to truly understand and value and appreciate all those things that came from the Gilbert family," she says.

Allison walks us through how we can all take ownership of ensuring our loved ones' memories live on in perpetuity. She also talks about how we can be an awesome friend and coworker to people who have lost loved ones, when we just aren't sure what to say. (She also includes ideas for special remembrance gifts, which we all need!)

Allison also shares why the way we talk about our late loved ones matters. "When I'm speaking to my children, I never say 'my mom' or 'my dad,' I will always say 'your grandmother' and 'your grandfather,' because it orients that relationship to them, and makes it more tangible to what they would have missed," she says.

Jean and Allison also talk about all of the baggage, stuff and money that's often associated with death, and the ways that people can best deal with it. (Hint: Nothing has to be done today, tomorrow, or even the next day after a loss... You can have some breathing room and wait six months before you do anything.) In other words, you don't have to wake up and immediately sell the house. Rather, you can wait until the emotions aren't so raw. You can take a breath and then bring in an advisor (a financial advisor, a trusted friend or family member) who is more neutral and who can help you think about next steps and perhaps purging your loved one's goods over time.

Allison also breaks down a guide for how to repurpose and donate your loved one's possessions, and how to make giving things away a less guilt-ridden process. She also offers up her thoughts on how to make it easier for our own children and grandchildren to deal with our "stuff" and to remember us after we're gone. Thankfully, the digital world has changed the game when it comes to remembering. It's easier than ever to share stories in a family Google doc, upload and digitize photos, and share memories — it's no longer the responsibility of one family member to be the repository of the entire family history.

Then, in Mailbag, Jean advises a woman going through a divorce on whether to keep saving or pay down her debt, since she will likely be splitting assets and liabilities evenly with her husband. She also guides a listener who's considering refinancing her home loan but is unsure if it's worth the time and effort to save half a percentage point, and offers her thoughts on getting a prenup to a woman who's engaged to a man who has a strained relationship with his children. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean dishes on how to retain your sanity and energy levels when pursuing a side gig.

Dec 25 2019

36mins

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Bonus Mailbag #15: Home Buying and Real Estate

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In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around.

In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around real estate and home buying. Jean advises a listener on how to buy a new home when all your money is tied up in your old one, as well as the ins and outs of selling a rental home while keeping some money liquid for a new home purchase.

She also advises on whether or not a listener should pay off her mortgage early, or invest the money, and weighs in on whether or not a couple should renovate and sell their home, or stay put.

From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend some more quality time together in the New Year!

Dec 21 2019

27mins

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Bonus Mailbag #14: Children, Families and Finances 

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In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around.

In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around children and families. Jean offers her thoughts on how women with limited incomes can afford to adopt, and available funding and financing options. We also talk through starting 529 plans for children, and strategies for supporting adult children through grad school without enabling them. And if you've ever wondered how to help your kids save, this episode's for you! Jean offers her thoughts on engaging your children, and how parents can open a brokerage account to help their little ones get excited about investing early on.

From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend some more quality time together in the New Year!

Dec 20 2019

17mins

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Ep 192: How To Earn What You're Worth In 2020

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You asked, and we listened! Our HerMoney family consistently requests more content around career advancement, negotiating for increased earnings, and taking a step up at your current company. Today’s HerMoney Podcast guest, Tracy Keogh, dishes on all of the above — and then some.

In her role as Chief Human Resources Officer at HP, Tracy has worldwide responsibility for the technology company’s strategic human resources activities, employee communications and social responsibility initiatives. She previously served as the Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Aon Hewitt, and has been teaching female executives how to negotiate — against her — for many years. In this week’s episode, Tracy offers us all a mini-course in some of her favorite tactics, including how to create a term sheet, how to ask for an off-cycle review to get a bump sooner than expected, and how to avoid negotiating against yourself. 

Oftentimes, women feel like asking for more money is “rude,” or that they might not be liked by others if they’re high earners, but that’s simply not true, Tracy says. The old wisdom of “you don’t get what you don’t ask for” has never been more applicable than where salary is concerned. 

Before going into any negotiation, do your homework. Find out what's common in your industry by looking online, talking to headhunters, friends, former colleagues, and anyone else you trust. 

Then, begin crafting your term sheet. Write out everything that has to do with your job, including what your salary is now, what you expect it to be, your desired title, your expected bonus, your desired vacation days, your retirement plan, and what you’d need to be offered in order to seriously consider leaving your current company for a new job.

Creating this term sheet — this “exhaustive list,” as Keogh calls it — enables you to have a 360-degree view of your total compensation package. “When you write these things down, you realize the current value of your situation,” she says. 

Tracy says she’s seen many women make the mistake of negotiating against themselves, and shares some thoughts on how to ensure this doesn’t happen to you. For example, you shouldn’t be the first one to offer up the salary figure you want, and you should always decline to offer your current salary — it’s illegal in many states for prospective employers to ask! She notes that when companies give offers, they almost always leave room for negotiation, and if you feel like an organization is low-balling you and simply won’t pay you what you’re worth, then it’s probably not the kind of company you want to work for. 

Tracy also discusses the importance of “negotiating from day one,” and how you can lay the groundwork for getting a higher salary without ever outright throwing out dollar figures. (She earned more by simply letting her company know upfront that she was her family’s sole breadwinner.)  

She also throws out tips for staying safe in a job, including the importance of getting everything in writing. For example, if your boss leaves his or her role, your new one may not agree to any “side arrangements” you had, so always get those in ink so you can continue to enjoy the perks of your role for years to come.

Then, in Mailbag, Jean advises a listener on where to get the best returns when you invest and the importance of having a diversified portfolio. She also counsels a woman who is wondering if the periodic credit increases her credit card company offers could possibly damage her credit, and offers advice to a listener struggling to get her husband interested in personal finance and co-managing their household’s money. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean discusses the importance of taking much-needed breaks at work — for a quick phone call, a moment of zen, or a even game of Candy Crush — all while in the bathroom. 

Dec 18 2019

38mins

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Ep 191: The Negotiating Skills You Learn In A Brothel (And Other Wisdom From An Economist) 

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What do the legal sex trade, the surfing world, gambling, and horse trading all have in common? They’re some of the unlikely places economist Allison Schrager has spent years studying risk, and we were blown away by the insight she shares with us this week on risk management and negotiating.

Allison, who is also the co-founder of risk advisory firm LifeCycle Finance Partners, gained some of her more interesting takeaways when researching her book, “An Economist Walks Into A Brothel: And Other Unexpected Places To Understand Risk.” She says she was inspired to study the economics of personal finance because she wanted to help make some of life's most necessary economic lessons more accessible. In many cases, all people need to succeed with their finances is education, she says — even something as simple as understanding the dangers of procrastination can help people make better choices.

As part of her research for the book, Allison spent time with sex workers and managers at Nevada’s bunny ranch, a legal bordello. There, she learned about the risks these women take, and how we can apply some of their negotiating skills to our daily lives. Allison surveyed the sex workers on what they charge customers, and was impressed by some of the negotiating tactics they employ — rather than having set prices for their services, these women negotiate for each individual transaction.

Allison says that these conversations eventually ended up changing her own attitude towards risk. Perhaps hearing 'no' is not that big of a big deal — if you don't hear 'no' regularly, then you're not asking for enough, she advises. When it comes to negotiating in other career fields, Allison advises offering a "menu" of options to your boss so there's no confrontation, and no single demand put in front of them. She also details why your peak earning years as a sex worker are your mid-40s, why we end up taking more risk when we feel safer, and how we can all take a more sophisticated attitude to risk.

Then, in mailbag, Jean tackles a quintessential money trade-off question, advises a woman who is underpaid in her field, and guides an Australian couple residing in the U.S. on some of the best investment strategies for expats.

Dec 11 2019

41mins

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Ep 190: Why Everyone Makes Mistakes With Money (And How To Get Better!) 

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At HerMoney, we’re always interested in hearing about the psychology of money and why we make the choices we make: Why do people continually fail to take action on things that are difficult or uncomfortable for them? Why do we all talk about earning money and spending money, but not saving it? 

These are just a few of the questions that Jeff Kreisler, author, comedian, and Editor-in-Chief of People Science, will tackle with Jean on this week’s episode. Jeff is the author of “Get Rich Cheating: The Crooked Path To Easy Street” and co-author of "Dollars and Sense: How We Misthink Money And How To Spend Smarter.” (His co-author for that one is behavioral economist Dan Ariely, who you can catch in episode 85 if you missed it!) Jeff has traveled the world to talk about sunk cost fallacy, solution aversion, and all the ways in which we allow ourselves to make poor financial decisions — despite knowing that we’re doing it. He says that while we can’t change human nature, thankfully we can build systems that will enable us to use our human nature for our own good. 

Jeff says there’s a “certain sense of shame” when you feel like you aren’t making all the right financial choices in life, but not knowing what to do with your money is an incredibly common thing — not something to be ashamed of. We all have complex emotions and uncertainty around our financial decisions, but when we face those big questions, the best thing we can do is seek advice from experts, and get on a path towards making changes in our systems and environments and how we do things. 

Thankfully, there are some easy behavioral science “tricks and habits” that can help us get out of our own way and conquer our personal finances, Jeff says. One suggestion is to go through your credit card statement — line by line — with someone else and articulate what each expenditure is for. When you have to explain your spending to an objective third party, it forces you to dig deep into questions like, “Did I really need this?” Another strategy is to split your paycheck into two accounts to essentially “trick” yourself into thinking you have less to spend than you really do. “You’re basically hiding money from yourself,” Jeff says. No matter how small the change you make, the important thing is that you’re giving yourself mental nudges to make lifelong changes. 

Then, in Mailbag, Jean tackles questions surrounding HYSAs (high yield savings accounts) and where to find the best rates. She also advises a woman who is just dipping her toes into the waters of investing for the first time, and counsels a woman who is just starting her career at 45 after having worked as a stay at home mom for the last 20 years. And lastly, in Thrive, Jean dishes some real talk on Facebook’s new dating platform, “Facebook Dating,” and whether or not you should consider putting yourself out there on the world’s largest social network. 

Dec 04 2019

40mins

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Ep 189: Mitch Albom On Love, Loss And Giving Back 

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Over the last few decades, author and journalist Mitch Albom has penned some of the most influential books of our time — Tuesdays With Morrie, The Five People You Meet In Heaven, For One More Day, Have A Little Faith, and Time Keeper, just to name a few. His words have had a profound impact on millions of people worldwide, and many of them have been turned into critically acclaimed movies. This alone would be an incredible resume, but Mitch didn't stop there — he also founded eight charities, many in the Detroit metropolitan area, where he lives with his wife Janine.

This week, Mitch sits down with Jean to talk about some of his charitable work, and the path that led him to Chika — a Haitian girl who was born three days before the devastating 2010 earthquake, and was brought to Mitch's 'Have Faith Haiti Mission' in Port-Au-Prince. His relationship with Chika — and his two-year, round-the-world journey to try and find a cure for her illness — is the subject of his new book that came out this month: ‘Finding Chika: A Little Girl, An Earthquake, And The Making Of A Family.’

In this episode, Jean and Mitch discuss what led him to write his new book, and Mitch offers up his thoughts on the most precious thing you can ever give someone, as well as what we can all do with our money to make us happy. Mitch also weighs in on how we can all find our "thing," our passion project or philanthropic endeavor that will help us make a difference in the world. Mitch also discusses how he and his wife have made the financial aspects of their relationship work seamlessly for three decades.

Then, in Mailbag, Jean and Kathryn talk saving in your 401(k) vs. paying down credit card debt, 401(k) loans, how to invest or sell stock options provided by your company, and the best ways to boost the contributions to your retirement funds. In thrive, Jean dishes on the double-digit annual gains the Dow is posting, and what long-term investors need to know.

Nov 27 2019

42mins

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Ep 188: How To Close The Gender Pay Gap Once And For All 

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What are you doing in the year 2119? That's the year the American Association of University Women predicts that the gender pay gap will finally close, unless we take steps to bridge the gap sooner. Thankfully, this week's guest, Katica Roy, is here to tell us how we can all do just that.

Katica is a gender economist and CEO of software company Pipeline that helps employers manage everything from the hiring process to employee reviews. As a gender economist, Katica looks at the economy through the lens of gender to see where it's working and where it isn't, and today she shares how we can level the playing field for ourselves and our fellow women.

Listen in as Katica shares some fascinating (and infuriating) facts about how often women are underpaid, and what corporations can do to help speed change. Katica details research from her company that spanned 4,000 companies and 29 countries, showing that for every 10% increase in gender equity, there is a 1% to 2% increase in revenue to a company's bottom line. She also talks about the sea change she's leading to shift the conversation and get more people thinking about gender equity as an economic opportunity rather than a social issue.

Katica shares her tips for getting paid more (along with a personal story!) as well as tips on how to negotiate, and details on how the gender wage gap impacts women of color and non-binary womxn. She and Jean also discuss how women are being adversely impacted by the pink tax. "When we talk about the gender pay gap, we talk about money coming into women's wallets, but the pink tax means more money is coming out of our wallets when we pay for everyday items," she says, explaining how women pay an average of 7% more than men for things like razors and shampoo.

Lastly, in Mailbag, Jean tackles questions about dating and debt, what to do with old retirement accounts, and how to manage asset allocation if you're part of the FIRE movement. In Thrive, Jean dives into the expense of campus visits and what to do with your teen to ensure you aren't spending too much on college before you've even paid your first tuition bill.

Nov 20 2019

44mins

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Ep 187: How Gen-X Women Can Save For Retirement (And Everything Else!)

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This week Jean sits down with Shelley Emling, Editor-In-Chief at AARP’s The Girlfriend, to talk all things Gen-X women and how they can get back on track for retirement. 

Gen-X women feel ignored by brands, and feel that most of the talk around investing and career advancement is focused on either Millennials or Boomers. Jean and Shelley tackle what Gen-X women can do to get off the sidelines and build the self-confidence they need to ask for raises and make empowered financial decisions. 

Jean also answers some of the most commonly-asked questions from readers at AARP’s TheGirlfriend, and tackles what to do (and what not to do) when you’re taking those first steps to regain control of your financial life. 

Lastly, in Mailbag, Jean dishes on the best way to manage credit cards while keeping your credit utilization rate low, and advises a woman who is considering moving money in her 401(k) and selling stocks. In Thrive, Jean talks about open enrollment and how to choose the right health insurance plan for you and your family. 

If you're not subscribed to the podcast, you're missing out on juicy tidbits from some of the most accomplished women in the world!

Nov 13 2019

32mins

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Ep 186: Lighting The Path To Savings and Security With The FIRE Movement

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Are you ready to cozy up by the warm glow of the FIRE movement? The acronym stands for Financial Independence, Retire Early, and it’s a topic we love covering here at HerMoney. Over the years we’ve broken it down with some incredible guests including Jamila Souffrant, Grant Sabatier, Jonathan Mendoza, Brad Barrett, and Vicki Robin

This week, we sit down for some one-on-one time with Scott Rieckens, author of Playing With Fire, and producer of the recent documentary by the same name. Scott walks us through his journey into the FIRE movement, and how he learned to prioritize his spending and saving goals. As an Emmy-nominated film and television producer and entrepreneur, Scott was inspired to explore the FIRE movement on the big screen when he discovered there was a lack of educational videos on the topic. 

Retiring early was a goal for Scott (as it is for many of us) but the FIRE movement goes well beyond that — it's about taking control of your finances once and for all, and reducing the stress that can arise when we feel like we aren't in control of our money.

The concepts around FIRE are simple, Scott tells Jean — and you don’t have to be an investing expert (or even the biggest fan of the FIRE movement) to get something out of the basic lessons. "Whether it’s the absolute best way to go or not isn’t really the point,” he says. “To me, it was just a matter of, ‘Okay, now I have the framework on how to get started.’” Scott cites Mr. Money Mustache, and Vicki Robin as major influences on his journey, along with the book, The Simple Path to Wealth by JL Collins

Scott tells Jean that he was led to explore the FIRE movement when he began to feel like he was squandering the money he was earning. “We were working so hard for our money, but we weren’t letting our money work hard for us,” he says. “We have a responsibility to our money, and I didn’t feel like I was doing my part with my daily Starbucks, or buying the latest ‘new shiny object.’ I knew these things weren’t the path to happiness, but I didn’t know any other way.” 

When they first joined the FIRE movement, Scott says he and his wife were out to see how far they could push their savings rate. Then, they decided to see what was “uncomfortable,” and that took them to the next level. “All of a sudden we realized we could live off one income, we could invest, and we had an emergency fund saved,” he says. 

In Mailbag, Jean advises a woman on credit card usage and selection, and answers a question about taking a job you're overqualified for in order to get your foot in the door at a good company. Jean also advises a woman who’s between jobs on health insurance options, including COBRA and short-term health plans that can be purchased from the marketplace. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean dishes on why people aren't checking their credit score as often as they were in years past, and why that could be a big mistake. 

Nov 06 2019

42mins

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Ep 185: Finding Life's True Riches With Rabbi Steve Leder 

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Tune into any reality show these days (Extreme Makeovers, Cribs, The Biggest Loser, the list goes on) and it probably won't be long before a certain message filters into your consciousness: If you change your outer life, it will change your inner life. But that's a lie. What we have is not who we are, no matter how hard pop culture may drill that message into our heads. That's just a bit of the wonderful insight shared on this week's episode by Rabbi Steve Leder, senior Rabbi of Wilshire Temple in Los Angeles. Leder is the author of several critically acclaimed books, including More Money Than God: Living A Rich Life Without Losing Your Soul, and More Beautiful Than Before: How Suffering Transforms Us. 

Listen in as he shares why he became a Rabbi, and how the synagogue became the place where he could pursue his passion for creative, cultural, intellectual and spiritual matters. He also discusses his early work on a congressional campaign and why he decided not to pursue politics. "I realized that I cared more about the values expressed in the bible than I did about the values being expressed in political warfare, so I made the decision at 20 years old to go to Rabbinical school, and I never looked back," he says. 

As a Rabbi, Leder says that over the years, he's seen many people who have a disconnect between their set of professed values and their lived values — and that's a recipe for trouble. When we have this disconnect, it can present many problems in our lives, and pose a challenge for how we raise our children. As a father, Leder knows all too well the challenges of raising kids who truly know the value of a dollar, and understand the difference between wants and needs. He and Jean share some real talk on how to raise healthy, well-grounded and decent humans in the Instagram, instant-gratification reality we live in. In today's world, we can press a single button and have just about anything we want delivered right to the doorstep. So how do we break the cycle of shopping for sport? "For kids, you have to engage," Leder says. 

In his most recent book, More Beautiful Than Before: How Suffering Transforms Us, Leder opens up about his difficult recovery from a car accident and severe back injury that changed his perspective on suffering. "I realized coming out the other end of it, that I knew very little to nothing about real pain, and this book was an apology, and an attempt to set the record straight about pain and what we can learn from it," he says. 

Lastly, in Mailbag, Jean advises a woman who recently found herself as the primary breadwinner following her husband's retirement, and tackles a question about the rules for exactly how much you need to have saved heading into retirement. In Thrive, Jean dishes on wedding insurance, and whether or not it's something the happy couple should really be investing in. 

Oct 30 2019

38mins

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HerMoney Podcast Episode 184: Building Your Personal Brand With Marketing Guru Seth Godin

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On this week's episode of the HerMoney podcast, we're going deep! We're diving right in for some introspection, and we're going to flip the script a little bit by asking you a question:  Are you the kind of person who always follows through? Someone who always — or almost always — keeps their promises?

If you're feeling guilty already, don't, because this week's guest, Seth Godin, has some motivation for all of us that's going to change the way we think about our word and our personal brand. Seth is the author of an incredible 19 books, including the worldwide best-sellers 'Linchpin,' 'The Dip' and 'This Is Marketing.' He's the founder of workshops including the ALT-MBA, and 'The Marketing Seminar,' which more than 10,000 people have taken, and if that weren't enough, he's also an entrepreneur and in 2018 was inducted into the Marketing Hall Of Fame.

Seth says that the strength of your personal brand — and perhaps even your entire career — hinges on a single question: Do you do what you say you're going to do? Seth says that you tell people who you are every day, at every interaction, without even realizing it. Because your personal brand all comes down to what people expect when they engage with you — and in that way, your brand is nothing but a promise... a promise you'd be wise to keep!

Listen in as Seth tells us all what good marketing looks like, how spam is "in the eye of the beholder" and how we should never (ever) spend money to make short-term pain go away. He also dishes on how our "lizard brains" (the parts of us that still make us wild animals) are influencing our decisions day to day, and how we can tame these parts of ourselves and tune into what's in our best interest. 

In Mailbag, Jean tackles the question of where to invest money once you've maxed out your 401(k) and addresses the best way for someone in their early 50's to save for retirement. She also advises a woman who rents out part of her home, is considering getting liability insurance, and is looking into refinancing her home loan. 

Lastly, in Thrive, Jean takes on the fact that some private colleges are — shockingly — lowering tuition, but there's more to this story than meets the eye. As these institutions lower their sticker price, they're taking away scholarships and other discounts. The big takeaway? Always look at the net price of what you're paying for college before you commit. 

Oct 23 2019

41mins

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Ep 183: On The Couch With Financial Therapist Amanda Clayman 

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That's just a bit of the wisdom shared by this week's HerMoney podcast guest, financial therapist Amanda Clayman. In her role, Amanda guides her clients on how they can positively change their overall approach to their finances, and adjust their thinking in areas that may be holding them back. 

Over the last decade, the concept of financial therapy has become more mainstream, as more people have sought to discover why and how our thoughts and feelings may shape our financial choices. 

Amanda says she was led to her profession after seeing "how money was so misunderstood, and how much suffering we really take on in our lives because of this misunderstanding." Facing her own financial struggles has better enabled her to guide her clients: "I was in a pattern where I would just shut my eyes and spend," she says, describing some of the money habits she had to re-learn. 

"I had been engaging with money only as a form of self punishment," she says, discussing a time when she erroneously believed she had to strip away all the small joys and comforts from her life in order to pay off debt. After some self-discovery, she was able to make the mindset shift from thinking of budgeting as a constraint that forced her to say "no," to a tool that has allowed her to say "yes" to the things she wants most in life. 

At the end of the day, Amanda says she tries to impart to all her clients that money is a tool that should be used consciously — a tool that allows us to take care of ourselves and the things and people we care most about, both today and in the future.  She describes why her approach to money is based on holistic health and wellness, and tells us what many of her clients have in common. (Hint: No one shows up to financial therapy because they want to check in and brag about how well they're doing with their money!) In many cases, people seek her guidance because of a conflict in their family, or a desire to finally put a stop to a recurring problem. Amanda starts each session by helping her clients to establish a framework for where money is or isn't working in their lives, and then digs into where and why money may be causing them anxiety. 

Amanda also offers up her thoughts on the automation of our finances — sometimes "set it and forget it" can separate us too much from our money. "I fully embrace and appreciate automation, but it takes us away from being conscious," she says. In other words, automation is a place that we want to get to, but there needs to be a period where we are highly engaged with our money before we can allow ourselves to disengage. 

In her role as a financial therapist, Amanda has guided hundreds of couples on their path to understanding one another's differing money styles, and has helped them "excavate under the surface" so they can start solving the real problems. (As opposed to just arguing about who is "right"... No one is, but often we so desperately want our partner to validate our point of view that it results in conflict!) 

Lastly, Amanda shares her thoughts on why money is such a sensitive and powerful thing, and offers her tips for the best things we can all do to feel positive and confident about our finances on a daily basis. She leaves us with some powerful philosophy to mull over as we look to make more empowered money decisions: “Don't live so in service of the future that you miss out on the joys of today. And similarly, don't be so focused on today that you aren't taking the necessary steps to have safety in the future.” 

Then, in Mailbag, Jean and Kathryn talk about the pros and cons of closing credit cards you no longer use, what to do if you worry you'll have too much money saved for college, and the myriad options for how childfree individuals can leave a legacy behind. And in Thrive, Jean gets serious about elder abuse — who’s at risk, how to prevent it, and what to do if you suspect it. 

Oct 16 2019

41mins

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A Concise Podcast

By Cindyk8086 - Jan 15 2020
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I love every episode of HerMoney. I learn something on each one, and I love the 30-40 minute length. The content is presented in a concise way and I can fit it in my morning routine. Thanks for all you do!

Her Money

By BF@MG - Oct 03 2019
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This is the financial podcast I listen to every week. I always learn something new. Great job!