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BLOGGED: a podcast for influencers

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Business
Education
Careers
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an new kind of blogger community

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an new kind of blogger community

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19 Ratings
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4

Such a cool concept for a podcast!

By est1996xx - Nov 12 2018
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I've listened to a few of these podcasts and am excited to learn from more!

Love!

By KARRIN RACHELLE - Jun 07 2018
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Thank you so much for your podcasts! ~Karrin Rachelle insta: @karrinrachelle

iTunes Ratings

19 Ratings
Average Ratings
15
0
0
0
4

Such a cool concept for a podcast!

By est1996xx - Nov 12 2018
Read more
I've listened to a few of these podcasts and am excited to learn from more!

Love!

By KARRIN RACHELLE - Jun 07 2018
Read more
Thank you so much for your podcasts! ~Karrin Rachelle insta: @karrinrachelle
Cover image of BLOGGED: a podcast for influencers

BLOGGED: a podcast for influencers

Latest release on Oct 17, 2018

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

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Rank #1: 009: Full-time Blogging Tips, Content Creation Strategy & Building a Community around your Platform with Erica Ligenza of Coming Up Roses

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we're talking with Erica Ligenza all about her best advice and insight into what it's like to be a full-time blogger. She shares some of her strategies behind her blog - from content creation to building a community around your own platform, and talks about tips for everything from social media to the challenges of being an entrepreneur. 

Erica is a Philadelphia-based life-and-style blogger and the author of Coming Up Roses. She's also a course creator and brand strategist who works to help businesses and entrepreneurs build their brands the right way, creating custom brand, marketing, and social media strategies.

Resources from this episode:

BossPitch: Pitching & Politely Persisting the Ultimate Brand Partnerships (Erica's Course)

Blog Strategy Workbook (My Haute Society)

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Find Erica:

CUR Blog // Instagram // Twitter

Blogged Podcast:

Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

Podcast: #BloggedPodcast

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The post 009: Full-time Blogging Tips, Content Creation Strategy & Building a Community around your Platform with Erica Ligenza of Coming Up Roses appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

Dec 25 2017

39mins

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Rank #2: 021: Brand Goals + Successful Collabs on Influencer Platforms with Brandbacker co-founders Sumeet Patel and Max Klausner

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we talk with Sumeet and Max about how to create successful collaborations using influencer platforms. They share insight into brand goals when it comes to collaborations as well as give us a little info about the BrandBacker platform and how bloggers and influencers can use it to connect and work with brands.

BrandBacker intelligently connects brands with thousands of influencers who create original blog posts, videos and social media posts. The BrandBacker content creation network has over 30,000 influencers that work with 100’s of brands including Neutrogena, L'Oreal, Evian and even the band One Direction. For over 6 years, they have helped generate over 100,000 pieces of content (and counting) that have reached well over 500 million consumers.

Sumeet Patel is a Co-Founder and Head of Product and Technology for BrandBacker. He is focused on building the inner and outer workings of BrandBacker while ensuring that the platform works well for both Influencers and Brands. Prior to founding BrandBacker, Sumeet was one of the first members of the renowned LinkedIn Data Science team and also worked on the model behind the FICO Credit Score.

Max Klausner is a Co-Founder and Head of Brand Partnerships for BrandBacker. He’s in charge of building relationships with brands and helping them craft their influencer marketing strategy.  Max has been involved in the beauty industry his entire life while working with his family's chain of cosmetic stores and recently founded an e-commerce makeup company. He's also served as a product manager for Affinity Labs and worked with the director of Moneyball.

Click here to pin this episode for later.

 Related Resources:

Brand Collaboration Resources - My Haute Society 

Find your blogger community!

Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

What we cover:

  • How the idea for Brand Backer first came about + how Max and Sumeet Met
  • A  little insight into the brand collaboration process: what are some of the most common goals brand’s have when working with influencers
  • How influencers can leverage influencer platforms to build relationships with brands
  • How influencers can get plugged into the BrandBacker platform and what are some of the advantages it offers
  • About one of Brandbacker's most successful campaigns:  What made it so amazing and some lessons that both influencers and brands can take away
  • Tips for influencers when it comes to being stand-out and an excellent influencer when it comes to working with brands

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Find BRANDBACKER:

Brandbacker Website  // Get started with BrandBacker as an influencer HERE

Blogged Podcast:

Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

#BloggedPodcast

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EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

Cara & C.J.: 00:00 You're listening to the blog podcast, episode number 21. Welcome to blog, a podcast for influencers. We're cj and Cara founders of my host society, a blogger community with events and resources to help you grow your following, build your blog, and monetize their influence. In this episode, we sit down with Max and submit to talk about how to create successful collaborations using influencer platforms and a little bit of insight into brand goals when it comes to collaboration and partnerships.

C.J.: 00:41 Brand backer intelligently connects brands with thousands of influencers who create original blog posts, videos, and social media posts. The brand backer content creation network has over 30,000 influencers that work with hundreds of brands, including Neutrogena, l'oréal, Evian, and even the band one direction. For over six years, I have helped generate over 100,000 pieces of content and counting that have reached well over 500,000,000 consumers. Amit Patel is a co-founder and head of product and technology for brand backer. He is focused on building the inner and outer workings of brand backer while ensuring that the platform works well for both influencers and brands. Prior to founding brand backers, to me, it was one of the first members of the rebound linkedin data science team and also worked on the model behind the fico credit score. Max Costner is co-founder and head of Brown partnerships for brand backer. He's in charge of building relationship with brands and helping them craft their influencer marketing strategy. Max has been involved in the beauty industry his entire life while working with his family's chain of cosmetic stores and recently founded an e-commerce makeup company. He also served as a product manager for affinity labs and worked with the director of moneyball. 

C.J.: 02:09 Thank you so much and some meat for sitting down with us today. We are beyond excited to talk a little bit about brand backer. It's a huge social influencer marketing agency obviously, or maybe not agency is the word you'd use, but it's huge in our world. We're. I, I know a lot of influencers are aware of it, so thank you so much for spending the time to chat with us. Awesome. Thanks for having us. Thanks for having us have corners. So just tell us a little bit about your background. Maybe what you were doing before you launch brand backer and how the two of you met and decided to watch brand backer.

Sumeet: 02:47 Yeah.  I'm originally from the bay area and so I've spent my whole life in kind of silicon valley kind of seeing the rise of that, um, you know, the nineties and then obviously, you know now, uh, and so I've always kind of been interested in technology. And so after graduating from UC Berkeley, go bears, um, you know, I, I went and worked in the tech and so, uh, initially working at [inaudible], um, which was great. Um, although, you know, there was a mortgage meltdown that happened, uh, and so, you know, saw, saw kind of the, uh, the backside of that and then moved on to Linkedin, which is a super interesting. Was there very early I got to see linkedin grow from kind of a small company to a publicly traded company. And I was focused mainly on analytics there. Um, you know, working on analytics products. So things like people you may know, things like that or also the business side of things. Um, then backs I actually met while while living on San Francisco. Maybe you can kind of go in his background.   

Max: 03:49 Um, so yeah, I'm just going like way back when, um, my background is sort of rooted in the cosmetic industry and uh, my family had a chain of cosmetics stores when I was growing up and uh, so they started those and so I kind of came from this entrepreneurial background, um, and then they sold their stores to JC Penney and then they did product development for a lot of the big box stores like Kohls, Walmart, a bath and body works, places like that. And then, uh, so I was sort of like grew up in that environment of doing product development and marketing pitches and that sort of, um, the environment that I, I was raised in and then when I was in college, so I went to Nyu for film. So I kind of come from that content creation, a background. I worked for a Bennett Miller who is a director who did a movie's lycopodium moneyball.  Kinda coming from I guess I was uh, I'm a photographer like growing up as well, um, and then got into video production and uh, and then built up that side of things too. So I'm sort of, I mean, I think both of these things are sort of applicable to, um, some of the roots of what we're doing now in fusing content creation with a, we work with a lot of, um, you know, cpg beauty brands and things like that. So a partially why I'm talking a little bit about that, but um, but yeah, so, uh, then, uh, my family, uh, I helped them start a makeup company when I was in college, so it's a performance makeup company that does a thing. Basically my sister was a dancer, so yeah. So you know, a little bit about that, the world, uh, yeah, I mean it's a different type of makeup and um, but yeah, like the, the idea was that every girl in the studio should have a similar look for the numbers and uh, providing a, um, a really easy way of being able to do that for the whole team. And so it's, it's a little different. But, um, I, I was uh, getting that off the ground when I was in college and then when I graduated, uh, I was sort of tasked with using my video production skills to do all of the content for that. So Youtube was like relatively new at this time. This, I mean that not to date myself or anything, but I like how old I'm getting, but I, yeah, I mean like youtube wasn't, that, didn't have that, a community and all of those videos and that content and that it has now where it's its own, obviously you guys know, uh, it's its own world. So, so yeah, I was very early involved in getting some of the, I went on to say some of the first, like how to make up videos, so like cut to, we did like a very in depth shoot and we did something like [inaudible] 20 like clips that were like maybe four or five minutes long of like all these different looks and a lot of glitter and sparkle.  So, so sorry, I'm already getting on tangents. So, so I was doing that and that's how I got into technology because then it turned into me doing all the video production to then, oh, you're somewhat technical than I basically moved out to silicon valley and a San Francisco. Uh, actually that is where I met some meat. So, but um, but yeah, we, we met um, early on, uh, because I, through craigslist, uh, moved in to my apartment and then a sweet lived down the street and was very good friends with the people who live there. They like, they went to college together and until we met at like one of the first weekends at a party there. And, uh, he invited me to start going to a weekly dinner that he had with one of our good friends and we'd all talk about startups and about, you know, our, our jobs and all kinds of stuff.  And um, we, we had similar interests, uh, like we were both into like he had done, so we did, uh, some film and video production in college and worked for some local TV stations and things like that. So, um, we just immediately clicked in movie we wanted to work on stuff together. Um, and uh, yeah, that's, that's kind of how that it was. It was really a chance and uh, luck, uh, that, uh, our, our paths crossed and then we started working on projects together. Yeah, that's sort of the backstory there that the time I like love hearing how people met. Um, we get asked a lot too and it's just really cool to, of see how the team

Cara: 08:59 I love how different your backgrounds are as well. Definitely. That's always cool to hear. So how did the idea for like brand backer specifically first come about through the projects that you're working on or just kind of hit you one day?

Max: 09:14 So basically we worked on a number of different projects before a brand backer and I think that's something that, uh, like when you're entrepreneurial and you're, um, like you learned that it takes a lot of trying, a lot of different stuff. Um, obviously when, when you, when you set out on the project, do you think like, oh, I, I, uh, I know exactly like what I want to build and then you put it out there and then that's not what the market wants necessarily. Um, or in, in you have to iterate and learn from that sale. Um, our, our first project was actually a project, a website, so like a, of like a kickstarter on steroids, um, in the sense that it wasn't necessarily about getting the funding, it was more about being able to find projects that you were interested in. Uh, and so, so that site was called go make it go, make.it to make it easier for, uh, to make people's ideas come to life.

Max: 10:11 That was the, uh, the goal of the site that was really the seed of everything. And to this day our company is still actually called go make it labs like our actual company name. So yeah. And then we had this idea for a, a, a trend site. So the main idea behind that was essentially that we could find trends before they became popular. We were able to predict, um, some, some, like, for example, like up and coming music like six to eight months before it blew up. Um, so it was like sort of like a crystal ball of, of contents and there are two, two big things that happened, uh, that are related to brand backer. Um, one was that we started working in monitoring creators more because it was the creators and influencers. And I guess at that, this was like maybe six years ago, maybe six and a half years. It was more like bloggers, but like the influencer wasn't as widely used as it is today. Um, as we're like now everybody, because we're not just using blogs, were using all the social channels and influencers more of the catchword than bloggers.

Sumeet: 11:21 Well, I think, I think a lot of, a lot of it was that. And even instagram wasn't even around yet.

Max: 11:26 Yeah, that's a good point. Yeah.

Sumeet: 11:29 I do remember meeting some of the instagram guys early on when they had just launched instagram and, and you know, it was one of five photo-sharing applications obviously in one. Um, but, but back then it was all about blogs and it's really hard to even to find blogs. So, um, you know, we've focused on that heavy, heavy early on.

C.J.: 11:52 Well, I think that was like really smart  of you guys because, um, I think a lot of people started focusing really hard on instagram the last couple years and it's obviously it can pay off, but instagram is an APP in itself. So the biggest thing we always tell people you know is God forbid instagram all of a sudden decides to leave one day, which I don't ever see that happening, but it's something, a lot of influencers talk about. My space to all your, all of your content goes with that. They own that and all of your followers go with that if you don't have something to kind of bring it home too. So we're really pushing that. I'm having that blog is like the most important thing and I think that brand back, we're kind of backside and really focused on that as well as like a big thing just because I think that kind of got lost in translation over the past couple of years and people had been blogging, you know, 10, 10 plus years ago and that was before it was even huge and now that you can actually make money off of it and there's all these social channels, it's a great thing.  But I think people really lost the sight of what the importance of having a blog and having people follow your, what you're saying it more than just like what an image that you're putting out with a quick caption. So, um, that's like really cool to me. Can you guys share a little insight into the brand collaboration process? Like what are some of the most common goals brands have when working with influencers? It's kind of a big thing we focus on is, is obviously creating that long-term relationship and, and really just building a good relationship overall with a brand. So what are some of those common goals that you see from brands?

Max: 13:23 Yeah. So, so what I see from the brand side, uh, is that the first thing that they're looking for overall in, in there like, you know, from a business perspective is exposure. Um, they're looking to get their product out there, their name out there to get visibility. Um, and I think that was like early on they're the main goal, but now it's become also about getting original content that is used in a, across their social media channels so that they have something that shows off the authenticity of the brand and a social proof for the brand because it's, it used to be that the brand was more top-down, it was saying that I am telling you like I'm Loreal, I'm telling you that this is what's cool and now the relationship is more bottom up where it's the consumer that is dictating the image of the brand.  So it's important for the brand to be able to work directly with the consumer and with influencers and bloggers to, uh, shape the narrative around the brand. And, uh, that's, that's a big part of, um, you know, a lot of brands marketing now and you're seeing that with the rise of a bunch of brands that are more bottom up and dictated by the crowd. Um, as opposed to you, um, them being in their own. Uh, I don't wanna say like labs and dictating what the products are. So, um, yeah, I think that those are, you know, from the brand's point of view, from a business perspective, ultimately all those things have been doing a good job at drives more revenue. Um, and you know, they are businesses and that's something important for influencers and bloggers to keep in mind is that ultimately they're, you know, trying to get the drive reputation.

C.J.: 15:15 Yeah. And that's something we try and kind of push to like our bloggers. Um, and it's something we've talked about in past podcasts as well that it's really important to know, like I've said before here, and I have both worked in corporate before, which I think gave us that mindset overall just because we kind of understood a little bit more behind how businesses run and um, you know, what needs to be done in, in business. Sometimes businesses business, it's my favorite saying. And so sometimes it's good, it takes a lot of the personal out of it and really just realized that there's money that needs to be made and goals that need to be made and sat and everything. I think influencers really need to see that, just like they're running their own brands and their own businesses and brands are working with them and, and running their own business as well. So that's good points. Influencers can leverage influencer platforms to build relationships with brands.

Sumeet: 16:07 I think just generally a heartbreak influencers to get in front of brands are on their own doing their own part of a bigger group. And so they're, you know, a lot of them have to reach out to brands individually. A lot of bigger influencers. Um, you know, people who are below 300,000 followers and more, you know, they get tons of brands coming to them, almost too many, uh, or they have an agent that deals with all this for them. And so I think, you know, having an influencer platform like brand back or uh, you know, we have, you know, Max and we have, we have a team of people that go out and are constantly looking for brands, for influencers to work with writing. So we're betting those people were going through or making sure that, you know, they understand how influencer marketing works and how the benefits and the pros, the cons so that when an influencer works with the brand or brand backer, they're already warm right there already.  They're already somebody who wants to work with you and is already willing to go the relationship with you and just being on the platform itself, uh, and engaging with brands, you know, already a step ahead of what you'd have to do if you are on your own doing it wrong. Um, I think, uh, once you know you're on a platform, I think, you know, building that relationship is a little bit easier. Um, you know, when you're doing as part of the community, uh, you know, the brands more willing to engage with you on messaging and work with you on content. Um, you know, obviously, you know, repeat working with the same brand is a huge thing. So I think a lot of influencers, um, you know, if they, like the product will do that. Um, and, and for, from what we've seen in our side, a lot of times brands constantly want new influencers, right? They don't want to keep going back to the same person. And so that makes building a relationship extremely difficult.  Like we always encourage our brands like, you know, if you like, you know, 10, 20 people that you've worked with in the, in the campaign, I go back and work with them again, do paid posts with them, uh, you know, build interest in terms of content with them because that really helps build a relationship going forward. I think it's really difficult when you just do a one off with the brand and then never hear from them ever again. And so like a lot of these, uh, a lot of times, you know, influencer platforms lie to work with the brand over and over again, just because the brand is using that platform to manage their, their influencer content. Um, and then I guess lastly, um, you know, generally like from, from building a relationship, just like you guys said, uh, it is, uh, you know, you're working with someone who's a professional.

Max: 18:39 On the other side, right. And so the more professional you are as an influencer, a, the more likely they are to want to work with you going forward. Um, and so, uh, you know, being responsive, you know, creating good calling, contact, being flexible because you know, they're just like you, they have, they have a schedule or they're doing things are busy. Uh, and so, you know, all that goes along way in terms of being easy to work with these here you are working with, the more likely you are to keep working on building that relationship with the brand.

Cara: 19:06 Yeah, I think there's so many good nuggets of good advice to unpack there, but I guess the first thing is like we've really seen the focus on long-term relationships kind of becoming a theme here in 2018 when I'm both brands and influencers are realizing that like we're more effective if it's not just that one off collaboration and if we actually kind of partner together, um, for the long-term and yeah. Then just the fact that like the platform really helps you, you know, get in touch with brands and, and know that when they come to the table, they already have influenced your marketing experience because otherwise if you're just reaching out to brands, you don't know what they've done and you might have to be starting from square one, like educating the brand about influencer marketing before you can even get into like a discussion about collaborations and payment and all of that.

Max: 19:56 That's been a problem for us for awhile, right? Because we were one of the first people in influencer marketing and I think we started probably 2012 with brand backer. Um, and we were, you know, we would approach brands and, and say, you know, you should get in front of these people, um, who are creating this great content. Uh, and they were just like, why? You know, they didn't understand. They didn't understand the reasoning. They didn't understand what the return on investment was. So to give away products or do you want us to pay these people? How do we know that they're going to even create the content itself? And I think that narrative has changed now I think, you know, pretty much every brand at this point understands what influencer marketing is, not everybody is comfortable with as a budget for it. And so that's why when you come to a platform and you see brands are already on there, they're already willing to work with influencers. They already understand that.

C.J.: 20:41 Yeah. And I think just getting on, um, the platforms themselves is like the biggest thing. Like I  sadly wasn't on many last year. It wasn't something that was like in my mindset of doing things and once I started putting myself out there is when I started really seeing sponsored posts come through and really building relationships overall with brands. So I think that's a huge good point that you made. Um, so how can influencers get plugged into the brand backer platform and what are some of the advantages that come from that?

Sumeet: 21:12 Obviously the easiest ways is just visit our website and sign up to you to confirm your channels is something a little bit different that we do. The other platforms may not do an idea behind it is that, you know, we don't want, we want to make sure that you actually are the owner of the blog or the instagram channel that you're signing up with and that you're not just making up that you'll Ryanna or something like that. So we have a little bit of a process that goes through that. But then once you're on the platform, um, you know, there's a number of open campaigns that you could apply to just brands that you can reach out to, to be part of their team. And what would that is that brands have a list of contacts on there, end of influencers that they trust, they work with regularly.

Sumeet: 21:55 And those influencers are people, um, who they count on for, you know, maybe they have a last-minute campaign they need to do and that they don't want to blast out to the whole network. They'll reach out to you and say, Hey, I need, I love for you to post on instagram or on Youtube. You can work on rates with them and things like that. And so those are kind of brand teams and get involved with, along with campaigns in terms of advantages. I think, uh, like I said before, you know, we're, we're curating all the brands as they come through and so we're not just letting everybody in. Um, and that means that, you know, you're not seeing a lot of junk and not seeing a lot of people who are coming in who are going to abuse the process. You don't say they're gonna do one thing and do something else or say, you know, they're going to pay you and not pay you things along those lines.  And so there's a lot more trust involved. Um, and then, uh, another thing obviously is like we've been around longer than than, than most. And so we've kind of worked out a lot of the kinks. I mean, as you guys know, and as anybody listening that, that works in this space knows there's a ton of back and forth that goes on during this whole process. Right. You know, whether that's like negotiating a rate or you know, getting a sample or creating content and having that reviewed or you know, just even tracking and doing analytics and things along those lines that goes on behind the scenes. And I would say that, you know, uh, you know, our platform has kind of worked on making that as efficient as possible just so that people aren't wasting time. There's no, you know, there's, you know, there's tons of things everybody is doing on a daily basis and that this shouldn't be as simple as possible and make it a seamless as possible to, to, to work with a brand or work with an influencer and get high quality content out as quick as possible.

Cara: 23:34 Yeah. Just as an influencer, kind of speaking to the platform, um, the team feature, being able to be on a brand team is really unique because a lot of platforms are kind of solely campaign based and you're only getting in front of the brand are in contact with the brand if they have a specific campaign out that you can apply to. So I thought that was a really, really unique approach and then as far as like content submission, um, the platform is definitely one of my favorites because you guys do make it so easy. I don't have to like email someone a wink or like fill out a google form, like there's a tracking code I can put in my blog posts. It's just very, very straight forward. So just from personal experience, I really have loved using the platform.

Sumeet: 24:18 Yeah. I think from a brand team perspective and then we're going to be doing a lot more of that going forward just in terms of having more visibility from the, from the influencer side. I think right now, um, if he joined our platform you can, you can join a team or request to join a team and that's kind of where it ends. Brands will then reach out to you when they have things going on, but you know, going forward more, more for you to do within, within the teams and things along those lines.

Cara: 24:46 Yeah. I just see like the industry kind of naturally moving that way to where there's those relationships and that were constant contact. So it's exciting to hear that you guys are kind of doing that already. Um, can you share a little bit about maybe one of your most successful campaigns? Uh, why it was so amazing or some lessons that both influencers and brands can take away from it?

Max: 25:10 Like we've worked with, uh, like now thousands of campaigns and uh, um, produced maybe close to millions of pieces of content. Um, so there's a lot to like be like, oh wow. I like one that stands out to me. Uh, that was just a very cool experience and something that was really huge and scope was that we did the launch of one direction's makeup line and uh, so this was like, you know, obviously a few years back. Um, but it's still sticks with me because it was like we were involved from like before the product existed and were involved in that. So like even involved in the discussions of like what some of the product might be and the product development process. And then having the product shipped to our influencers before it was available to the general public to build buzz. So it was, it was cool for us to be able to give our influencers the experience of having a product before, you know, it, it was out in mass and uh, just like a cool tree that we don't normally get to do. Um, there, there was also some cool things involved with working with the brands, with the band's management, uh, and working with the band and I'm doing posts that were, you know, for the lion and US getting to you be involved  in that process. That's not always something that happens in campaigns. And then we typically don't get to work, you know. It was definitely a, it was definitely an interesting campaign I think was one of our first kind of bigger campaigns that helped us grow as a company. Early on. I think we had, we had the, some of the, I think one of the band members paint his nails posted on instagram and like it got picked up by like 17 magazine and like teen vogue and all sorts of publications because, you know, this is outrageous that kind of a boy band is coming up with a women's makeup line. Um, and so it was definitely a fun, fun campaign to work on. Definitely.

C.J.: 27:26 That sounds super fun in that sense. So unique just like super different than anything we've really heard. And then to have like the band backing you in being super creative, like most bands are with coal state, you know, a nail picture of that as like, it's hilarious and something I think a lot of people can connect with in a really different way than just kind of like a social influence. Um, can you give maybe like two to three tips for influencers when it comes to being a standout influencer? Like an excellent influencer when it comes to working with brands? I know that's something we really try and push with our community, with ourselves. Um, and something that we talk about all the time in the podcast is just how to set yourself apart because there's obviously millions of us social influencers out there now. So, um, what are like two to three tips that you guys have for them?

Max: 28:16 Yeah, I mean, I, I think, um, I think the number one thing is creating high quality good content. Um, I think a lot of people focus on how many followers they have and so they're going through and saying like, oh, I haven't hit my, I haven't hit my 10,000 follower goal or whatever that is. And um, I think what's more important a lot of times for brands, especially the type of content that you're creating and the type of image that you're creating. And so, um, you know, I, I know for a fact that when brands come through our platform, they, they look for infants or work with, you know, follower count is one thing. But if you're creating really good imagery, if you're doing a really good job with your blog posts or youtube videos, I'm explaining, explaining, you know, uh, you know, their, their products and things along those lines, you know, brands are more likely to pick you.

Max: 29:06 And then the second thing I would say, uh, it's probably again, like it's making sure you realize being professional, right? So it's making sure that you realize what you're working with, like a marketing or a PR professional on the other end, right? You're not, you're not talking to a customer service, you know, a lot of times we get, we'll get messages where people are like, you know, all caps emailing us about the sample or something. Like things like that. Like, you know, if a brand's sees something like that, they may like your mark and saying like, Hey, I don't want to work with that person ever again. So, you know, in a lot of it comes down to that, a lot of it comes down to the more reliable you are in terms of, you know, updating the brand, uh, on, you know, your content timeline on when to expect certain things.

Sumeet: 29:50 Um, if you received a sample, things along those lines, being reliable, being consistent, uh, goes a long way in helping you from an influencer side, be seen by brand as somebody they want to work with. But it also just helps generally when you're posting, right? So, you know, especially for you to, uh, you know, posting on a regular schedule issues, right? So it's just like a TV channel, like if you're posting every Tuesday and Thursday your followers will naturally come back. And so consistency is a big, is a big piece there. And I guess like the last thing I would be, I would say is that I focus more on, on the engagement, on your posts. Um, again, like, you know, follower accounts are great, but if your posts are engaging, you're going to pick up followers naturally. And so, you know, do more I guess, uh, in, in the post themselves.

Max: 30:40 I tried to engage your community, right? Like ask some questions, uh, you know, run giveaways and contests, you know, reply to all their comments and I think that's, it could be basic things that you, you should be doing regularly. But you know, brands are constantly looking at engagement numbers right there. If you have 100,000 followers and 50 people are liking each of your posts are, um, so, so, uh, is that, so make sure that, you know, the more engaging the postcard and more people who like comment, you generate conversation around your posts and your followers are going to get naturally and the way I to ask like, you know, is there a way to game the system? Can we get more engagement? Can I get more followers? And you know, we don't control that, you know, instagram, youtube as those channels control how people are seen. But the best do you think you can do is creating high quality content that's engaging?

C.J.: 31:28 Yeah, I think that's really good advice. Like spending your time on focusing on good content rather than like trying to find the loophole or the hack is probably the most valuable.

Max: 31:39 Yeah. And if you have, if you have the resources like in I, I mean not everybody does, but you know, invest to try to invest in some equipment that helps make your product better. Right? So that, that might just be like, it's like having a friend who's a photographer come out and take your photos or do a video for you. But that could mean like, you know, getting the proper lighting for your video or um, you know, potentially taking a class online or whatever, just to learn more about how to take a photo better or video veteran things along those lines. You know, refining your craft is going to make your product much better at the end in ter, in terms of your content.

C.J.: 32:13 Exactly. That makes you like enjoy it more. I think being someone who likes to be creative in putting the effort into every single photo you post sometimes sounds silly because yeah, you don't want to overthink it. I think a lot of people can spend way too much time trying to create the perfect. Um, and overall I think if you are in that creative mindset and really just, you know, putting your heart into it, the best images are going to come out of that. And then um, I think what you hit it on the head with engagement is the biggest thing that we try and push. I'm really trying to like engage with the people that are commenting on your pictures and maybe going to comment on their pictures and then even going a step further and seeing who's commenting on their pictures and really reaching out to that.

C.J.: 32:55 And I think another way we say engagement as huge as with the creation of IG stories. I'm really taking the time. A lot of people don't like their face or their voice on videos or anything like that. Really hard to get over. But I think doing that step is like the easiest thing because giving away after 24 hours, you know? Yeah. If someone's judging you, they can unfollow you. But the likelihood of that happening more than someone connecting with you is, is not likely. So I think just like really making that connection because people think they know you through your social channels, which is scary but also great. But um, I've enjoyed talking with them one on one in a sense through stories and showing them a little bit more about your life behind the perfect image or the perfect feet is the way I've definitely seen like a huge connection for me with engagement, which I love it story because I was never a huge snapchat girl, so it was big for me.

Sumeet: 33:55 The more, the more authentic, the more authentic you are. Right? I mean, you don't want it. You want to be just like everybody else, right? You don't want all your, all your photos just look like everybody else's photos. Videos don't think everybody else's, you know, it's, it's, you know, you have to bring your personality into it and be authentic because people won't, they won't trust you as an influencer or just trust you as a general person if you were putting out all this stuff that doesn't seem legitimate.

Cara: 34:19 Yeah, so like a tie in to that importance of like authenticity. A lot of times we talk about how you should only be partnering with brands that are a good fit. Um, do you guys have any advice for identifying brands that are a good fit for you? Maybe for an initial collaboration and then even for that, like long-term relationship?

Max: 34:41 Yeah, I mean, I, I think um, if we're talking about in the context in brand backer, um, first of all, uh, there are all kinds of different opportunities that you'll be exposed to you and essentially, and I, I'm not sure like how familiar people are with our platform or how it works, um, but essentially there are different campaigns or are we call them campaigns or opportunities depending on if it's going out to you the network or if it's a private opportunity that's only going out to a segment of people. But uh, regardless, I mean, I think like as an influencer, you know, uh, what you like about and you should be writing about the things. Going back to that whole point on authenticity, I like things that you enjoy, that you're passionate about. And when I talked with brands and they'll often ask me, why do you, uh, why do influencers do what they do it bloggers do what they do.

Max: 35:36 Um, and uh, I mean, I think a big part of that is that it starts out as an outlet for your passions and your creativity and a space for you to be able to, uh, you know, talk about what you enjoy and then from there, you know, maybe it becomes more serious, uh, and becomes to the level where you're monetizing it or you get perks from doing that. Um, but I think that that whole idea of I'm doing what you're passionate about and then finding brands who are representative of your values and of, uh, the things that you like, uh, is, is huge. So we basically are presenting different brand types, uh, things that you are interested and genuinely want to talk about. Uh, you can apply for. And then from there, the brands will, uh, you know, pick and choose the people that they think are the best match for, for the their brand. So there is like a matchmaking process happening between the two sides and um, and it's, it's also like the brand being able to say like, I think that this person, um, you know, is a good representation of um, of what our brand stands for and they're going to produce that authentic voice that we're looking for that's going to support all those efforts that, uh, you know, feed into that brand story. So I think that those are kind of how both sides are working towards finding that place where it's authentic.

Max: 37:06 Yeah. I think, I think when you look at it from, from just like view beauty campaign itself, I think we see some kind of money. We, we've, we've run campaigns across the board. Most, most of our campaigns kind of are in the lifestyle side. CPG, we'd have run like things, uh, you know, from pets, right? And people will, people will apply with the campaign. They don't even have pet or there say, I mean, there's like just basic things like that where it's like you shouldn't be applying to campaigns where you know that, that don't make sense for your, your channels, right? So if you don't ever talk about food and your channels mainly about beauty, probably shouldn't be applied to the food campaigns, things on those lines as well as having a general idea for what you want to do with the product. Once you get it. I think a lot of times, um, you know, people get excited and they're like, oh, this a new campaign was just supply, was really thinking through and saying that this was actually a product that, that fits what I'm doing.

C.J.: 38:02 Awesome. So, um, now that we've chatted about a ton of this, where can people find you online so they can get in on this? Goodness,

Sumeet: 38:11 OK, well I'm a, I'm, I'm not really a much of a public person, but most of my life,  most of my online presence is, are private, so like friends and family. So you, you can see back to that, very responsive on email.

Max: 38:31 But, uh, and, and obviously you guys should check out brand backer, far as the, uh, the main thing that you should be checking out, uh, because we ourselves are not as interesting as a platform. Um, and all this stuff going on. Yeah. Yeah. My, my instagram's worlds of Max. Uh, so like, yeah, we're old of Max and uh, if, if you wanted to check it out, there's all kinds of stuff. We've been very, uh, head down, building out the features and functionality and the robustness of the platform and have done a pretty bad job of actually doing our own content tuition just because we've been, like say it's like we're a very, a bootstrap team where we're, uh, just, just very much product focus and, and getting a lot of brands. So, um, but we, we are, we'll have a lot more content coming in the near future.

Sumeet: 39:32 We're going to be doing a lot more on our blogs, into soaps and youtube channel. I think if you visited our instagram or youtube, you wouldn't think that we were even a company. Still the art, we are still active and uh, we'll be posting more or, uh, this year. Perfect. Well thank you so much. Thanks for having us.

Max: 39:51 Awesome. Thanks so much for spending the time. Yeah. Thank you guys for having us. It's been great.

Cara: 39:57 Of course, don't forget to check out the show notes for all the amazing resources like this. You here in this orange. One more thing about joining my society has less than a month, doesn't go and you can get access to all sorts of exclusive resources like posts, guides, workbooks, rate calculators in more. That will help you grow your following, build your blog and monetize your influence. If this sounds like a good deal, you can hop over to my hood society.com/join. See you soon.

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Apr 17 2018

40mins

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Rank #3: 025: How to use Pinterest to the fullest + working with brands on Pinterest Collabs with Simple Pin founder Kate Ahl

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we talk with Kate Ahl all about how to fully leverage pinterest for your blog. We cover using Pinterest effectively to drive traffic to your blog, some of the essential analytics that you should be tracking, some strategy for promoting pins, and how to work with brands on Pinterest. 

Kate is totally a pinterest queen and has so many amazing tips and tricks to share. We also cover the benefits of Rich Pins and why  they’re a must-have for bloggers, advice for growing a following on Pinterest, and some tips for creating pins that go viral.

Kate Ahl has a passion for helping bloggers, content creators, and small business owners grow their business using Pinterest. She teaches Pinterest marketing via actionable, simple steps that help business owners move forward successfully instead of feeling overwhelmed.

She started Simple Pin as a way to help her blogger friends take one thing off their plate so they could focus back on creating content for their blog. Four years later, with 100 management clients and over 400 accounts worked with, she knows a whole heck-of-a-lot about Pinterest.

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JOIN MY HAUTE SOCIETY PINTEREST BOARDS HERE

PINTEREST RATE CALCULATOR (For Brand Collabs)

TAILWIND  (Pinterest Scheduler)

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Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

What we cover:

  • How Kate got started as a Pinterest expert
  • Kate's best tips for using Pinterest effectively to drive traffic to your blog in terms of what you should focus on if you have limited time each week
  • Some of the essential analytics that you should be tracking as a blogger - what they tell you + what they mean in terms of changes you should be making

  • Strategy for promoting pins:  The basics and why promoted pins might be a good idea for bloggers
  • How to work with brands on Pinterest
  • The benefits of Rich Pins and why they’re a must-have for bloggers
  • Advice for growing a following on Pinterest
  • Whether or not followers are important with the Smart Feed
  • Secrets to making a pin go viral
  • Basic keywording tips for pin descriptions -  Where to find keywords and how to make sure they’re not too broad

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Simple Pin Website // Simple Pin Pinterest

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The post 025: How to use Pinterest to the fullest + working with brands on Pinterest Collabs with Simple Pin founder Kate Ahl appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

May 29 2018

17mins

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Rank #4: 018: Leveraging Influencer Platforms to Build Long Term Brand Relationships with Obvious.ly Founder & CEO Mae Karwowski

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with Mae to talk about how bloggers can leverage influencer platforms to build long-term relationships with brands, how repeat collaborations with the same brand are good for influencers, and the benefits of outsourcing collaboration logistics by using an influencer platform. 

Mae also shares some of the challenges and advantages of being a female CEO, as well as ways to manage brand expectations, and how she sees the influencer marketing industry evolving going forward.  

Mae Karwowski is the founder and CEO of Obvious.ly, a technology-driven influencer marketing platform that launched in 2014. Through Obvious.ly, Mae has worked across thousands of campaigns. By building and cultivating influencer communities​ ​for hundreds of brands, ​she has multiplied her clients' networks from 10 to 10,000. Obvious.ly’s platform enables them to identify influencers, track progress, scale campaigns, measure success and refine for future activities. Their HQ is located in New York City, with offices in Los Angeles, Paris, San Francisco and Sydney.

Prior to starting Obvious.ly, Mae directed social media for Gilt City, part of Gilt Groupe, and oversaw social execution for clients such as Bravo, UGG, and Coca-Cola with the agency 360i. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a Bachelor's in Philosophy. She currently lives in Manhattan and loves all things corgis.

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Join Obvious.ly as an Influencer

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Obvious.ly Website  // Obvious.ly Instagram // Mae's Instagram

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Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

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The post 018: Leveraging Influencer Platforms to Build Long Term Brand Relationships with Obvious.ly Founder & CEO Mae Karwowski appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

Mar 27 2018

41mins

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Rank #5: 017: The Art of Collaboration with Muses founder and CEO Shirley Yang

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 On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with Shirley to talk about some of her best tips for creating successful collaborations, some advice on community for bloggers and some of the key things influencers should be focused on when it comes to the influencer’s role in really helping brands grow through partnerships.

Shirley also shares what inspired her to start the Muses platform, how it has grown and developed form her initial vision, an overview of the Muses app for bloggers or influencers who maybe haven’t used it yet, and some ways you can get plugged into the Muses platform as an influencer.

Shirley Yang is the Founder and CEO of Muses, a global brand builders' network with 20,000 members in 75 countries. Shirley has helped thousands of YouTube and Instagram stars rise to fame as well as hundreds of companies from small businesses to the Fortune 50's strategize social media and influencer marketing strategies. Shirley's background is in Engineering, she's led product tech teams at NBC, Amazon, Sony, and Fox. Shirley is also on the Advisory Board for DoSomething.org and Women Tech Founders.

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MUSES App

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MUSES APP  // Muses Instagram // Shirley's Instagram

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Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

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Mar 06 2018

37mins

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Rank #6: 014: Why Community is Essential to Success + Developing a Collaboration Over Competition Mindset with Rising Tide Society Co-founder Natalie Franke

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with Natalie Franke to talk about why a collaborative mindset is essential for success as a creative entrepreneur and tips for how bloggers can create content that facilitates community, not just with each other, but also with their followers and audience. Natalie also shares a little about her amazing journey as an entrepreneur, we talk about what community has meant for her in her personal life, and she gives advice on some of ways we can establish a “Community Over Competition” mindset

Natalie Franke is an entrepreneur, mobilization marketer, community builder, and neuroscience nerd. As one of the Founders of the Rising Tide Society and the Head of Community at HoneyBook, she leads tens of thousands of creatives and small business owners while fostering a spirit of community over competition. She lives in San Francisco with her husband and dog, consumes copious amounts of coffee every day, and enjoys traveling to new cities with a camera in hand.

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Rising Tide Society Blog

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Natalie's Website  // Natalie's Instagram  // Rising Tide Society Instagram

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Feb 05 2018

32mins

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Rank #7: 024: Are you ready to be represented by an agency? Get the full scoop + a peak into how agencies can help you grow with Societygal founder Jennifer Jaden

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we talk with Jennifer Jaden all about the ins and outs of being represented by an agent as an influencer. We answer questions like, What do influencer agencies do? and How do I know I'm ready to be represented by an agency? Plus, we talk about different structures and fees when it comes to agencies.

We also chat about collaboration tips & trends as well as some of Jennifer's best advice for finding success as an influencer. We dive deep into Societygal to talk about how Jennifer started it as a community that grew from her passion to help female entrepreneurs succeed. Jennifer shares how Societygal has grown and expanded to now have an agency component and full suite of services.

Jennifer Jaden is the queen of creating an impactful online presence, from a bombshell brand concept to a lucrative launch, that gets you noticed in the crowd. Her goal is to help women build a strong digital presence and voice.

Jennifer started her career as a successful blogger and once she realized the power and potential in the online space, she knew she had to share her natural abilities with other women to support their growth. She has been featured in Seventeen Magazine, The Skinny Confidential, and Radiant Podcast just to name a few! Jennifer's latest venture is her agency within societygal. A completely fresh concept that connects influencers, bloggers, public figures and coaches with brands to collaborate with. Theses opportunities include features, press and endorsements that align with their brands.

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SOCIETYGAL FACEBOOK GROUP

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What we cover:

  • A  little bit about SocietyGal - both the community and agency component - How those can help influencers grow and maximize their exposure
  • Insight into the role of agencies when it comes to influencer marketing
  • How bloggers can know they’re “ready” to be represented by an agency
  • The different structures when it comes to partnering with an agency - like a % commission, flat rate monthly payment, etc
  • Trends you see in terms of what brands are looking for when it comes to collaboration
  •  The best piece of advice Jennifer has for influencers when it comes to building a successful career

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Societygal Website // Societygal Instagram // Jennifer's Instagram

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May 22 2018

39mins

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Rank #8: 019: Tailwind Part 1 – Building a Solid Pinterest Strategy as a Blogger with Alisa Meredith

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with Alisa for part 1 of 2 with Tailwind, to talk about the basics for developing an amazing Pinterest strategy as a blogger or influencer. Alisa shares essential tips for mastering Pinterest as a blogger, tips and tricks for using it to drive traffic to your blog and building a following on the platform. She also shares some advice for paying attention to Pinterest analytics, leveraging group boards to drive traffic and grow your following, and what to focus on if you just have one hour to spend on Pinterest per week.

Alisa is the content marketing manager at Tailwind and Founder at Alisa Meredith Marketing, who has (more than once!) been accused of a Pinterest obsession. Blogger, speaker, and Pinterest Ads Specialist, she’s a big believer in the power of visual marketing, and is on a mission to help businesses find their creative side in order to appeal to customers in a whole new way.

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 Related Resources:

TRY TAILWIND!  (First month FREE)

Pinterest Strategy Secrets (Tailwind)

Set yourself up for Success (Pinterest)

About the new Pinterest Following Tab (Pinterest)

Find your blogger community!

Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

What we cover:

  • What is the primary benefit of Pinterest for bloggers and influencers?
  •  If you had to give just 2-3 tips for mastering pinterest strategy as a blogger, what would they be?
  • If I have 1-2 hours to spend on pinterest a week for my blog, what are some of the things I should be focused on?
  • What are some essentials for using pinterest effectively to drive traffic to my blog as an influencer?
  • Do you have some tips for how to grow a following on pinterest?
  • What are the best ways to leverage group boards to drive traffic and grow my following?
  • Do you have any advice for how you can make your pins go viral? 

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Tailwind Website  // Tailwind Pinterest // Alisa's Website // Alisa's Pinterest

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Apr 03 2018

46mins

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Rank #9: 013: Rebranding, How to Scale your Blog with Personal Growth, and How your “Why” Impacts your Content with My Haute Society founders Cara & C.J.

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with just the two of us to talk about our best tips for rebranding your blog, making the decision to expand or narrow your niche, and share a little backstory on our amazing community and why we think its essential to the blogging game.

CARA: 

I'm Cara, southern raised and living in Denver. Some of my best skills include shopping and snacking. I excel at drinking mimosas and I'm always down for a coffee break. I am a huge fan of BYOB (being your own boss). I'm a color + prints enthusiast and the founder + editor of Brighter BOLD.

Brighter BOLD is a movement towards empowering women to bring their boldness to light and turn up the volume on their inner voice. Brighter BOLD launched in 2016 as a space for women looking to become confident in who they are, fearless with their style, and who want to surround themselves with a community that supports them on a journey of self-love.

You'll find encouragement, lifestyle pieces, style advice, DIY tips & tricks, beauty favorites, and more to help you explore new trends and define your personal style. My goal for this space is to inspire others to find self-love through being brave with their lifestyle.

C.J.

My name is Courtney Oldenkamp and I’m a 26 year old girl married to the man of my dreams. We live in Denver, Colorado, and love the 300 days of sunshine it provides us each year. I am an absolute lover of life and a hard believer that following your passion is the true key to happiness in life… Chocolate helps with that as well! Fashion is such a fun expression of who someone is and I find such joy in sharing that with you.

Everyday Chiffon is a fashion, travel and lifestyle blog, created in 2015 to help inspire the everyday girl to live outside the box and the importance of doing so with a smile. I provide travel diaries, style tips & tricks, delicious recipes, giveaways and a whole lot of positivity to push women into mindful thinking to look & feel good

 Related Resources:

Join our blogger community HERE!

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Cara: Brighter BOLD // Instagram // Twitter // Facebook

CJ: Everyday Chiffon // Instagram // Twitter // Facebook

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Jan 29 2018

32mins

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Rank #10: 012: The Importance of Community for Bloggers + Thinking Long-term with HerCampus & InfluenceHer Co-Founder Stephanie Lewis

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with Stephanie Lewis to talk about her journey in founding HerCampus and the InfluenceHer collective. She shares insight into her journey as a young entrepreneur, some tips she's learned along the way and some ways young influencers can set themselves up for a successful career. We talk about the importance of getting plugged into a community, why you should have a long-term focus and what that means in the influencer space.

Stephanie has grown Her Campus to over 90 million monthly multi-platform content views, with chapters at 300+ colleges worldwide.  Stephanie also spearheads Her Campus's additional user-facing initiatives, including 22 Under 22, the InfluenceHer Collective and High School Ambassador Program, and oversaw Her Campus's first book, The Her Campus Guide to College Life which was a back-to-school bestseller at Barnes & Noble. She has been named to Inc.’s 30 Under 30, Businessweek’s 25 Under 25, EY Entrepreneurial Winning Women, and Glamour’s 20 Amazing Young Women.  Stephanie is a 2010 graduate of Harvard University, where she majored in psychology, minored in economics, and was a member of Delta Gamma.  Some of her favorite things include doing barre classes, running, bargain shopping, hanging ut with her rescue puppy Yeti, and vacationing in Maine with her husband, Jason.

The InfluenceHer Collective is a curated network of blogs and vlogs written by young women on fashion, beauty, cooking, fitness, design, lifestyle, and more.  The Collective provides a community for influencers to share ideas and inspiration with one another and receive editorial and sponsorship opportunities from Her Campus and their partners.  It also provides brands with the chance to reach 2,600+ digital, millennial influencers and their audiences through sponsored blog content, social media campaigns, and more.

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Find your blogger community! Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

InfluenceHer Collective

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HerCampus Website  // HerCampus Instagram  // Stephanie's Instagram

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Jan 22 2018

28mins

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Rank #11: 015: Part 1 – A Fresh Perspective on Influencer Marketing with FOHR Card Co-Founder & CEO James Nord (Organic influence, Social Algorithms & Growth Mindset)

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with James Nord for a fresh perspective on influencer marketing. In part 1 of 2, James shares his origin story, a little bit about how he got into the influencer space, and what led to him co-found FOHR Card. We also talk about the importance of being growth-minded, the logic and necessity of social media algorithms and how to work with them, as well as how to organically share products with your audience through your sponsored content.

James Nord is the Co-Founder and CEO of Fohr Card, which builds technology that helps brands and influencers work together more efficiently. Fohr Card uses millions of data points and fairly complex algorithms to help make the best influencer recommendations, set fair market pricing and report on the efficacy of a brand's social-media campaigns. Over the last 3 years, Fohr Card has paid out millions of dollars to their influencers and helped brands like Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Estee Lauder and Jaguar improve their influencer strategy. Prior to starting Fohr Card, James was one of the most followed photographers on Tumblr and leveraged that following into a lot of free clothes and gigs with Oscar de la Renta, Thom Browne, Puma and Stella Artois.

 Related Resources:

FOHR Card for Influencers

Drink with James Series 

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Find James / FOHR Card:

FOHR Card Website  // James' Instagram  // James' Twitter

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The post 015: Part 1 – A Fresh Perspective on Influencer Marketing with FOHR Card Co-Founder & CEO James Nord (Organic influence, Social Algorithms & Growth Mindset) appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

Feb 12 2018

38mins

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Rank #12: 020: Tailwind Part 2 – Using Tailwind to Save Time, Automate & Kill it on Pinterest with Melissa Megginson

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with Melissa for part 2 of 2 with Tailwind, to take a deep dive into Tailwind and learn how you can use the app to save time, automate, and kill it on Pinterest. Melissa shares insight for how to use Tailwind to schedule out your pins, get access to analytics that can help you make the best decisions for your content and your audience, and tips for leveraging Tailwind Tribes no only to get others to share your content, but also to build an authentic community on Pinterest. 

Melissa Megginson is the Marketing Manager and resident Cat Lady at Tailwind, the leading visual marketing tool for brands. In her 5 years at Tailwind, Melissa has won an ADDY award, worked with major brands like Adobe and JCPenney, and is currently working towards an MBA from the University of Oklahoma.

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 Related Resources:

TRY TAILWIND!  (First month FREE)

My Haute Society Tailwind Tribe

Find your blogger community!

Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

What we cover:

  • About the Tailwind Platform + an overview and how it got started

  • The specific advantages of the platform for bloggers

  • Strategies or tricks for scheduling pins effectively

  • How influencers can best use Tailwind not only to save time but also drive traffic to their blogs

  • Essential tips and tricks you would say are must-do’s for bloggers and influencers

  • Common mistakes people make when using Tailwind - features they are underutilizing or not using at all

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Find Melissa / TAILWIND:

Tailwind Website  // Tailwind Pinterest // Melissa's Twitter // Melissa's Instagram

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Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

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EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

Cara: 00:00 You are listening to the blog podcast, episode number 20.

Cara & C.J.: 00:09 Welcome to blog and a podcast for influencers. We're Cara & C.J.  founders of My Haute Society, a blogger community with events and resources to help you grow your following, build your blog and monetize your influence.

Cara: 00:27 We're doing a two part series with tailwind and on this week's episode in part to have to sit down with Melissa Megginson to take a deep dive into tailwind and learn how you can use the App to save time, automate and kill it on pinterest. Melissa shares insight for how to use Tailwind to schedule out your pins, get access to analytics that can help you make the best decisions for your content and your audience and tips for leveraging tailwind tribes, not only to get others to share your content, but also to build an authentic community on pinterest.

C.J.: 01:09 Melissa, Megginson is the marketing manager and resident Cat lady at Tailwind, the leading visual marketing tool for brands. In her five years at Tailwind,  Melissa has won an addy award, worked with major brands like adobe and jc penny and is currently working towards an Mba from the University of Oklahoma. 

C.J.: 01:35 Hi Melissa. Thank you so much for sitting down with us today. We are super pumped to dive into pinterest and tailwind and learn a little bit about that as it's slowly but surely really kind of bumping up, I think becoming a huge topic of conversation in our community, so thank you for spending the time with us.

Melissa: 01:53 Well, thank you so much for inviting me. I'm excited to talk to you guys and get to know your community a little bit more.

C.J.: 01:58 I'm course. Yeah, they're excited to learn more. So we'll start with the same question we asked Alisa in part one last week, but can you share your story a little bit about how you got started and what you love about it so much

Melissa: 02:16 Tailwind was actually my very first job out of my undergraduate degree in. Funny enough, I actually thought I was applying for a job at Pinterest, what I sent in my resume for it. I was fresh out of college. I'll start. Yeah, not really knowing what I was going to do with my life and I'm at the time we were a website called Penn League, which was really focused on, um, sort of scraping and finding people for you to follow. It was a little, a little bit different from what we're doing now. But after talking to Danny, our CEO, I was sold on the vision for the company. I was sold on what they were doing and just how and driven and focused. Danny and Alex are two co-founders were so I have been with tailwind for five years and other than Danny and Alex, I have been here the longest. Wow. So it does feel like that speaks a lot to the company because it's so great to work for. I get to go to work with my best friends and talk to amazing people every single day and really help them grow their businesses and grow their pinterest accounts and just generally make the online world a better place. I, I, I always talk about how much I love my job and I could not ask for a better work environment or community or employers and employees or quits. Uh, I feel very, very lucky to be here.

C.J.: 03:47 So you hear that from a lot of entrepreneurs obviously when they're doing their own thing, but it's so rare to hear that when you're actually still a part of, you know, what is a corporation. So that's awesome. Um, I do have to ask just like such a random question, but were you bummed when you found out it wasn't pinterest?

Melissa: 04:04 I actually was a little bit because I thought he's so much fun. Like Penn League pinterest. I thought maybe it was like their sales side or something, but then, you know, I, I bounced back and was happy to even be offered a job at the 21 year old.

C.J.: 04:20 Obviously it worked out for you

C.J.: 04:27 just for people who haven't heard of tailwind because I know you just started using it within the past year and it is a game changer. We absolutely love it. But before then we had no idea anything like that existed.

Cara: 04:40 I didn't know it existed because I was like, oh, this is new. Like, nope, it's been around a while -You've just been just in the dark, haha but maybe for those people that are newer, can you share a little bit about, um, the tailwind platform? A little bit of an overview and then maybe how you, how it got started if you know any of that.

Melissa: 04:59 Oh, absolutely. So talking about just the overview of tailwind. We are a pinterest and instagram partner tool, so that means that we are directly partnered with the pinterest and Instagram Api. So you just log in using your instagram and Pinterest usernames and where we're able to, uh, be partnered with them and have that relationship with those tools, which is very valuable there. I have to give my little spiel, my little spaces feel there are other tools out there that will ask for your username and password from instagram and pinterest that are not partnering with us and you really gotta be wary of that because that's putting your account in danger. Totally. So that's just my little. I have to do it. I'd have to put it out there.

C.J.: 05:46 Something that a lot of waters um, aren't as weary about. And it's something I think you're just kind of like, oh, they're asking for permission. I'm just going to like open it up because you think it's a normal. And I've definitely started being. I even remember actually researching tailwind when I got because I was like, I don't know, like I had, you know, I saw it on twitter, some blogger wrote about it and that's how I knew about it, but I was like, well maybe she, you know, maybe she doesn't know or something. And then we're going. Obviously

Melissa: 06:13 it was like totally reputable. People don't know there's like official partners yet or official. Official. Yeah. And so that's something to keep in mind. So you know, even if you don't use tailwind, which of course I highly recommend, I used to definitely use the partner APP and so with that partnership that we have, we are really focused on helping our members grow and make the most of their time on pinterest and instagram and we do that through scheduling. So using our smart schedule which looks at when your audience is most active and most receptive to your content and plan to schedule around that as well as analytics so you can understand what's working for you, what's driving traffic and re pins and all that fun stuff so you can really make the most of what you're doing and your time on pinterest. And we have a ton of bloggers using the platform and finding great success.

Melissa: 07:09 And that's a lot of what I do here is working with and talking to bloggers to make sure that they're utilizing not only tailwind but also pinterest, instagram, all that good stuff. So that, you know, bloggers, they're busy, they have a lot to do. So making sure that their time is best spent. And tailwind actually started, um, about five and a half years ago, five and a half to six years ago at a startup weekend in New York City. That's where Danny and Alex met. Oh Wow. That's really cool. I didn't know that. Yeah. So it was sort of a serendipitous that they got teamed up and they created a company called Brian's view, which was a platform that could go on and get matched with different wedding vendors and they realized like, ah, we're getting a ton of traffic from pinterest and we're competing with them on certain things and maybe we should just really lean in on this pinterest thing, which is where Penn Lake came from and we grew from there. Decided we didn't want to be pigeonholed as penn league just for Pinterest pitcher named potato land and that sort of been history ever since I was in 2013. And we have just been growing like crazy. Expanding our network, expanding our reach and you know, really trying to make the most of our time with our members and helping them reach their full potential. Yeah. Well it's an amazing platform. Absolutely.

Melissa: 08:38 Me Too, but I am biased

C.J.: 08:42 some of the, um, a specific advantage you'd say of like using the platform for specifically bloggers or like social influencers.

Melissa: 08:53 The biggest thing I would say is, you know, are busy, they're doing so much and a lot of them still have full time jobs and so we're there to help vulgar, save time and still be present on pinterest and on instagram so they don't have to worry about it day in and day out. They can remain consistent and pinning consistently sharing instagram posts consistently to the right audience at the right time without having to, you know, stop in the middle of their job and go post to instagram or pen a bunch of stuff and it just really helps bloggers timebox efficiently. And then, you know, once a week or however often they can go in and look at their analytics and see how that content is performing. If there's any tweaks they need to make, they can with our a of side that can even look at their traffic from pinterest and see, you know, this pen did really well. Maybe it's on a certain board that I need to be pending to more and it's really just all about helping bloggers may manage their time efficiently and effectively get in front of the right people at the right times.

C.J.: 10:00 Yeah, I actually use it for that exactly how you say it. Like once a week, um, it was just something that I don't have to think about every day. Then it makes my life so much easier. And then I love the emails the tailwinds sends you on because that summary, because it reminds me to go check my stitches. So no, I think that's even that you made that point. That's exactly how I use it as a blogger. So I feel like there's so much. I haven't even.like dove into what's tailwind. Like just the automation alone has been a game changer because I was in the boat where I would get on pinterest once a week pin, like a thousand paintings and I wouldn't be feeling the other week to like a month. And my followers were probably like, what the heck? Like I don't want to.

Melissa: 10:45 Yeah, I mean pinterest signals to, so it's not just your, your followers. It's also important to maintain consistency for the pinterest algorithm say too, so it's, you know, that's just really what we're trying to do is help you guys be consistent and not not make your followers. And then pinterest algorithm feel a little crazy when you go on and pick a thousand things at once.

C.J.: 11:08 Do that really well. You're definitely, definitely one of my favorites. When it comes to scheduling tools for social, when it does come to scheduling pins, do you have any strategies or maybe some tricks for scheduling effectively?

Melissa: 11:23 The top thing I would say is the browser extension, and I know it's something that when you sign up for tailwind or a pretty pushy about it, you'd better get that browser extension.

C.J.: 11:34 I probably wouldn't have done it because I'm the non-techie version of and I was happy you were pushing on it.

Melissa: 11:42 Yeah, and there's a reason we're [inaudible]. It's amazing allows, you know if you landed on a page that just has incredible photos and you really want to share it with your audience, you can click on the button and it'll fall in all of those images and you can schedule them from there, which is a great way to get a ton of content at once. You can even do that on Pinterest, so like if you find a board that has incredible pins and you want to make sure that those go out to your audience at that tail end button, collect them and schedule them. Said that's a very fast way to make sure that you're scheduling on the go and you're not having to like go into detail when copy the url, paste it in there. It's very easy. It's, there's a reason we have everyone do it right away that says that's totally. Yeah. Number one thing

C.J.: 12:30 I was going to say, I don't even think I know how to do it without the extension. It's just like so seamless.

Melissa: 12:36 I don't know if I do either.

C.J.: 12:39 So when it comes to the actual schedule, so knowing kind of sets up one for you, can you kind of speak to what goes into that and how it kind of decides on like the optimal schedule so you don't have the care?

Melissa: 12:54 Yeah. So that's what we call our smart schedule and it is looking at your pinterest presence when he's been pending and when your followers and people finding your content have been discovering that content and sending that content and create a schedule based around those metrics. So when we say smart scheduled, we really do mean it is a smart schedule, paying attention to what's happening on your account and creating a schedule from there. I believe we start people off with like five to 10 hens per day, but you can always go down if it's overwhelming and then build up or as you're growing we have recommended time slots of pop up that you can just click on and it'll add that time slot for you. So you're able to continue to grow, uh, and make sure that you're getting in front of your audience at the right time on the right days,

C.J.: 13:48 which is awesome because I know a lot of other schedules schedulers, you log in and it's like, OK, set up your schedule and you're like, what did I have no idea. Like the adding. I like how it like really does get that feedback and kind of know when the best times are and then recommend those for you. So like is continually improving and it's not just like a schedule you set and forget kind of thing.

C.J.: 14:12 I think that like you're my smart schedule usually leans towards evenings, which I'm assuming is because most people have jobs and are working like we are in there all day and aren't pinning. Would you ever think that it's like a smart thing to do to add on and start trying to get more traffic like in the morning? Or would you say the smartest thing to do is to stick with just that smart schedule and just benefit the most from

Melissa: 14:36 that has been the absolute smartest thing you can do. Is test a continually be testing and optimizing, so if you want to see if you can get in front of the people that know, maybe scrolling through their phone first thing in the morning, waking up, then absolutely tested and see if those time slots are performing for you so then you can go back and keep them or delete them and be able to see if that is working or if it isn't.

C.J.: 15:01 That's a really good point. I was just curious.

Speaker 3: 15:04 Yeah,

Cara: 15:10 we just wanted to take a second to fill you in on tailwind. Tailwind is amazing. It can help you automate pinterest, scheduling your pins for you and give you great insights. If you want to try it. We have a referral code that you can use to get your first month free. All you have to do is go to bit dot Lee slash try. Tailwind will also have this linked in the resources section of the show notes for easy reference and now back to the episode.

C.J.: 15:47 Um, so how can it influencers best use tailwind, not only to obviously save time, which is a godsend, but also to really drive traffic to their personal blogs, which is obviously the biggest thing that we're trying to kind of get from using Pinterest, which we would love that. Alicia talked a lot about how pinterest is all about pushing people away from the site, which is something you really don't find anywhere else. So, um, how do you think influencers could best use that to their advantage?

Melissa: 16:16 So I think my favorite part of tailwind I haven't even talked about yet, and that is our tribes features, which, uh, our CEO coated, it's making social media a team sport. You go in and you searched for tribes that are related to your niche and you join them in, you're working with fellow bloggers that are in your niche sharing similar content. You're supporting one another and you never have to leave the tailwind dashboard. It's a great way to collect really relevant content to your audience and they'll be sharing your pins as well. So it's reciprocal. It's a, it's a great way to support your fellow blogger. It's also a great way to just sort of make friends in that space so you're able to get that content out there faster or country's smart food. I'm not sure if Alisa touched on this much, but pinterest smart food is not necessarily a hundred percent based on when the pen goes out.

Melissa: 17:12 It's based on a lot of different factors. So the quicker you have more people sharing your content from your site, the faster it'll rank in algorithms and get in front of people and that's just going to help you and you're helping your fellow blogger by doing that in return. And so it is built in there. You can see, um, how many times you've shared. If you need to share a little bit more, you can create a try it if you don't see one that's necessarily right in line with what you're doing. We have some that are based around community. So you know, you guys can make a community one for your, uh, for your group and share each other's. There's just so much power within tribes. And it's so exciting and I can talk about it all day.

C.J.: 17:55 They are so cool and I really love how you in like instead of a group born where it's like actually on your pinterest pinterest account, they're like behind the scenes and then they can be like a bigger than some of the group boards I've even found.

Melissa: 18:09 Oh yeah, they can be really huge. And actually some of the most popular ones though or most effective I'll say have been really small one. So like a group, a small group ministry sponsors coming together and sharing each other's content because they're not necessarily seeing those come through on pinterest or I know there's a ton of facebook share groups and things like that. So it's right there. You know where you're thinking about sharing content and you can schedule it very easily. You're not having to bounce around to different tabs.

C.J.: 18:38 Yeah, it's a really good point. I didn't even think of that because like, usually I don't know if you're aware of like behind the scenes instagram with bloggers, a lot of like group boards through Dns and everything that you kind of help with engagement. Um, but that would be a good idea with just creating smaller groups with the people you already know, you know, you have the content and then can just really want to get a benefit from seeing each other's pins. But to knowing that always someone's going to have your back. So that's something I didn't even think you'd always think like the higher number is the more shares, but um, that's a really good way of thinking about it.

Melissa: 19:10 Yeah. We really want to support that community and make sure that their need for supporting, helping people support their communities and just sort of, we believe that you can grow bigger, better, faster together. So why not make sure and enable that.

C.J.: 19:26 Yeah, totally. So are there any like strategies to tailwind tribes besides, um, maybe just like finding groups that are really good fit. Like should you focus on kind of finding a variety of groups or how does that work?

Melissa: 19:41 Finding a variety is really good because then you can, you know, see if some are working better for you than others. I, it's not necessarily a bad thing if you join one and the people just aren't interested in what you're pinning because there's probably another tribe out there for you. Uh, one of the nice things is we have a preview before you joined so you can see what the rules are, what kind of content is being pins. You can see a list of the people that are in there and how many shares have been created. So that's a good way to evaluate before you join. Because we do have a limit on the number of tribes you can join depending on your plan level. So you do, you don't have to like upgrade to our unlimited plan to be able to see all the information, but it's still really good to see that. And then if you don't see one that is exactly in your niche so you can create one. And that's how you can start inviting people into your tribe. I'm helping spread the word and make your own rules that way. So we have some people that'll say one to one ratio if you're sharing when you a pen, one or only a portrait style pins, things like that. So it's really, it's what you make of it when you're putting in is what you're going to get out

C.J.: 20:59 for. Sure. That's awesome. Um, do you have any like essential tips and tricks that you would say are our must use for bloggers and influencers when it comes to using tailwind?

Melissa: 21:10 Uh, definitely be consistent. Consistency is key on pretty much any platform. I think really a good idea. And that's, you know, you're sending the right signals to pinterest and showing them that you're adding value to the site and making sure that you're not only planning your own content. I like to think interest as a magazine and not a catalog. People went through and you know, ads are good every once in awhile. Senior and content is great every once in a while, but people are there to be inspired. Are there to start crafting their perfect life there, they're just not to only see exactly what you're doing from your website, but they're there to see what your curating based on what a, whatever it is that you are promoting with pinterest. So making sure that it's not all from your site. Recently pinterest came out and said it should be about 50 50 pins from your insight and pins from other people, but you can play with that ratio as well. And again, I think testing is really important and really great. And what works for one person may not work for another. Yeah. And pay attention to those, those, uh, analytics not only tailwinds but also on pinterest.

C.J.: 22:34 Yeah. So maybe we could talk about kind of the tailwind analytics a little bit. I know there's a lot of amazing information and for someone just getting on, maybe it could be overwhelming. So what are like a few key statistics that would be really good to focus on? Just starting out and then maybe a couple more to add on once you have the hang of it.

Melissa: 22:55 Uh, one of the most valuable ones I think right away to look at is fewer pen inspector and that will show you, I think you're 500 most recent pants and you can sort those by the date pinned by what board they're on by certain key words, um, different categories and by the number of reasons so you can pay attention to what pins are driving, a bunch of free pens, what pin maybe what boards are those pins on and really see where your traffic and where your refunds are coming from, dependent specter. And so that's, that's one that's really, really important. And I also love just being able to type in any key word and see the different ones that come up. And you can also see the ones from your site. There's, excuse me, there's a ton that you can do with the pen inspector. And then I think our most under utilized report and the dashboard is the board insights page. That one is incredible, especially if you have a bunch of group boards and he wanted to make sure that you're in a pending to the right boards and paying attention to the right group boards and it can be really overwhelming to keep up with like 70 board.

C.J.: 24:11 It's a few have

Melissa: 24:15 so if you want to, you know, maybe see which ones need more love, which ones are driving repins for you. I mean even within the past seven to 30 days. That's a good stat to look out what boards are driving this red pens or those followers for the past 30 days. What ones haven't driven me any free pens in the past 30 days and maybe those are ones that you can leave and not have to think about anymore. Free up that room in your brain or or even be able to join other ones that are more relevant to you.

C.J.: 24:50 No, that's a really good point because I think that's even true with again like the instagram pod groups or something like if you start noticing one that's just like not in gauging the right way or doesn't have the right people. Even getting to your pictures, I mean, what's the point of, you put so much effort into your social media if you're already spending so much time on it and it's not really paying back. Um, I think that's a huge thing. Like I'm definitely going to go look at that tonight because I'm curious if there's any of them that I can get rid of and add a different one or something. So that's a good tip.

Melissa: 25:18 Even with tailwind. A couple of years ago I took a look at it and our most popular board was one on Seo and I never pin to it. So I started in pending to it more and more. We created more boards are related to the pens that were on there. So we're able to expand our reach a little bit that way. I'm sure it's changed since then. Alisa is doing all of our pending for us now. But that was one of the really interesting insights that, you know, I was able to glean personally was people are really interested in what we have to say around website development and um, what you can do on your site to improve your pinterest presence.

C.J.: 25:56 Yeah, I think it's so cool. All the feedback you get from like pinterest and tailwind analytics, like about your content almost, you know, it like resonates with your audience maybe more clearly than you do on other platforms. So yeah, for sure. So, um, are there any mistakes that you see in terms of like people using tailwind or maybe even specifically bloggers? I know you talked about the board insights being under utilized in anything. Do you see anything else that people are either making mistakes on or not using enough that could really, really benefit traffic?

Melissa: 26:28 I would say that probably the biggest mistake outside of like putting too much of your own content is being afraid of working with other people that are into niche related to you because you see them as competition when really I know it's a popular saying not on the Internet. That collaboration over competition or community over competition and that's so true. It really should be more about lifting each other up and helping one another and growing together and that's where, you know, of course tribes comes in, but as well as group boards and pending your friends content, making sure you're going to their page or their pinterest page and scheduling out some pens from there. So I'd say that's probably the biggest issue, not just within Pinterest, but just overall in the business community.

C.J.: 27:20 No, I'm glad you said that because we talk so highly of community over competition. We actually even did an interview with um, Natalie Natalie who started. Yeah, like the Hashtag community over competition. Never thought it would have gone as blown up as it did, but we even dive deeper with our community that it's so much more than just hashtag like it's something you really need to be supporting your girl bosses even if it's not even girl bosses, but other male friends who are even doing it. And so I think to see that that's even becoming a real thing on pinterest is huge because the social media world is so over saturated with people and I think it's become this like stepping stone of who do you trust or who do you work with or who you give out information and who you want to be one on one with and I think I'm not having to question that and just know that there's a community out there of girls or guys who are supporting you and supporting your content is like the biggest thing that we're trying to push. And I think everyone is in 2018, which is so beautiful. Seen it like rise so much this year.

C.J.: 28:27 Just that collaboration can be a competitive strategy like you're all working together to grow. And I feel like stuff like tribes really makes that feels so much easier. Like you don't have to go out and find all these people and then like build your own group. It's just like really easy to find a group that you fit in with and I'll be able to support each other. So definitely amazing.

Melissa: 28:50 One of our influencers was talking about tribe. She had this found this great quote from Helen Keller said, alone, we can do so little to but together we can do so much and that really is a theme. I'm tribes of community over competition of working together, growing together better together. And again, I love hearing that you guys are supporting that too.

C.J.: 29:15 Yeah, and I think it was something like, just like if any of the bloggers are listening. I remember when I first started it was almost not, I'm really a big extroverted community type person as is, but when I started I was really scared to do that. Community wasn't as much as I wanted competition. I just didn't want to know how to die. I didn't know how to dive in and I was scared to reach out to people and ever since I changed that mindset and really just dove in and really took the opportunity of coming. Even if it was a blogger that has 200,000 followers and jamming them about what they use to edit or um, any other questions I might have. It really changed my life because when I started actually connecting with people one on one, um, and so I think that's like a huge thing that people, I know people are really scared to do it, but maybe not as much as not wanting to do it. Um, but taking that first step is like life changing and opened my door to so many collaborations and like even this giveaways to gain more followers from people that were like, you, you know, certain things like that that I would've never been able to do two years ago because I was so scared that people are going to laugh at me or not thinking of good as bad or something like that. Yeah. I love that.

Melissa: 30:26 If you think about it, who doesn't like to be asked for their opinion or come in and I'm the same as the same way, they'd be afraid to ask people for things. I'm less extroverted, a little bit more introverted, so it was an uncomfortable space for me, but people are generally so nice and so welcoming and always moving to help. It's wonderful.

C.J.: 30:51 It is wonderful. Yeah. I feel lucky to be a part of it. So before we kind of wrap up, are there, is there any other like feature or maybe like a really good way to use tailwind that we haven't really gone over that you kind of want to share or give us a little advice about

Melissa: 31:09 the. The thing that I would say is our instagram product. I know we didn't talk much at all, but it's really neat. I would definitely recommend checking out, especially our hashtag finder if you're on on Instagram, it allows you to type in some hashtags and will recommend one based on those hashtags that you typed in and it's a great way to discover new ones and we ranked them by popularity. So there's competitive ones, good ones, better ones, more niche ones. Um, and it's just amazing for finding those hashtags and those communities on instagram that you might not have known about before.

C.J.: 31:48 That's awesome. Like a Hashtag. Yeah. Perfect. So now that we've learned a lot about you, where can people find you online? Like as in your website, social, personal, social is anything like that. So people can connect with you as a community, so tailwind

Melissa: 32:08 where you can learn more about tailwind and sign up for our free trial of course. And then you can find me pretty much anywhere on the Internet at Melmeg. Mel In egg.

C.J.: 32:20 Perfect. Yeah, we'll link that all below obviously. And Yeah, I think we have a tribe actually that we have for our members. We have a few people in that of link that below as well so everyone can jump in on that. Thank you so much. So Melissa, we like I totally cob, we're so excited these interviews, um, just being able to sit down and talk about pinterest and ton as para and I have really, really jumped into it. Um, and I know a lot of bloggers again just have like a fear of time commitment or um, you know, not knowing what's really going to come from it or anything like that. So thank you. Thank you for filling in a lot of the gaps and really just educating, um, you know, some of our community about tailwind. Oh absolutely. And I'm always happy to help. So, you know, send me a message on whatever platform we can find me on and I will help guide your way. For sure. Thank you so much guys.

Cara: 33:18 Don't forget to check out the show notes for all the amazing resources and then that link to grab one month. Free of tailwind is bit.ly/trytailwind . If you liked this show, be sure to rate, review and subscribe on itunes. Leave us a review, be sure to screenshot it and send it over on instagram and we will give you a shout out. Then one more thing we would absolutely loved if you join my society as a member, it's less per month than a dozen donuts from Dunkin and you can get access to all sorts of exclusive resources like posts, guides, workbooks, rate calculators in more. That will help you grow your following, build your blog and monetize your influence. If this sounds like a good deal, you can hop over to my hood society.com/join.

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The post 020: Tailwind Part 2 – Using Tailwind to Save Time, Automate & Kill it on Pinterest with Melissa Megginson appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

Apr 10 2018

34mins

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Rank #13: 028: Launching your own Physical Product Line with “Fiercely” Founder & Blogger Valery Brennan

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with Valery Brennan - who is also one of our amazing members - to chat about launching your own product line as a blogger. We talk a little about her blogging career and a lot about what it took to launch her own line. We also dive into the inspiration and motivation behind her brand and Valery shares tips for other bloggers who are thinking about launching their own physical product line.

Valery Brennan is an entrepreneur, and fashion and beauty blogger with vivid hair, a knack for edgy, 80s inspired fashion and a love for everything unconventional. She's the queen of turning passions into side hustles and is the one woman operation behind the women's empowerment shop, Fiercely.

Birthed out of a lifelong love for tshirts, Fiercely provides an alternative to "feminist" shirts that are made in sweatshops. Everything at Fiercely is ethically-produced and a percentage of each purchase goes straight towards an organization that works to empower women. Let's start a conversation and maybe even change the world together.

Click here to pin this episode for later.

 Related Resources:

Get free shipping on your Fiercely Order, Use code HAUTEBABE

Episode 005 with Haylee of Bad Bitch Branding

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Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

What we cover:

  • How Valery first got started blogging and what inspired her to start her own line of products
  • How her your line has evolved since it first began and what that process of “evolution” looked like
  • A little bit about the motivation behind Valery's brand + building a brand that is in line with your "why"
  • How bloggers can know if they’re “ready” launch a product line
  • Advice Valery has for bloggers who want to launch their own physical product line
  • Some strategies in terms of marketing your products that might be a little unique or different than other “brands” because you’re an influencer
  • How to leverage some of your existing relationships to collaborate and get the word out about your line
  • The biggest challenge to having a line as a blogger and what Valery wishes she'd done differently when just getting started

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Find Valery on social:

Valery's Instagram / Valery's Blog  // Fiercely Instagram / Fiercely Website

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Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

#BloggedPodcast

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The post 028: Launching your own Physical Product Line with “Fiercely” Founder & Blogger Valery Brennan appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

Jul 03 2018

38mins

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Rank #14: 022: Email Lists & Why all Bloggers need a Killer Email Marketing Strategy with Nathan Berry, Founder and CEO of Convertkit

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we talk with Sumeet and Max about how to create successful collaborations using influencer platforms. They share insight into brand goals when it comes to collaborations as well as give us a little info about the BrandBacker platform and how bloggers and influencers can use it to connect and work with brands.

In previous careers Nathan has been a designer, author, and blogger. After learning the power of email marketing he gave up a successful blogging career to build ConvertKit. Outside of work Nathan spends his time playing soccer, woodworking, and chasing after his two little boys

Click here to pin this episode for later.

 Related Resources:

TRY CONVERTKIT

Find your blogger community!

Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

What we cover:

  • Basic elements of email marketing and maybe a little bit of an overview of the process
  • The metrics and statistics that bloggers should have a handle on when it comes to email marketing 
  • Essential tips and tricks for growing an email list as a blogger
  • How Convertkit was built to help bloggers grow their lists effectively
  • The basics of an email marketing funnel: what they are and why they can benefit bloggers and influencers
  • What it means to “nurture your list” + some tips for doing it successfully
  • How you can use your email list to learn more about your audience - what they are interested in or what resonates well
  •  Convertkit is working on a super cool project right now called I am a Blogger to spread the word about what it means to be a blogger: a little about what it is and how bloggers and influencers can get involved

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Find CONVERTKIT:

ConvertKit Website

Blogged Podcast:

Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

#BloggedPodcast

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The post 022: Email Lists & Why all Bloggers need a Killer Email Marketing Strategy with Nathan Berry, Founder and CEO of Convertkit appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

Apr 24 2018

30mins

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Rank #15: 026: Launching a Podcast as a blogger: Tech, Tips & How it can help you Grow & Monetize your Brand with Cara & C.J.

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On this week's episode of the Blogged Podcast, we sit down with just the two of us (My Haute Society founders Cara & C.J.) to talk all about launching a podcast as a blogger. We share how podcasting can help you grow and monetize your blog, how to know if you're ready to start a podcast, and some advice for a blogger who is just getting started podcasting.

We give you a step-by-step for launching your podcast, what tech you'll need and a little about how to get it setup. We also share a little insight into how we plan and run our episodes plus our favorite parts about podcasting.

Click here to pin this episode for later.

 Related Resources:

Members (FREE!) // Non-Members

Podcasting Faves:

Scheduling Guests: CALENDLY

Microphones: BLUE SNOWBALL ICE / BLUE YETI

Hardware: STUDIO HEADPHONES / POP FILTER FOR MIC / MIC SUSPENSION ARM

Recording & Editing Software: ZENCASTR / GARAGEBAND / ECAMM + SKYPE

Hosting / Publishing: POWERPRESS + WORDPRESS

Find your blogger community!

Become a My Haute Society Member HERE

What we cover:

  • How podcasting can help you grow & monetize
  • How you'll know if you’re ready to start a podcast
  • Step-by-step for how to start a podcast
  • What tech you will need + some insight into getting it set up
  • How to choose your hosting style
  • How we plan & run our podcast episodes
  • What our favorite part about podcasting is
  • Advice for a blogger who is just getting started podcasting

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Find My Haute Society on social:

Instagram // Pinterest / Facebook / Twitter

Blogged Podcast:

Website: https://myhautesociety.com/blogged

#BloggedPodcast

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This post contains affiliate linking. While these links don’t cost extra for you to use, a percentage of all sales made through these links will help fund free content on myhautesociety.com

The post 026: Launching a Podcast as a blogger: Tech, Tips & How it can help you Grow & Monetize your Brand with Cara & C.J. appeared first on MY HAUTE SOCIETY.

Jun 05 2018

53mins

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