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Everything Sounds

Everything Sounds is a podcast and short-form radio program exploring the role of sound in art, science, history, culture, and our everyday lives. Even silence has a sound.

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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30: The Silent Age

Over the years, sound effects and music have been used to make video game experiences more memorable or immersive. Smart phones and mobile technologies have allowed developers to further explore the role of sound in their games. One recent release from House on Fire titled The Silent Age allows players to lead their character on a time-traveling journey where sound creates an unusual and eerie atmosphere. Learn more about the game in this episode with Nevin Eronde and Thomas Ryder.

18mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #1

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17: Most Relaxing Song

Music can do a number of things, but can it help tortoises reproduce? The answer is no, but music can help us to relax and unwind. Researchers took the relaxation a step further by trying to create the most relaxing song in the world. The song was the result of the initiative of Radox, Mindlab, Lyz Cooper from The British Academy of Sound Therapy, and Marconi Union. How does their creation, titled, “Weightless,” compare to tea, massages, or a leisurely walk on the relaxation scale?Find out on this week’s show as @MaxOwens helps us learn about the art and science of music used for relaxation.

19mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #2

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26: Gennett Records

The early recorded history of jazz, blues, and country music in America usually isn’t associated with a place like Richmond, Indiana. However, for a brief period early in the 20th century the Gennett record label based in Richmond recorded music from artists such as Gene Autry, Charley Patton, Blind Lemon Jefferson, and Hoagy Carmichael. Learn about the history of the label from Rick Kennedy, the author of Jelly Roll, Bix, and Hoagy.Music featured:Charley Patton – Down the Dirt Road BluesFiddlin’ Doc Roberts – Deer WalkBix Beiderbecke – Davenport BluesWilliam Harris – Bullfrog BluesHoagy Carmichael & Pals – StardustKing Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band – Chimes BluesJelly Roll Morton – King Porter StompScrapper Blackwell – Blue Day BluesRecommended:Blind Lemon Jefferson – Mosquito MoanCharley Patton – Spoonful BluesNew Orleans Rhythm Kings – Mr. Jelly LordFletcher Henderson – Honey BunchMarion McKay – HootenannySounds Used (freesound.org):‘locomotive.wav’ by laurent, ‘Stem_Train.wav’ by knufds,Note: When the episode was originally published, we used an incorrect estimation of the number of white males in the KKK in Richmond in the 1920′s. The issue was corrected in this version of the program. We regret the error.

20mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #3

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40: London Parakeets

The soundscapes of cities are always changing and London is no exception. Human-produced sounds usually push the sounds of nature into the background, but the shrill calls of parakeets have been increasingly cutting through the noise in the London suburbs over the years. How these exotic birds arrived in England is still a mystery, but they have flourished in their new home. Learn more about how these birds have been a blessing and a burden in the lives of Londoners with the help of Everything Sounds contributor, @MaxOwens, and Tim Webb from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.More at: http://www.everythingsounds.org/40/

24mins

26 Sep 2013

Rank #4

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21: Nick Zammuto

The Beatles released their album, Rubber Soul, in 1965. This album includes a track titled “In My Life” that features an instrumental bridge created through a clever production trick by George Martin. A similar technique was utilized nearly four decades later by The Books on their album, The Lemon of Pink. The Books were known for making use of sounds and audio samples that aren’t typically heard in music. The Books disbanded in 2012, but Nick Zammuto is continuing to find creative approaches for organizing sound with his new band, Zammuto.George's Books CollectionGeorge’s Books CollectionLearn about Nick’s decision to leave the world of chemistry to focus on creative uses of sound in this conversation recorded before a recent performance in Evanston, Illinois.

29mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #5

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11: Microphone Museum

Bob Paquette has been collecting microphones for over six decades. His collection resides in his microphone museum that resides in the building that houses his family business in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Bob shared his knowledge of microphones and audio technology as well as anecdotes about the ill-fated Turner “Colortone” microphones, performers’ fears about using early microphones, and how portions of his collection ended up in the hands of a famous director. For more on microphones, you can check out Bob’s book, The History and Evolution of the Microphone.

20mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #6

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10: Rhythm Discovery

In downtown Indianapolis, there is an interactive museum where you’re free to hit, scrape, and strike just about anything you can see. The Rhythm! Discovery Center is an excellent resource for education for anyone with an interest in sound. Matthew Altizer joins us to explore this unique percussion museum that was conceived by the Percussive Arts Society. Find out about unique items in their collection including a World War II-era Ludwig “Victory” drum set, Clair Omar Musser’s one-of-a-kind Celestaphone, and giant wind chimes.

13mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #7

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55: Restaurant Sound Design

In the 2013 Zagat Dining Trends Survey, diners shared information about their tipping habits, favorite cuisines, and even their top complaints about restaurants. Not surprisingly, high prices, poor service, and crowded restaurants were some of the biggest gripes, but the number one complaint was noise. How much of the sound is there by design and how can restaurant owners use sound to make dining out a more pleasant (and less noisy) experience?Clark Wolf has consulted to restaurants, hotels, and just about every type of venue where people gather to enjoy food. Part of his job is to think about the ways in which sound can be used to enhance dining experiences. Learn more about the best and the worst of sound and music in restaurants with Clark Wolf on this episode of Everything Sounds.

17mins

2 Oct 2014

Rank #8

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41: Sounds from The Memory Palace

The Memory Palace is produced by Nate DiMeo and features historical narratives that are touching, humorous, and intriguing. In this episode, we share some stories from The Memory Palace focus on sound in some way. You can find the original pieces below: http://thememorypalace.us/2013/09/the-rush-of-the-river-and-the-roar-of-the-falls/ http://thememorypalace.us/2009/06/episode-12-these-words-forever http://thememorypalace.us/2013/07/o-how-we-danced/ http://thememorypalace.us/2009/07/episode-16-secret-kitty http://thememorypalace.us/2012/07/heard-once-2/

27mins

31 Oct 2013

Rank #9

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15: Music & Memory

Nearly everyone has strong emotional connections to music. Music can remind us of our past and affect our mood. Dan Cohen of Music and Memory realized that our relationship to music might improve the quality of life for the elderly in health care facilities. Music and Memory has provided personalized listening that has benefitted patients, families, and health care providers. Learn more about their efforts and some examples of the results in this week’s episode. If you have an old iPod that you would like to donate or want to find out more, visit the Music and Memory website.

15mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #10

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54: Shapenote

Shapenote singing is a tradition developed in the late 1700's and early 1800's that helped everyday people sing music even if they couldn't sight-read standard musical notation. Shapenote and the Sacred Harp songbook are still allowing people to share a musical experience until this day. Learn more about this tradition from Anne Heider, Robert from the Chicago Shapenote Singers, and Ruth Reveal.You can learn more about Shapenote, the Sacred Harp, and find singings in your area at http://fasola.org.Also, thanks to Kate Lumpkin for her help with this episodes.

18mins

4 Sep 2014

Rank #11

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13: The Sounds of East London

Dominic WIlcox is an established artist in London, England. His work ranges from sculpture, clothing design, drawings and more recently a vinyl record. The ‘Sounds of Making in East London’ is a commissioned work by Dominic after he was asked to create a ‘souvenir of East London.’ Instead of taking a traditional route, he went around to the ‘makers’ of the East end and recorded them on the job. The resulting work is a tribute to the overlooked and forgotten jobs of England.This episode uses these sound effects from freesound.org:‘air-raid’ by blaukreuz, ’Marines in Firefight Gunbattle (Raw audio)’ by qubodup, ’BellChurch’ by mich3d, ’morning_birds’ by morgantj, ’20120715_ourense.bell.01′ by dobroide, ’thsha1_binaural_church_bell_20060528_1′ by thsha1, ’01112 church bells 3′ by Robinhood76, ’Sirmione – Kirchenläuten’ by aarom

16mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #12

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25: Packard Campus

Cold War tensions led to the creation of a Federal Reserve bunker inside of Mount Pony in Culpepper, VA in 1969. The bunker stored cash and currency that could help restart the United States economy in the event of a catastrophic incident. Such an incident never occurred and the location remained largely unused through the the 90′s. The location has since turned into the home of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation. Learn about lost films, the National Jukebox, IRENE, how big a petabyte is, and much more on a tour of the facility featuring Gene DeAnna and Matthew Barton.

28mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #13

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18: Soundwalk

While Stephan Crasneanscki was working towards his Ph.D, he found that museum guides were lacking personality and feeling. He set out to create his own audio tours that were designed to have the listener discover the story of a location while getting lost in it. From there, Soundwalk Collective was born. Now, Stephan travels the world with his collaborators to use sounds to bring attention to the experiences and people that may normally go avoided or unnoticed. This episode uses these sound effects from freesound.org:‘trail_footsteps_1_0725_102951.wav’ by Ephemeral_Rift, ‘Car Door Shut.wav’ by jpkweli, ’morning_birds’ by morgantj, ‘wind in the trees’ by cajo, ‘16.12.2011.013.wav’ by deathicated, ‘crowds in yard.wav’ by cognito perceptu, ‘running leafy area loop.wav’ and ‘running gravel or dry leaves loop.wav’ by bevangoldswain, ‘small_person_animal(s)_in_leaves.wav’ by superEGsonic, ‘KidsAtPlayground.wav’ by gynation

21mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #14

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19: Sound Chambers

For years George had been obsessed with the stories of two sound chambers on the campus of Indiana University in Bloomington. Known as ‘acoustic test chambers’ around the campus, the two rooms (at least in George’s case) have been shrouded in mystery, rumor and intrigue. Recently included as part of the IU Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, what are actually called the anechoic and echoic test chambers are now being used for sound localization research.On this week’s show, find out the history and debunk the rumors of these chambers, while experiencing two of the most unnatural sounding rooms on earth.Note: When the episode was originally published, we incorrectly stated that the chambers were built in the 1970′s. The chambers were built in the 1950′s and the episode has since been corrected. We regret the error.

22mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #15

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53: The Black Country

Individuals can share a common language, but it can sound different due to accents and regional dialects. In some cases, there are profound differences between areas that are in close proximity to one another. The Black Country, an area of the West Midlands in England, is known for a unique dialect that can be difficult for modern English speakers to clearly understand. In this episode, Alex Adey shares stories of the history and torchbearers of the Black Country dialect.More from Alex Adey: https://soundcloud.com/alexmadeyThe Black Country Museum: http://www.bclm.co.uk

19mins

10 Jul 2014

Rank #16

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14: Bicycle Sounds

Rube Goldberg machines are unnecessarily complex contraptions that are assembled to perform simple tasks. Rube Goldberg machines were part of the inspiration for a video art piece by Stephen Meierding titled “Bicycle Sounds.” Find out how Stephen went from pursuing chemical engineering to assembling the video in his Brooklyn basement.

16mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #17

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47: The Heartbeat

The Tell-Tale Heart, one of Edgar Allan Poe's best known works, was written in 1842. The tale of madness involves a number of senses, but comes to a dramatic climax with a single sound -- a heart beating beneath the floor. George adapted the story into a radio drama, The Heartbeat, which was then produced by @auburnuniversitytheatre's Radio Flyer Theatre. Enjoy this modern re-imagining of the classic story on this episode!You can hear the entire version from @scottkwaters here: https://soundcloud.com/scottkwaters/radio-flyer-theatre-heartbeatThe Heartbeat was directed by Anna Claire Walker. It was produced by Taylor Dyleski, Kelly Walker as well as additional production, sound design and audio engineering from Scott Waters for Auburn University's Radio Flyer Theatre. It was adapted by @georgedrakejrAlso, find out more about Edgar Allan Poe at The Poe Museum Website: http://www.poemuseum.org/If you haven’t read the original prose of ‘The Tell-Tale Heart’ by Edgar Allan Poe, you should read that first: http://www.poemuseum.org/works-telltale.php

38mins

6 Feb 2014

Rank #18

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22: Audium

Stan Shaff has been interested in the relationship between sound and space for well over 50 years. His Audium installation in San Francisco is an ever-changing sound art project that involves a control console forged from dozens of pages of schematics and a dome-shaped room with speakers placed everywhere from floor to ceiling. Find out more about the Audium experience and its development in this episode.

16mins

19 Sep 2013

Rank #19

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51: Zappa Dummy

NPR's Protojournalist published a list of 6 odd college courses in America. On the list is a course on the music of Frank Zappa. The course was developed by Andy Hollinden at Indiana University. Holliden's interest in Zappa first manifested itself while he was in high school. Beyond listening to the music and poring over linear notes, Andy constructed a dummy of Frank Zappa that would later provide him with more insight and memories than he had ever imagined.

18mins

12 Jun 2014

Rank #20