Cover image of A Cape Cod Notebook from WCAI
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Society & Culture
Government
Science
Natural Sciences

A Cape Cod Notebook from WCAI

Updated 13 days ago

Society & Culture
Government
Science
Natural Sciences
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A nature writer living in Wellfleet, Robert Finch has written about Cape Cod for more than forty years. He is the author of nine books of essays. A Cape Cod Notebook airs weekly on WCAI, the NPR station for Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and the South Coast. In both 2006 and 2013, the series won the New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.

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A nature writer living in Wellfleet, Robert Finch has written about Cape Cod for more than forty years. He is the author of nine books of essays. A Cape Cod Notebook airs weekly on WCAI, the NPR station for Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and the South Coast. In both 2006 and 2013, the series won the New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.

iTunes Ratings

18 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
2
0
0
2

This speaks to my heart

By Moonflowerkl - Sep 12 2019
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I adore this podcast. And I adore Cape Cod. I don’t use the word “adore” lightly. There is something wild and so very natural about the Cape and these short essays about this wonderful place make me yearn to be there full time. I hope these stories continue. Thank you for this podcast that speaks to my heart.

Keeps me in a Cape Cod frame of mind

By Pattycaker62 - Feb 20 2019
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I so hate leaving the cape each year, and gaze mournfully over my shoulder as we pull away. This podcast keeps me sustained with stories about the wildlife, seashores, happenings and history of the cape. The authors/speakers are wonderful. Thank you.

iTunes Ratings

18 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
2
0
0
2

This speaks to my heart

By Moonflowerkl - Sep 12 2019
Read more
I adore this podcast. And I adore Cape Cod. I don’t use the word “adore” lightly. There is something wild and so very natural about the Cape and these short essays about this wonderful place make me yearn to be there full time. I hope these stories continue. Thank you for this podcast that speaks to my heart.

Keeps me in a Cape Cod frame of mind

By Pattycaker62 - Feb 20 2019
Read more
I so hate leaving the cape each year, and gaze mournfully over my shoulder as we pull away. This podcast keeps me sustained with stories about the wildlife, seashores, happenings and history of the cape. The authors/speakers are wonderful. Thank you.
Cover image of A Cape Cod Notebook from WCAI

A Cape Cod Notebook from WCAI

Latest release on Oct 20, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 13 days ago

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This means that the episode rankings aren't working properly. Please revisit us at a later time to get the best episodes of this podcast!

Rank #1: Off Season

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The other Friday night, we were driving around. With the heat on, windows down, and (new this year) masks on. I leaned my head out the window a bit, the sky turning from pink to yellow to blue. We headed towards the western end of the island, where the sun lingers the longest. Everyone speeds up as they approach the slight hill on the way to the dump.

Oct 20 2020

2mins

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Rank #2: The Green Flash

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Today I’d like to talk to you a bit about the “green flash.” And no, by that I don’t mean the merging of two of my boyhood comic book heroes, the Green Arrow and The Flash. No, I mean the “green flash,” one of the most common yet rarely observed of celestial phenomena.

Oct 13 2020

3mins

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Rank #3: The Value of Ignorance

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Thoreau once wrote, “A man’s ignorance can be a useful, even a beautiful thing.” One day last summer I experienced the truth of this first-hand. For some time I had noticed a small new sign on the east side of Route 6, shortly before the Truro Center exit that said “Conservation Trails.” So I decided to check it out. I pulled off the highway into a small parking lot, where a map identified the area as the ANSEL CHAPLIN AND DAVID KUECHLE CONSERVATION AREA, owned and maintained jointly by the Truro Conservation Trust and the Town of Truro.

Oct 06 2020

3mins

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Rank #4: The Sky Is Not Empty

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In the wild world, birds are the most commonly seen vertebrate, and, at this time of year—September into October—the Tree Swallow is probably the most commonly seen bird. These tiny green-and-white beings flock to our coastal areas by the tens of thousands. The Cape could be seen as Convention Central for them, as they congregate prior to migration south. They can be seen over ponds and lakes, over the dunes, and most especially up in the sky.

Sep 29 2020

4mins

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Rank #5: A Different Kind of Summer

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Like many Cape Codders this summer, I had extra people at my house. Family who usually come for two weeks came for two months. Some days there were three adults working, from bedroom to basement. One 8-year-old in Zoom camp or school in the kitchen. And one 4-year-old doing whatever he could wherever he was.

Sep 22 2020

3mins

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Rank #6: Out to Sea

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It is undeniable, this slipping away of summer. The sun, still tucked into ocean waves like blankets, rises later than I do. The electric symphony of insect sounds has been unplugged, or at least dialed down a few notches.

Sep 15 2020

3mins

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Rank #7: Why Do We Need Nature - Part Two

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Over the years I have attempted to answer that question again and again: Why do we need nature in an essential but non-utilitarian way – the way we need music or art or literature – or love? Today I’d like to give you just two of the answers I’ve come up with – knowing that, like all such answers, they are inadequate. One reason I believe we fundamentally need nature is the physical contact that nature affords. For one thing, most of the best nature writers I know have begun their life-long passion for the natural world with just such playful, undirected interactions. But this, ironically, goes against the current environmental catechism. More and more we are told not to physically interact with the natural world. “Take only photographs, leave only footprints” is the contemporary environmentalist’s mantra – and as we know, in a sensitive place like Cape Cod, even footprints are looked down upon. I have on more than one occasion been criticized for urging greater physical contact with

Sep 08 2020

4mins

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Rank #8: Why Do We Need Nature - Part One

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Sometimes I think that almost everything I’ve written in my long career here as a writer on Cape Cod has been an attempt to answer one crucial underlying question, namely, “Why do we need nature?”

Sep 01 2020

3mins

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Rank #9: The Search for the Elusive Four-toed Salamander

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We share this planet with multiple uncounted millions of species. If we consider just those visible, there are still millions; and even if we limit our focus to just those with backbones—fish, birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians—we will have to deal with many thousands, and new species are still being discovered in the frontiers of the rain forest canopy and the ocean’s depths.

Aug 25 2020

4mins

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Rank #10: The Search for Solitude During Summer

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A couple of weeks ago, my phone buzzed with a message from Amanda. She’d sent a link to a boat for sale out in Polpis. She’s always sending me interesting items--a house on a Cliff, new to the market, a steal at 22 million dollars. The latest infection numbers from the hospital. Or a photograph of some corner of the island I’d never really considered much before she captured it.

Aug 18 2020

3mins

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