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Stephanomics

Updated 2 days ago

Rank #36 in Investing category

Business
Careers
Investing
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Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

Read more

Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

iTunes Ratings

240 Ratings
Average Ratings
180
17
10
12
21

Best

By jj237? - Oct 03 2019
Read more
The first episode was outstanding. Looking forward to the whole season

Great podcast ! Don’t go on hiatus!!

By katandbrandon - Dec 02 2018
Read more
This is a well produced and interesting podcast.

iTunes Ratings

240 Ratings
Average Ratings
180
17
10
12
21

Best

By jj237? - Oct 03 2019
Read more
The first episode was outstanding. Looking forward to the whole season

Great podcast ! Don’t go on hiatus!!

By katandbrandon - Dec 02 2018
Read more
This is a well produced and interesting podcast.

Listen to:

Cover image of Stephanomics

Stephanomics

Updated 2 days ago

Read more

Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

36: Puerto Rico's $70 Billion Crisis Just Might Be Catastrophic

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Puerto Rico missed a $400 million debt payment on Sunday, and bigger, more consequential defaults could follow. But how did things get so bad in the first place? Michelle Kaske, Bloomberg's municipal bonds reporter, joins Dan and Aki to discuss the best- and worst-case scenarios for the U.S. Territory as its next payment deadline approaches.

May 04 2016

18mins

Play

40: How to Earn $250/Hour in the Gig Economy

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Every day the gig economy gets bigger, whether you're talking about drivers on Uber or programmers on Upwork. Are these workers freed from the drudgery and rigidity of full-time jobs, or are they exploited by companies that want to sidestep the commitments and the costs of traditional employees? Danny Margulies, who catapulted from unemployment in 2012 to a freelance copywriter commanding as much as $250 an hour, joins Aki and guest co-host Saleha Mohsin this week to offer a peek into his own life. Danny loves his arrangement, but as Benchmark's own Tori Stilwell reports this week, some economists worry it's leading to a more precarious labor market for middle and low-wage workers.

Jun 01 2016

26mins

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47: Looking Back on President Trump's First Six Months

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How would the U.S. economy fare under President Donald J. Trump? Hosts Scott Lanman and Kate Smith journey one year into the future to track the Benchmark podcast from July 21, 2017. Joning them is Neil Dutta from Renaissance Macro Partners, who helps explain just what's happened during Trump's first six months -- and we also learn just how crazy this Pokemon Go thing has gotten.

Jul 20 2016

21mins

Play

How the Trade War Is Reshaping Supply Chains From Los Angeles to Vietnam

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Economies represent the ultimate sum of millions of people and businesses making millions of decisions. And if enough of those businesses are frozen on how to respond to the U.S.-China trade war -- like the owner of a Los Angeles cosmetics company featured in this week's episode -- then the U.S. economy will be in trouble. Sarah McGregor, editor of Bloomberg's real-economy team, reports on how the businesswoman, Dara Venekeo, is being forced to consider whether to relocate her hard-built supply chains from China to another country, such as Vietnam.

The conversation on supply chains continues as host Stephanie Flanders visits Singapore this week and checks in with Asia economy reporter Michelle Jamrisko there on how the situation is playing out in Southeast Asia and particularly Vietnam. Stephanie also talks with Asia economy editor Malcolm Scott on how the China-dependent economies of South Korea, Australia and New Zealand might need to resort to unorthodox monetary measures to shore up growth.

Oct 31 2019

24mins

Play

Death and Despair in White America

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We usually don't think about economics as a life-or-death subject. But for white Americans without a college degree, there's no other way to describe it. With job opportunities limited and an opioid epidemic in full throttle, death rates among this group are skyrocketing, an issue that probably helped elect Donald Trump as president. Anne Case and Angus Deaton, the married academic couple who brought this issue to the forefront, have just issued a followup paper to their groundbreaking 2015 study on the subject. Case returns to Benchmark to discuss the latest findings with Dan and Scott -- and offers her ominous take on what it portends for the future of the nation.

Mar 29 2017

26mins

Play

Washington Talks, the World Listens

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What is the future for international institutions like the International Monetary Fund - and what, if anything, can it do to help Argentina? These are just some of the topics in a special episode from the annual meetings of the Fund and World Bank in Washington. Stephanie speaks about the future of the world on an all-star panel with former India central bank chief Raghuram Rajan and ex-Bundesbank head Axel Weber, along with Columbia University professor Glenn Hubbard, a White House economic adviser under George W. Bush. She also gets a chance to ask Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas President Robert Kaplan - who helps set US interest rates - whether central banks can even control inflation anymore.

But first, Latin America economic editor Bruce Douglas reports from Buenos Aires on just how deep Argentina's problems go -- and whether they can be fixed. It's all part of Stephanomics's lead-up to Bloomberg's New Economy Forum in Beijing in November, where global governance will be high on the agenda.

Oct 24 2019

36mins

Play

Episode 2: Should You Be Freaking Out Over China?

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(Bloomberg) -- When stocks crash in the world's second-largest economy, people pay attention. In this bonus episode, Brookings senior fellow Kenneth Lieberthal joins the team to discuss what's happening in China, where its economy is heading and what Dan discovered while back-to-school shopping for his son.

Sep 15 2015

22mins

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Why Everyone Needs to Care About the Fed's Shrinking Balance Sheet

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The Federal Reserve said this week that it's about to try something that's never been done on this scale in the annals of central banking: reduce its $4.5 trillion stockpile of assets. The ramifications could be felt everywhere from mortgage rates, to the cost of vacationing in Thailand, even to President Donald Trump's attitude toward the Fed. Bloomberg reporter Chris Condon joins Scott to explain what's happening and try to come up with a better name than "balance sheet normalization" for the whole process. 

Jul 27 2017

15mins

Play

Big Data's Lens Into the U.S. Economy

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Most U.S. economic data, such as jobs and consumer spending, is based not on actual data, but on surveys of Americans and businesses. What if you could look at every single purchase that people make, or peek at the bank accounts of every small business? The JPMorgan Chase Institute is trying to do just that -- using the bank's vast customer data -- and sniff out trends in the economy that are invisible in the official numbers.

Nov 29 2018

29mins

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Episode 43: What have they done?

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Have British voters rejected more than the EU? The vote to leave the Union, which grew from the idea seven decades ago that enmeshed economies won't wage war on one another, is a blow to the liberal order that's prevailed since 1945. It's also a shot across the bow of modern family life. Paul Gordon from London joins Dan Moss to explain why. We also find out what the barista said to Paul as dawn broke in London and how he will greet his German wife when he comes home to Frankfurt.

Jun 24 2016

16mins

Play

Episode 4: The Millennials Go Rogue

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(Bloomberg) -- With Dan on vacation, Tori and Aki take the chance to talk about their generation: the millennials. They push past the stereotypes and fact-check some common assumptions using real data. Listen to find out if millennials are forever scarred by the recession, when they'll start having children, and just how big the consequences of their economic decision-making could be.

Sep 24 2015

21mins

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Why Millions of Americans Still Live Paycheck-to-Paycheck

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Millions of middle-class Americans face an unexpected reality in today's era of economic growth: their paychecks vary so much that paying bills and saving for the future is exhausting and challenging month after month. This week on Benchmark, Dan and Scott speak with Jonathan Morduch and Rachel Schneider, whose book, "The Financial Diaries," vividly illustrates the financial struggles of more than 200 U.S. families.

May 31 2017

26mins

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How Artificial Intelligence is Taking Over the Economy

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From self-driving cars to robot-powered factories, artificial intelligence is taking over significant pieces of the global economy. But while this is good news for the businesses incorporating robots into their workplaces, it also means more and more people will lose their jobs to computers. Joshua Gans, co-author of the recent book "Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence," explains to hosts Scott Lanman and Christopher Condon what this shift means for the economy, and how it will also impact issues like inequality, monopolies and geopolitical competition. 

Apr 26 2018

21mins

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Why China's Population Is About to Plunge

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Is a trade war or surging debt the biggest threat to China's economy? Try declining fertility. While the nation recently relaxed its one-child policy, such moves are unlikely to head off a projected plunge in population that will constrain the country in coming decades. In the second of a two-part episode on falling global fertility, Scott Lanman talks with Cai Yong, an expert in Chinese demographics at the University of North Carolina, about the challenges facing the world's second-biggest economy.

Jul 05 2018

16mins

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Episode 3: Will You Get a Raise This Year?

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(Bloomberg) -- Hosts Tori Stilwell, Aki Ito and Dan Moss talk paychecks. Why have Americans' wages been stagnant for more than six years, when will that change and which industries' workers are in the best position for a raise? The hosts use Labor Department data and a Magic 8 ball to get to the bottom of things.

Sep 17 2015

21mins

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How Trump's Tax Cut Will Lead To NYC's Fall

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The American South will keep rising and Dallas will eclipse New York. The city that never sleeps has had its obituary written plenty of times, but it may just have met its match in native son Donald Trump. His tax-cut law is more than just a deficit-busting giveaway to the rich; it affirms the economic and political rise of the South. Even New York's famed cultural and intellectual scene is in jeopardy along with financial primacy. Jared Dillian, publisher of the `Daily Dirtnap' and a Bloomberg View contributor explains how to Dan and Scott.  

Jan 11 2018

21mins

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Why GDP Is a Dumb Way to Measure Economic Output

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G, a D and a P. Three letters, lots of trouble. Gross Domestic Product is the world's most common way to measure the value of all goods and services produced in an economy. But does it really deserve its pedestal? Lorenzo Fioramonti, a professor at the University of Pretoria, tells Dan and Scott that the acronym should actually stand for "Gross Dumb Product." He argues that it's responsible for all manner of sins, ranging from the pillaging of a South Pacific island to an instrument used by austerity-craven northern Europeans to hammer Greece. Time for a revolution, Fioramonti insists. Just make sure investors don't crucify you.

Apr 12 2017

24mins

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How Trade War is Reshaping China

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The force of the trade war unleashed by Donald Trump goes beyond peeved farmers and pricier gadgets. The entire economic model of modern corporations is up for grabs, just as China is undergoing a huge internal shift that's likely to upend supply chains. Frances Lim of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts shares with Daniel Moss of Bloomberg Opinion her conclusions from a recent trip to the epicenter. 

Sep 13 2018

23mins

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How Will a Trade War Impact China's Economy?

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The U.S. and China are on the verge of a trade war, one that President Donald Trump says will be easy to win. So how will it really impact China's economy? Is the nation's GDP really growing at an incredible 7 percent rate, or is it about to collapse from a mountain of debt and aging population? Jeff Kearns, a Bloomberg editor who just finished a three-year stint in Beijing, helps separate myth from fact with host Scott Lanman, himself a former China economy editor.

Jun 21 2018

20mins

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India: All Growth, No Jobs

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This week we focus on the two giants of the global economy: China and India. At first glance, China seems to be shrugging off the effects of U.S. tariffs, but Bloomberg economists looked closer and found that Chinese exports to the US in 1,000s of product categories had been hit hard and this trade had not also been replaced by U.S. production or exports from other countries. Host Stephanie Flanders gets the full story from Bloomberg economist Maeva Cousin. We also explore a great economic puzzle of recent times:  how can India grow by 6%-7% a year for 20 years without creating jobs for half of its potential workers?    

The world’s second most-populous economy has seen a step change in its economic performance in the past 20 years but job growth keeps coming up short. Less than half of the working-age population is in work or even looking for a job -- and nearly 80% of women are not in the workforce at all. Anirban Nag and Vrishti Beniwal go in search of an answer on the streets of New Delhi, and Stephanie asks Bloomberg Opinion columnist Mihir Sharma what it all means for India’s newly re-elected Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Jun 27 2019

29mins

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Remembering Paul Volcker

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Paul Volcker, the former Federal Reserve chairman who died this week at age 92, was an imposing public figure—in height as well as stature.

He was best known for his bold moves in the U.S. war against inflation, and for his dedication to public service. But there was more to the man, as Bloomberg Markets editor Christine Harper discovered as she worked with Volcker to co-write his 2018 memoir, “Keeping At It.”

Harper joins host Stephanie Flanders to share her memories and observations of Volcker’s humor, hobbies and patience.

Also this week, Stephanomics explores what’s ailing India, which this year lost its title as the world’s fastest-growing major economy.

Moreover, any chance of regaining that crown looks like it’s slipping away, despite the efforts of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. One reason: The gem and jewelry industry, which accounts for almost 7% of India’s economy, is suffering thanks to external forces like the U.S.-China trade war as well as a possible setback from the Indian government itself.

Anirban Nag reports from Mumbai on the sector, while Flanders digs deeper into the Modi agenda with Bloomberg economist Abhishek Gupta.

Dec 12 2019

29mins

Play

More Than Just Brexit

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Will the Conservatives loosen the purse strings and spur a growth revival? Can Labour realize its vision of radically reshaping the U.K. economy? How will the course of Brexit be altered?

Stephanie Flanders tackles these questions and more in a preview of Great Britain’s Dec. 12 vote to elect a new government.

Flanders leads a live-recorded panel discussion with three important thinkers: Paul Johnson of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, Bronwen Maddox of the Institute for Government and Anand Menon of UK in a Changing Europe.

Then Bloomberg U.K. economist Dan Hanson joins Flanders for a closer look at the implications of three possible results of the election.

Dec 05 2019

43mins

Play

Superyachts: The Key to the Global Economy

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What does the business of flashy superyachts for the megarich have to do with the health of the U.S. economy?

A lot, it turns out. They’re often seen as a barometer of consumer spending, and as the holiday shopping season gets in full swing, all eyes are on American wallets.

On this week’s episode of “Stephanomics,” Bloomberg reporter Michael Sasso visits a big boat show in Florida only to discover that sales aren’t looking so great. Then host Stephanie Flanders talks with Carl Riccadonna, Bloomberg’s chief U.S. economist, about his somewhat downbeat macro view of holiday spending.

As a bonus, you’ll hear some additional insights from last week’s New Economy Forumin Beijing. Jorg Kukies, Germany’s deputy finance minister, talks with Flanders about the impact Brexit will have on Europe’s biggest economy.

Nov 28 2019

23mins

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Driving the New Economy

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This week’s episode of Stephanomics comes to you from Beijing, where Bloomberg hosted the second annual New Economy Forum, bringing together global leaders to discuss how to solve the world’s biggest challenges. 

Stephanie Flanders first interviews Nicholas Stern, one of the world’s foremost experts on climate change and economics—a combined subject that’s gained increasing urgency for policymakers. Stern is a former adviser to the U.K. government and now chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change at the London School of Economics.

Then we have Zhu Min, a former senior official at China’s central bank as well as the International Monetary Fund. He joins Flanders to discuss key issues in the global economy as well as the U.S.-China trade war.

Finally, we’ll hear excerpts from a panel discussion on a Bloomberg Economics report called Drivers and Disrupters, addressing the forces threatening the world’s hottest economies. Speakers include Tom Orlik, Bloomberg’s chief economist, and former HSBC Chief Economist Stephen King.

Nov 22 2019

35mins

Play

Is It Curtains for the U.S.-China Economic Relationship?

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Beneath the tariffs, counter-tariffs and on-again off-again negotiations between the U.S. and China over trade policy, a deeper confrontation is brewing—one with potentially bigger consequences.

In a punitive, short-term move, the U.S. is preventing Chinese companies from using some American technologies. But longer-term, the tactic may trigger a “Silicon Curtain” behind which China develops homegrown tech to rival America’s.

Carolynn Look reports from China on how this is playing out for businesses big and small, and host Stephanie Flanders talks with Bloomberg Chief Economist Tom Orlik about what it all means for China’s economy.

Then we switch gears, in more ways than one, and turn to a new list of the best (and worst) cities around for drivers. Flanders and Bloomberg economy editor Zoe Schneeweiss discuss what makes a metropolis great for automobiles. As it turns out, what’s good for driving can also be good for walking and bicycling.

Nov 14 2019

29mins

Play

What the Sanders or Warren Wealth Tax Means for Inequality in the U.S.

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The 2020 U.S. presidential election may be a year away but one policy idea is already stirring fierce debate: a big-time tax on the richest Americans. Katia Dmitrieva reports on why Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren want to implement a wealth tax, and how it might work. Many economists have also been warming to the idea of taxing wealth. But you can't help noticing that most of the European countries that have tried wealth taxes have later junked them. Host Stephanie Flanders talks with Bloomberg economists Johanna Jeansson and Maeva Cousin about the death of wealth taxes in Sweden and France and the possible lessons for the US. 

Then Stephanie talks with Frankfurt-based economy editor Jana Randow about two major milestones in the region: Christine Lagarde taking over as president of the European Central Bank and the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Randow -- the co-author of a recent book about outgoing ECB head Mario Draghi -- explains how Lagarde is likely to differ from her predecessor. She then shares her personal memories of November 1989 from the standpoint of a child growing up in East Germany.

Nov 07 2019

30mins

Play

How the Trade War Is Reshaping Supply Chains From Los Angeles to Vietnam

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Economies represent the ultimate sum of millions of people and businesses making millions of decisions. And if enough of those businesses are frozen on how to respond to the U.S.-China trade war -- like the owner of a Los Angeles cosmetics company featured in this week's episode -- then the U.S. economy will be in trouble. Sarah McGregor, editor of Bloomberg's real-economy team, reports on how the businesswoman, Dara Venekeo, is being forced to consider whether to relocate her hard-built supply chains from China to another country, such as Vietnam.

The conversation on supply chains continues as host Stephanie Flanders visits Singapore this week and checks in with Asia economy reporter Michelle Jamrisko there on how the situation is playing out in Southeast Asia and particularly Vietnam. Stephanie also talks with Asia economy editor Malcolm Scott on how the China-dependent economies of South Korea, Australia and New Zealand might need to resort to unorthodox monetary measures to shore up growth.

Oct 31 2019

24mins

Play

Washington Talks, the World Listens

Podcast cover
Read more

What is the future for international institutions like the International Monetary Fund - and what, if anything, can it do to help Argentina? These are just some of the topics in a special episode from the annual meetings of the Fund and World Bank in Washington. Stephanie speaks about the future of the world on an all-star panel with former India central bank chief Raghuram Rajan and ex-Bundesbank head Axel Weber, along with Columbia University professor Glenn Hubbard, a White House economic adviser under George W. Bush. She also gets a chance to ask Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas President Robert Kaplan - who helps set US interest rates - whether central banks can even control inflation anymore.

But first, Latin America economic editor Bruce Douglas reports from Buenos Aires on just how deep Argentina's problems go -- and whether they can be fixed. It's all part of Stephanomics's lead-up to Bloomberg's New Economy Forum in Beijing in November, where global governance will be high on the agenda.

Oct 24 2019

36mins

Play

Coming Soon: Travel Genius Season 2

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Bloomberg's Travel Genius podcast is back! After clocking another hundred-thousand miles in the sky, hosts Nikki Ekstein and Mark Ellwood have a whole new series of flight hacking, restaurant sleuthing, and hotel booking tips to inspire your own getaways—along with a who's who roster of itinerant pros ready to spill their own travel secrets. From a special episode on Disney to a master class on packing, we'll go high, low, east, west, and everywhere in between. The new season starts Nov. 6.

Oct 23 2019

2mins

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A Newly Minted Nobel Laureate on Making Economics More of a Science

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The macroeconomic kind of economist tends to get the most attention - talking about growth, inflation and whether interest rates should go up or down. But it’s the micro economists working away quietly on smaller parts of the economy who have typically done most to change the world. This week Stephanie Flanders talks to one of them - Harvard University’s Michael Kremer about winning the 2019 Nobel Prize for Economics with two other researchers - and how their work has transformed the way we tackle global poverty. There’s something for macro fans as well with a high level discussion on the future of monetary policy. 

Should central banks be trying to save the planet - and are there tools to fight the next recession which do not disproportionately benefit the rich? These are Just two of the questions up for debate in a panel Stephanie chaired this week featuring Claudio Borio of the Bank for International Settlements, former Bank of England policy makers Sir Charlie Bean and Dame Kate Barker, and Graham Turner, founder of GFC and adviser to the U.K. Labour Party.

Oct 17 2019

29mins

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The Baby Bust and the Global Economy

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Growth has been slowing around the developed world — not just in recent months but for decades. One potential reason is that women are having fewer babies. On this week's Stephanomics, reporter Jeannette Neumann visits a region in Spain with the lowest fertility rate in Europe to find out why this is happening and what it means for the global economy. Host Stephanie Flanders also talks with Darrell Bricker, co-author of the book “Empty Planet,” about his theory that the global population will begin to decline.

One way to prop up the birthrate could be to offer employees a better work-life balance. Recent U.S. data showed that people who work at home aren't just growing in number but also, on average, earn more than those who commute. Bloomberg Opinion columnist Justin Fox joins Stephanie to consider the implications of this striking fact.

Oct 10 2019

31mins

Play

The Trade War Has Already Caused a Recession for America's Factories

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Stephanie Flanders returns with a new season of Stephanomics, bringing on-the-ground insights from Bloomberg's reporters and economists into the forces driving the global economy. On this week's episode, senior trade reporter Shawn Donnan heads to the front lines of the US-China trade war in Wisconsin, and Stephanie talks through its global impact with Penny Goldberg, chief economist at the World Bank.

One silver lining to all this, says Goldberg, is that more attention is finally being paid to trade policy. She also discusses whether this period will mark the high point for globalization - and confirms the suspicions of manufacturers that Shawn spoke to out in the field, who believe that they are paying the tariffs - not China, as claimed so often by Donald Trump. 

Oct 03 2019

34mins

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Introducing Stephanomics Season 2

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Stephanie Flanders, head of Bloomberg Economics, returns to bring you another season of on-the-ground insight into the forces driving global growth and jobs today. From the cosmetics maker in California grappling with Donald Trump's tariff war, to the coffee vendor in Argentina burdened by the nation's never-ending crises, Bloomberg's 130-plus economic reporters and economists around the world head into the field to tell these stories. Stephanomics will also look hard at the solutions, in the lead-up to Bloomberg’s second New Economy Forum in Beijing, where a select group of business leaders, politicians and thinkers will gather to chart a better course on trade, global governance, climate and more. Stephanomics will help lead the way for those debates not just with Bloomberg journalists but also discussion and analysis from world-renowned experts into the forces that are moving markets and reshaping the world. The new season of Stephanomics launches Oct. 3.

Sep 26 2019

3mins

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Introducing Prognosis Season 3: Superbugs

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On this new season of Prognosis, we look at the spread of infections that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines. You're probably more likely to have heard of these as superbugs. Their rise has been described as a silent tsunami of catastrophic proportions. We travel to countries on the frontline of the crisis, and explore how hospitals and doctors around the world are fighting back. Prognosis’ new season launches Sept. 5. 

Aug 28 2019

3mins

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Bretton Woods at 75 and the Other Mexico Border Crisis

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Under pressure from President Donald Trump, Mexico is cracking down on migrants coming from its own southern neighbor, Guatemala. But the hit to the local economy could have unanticipated consequences for the U.S. Bloomberg's Eric Martin reports from the border, while Stephanie takes stock of these and other challenges for international economic cooperation at a conference in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire.  This month also marks 75 years since the Allied powers gathered at the Mount Washington hotel to lay the groundwork for the post-World War II economic order. At a conference commemorating the anniversary she talks with Meg Lundsager, the U.S.'s representative at the IMF from 2007 to 2014 and Nouriel Roubini - the economist famed for predicting the financial crisis who's recently become a big critic of the speculation in cryptocurrencies. 

Jul 25 2019

30mins

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The View From Paris

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The yellow-vest protests that shook France last year may be over, but the forces of political and economic anger continue to ripple around the world. Stephanie visits the City of Lights to speak with two key figures about how the country is faring and how major nations' finance chiefs are tackling these issues -- as well as Facebook's proposed digital currency, Libra -- at this week's Group of Seven meeting in France. Listen to her interviews with French Finance Minister Bruno le Maire and Laurence Boone, chief economist at the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Jul 18 2019

28mins

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In Spain, the Olive's Loss Is Aluminum's Gain

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Donald Trump’s trade policies have created winners and losers around the world. Among the big losers so far, count Spanish olive farmers. Their exports to the U.S. were hit with a huge tariff last year. U.S. officials claimed they had been undercutting California olive growers by selling Spanish olives on the cheap. Though barely a blip on the global trade war, it has been very bad news for the olive groves of southern Spain. But business is booming for Europe’s aluminum industry, especially its exports to the U.S., despite President Trump’s tariffs. What gives? 

Bloomberg's Jeannette Neumann wades into the worlds of olives and aluminum to figure out what's going on, then Stephanie talks through some of the many other unintended consequences of U.S. trade wars with Bloomberg trade tsar, Brendan Murray. She and Executive Editor Simon Kennedy also chat about the political pressure being piled on the US Federal Reserve and many other central banks. 

Jul 11 2019

29mins

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Is Populism the End or Salvation of Liberal Democracy?

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This week we bring you a special conversation between host Stephanie Flanders and Financial Times columnist Martin Wolf. They try to make sense of the rise in populism in recent years, what it means for the global economy, and whether it spells the end of liberal democracy. The event was recorded in London on July 1.

Jul 04 2019

30mins

Play

India: All Growth, No Jobs

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This week we focus on the two giants of the global economy: China and India. At first glance, China seems to be shrugging off the effects of U.S. tariffs, but Bloomberg economists looked closer and found that Chinese exports to the US in 1,000s of product categories had been hit hard and this trade had not also been replaced by U.S. production or exports from other countries. Host Stephanie Flanders gets the full story from Bloomberg economist Maeva Cousin. We also explore a great economic puzzle of recent times:  how can India grow by 6%-7% a year for 20 years without creating jobs for half of its potential workers?    

The world’s second most-populous economy has seen a step change in its economic performance in the past 20 years but job growth keeps coming up short. Less than half of the working-age population is in work or even looking for a job -- and nearly 80% of women are not in the workforce at all. Anirban Nag and Vrishti Beniwal go in search of an answer on the streets of New Delhi, and Stephanie asks Bloomberg Opinion columnist Mihir Sharma what it all means for India’s newly re-elected Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Jun 27 2019

29mins

Play

Draghi and Diversity

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European Central Bank President Mario Draghi earned the ire of Donald Trump this week with his farewell speech at a major annual conference. Editor Paul Gordon was there at the prestigious gathering in Sintra, Portugal, and breaks down Draghi's comments with host Stephanie Flanders. 

Then hear a special recording of Stephanie's engaging live panel discussion this week in London with two of the city's most prominent economic voices, HSBC Chief Economist Janet Henry and the Chief Economic Advisor to the UK Treasury, Clare Lombardelli. They discuss an increasingly hazy outlook for the world economy and offer their unique perspective on women and diversity in the economics profession -- or lack thereof.

Jun 20 2019

32mins

Play