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Inside Social Innovation With SSIR

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Talks and lectures by leaders of social change, from Stanford Social Innovation Review (ssir.org).

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Talks and lectures by leaders of social change, from Stanford Social Innovation Review (ssir.org).

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14 Ratings
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iTunes Ratings

14 Ratings
Average Ratings
8
1
1
1
3
Cover image of Inside Social Innovation With SSIR

Inside Social Innovation With SSIR

Latest release on Jan 14, 2020

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Talks and lectures by leaders of social change, from Stanford Social Innovation Review (ssir.org).

Rank #1: 2011 Stanford Healthcare Summit

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Behavior change is a step-by-step process, and psychologist and innovator Dr. BJ Fogg guides designers and researcher with “The Behavior Wizard,” which maps routes to the 15 ways to achieve behavior change. With specific health targets, whether it be to “eat quinoa for the first time” or “to stop smoking permanently,” his model outlines techniques to stop or decrease behaviors that are unhealthy or start or increase more healthful habits. Fogg is the Director of the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford and has taught the course Creating Health Habits with Social & Mobile Technologies, where students gained expertise in using technology to create habits in everyday people. He speaks in the 2011 Global Health Series organized by the Stanford Global Health Center in partnership with the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/b.j._fogg_2011_stanford_healthcare_summit

Aug 11 2011

26mins

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Rank #2: Promoting Health Through Weight Loss

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In the United States, 60 million adults are obese and 9 million children and teens ages 6 to 19 are overweight. Being too heavy increases the risk of health conditions and diseases. In this university podcast, Harvard business professor Leslie John reports on studies providing financial and social incentives to get people to lose weight. Using lotteries and monetary deposits as collateral, researchers got people to lose an average of 14 pounds over several months. Leslie John spoke at The Science of Getting People to Do Good, a Prosocial Briefing held at Stanford.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/promoting_health_through_weight_loss

Jul 31 2012

32mins

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Rank #3: Corporate Responsibility Through the Stakeholder’s Lens

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Corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives are usually thought of as top-down, with the interests of company executives taking precedence over other workers. In this talk, CB Bhattacharya, a visiting Stanford professor and author of Leveraging Corporate Responsibility: The Stakeholder Route to Maximizing Business and Social Value, examines why the traditional approach to CSR should be reexamined. Speaking at a seminar organized by the Stanford Center for Social Innovation, he details how his research supports stakeholder-driven corporate social responsibility initiatives. He explains why this change from top-down to stakeholder-driven initiatives means higher returns for us all.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/corporate_responsibility_through_the_stakeholders_lens

Jul 12 2013

45mins

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Rank #4: Network Mindsets in Nonprofit Management

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Nonprofit management is presented with the challenge of adjusting to constant developments in technology and social media. To cope, leaders learn to use a network mindset. In this audio lecture, author and social media guru Beth Kanter presents ways nonprofit organizations can develop a networking mindset. These hard-won lessons are based on her own and others’ experiences within nonprofits and successful social media campaigns. Speaking at the Stanford Social Innovation Review’s Nonprofit Management Institute, Kanter focuses on best practices for utilizing professional relationships and the steps organizations can take to develop a network model.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/network_mindsets_in_nonprofit_management

Feb 06 2013

1hr 7mins

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Rank #5: Social Entrepreneurship and Cocoa Farmers

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For TCHO, San Francisco’s only chocolate factory, social entrepreneurship is the focus. In this audio lecture, company executive John Kehoe talks about how the firm not only produces high-end chocolate products, but also helps farmers in developing countries. He discusses challenges associated with sourcing and cultivating quality organic cocoa beans, and what it takes to invest in and work with growers. Kehoe spoke at the Stanford Graduate School of Business at the invitation of the International Development Club.

John Kehoe is Vice President of Sourcing and Development at TCHO, San Franciso’s only chocolate factory. He began his career in international trade in Caracas, Venezuela in 1987. Since the cocoa market in Venezuela was liberalized in 1991, his work has been dedicated to the procurement and marketing of specialty cocoa, working closely with farmers, exporters, importers and chocolate manufactures. In 1999, ED&F Man Cocoa hired Kehoe to restructure a cocoa exporting operation in the Dominican Republic. In 2002, he returned to the United States, and founded EcoTrade, a specialty cocoa brokerage and consultancy based in Miami. Through friendships and contacts developed over the years, Kehoe expanded his experiences to initiate new relationships and diversify supply in Ecuador, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Madagascar, and to include fair trade cocoa from Ghana and the Ivory Coast. This work was considered by many as pioneering a market in the United States for specialty cocoa.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/social_entrepreneurship_and_cocoa_farmers

Jan 31 2014

37mins

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Rank #6: Get Out of Your Own Way: Challenging Your Mindsets and Behaviors

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Building successful networks isn’t just about pairing organizations with similar missions. It’s also about human relationships. In this talk from our 2016 Nonprofit Management Institute, conservationist Steve McCormick looks at several common barriers to developing strong relationships—and ways to overcome them.

Steve McCormick is cofounder and CEO of The Earth Genome, a startup venture to create the first global, open-source information platform on ecosystem services and natural capital. He previously served as president and CEO of The Nature Conservancy.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/get_out_of_your_own_way_challenging_your_mindsets_and_behaviors

May 01 2017

50mins

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Rank #7: Social Problem Solving through Innovation

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This podcast, given by Chris Librie - the Senior Director of Strategy and Corporate Affairs at HP, describes the corporation’s commitment to social responsibility. Since its inception, Hewlett-Packard has embraced the goals of both innovating great new technologies, and applying those technologies in ways that improve the lives and livelihoods of the larger world. In order to do this, HP has developed a holistic approach to social problem solving. This method looks at three main components of sustainability: human impact, environmental impact, and economic impact. After analyzing these sectors of influence, HP aims to address all three legs with its solutions. Throughout the podcast, Chris Librie gives examples of the impact HP has had on the global social sector - from combating HIV/AIDS in Africa, to targeting more efficient methods of meeting exponentially rising data demands. Chris portrays his excitement for the future of social innovation and inspires listeners to be a part of the larger social movements around them.

As Senior Director – Sustainability Programs, Chris Librie is responsible for leveraging and aligning HP’s capabilities in environmental sustainability and health care into a focused set of global programs that contributes to HP’s top-line growth, brand and reputation. Chris leads a global team to articulate the HP sustainability strategy with a single voice, implement HP-led initiatives that have a positive impact on the environment and manage the development of company-wide environmental goals. With the support of recognized leaders in global health as partners, Chris and his team collaborate to drive transformational programs which strengthen the quality of health systems and accelerate access to health care. Chris’ background includes branding, marketing, general management and environmental experience. Prior to joining HP, Chris worked at S.C. Johnson & Son, where he served as Director, Global Sustainability. There Chris led a team to drive the company’s global sustainability strategy, establish company targets and drive key projects. In addition to S.C. Johnson, he has held senior positions at Diageo Brands and Unilever. Chris graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Arts in History. He then earned his Master of Business Administration in International Business at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/social_problem_solving_through_innovation

Oct 19 2014

14mins

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Rank #8: Creating Infectious Action

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Wouldn’t it be amazing if you knew how to get people to act on their best intentions? Jennifer Lynn Aaker has spent most of her career researching the science of getting people to do the right thing. In this keynote session she confesses her frustrations when her students don’t remember the things that she believes are most important in the classes she teaches.

So in one class she conducted a crowdsourced experiment which literally changed the way Jennifer views and thinks about social media. In her class one of her students gave her a set of slides that told a very compelling story. She shares that story and explains how it led her to come up with a new theory for creating infectious action.

By sharing Sameer Bhatia’s and Vinay Chakravarthy’s stories, Aaker identifies four key parts to what she calls the Dragonfly Model. With these four ideals, she believes there is a repeatable method that we can follow to get people to take action, but perhaps even more important, to influence people to get others to take action as well.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/jennifer_lynn_aaker_creating_infectious_action

Aug 04 2011

14mins

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Rank #9: New Skills for the New Social Economy

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What exactly is the new “social economy,” how did it come about, and what are its implications for nonprofit management? In this audio lecture, philanthropy, policy, and technology researchers Lucy Bernholz and Rob Reich explore some possible answers to these questions. Evaluating the changes that the social economy has created, Bernholz and Reich focus on new options that are available for both doers and donors. Speaking at Stanford Social Innovation Review’s Nonprofit Management Institute, the two analyze the impact that this new economy is having on nonprofit management and how social leaders can adapt.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/new_skills_for_the_new_social_economy

Mar 26 2013

1hr 8mins

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Rank #10: The Future of the Healthcare Sector

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As an executive with UnitedHealth Group, Richard Migliori is responsible for ensuring clinical excellence and linking that excellence to practical clinical outcomes and robust business results. In this university podcast, he talks about innovation as the lifeblood of his organization, and the criteria by which innovative efforts are adopted. He emphasizes the need for the healthcare system to become more connected, intelligent, and aligned in order to be sustainable in the long-term. Migliori spoke at the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, sponsored by the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Richard Migliori is executive vice president of health services for UnitedHealth Group. He also serves as chief healthcare officer of UnitedHealth Group Alliances, a division of UnitedHealthcare Medicare and Retirement. Migliori joined UnitedHealth Group in 1996. He brings to his current executive position over 20 years of experience in the health care sector, including time as CEO of four diverse companies. He has published more than 35 articles on topics ranging from continuous quality improvement methods in a clinical setting to surgical oncology and solid organ transplant. Migliori holds an MD from Brown University and completed a National Health Research Fellowship in immunology, transplantation, and oncology funded by the National Institutes of Health.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/the_future_of_the_healthcare_sector

Sep 26 2011

19mins

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Rank #11: Philanthropy and the Free Market in Education

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The Jaquelin Hume Foundation engages in philanthropy by supporting free-market solutions to education reform. In this audio interview with Stanford Center for Social Innovation correspondent Ashkon Jafari, Executive Director Gisele Huff talks about the foundation’s investment strategy, and why innovation and technology initiatives are a big component of the organization’s giving. She also discusses education reform, what improvements the for-profit market can bring to K-12 education, and where the challenges to America’s school systems lie.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/gisele_huff_philanthropy_and_the_free_market_in_education

Aug 10 2011

24mins

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Rank #12: Debating the Role of Philanthropy in Democracy

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Given the largely unaccountable position of power held by philanthropists, what role should they play in democratic societies? In this recording from the 2017 Philanthropy Innovation Summit, hosted by Stanford’s Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, Rob Reich, a Marc and Laura Andreessen faculty co-director of Stanford PACS, facilitates a conversation with Reed Hastings, cofounder and CEO of Netflix, and Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation.

They discuss their differing approaches to charitable giving and grantmaking and how in their own ways they aim to inspire public confidence that they are learning from mistakes and improving their effectiveness.     

Says Walker, “I’m less obsessed with ‘Are we holding these rich people accountable?’ than I am in saying, ‘Are we helping philanthropists have the right approach to their philanthropy,’ and ‘Are we pushing back?’ because there is a lot of arrogance.”

Additional resources: Does Philanthropy Threaten Democracy? Democracy and Philanthropy

@darrenwalker @reedhastings @robreich

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/debating_the_role_of_philanthropy_in_democracy

Jan 25 2018

45mins

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Rank #13: Building a Communication Strategy for Diversity and Inclusion

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Communication strategy can’t be an afterthought for organizations that want to fully embrace diversity, equity, and inclusion. It requires a careful examination of words, images, ideas, and narrative framing. Where should you start?

Using insight from systems thinking and social, behavioral, and cognitive science, Ann Christiano and Annie Neimand describe how to craft stories and multimedia experiences that disrupt bias and drive social change. They present four questions to help develop an effective communication strategy—a “back-of-the-envelope” framework they also outlined in an article for SSIR.

Christiano holds the Frank Karel Chair in Public Interest Communications at University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications and is director of the school's Center for Public Interest Communication, where Neimand is research director.

They offer tips such as trying to connect a nonprofit’s messaging to conversations that are already happening in the broader culture and finding respectful ways to tap into the stories of those your organizations seeks to help. “The most affected are the most effective,” Christiano says.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/building_a_communication_strategy_for_diversity_and_inclusion

Mar 26 2019

1hr 14mins

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Rank #14: How Big Indicators Can Help Solve Global Problems

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To solve “wicked problems” like deforestation and persistent poverty, we not only need better data but also better indicators to identify problems and patterns in real time. Planet Inc., a geospatial organization that has deployed the largest constellation of Earth-observing satellites in history, is leading the way—using data insights to help solve these complex global problems.

At our 2018 Data on Purpose conference, Andrew Zolli, Planet’s vice president of global impact initiatives, discusses what he sees as the coming age of “big indicators.” Breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, computer vision, crowdsourcing, and other related analytical approaches are converging, allowing us to detect patterns in data that would elude even the most sophisticated human analysis—collectively, these tools are known as big indicators.

We have the tools to help us monitor the health of our planet instantaneously, and we are on the cutting edge of being able to predict crises like flood or famine thanks to big indicators, Zolli says. He argues that the next step is to restructure data-collection funding to create instruments that will allow us to intervene in extremely precise ways.

Additional Resources:After Big Data: The Coming Age of “Big Indicators” Andrew Zolli - Globeshakers with Tim Zak The Mismeasure of Impact @Andrew_zolli

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/how_big_indicators_can_help_solve_global_problems

Apr 05 2018

52mins

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Rank #15: What Have We Learned About Fighting Poverty?

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Organizations around the world spend billions of dollars each year trying to lift people out of poverty. Despite the best of intentions, many of these efforts fail, and many others achieve less than optimal results. But some organizations have successfully designed, funded, implemented, and scaled impressive anti-poverty interventions. In this panel, SSIR’s Eric Nee talks to leading experts from three.

Asif Saleh, senior director of strategy, communications, and empowerment at BRAC, talks about what the world’s largest NGO has learned about scaling up programs. Yale economist Dean Karlan outlines lessons that Innovations for Poverty Action, the nonprofit research and policy organization he founded, has drawn from more than a decade of evaluating poverty programs around the world. And Kevin Starr talks about the evidence-based approach that the Mulago Foundation, where he is managing director, uses to find and fund poverty-fighting organizations.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/what_have_we_learned_about_fighting_poverty

Jun 20 2016

1hr 26mins

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Rank #16: Scaling Excellence Successfully

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In this podcast, Professor Sutton overviews his findings in studying methods for successfully scaling excellence. To sum up these conclusions, Robert Sutton describes a few main lessons. Among these, Professor Sutton further details importance of focusing on the mindset one is trying to scale, the significance of self-driven culture in scaling, the consequence of making teams too large in the process of scaling, and the need to dispel all the identifiably unwanted parts of an organization prior to scaling. Through his enthusiasm and real-world examples, Professor Sutton explains the importance of taking a logical and thought out approach to scaling, with the caveat that undergoing such a process could be immensely good or incredibly destructive.

Robert Sutton is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and a Professor of Organizational Behavior (by courtesy) at Stanford. Sutton has been teaching classes on the psychology of business and management at Stanford since 1983. He is co-founder of the Center for Work, Technology and Organization, which he co-directed from 1996 to 2006. He is also co-founder of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (also known as the d.school).

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/scaling_excellence_successfully

Oct 23 2014

12mins

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Rank #17: Using Data to Create Social Change

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In the opening keynote of SSIR’s 2015 Data on Purpose conference, Nancy Lublin shares how she mobilized DoSomething.org around data. She discusses the mistakes she has made, the lessons she has learned, and how she believes that data can be a powerful force for social good.

Lublin served as DoSomething.org’s CEO from 2003 to 2015. She is the founder of Crisis Text Line, where she currently serves as CEO, and the creator of Dress for Success.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/using_data_to_create_social_change

Apr 21 2016

52mins

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Rank #18: Private Equity in Africa

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Chairman Thomas Gibian talks about how he helped Emerging Capital Partners become the first private equity firm to raise more than $1.8 billion to invest in companies across the African continent through seven funds. He sets the stage by discussing how the private sector was the engine of growth in China and India, and shares how some of the lessons have been applied to Africa. He talks about where the growing markets are in the African continent, and the promising future for entrepreneurs there. Gibian spoke at the 2011 Stanford Africa Forum on entrepreneurship and development.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/thomas_gibian_private_equity_in_africa

Sep 01 2011

25mins

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Rank #19: The Role of the Voluntary Sector in the Era of Health Reform

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Why have nonprofits historically been seen as workhorses rather than leaders in the search for social innovation? In this panel discussion, Dr. David Shern, CEO of Mental Health America, and Father Larry Snyder, President of Catholic Charities USA, discuss the potential of nonprofits as catalysts for innovation in health care reform. Shern contextualizes the United States’ shortcomings and explains the need for equitable access to healthcare resources, both for preventative and treatment services. Snyder emphasizes the importance of a less monolithic measure of poverty and a more contemporary design for our current “safety net” solutions. “Leadership 18” members Dr. Shern and Father Snyder were invited by the Center for Social Innovation’s Public Management Program and the Center for Leadership Development and Research at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/dr._david_shern_fr._larry_snyder_the_role_of_the_voluntary_sector_in_the_er

Jul 28 2011

28mins

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Rank #20: Social Enterprise through Digital Design

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Social enterprise is scaling up through innovative digital design of everything from robots to LEDs. The result has been a positive impact on clean water, sanitation, climate change and energy consumption. In this audio lecture, Carl Bass, President and CEO of Autodesk, discusses at Social Innovation Summit 2013 the application of design to solve social problems. Bass describes how the availability of infinite computing capacity combined with people’s willingness to share their knowledge of how to make things advances social entrepreneurship for everyone’s betterment. Inexpensive access to information and tools empowers more people to innovate through the principles of design that Bass explains. In this Social Innovation Conversations, Stanford University podcast, Bass shares examples of creative small businesses that advance social enterprise through innovation.

Carl Bass is president, chief executive officer and interim chief financial officer of Autodesk, a leader in 3D design, engineering, and entertainment software. Bass co-founded Ithaca Software, which was acquired by Autodesk in 1993. Since joining the company, he has held several executive positions including chief technology officer and chief operations officer. Bass serves on the boards of directors of Autodesk, Quirky and E2open; on the board of trustees of the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum; and on the advisory boards of Cornell Computing and Information Science, UC Berkeley School of Information and UC Berkeley College of Engineering. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Cornell University. Bass is a maker and spends his spare time building things—from chairs and tables to boats, and most recently, an electric go-kart.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/social_enterprise_through_digital_design

Oct 19 2014

22mins

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The Risk and Rewards of Mergers as a Nonprofit Growth Strategy

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Even as nonprofits are put on the defensive by political polarization, inequality, climate change, and other threats, many of them still seek out opportunities to expand their impact. For those dissatisfied with small steps forward, mergers present the chance to leap ahead. But it won't be easy.

"It takes a lot of time," says David La Piana, managing partner of La Piana Consulting. "There are opportunity costs, things you could be doing but you won't because you're dedicating energy to the merger. And it is risky."

In this recording from SSIR's 2019 NMI conference, La Piana discusses common roadblocks to successful mergers and strategies for surmounting them.

Jan 14 2020

20mins

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Scaling and Innovation

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Scholars have noted that most new ideas are poor ones that won’t be adopted. So how can organizations integrate innovation productively and prevent it from having unintended consequences? 

In this recording from SSIR’s 2019 NMI conference, Christian Seelos, coauthor of the best-selling book Innovation and Scaling for Impact and co-director of the Global Innovation for Impact Lab at Stanford PACS, explores the “innovation pathologies” that can derail the best intentions. He also discusses the ways organizations such as Aravind and BRAC have sidestepped these threats by blending innovation with scaling.

Seelos argues that process is what's important: "If you operate innovation from an attitude of learning ...  you cannot be frustrated and you will never fail. Innovation is just replacing uncertainty with knowledge.”

Dec 17 2019

46mins

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Nonprofit and Government Collaborations Move at the 'Speed of Trust'

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What do mayors look for and ask from nonprofit managers? What do they wish leaders in the sector would ask of them, and how can public servants and nonprofit leaders learn to better communicate and collaborate?

In this recording from SSIR’s 2019 NMI conference, Mayors Libby Schaaf of Oakland and Michael Tubbs of Stockton spoke with Autumn McDonald, director of New America CA, about the best ways to build mutually beneficial partnerships between local government and nonprofits.

"I've seen fear around collaboration—how is this going to take something away from me?” Mayor Schaaf says. “We have got to think big. We have got to be less afraid."

Dec 03 2019

57mins

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Transforming Programs Through Predictive Analytics

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Predictive analytics can help organizations iterate rapidly, become more transparent and precise, and pinpoint opportunities to address inequities in their work.

In this recording from our 2019 Data on Purpose conference, Parag Gupta, vice president of the Stupski Foundation, and Jeff Gold, assistant vice chancellor at California State University, share a case study of how public higher education institutions are successfully using predictive tools to increase graduation rates and close the achievement and opportunity gaps between low-income and underrepresented minority students and their peers. In 2018, after using these tools, Cal State graduation rates were the highest they’ve ever been while equity gaps also narrowed.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/transforming_programs_through_predictive_analytics

Jul 15 2019

37mins

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Building a More Ethical Blockchain

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Blockchain can help with a variety of social and economic challenges—from securing identity for refugee or homeless populations to minimizing the presence of conflict diamonds in the industry’s supply chain. But at the end of the day, technology is just a tool serving an end, and one that must be handled carefully to manage the values embedded within it.

In this recording from our 2019 Data on Purpose conference, Cara LaPointe, senior fellow at the Beeck Center for Social Impact and Innovation at Georgetown University, shares questions and concepts from her Blockchain Ethical Design Framework to help practitioners interrogate whether a technology is created with ethics in mind.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/building_a_more_ethical_blockchain

Jul 01 2019

1hr

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Strengthening Data Capacity in the Social Sector

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What can help the social sector go big on data in the right ways? For one, organizations should stop underestimating their capabilities. And for another, they should build their data strategy around deeper strategic goals as opposed to funding opportunities.

In this recording from our 2019 Data on Purpose conference, Kevin Miller, civic technology manager from the Microsoft Cities Team, Aman Ahuja, a data consultant, Kathryn Pettit, principal research associate at The Urban Institute, and Kauser Razvi, principal of Strategic Urban Solution, share their advice and concerns, emphasizing the importance of building a data culture over technical expertise.

Scaling up the social sector's data capacity requires champions at every level, be that a school district, state government, or national network, Razvi says. “That person doesn’t have to be a technologist” but they need to understand how data can help solve social problems.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/strengthening_data_capacity_in_the_social_sector

Jun 19 2019

49mins

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A Hippocratic Oath for Our Digital Lives

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What responsibilities do we have as individuals, organizations, and a society for how we conduct ourselves online? In this recording from our 2019 Data on Purpose conference, Henry Timms, president and CEO of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and former president of 92Y, offers a pledge—a Hippocratic Oath of sorts—to help social sector leaders create digital communities that give people a meaningful role in our society.

“We need to move past the 'move fast and break things' philosophy and shift to 'move thoughtfully and improve things,'” Timms says. “People want to be part of a larger mission and larger idea.”

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/a_hippocratic_oath_for_our_digital_lives

May 29 2019

31mins

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Critical Skill for Nonprofits in the Digital Age: Technical Intuition

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In a world where the pace of organizational learning is often slower than the pace of technological change, activists and nonprofit leaders must develop their “technical intuition.” Not everyone needs to become a tech expert, explains Alix Dunn, of the consulting firm Computer Says Maybe, but this ongoing process of imagining, inquiring about, deciding on, and demanding technological change is critical.

In this recording from our 2019 Data on Purpose conference, Dunn walks through her guidelines to help anyone to develop these skills.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/critical_skill_for_nonprofits_in_the_digital_age_technical_intuition

May 07 2019

25mins

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MacArthur Foundation Program Leader Reflects on Lessons From 100&Change Grant Competition

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In 2016, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, launched 100&Change—a new grant competition, that would award $100 million to an organization with the best proposal to help solve a critical social problem. The foundation awarded the grant to Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit that produces Sesame Street and other children’s educational programs, in partnership with the International Rescue Committee. The grant supports programming to educate young children displaced by conflict and persecution in the Middle East. MacArthur is now accepting applications for a second $100 million grant.

In this episode, Priss Benbow, a fellow at Stanford’s Distinguished Careers Institute speaks with Cecilia Conrad, managing director at the MacArthur Foundation, who leads 100&Change. They cover the ins and outs of running a big bet competition, addressing the lack of diversity in philanthropic big bets, and a new spinoff organization working to match donors with promising proposals for social change.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/macarthur_foundation_program_leader_reflects_on_lessons_from_100change_grant_competition

Apr 23 2019

38mins

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Sesame Workshop, Winner of 100&Change Grant Competition, Discusses What’s Next

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In 2016, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, launched 100&Change—a new grant competition, to award $100 million to an organization with the best proposal to help solve a critical social problem. In 2018, Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit that produces Sesame Street and other children’s educational programs, was named the winner in partnership with the International Rescue Committee. The grant supports programming to educate young children displaced by conflict and persecution in the Middle East.

In this episode, Priss Benbow, a fellow at Stanford’s Distinguished Careers Institute, speaks with Sherrie Westin, president of Global Impact and Philanthropy at Sesame Workshop, about the process of applying to a “big bet” grant competition, developing new culturally appropriate Sesame Street characters, and how the two partner organizations will measure program impact.

On our next episode, you’ll hear from Cecilia Conrad, who leads 100&Change, to get the grantmaker’s perspective.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/sesame_workshop_winner_of_100change_grant_competition_discusses_whats_next

Apr 09 2019

27mins

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Building a Communication Strategy for Diversity and Inclusion

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Communication strategy can’t be an afterthought for organizations that want to fully embrace diversity, equity, and inclusion. It requires a careful examination of words, images, ideas, and narrative framing. Where should you start?

Using insight from systems thinking and social, behavioral, and cognitive science, Ann Christiano and Annie Neimand describe how to craft stories and multimedia experiences that disrupt bias and drive social change. They present four questions to help develop an effective communication strategy—a “back-of-the-envelope” framework they also outlined in an article for SSIR.

Christiano holds the Frank Karel Chair in Public Interest Communications at University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications and is director of the school's Center for Public Interest Communication, where Neimand is research director.

They offer tips such as trying to connect a nonprofit’s messaging to conversations that are already happening in the broader culture and finding respectful ways to tap into the stories of those your organizations seeks to help. “The most affected are the most effective,” Christiano says.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/building_a_communication_strategy_for_diversity_and_inclusion

Mar 26 2019

1hr 14mins

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Getting Local: Collaborating With Communities of Color

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“Community-centered” approaches to social change are nothing new. But the term has become a buzzword in the professionalized social impact world, and strategies intended to elevate the needs of grassroots movements often miss the mark. How can nonprofits do better at treating the people they’re trying to support as partners instead of patients? How can organizations shift their approaches from advocating for a population to advocating with them?

Darnell Moore, head of strategy and programs for the US office of the human rights organization Breakthrough discusses these issues with: Coya White Hat-Artichoker, founder of the First Nations Two Spirits Collective and the community health and health equity program manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota; Mauricio Lim Miller, founder of Family Independence Initiative; and Fresco Steez, the minister of training and culture at Black Youth Project 100.

“We have to be thinking about ways that our work moves us from the very cozy spaces that we tend to exist in, and out into the communities, into the streets, into the places with the people that we serve,” says Moore. “That hasn’t been the case for a lot of us, often because it’s sort of not made a priority.”

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/getting_local_collaborating_with_communities_of_color

Mar 12 2019

47mins

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Dismantling Invisible Barriers to Capital

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Research shows that when talented social innovators lack “invisible capital”—the so-called right pedigree, right passport, right skin color, right gender—they may fail to get the attention and investment they need to succeed. How can leaders in philanthropy improve access to capital? What tools can help nonprofit leaders overcome these barriers and get the support they need?

Social entrepreneur, author, and Stanford University lecturer Kathleen Kelly Janus leads a discussion about these questions with Echoing Green President Cheryl Dorsey, Whitman Institute Co-executive Director Pia Infante, and California Endowment CEO Robert Ross.

“Philanthropy is reinforcing many of the very forms of inequality that we are all working so hard to solve,” Janus says.

Dorsey identifies three main systemic barriers—a lack of access to capital and opportunities, psychological stress from social exclusion, and the unequal control of resources and political power in society—as some of the challenges to achieving more equitable investment.

Funders have to take a structural response to addressing these barriers, says Ross. Solutions might include changing the makeup of board rooms, staffs, and leadership teams. Or it might mean looking out for emerging leaders who haven’t already received major investment, and supporting them or having funders participate in implicit bias training.

“You can’t see what you can’t see,” Infante says. “It’s important who’s in those choosing seats.”

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/dismantling_invisible_barriers_to_capital

Feb 26 2019

1hr 2mins

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Navigating Double Jeopardy in the Social Sector

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Black women face racial and gender stereotypes and biases that often keep success in the hands of the few—and their experiences working in the social sector are no exception.

To understand the unique set of racial and gender barriers—coined “double jeopardy”— that stymie black women, listen to this discussion from Makiyah Moody, senior consultant at La Piana Consulting; Tyra Mariani, executive vice president of New America; Crystal German, principal of Prosperity Labs; and Ify Walker, founder and CEO of Offor. They provide insight into everything from survival strategies to creating more inclusive work environments.

“In my daily life, being black and being female comes into play on a constant basis, and that takes a toll,” German says. “It gives me a different level of appreciation. It gives me a different level of empathy.”

The conversation was based on Moody’s interview series, “Black & Bold: Perspectives on Leadership,” which she expanded upon in her 2018 SSIR piece about black women’s use of kinship to overcome career barriers in the social sector.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/navigating_double_jeopardy_in_the_social_sector

Feb 11 2019

50mins

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How Client Feedback Helped Transform a Houston Health Agency

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Due to her father’s work as an engineer, Paula John moved around a lot in her youth. She often felt seen but not heard in the relationship with her dad. With her own family, she tried hard to listen, and she expected the same consideration from her local Houston health agency, she told former NPR host Bill Littlefield. When she reached out to the agency for help with an illness, and it sent her home empty-handed after a four-hour wait, she gave it harsh feedback. “She was right,” said Cathy Moore, executive director of Epiphany Community Health Outreach Services (ECHOS). “Some of the things she said were some of the things we focused on most.”

Through a Listen for Good grant, ECHOS began regularly surveying clients like John and responding to their feedback to transform the way ECHOS works.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/how_client_feedback_helped_transform_a_houston_health_agency

Jan 29 2019

9mins

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Increasing Equity and Inclusion in the Arts

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What practices make the arts more or less inclusive? At Stanford Social Innovation Review’s 2018 Nonprofit Management Institute conference, leaders from three San Francisco Bay Area arts organizations discuss how they are shaping both their organizations and their performances to make them more diverse and welcoming to all.

“That's the next big shift if we are to survive—to go into the community, knock down those norms, and be something that is accessible,” said panelist Tim Seelig, artistic director of the San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus.

Nayantara Sen, manager of cultural strategies with Race Forward moderates the conversation with Seelig, Judith Smith, founder and director of AXIS Dance Company, and Sherri Young, executive director and founder of the African-American Shakespeare Company. They discuss the meaning of equity within their respective communities, learning from failures, and building sustainable partnerships.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/increasing_equity_and_inclusion_in_the_arts

Dec 20 2018

1hr 8mins

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Former Prisoner Pays Forward the Gift of Being Heard

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When Shannon Revels came home to Oakland after nearly 15 years in prison, he found his criminal record made it difficult to get a job. But through the Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO), he found a role first as a janitor then resident services counselor in transitional housing for the formerly homeless. In this interview with former NPR host Bill Littlefield, Revels discusses the importance of his being heard by a teacher he met in prison, giving feedback to CEO and seeing it acted upon, and how he created ways to listen to his residents and dignify their suggestions with action.

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/former_prisoner_pays_forward_the_gift_of_being_heard

Nov 27 2018

7mins

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Rewriting Our Cultural Narrative for a More Just Society

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The nonprofit Color of Change was formed after Hurricane Katrina to use online resources in the fight for the rights of Black communities in America. Since then, Color of Change has grown into the nation’s largest online racial justice organization, with more than 1.4 million members.

Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change, spoke at our 2018 Nonprofit Management Institute conference about the nature of political and cultural power and the importance of continually assessing the nonprofit sector's efforts to bring about change. Robinson says, “We have to continue to challenge and ask ourselves, ‘What are we winning?’”

Additional Resources

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/rewriting_our_cultural_narrative_for_a_more_just_society

Nov 06 2018

35mins

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The Tenuous Relationship Between Technology and Social Innovation

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Technology can magnify the power of grassroots organizing and social innovation, but it can sometimes bring about societal harm, whether intentionally or not.

At SSIR’s 2018 Frontiers of Social Innovation conference, Rob Reich, a Marc and Laura Andreessen faculty co-director of Stanford PACS, explores the implications for the social sector and free speech in conversation with Kelly Born, a program manager at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation’s Madison Initiative, and Arisha Hatch, a managing director of campaigns at Color of Change, the largest online racial justice organization in the United States. They touch on topics including election integrity in the United States, online organizing around discriminatory policing, and the spread of hate speech and false information on social media platforms.

“Our democracy, our informational ecosystem, has been outsourced to a very few, very powerful platforms,” says Reich. “We don’t really know how the algorithms that power them are working to facilitate the very communication that we all depend upon.”

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/tenuous_relationship_between_tech_and_social_innovation

Aug 28 2018

52mins

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Fostering a Human-Centered Approach to Artificial Intelligence

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Artificial intelligence (AI), once a niche discipline within computer science, has blossomed over the past decade—including in the social sector. In this recording from our 2018 Frontiers of Social Innovation conference, Johanna Mair, academic editor at SSIR and a professor at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, speaks with AI expert Lab Fei-Fei Li about the growing importance of AI to the social sector and the imperative to improve representation within the community of AI technologists. Li is an advocate of “human-centered AI”—an approach emphasizing human psychology, augmentation rather than replacement, and social and human impact—and in 2017, she co-founded AI4ALL, a nonprofit organization working to increase diversity and inclusion in AI. Li argues that including people of diverse backgrounds is important to putting fears about the technology at bay.

“We know AI will change the world,” Li says. “The real question is who is going to change AI?”

https://ssir.org/podcasts/entry/fostering_a_human_centered_approach_to_artificial_intelligence

Jul 31 2018

36mins

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