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The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast

Updated 7 days ago

Education
Alternative Health
Self-Improvement
Health & Fitness
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Nutrition | Lifestyle | Inspiration

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Nutrition | Lifestyle | Inspiration

iTunes Ratings

246 Ratings
Average Ratings
223
9
2
6
6

Amazing!!

By Jesusrocks247 - Jul 27 2019
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So here it is almost August 2019 and I have been AIP For over a year and just now found this! I started from the beginning- 2016 podcasts and I’m addicted! I’m binge listening 😜 I feel like I’m way behind but I’m catching up quickly and I’m feeling so much better because of it! I was finally diagnosed Hashimoto’s after about 8 years of thinking I was going through menopause (until the main symptoms plus adrenal fatigue kicked in) I want to become an AIP certified health coach so I’ll probably be listening to these episodes again and taking lots of notes! Angie and Mickey there are no words to say how thankful we are that you guys have been such pioneers in this area! Whenever I hear Angie start to cry I tear up with her LOL. Keep up the good work ladies and most of all keep putting these podcasts out! They are helping millions and millions of women find their health again and there’s no prices that you can put on that! Much love to you both! 💗💗💗

Thankful!

By Jessaaron3 - Jan 28 2019
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So thankful I found these ladies! To finally feel like you have found people that just “get it” is the best feeling. It feels like they’re talking directly to me and this resonates so much with my own story and diagnosis. What a wealth of information! I am going to binge listen to the rest of the podcast this week! :)

iTunes Ratings

246 Ratings
Average Ratings
223
9
2
6
6

Amazing!!

By Jesusrocks247 - Jul 27 2019
Read more
So here it is almost August 2019 and I have been AIP For over a year and just now found this! I started from the beginning- 2016 podcasts and I’m addicted! I’m binge listening 😜 I feel like I’m way behind but I’m catching up quickly and I’m feeling so much better because of it! I was finally diagnosed Hashimoto’s after about 8 years of thinking I was going through menopause (until the main symptoms plus adrenal fatigue kicked in) I want to become an AIP certified health coach so I’ll probably be listening to these episodes again and taking lots of notes! Angie and Mickey there are no words to say how thankful we are that you guys have been such pioneers in this area! Whenever I hear Angie start to cry I tear up with her LOL. Keep up the good work ladies and most of all keep putting these podcasts out! They are helping millions and millions of women find their health again and there’s no prices that you can put on that! Much love to you both! 💗💗💗

Thankful!

By Jessaaron3 - Jan 28 2019
Read more
So thankful I found these ladies! To finally feel like you have found people that just “get it” is the best feeling. It feels like they’re talking directly to me and this resonates so much with my own story and diagnosis. What a wealth of information! I am going to binge listen to the rest of the podcast this week! :)

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The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast

Updated 7 days ago

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Nutrition | Lifestyle | Inspiration

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #3: Step 1: In-Depth with Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D.

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness

Episode #3: Step 1: In-Depth with Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D. is a conversation with the AIP expert covering everything from the basics of immune system function to prevention, testing, and treatment for autoimmune disease. In this great discussion, Sarah talks specifics about who is at risk for developing autoimmune disease, including the “accidents” of antibody formation. Very interestingly, she spoke with us about how our immune systems are “nutrient hogs” and how that applies to the healing approach of AIP. And yes, we all shared a little emotional moment to reflect on the ripple effect of Sarah’s work. This is a great episode for taking those first steps in truly informing yourself about autoimmune disease.

If you’d like to go more in-depth on Step 1: Inform, check out the “Confirmed, Suspected, and Related-Autoimmune Diseases” list or the “Learn About Your Disease” section, both in Chapter 1. These sections add detail to the information shared by Sarah in this episode.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Introduction
  • 1:50 Introducing Sarah
  • 3:00 How the immune system works and autoimmune disease develops
  • 6:20 How many autoimmune diseases are there?
  • 7:50 Sarah’s experience with informing herself about her autoimmune diagnoses
  • 9:42 Who is at risk for autoimmune disease?
  • 10:55 The risk for developing multiple autoimmune diseases and the role of antibody formation
  • 14:09 Common primary autoimmune diseases
  • 14:30 The role of nutrient deficiency in autoimmune disease
  • 15:50 Prevention of autoimmune disease
  • 23:25 Testing and treatment for autoimmune disease in the conventional and alternative system
  • 28:00 Sarah talks about how to have a conversation with your doctor
  • 30:30 Sarah’s unique research background and how she used it to create AIP as it stands today
  • 34:12 Our gratitude for Sarah’s work and sharing a few heartfelt tears
  • 36:54 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today, using the links provided below!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #2: Step 1: Inform – Our Stories, and the next episode, Episode #4: Step 2: Collaborate – Our Stories. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #3: Step 1: In-Depth with Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D. appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 01 2016

38mins

Play

S2 E1 Q + A #1 – Thyroid medication, Hashimoto’s remission, and finding balance with AIP

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 2! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Season 2 Episode 1 Q + A #1 is the first installment of our new Q + A format. In these episodes, we’re answering questions you submitted to us via social media! This season, the podcast will alternate between Q + A episodes like this and interview episodes featuring the voices of real AIPers just like you.

We cover a lot of ground in this first Q + A episode! Topics discussed include thyroid hormone replacement, AIP dogma, our personal reintroduction journeys, balance over perfection, adrenal support, and diet modifications for neurological disorders. Scroll down for the full episode transcript.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a complimentary resource for those on the road to recovery. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’ve got both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt, a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I have endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease. After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.Autimmune-Paleo.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

Mickey Trescott: This podcast is sponsored by The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook; our co-authored guide to living well with chronic illness. We saw the need for a comprehensive resource that goes beyond nutrition to connect savvy patients, just like you, to the resources they need to achieve vibrant health. Through the use of self assessments, checklists, handy guides and templates, you get to experience the joy of discovery; finding out which areas to prioritize on your healing journey. Pick up a copy wherever books are sold.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:
1. Thyroid hormone replacement [6:29]
2. Dogmatic AIP; elimination and reintroduction [11:54]
3. Weaning off thyroid hormone replacement [17:21]
4. Mickey and Angie’s personal reintroduction journey [21:37]
5. Iodine supplementation for thyroid [28:13]
6. Balance over perfection [29:32]
7. Non-AIP fillers in medications [33.10]
8. Adrenal support [35:23]
9. AIP and autoimmune neurological disorders [43:11]

Mickey Trescott: Hey everybody! Mickey here, and welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, season two. We had some really awesome feedback from you guys; it was really overwhelming on our blog posts, our Instagram accounts, and also the reviews in iTunes. So thank you guys so much for sharing. And we decided to bring things back for another round, since you guys told us that it was so helpful. So we’ve got a little bit of a program ready for you. Angie; should we tell everyone what we’ve been up to since the last season of our podcast ended?

Angie Alt: Yeah, sure. We’re trying not to get too chatty on you guys for this podcast. We’ve had a pretty fun few months, and we wanted to update you. The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook came out in November; woot, woot! And we had a great time on our 5-city book tour. We’re so grateful for everyone’s support; it was a great experience getting to meet so many of you, and hearing your stories, and watching your local communities kind of take shape and seeing you meet each other and sharing stories together at those book signings. Mickey, what was your favorite part of the tour?

Mickey Trescott: I loved the events with the food. So of course, I liked all the events; but enjoying AIP food with an AIP community is such a rare thing, that it was just really fun, those bookend events. So our first event was at Mission Heirloom and they just made this delicious meal for us, which is so fun to hang out with a bunch of other AIP people. I actually think that those two events; so then we did Hu Kitchen in New York City; both of them had almost 100 people, which I’ve never had the experience to hang out with 100 of my friends that eat like me, so that was really powerful.

Angie Alt: {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: And really fun. What about you, Angie?

Angie Alt: Yeah. A big, big thank you to Mission Heirloom and Hu Kitchen; that was amazing. We really appreciated that support for our peeps. I don’t know what my favorite part was. I think getting to hear everybody’s stories, and see the way our work is impacting real live people out there; that’s really exciting. Getting stranded on train tracks was pretty fun; do you remember that, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Angie Alt: {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, we almost didn’t make it to D. C., but we made it happen.

Angie Alt: Yeah. Let’s see; what else have we been up to since the book tour?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so you know, the first thing we did was take a chill period. You know, we spent some time resting and relaxing, taking care of ourselves; because we spent the better part of two years writing that book, and it was a big labor of love, but I think we needed to have a little season of kind of coming down off of that epic workload situation.

Angie Alt: Right. But, we did put in a little bit of work. One of our big projects that we worked on for the beginning of 2017 was relaunching our website under the brand Autoimmune Wellness. Hopefully, you guys are seeing that out there. We just think that the name really suits our mission, and will help us take our message to a more mainstream audience; viva la revolution, people.

Mickey Trescott: Woot, woot!

Angie Alt: We’re really focused on eventually making AIP this mainstream option for folks with autoimmune disease, and we feel like Autoimmune Wellness will help us get there. Let’s see; what else have we been up to, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: So, we have recently been working on a special project that those of you that are health coaches; so nutritional therapy practitioners, or other kind of practitioners in the natural health scene, will be really interested in. so make sure that you guys are on our email list to be the first to hear about it. You can sign up at our website; www.autoimmunewellness.com, or the old website, www.autoimmune-paleo.com, will redirect there, and you can opt in and you’ll be the first to hear about it. And I’m sorry we can’t share any more details, but it’s going to be really fun.

Angie Alt: Super secret squirrel.

Mickey Trescott: Secret squirrel; that’s one of Angie’s favorite phrases. So back to the podcast; we want to tell you guys a little bit about what to expect this season, because our format is going to be a little different this time around.

Angie Alt: Yeah, so this season we’re going to be alternating between Q&A episodes, where Mickey and I are just going to take as many of your questions as we can and answer them for you guys. and then we’re going to be doing interview with real people who are going to share their journeys to autoimmune wellness, and what it’s actually been like for them. Just regular people out in the community who are using this method of working toward healing.

Today is our first Q&A episode, and we asked you guys to submit your questions; I think we took these mostly on Instagram, right Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: Yep.

Angie Alt: And boy; you guys gave us a lot of questions.

Mickey Trescott: A lot of questions. {laughs}

1. Thyroid hormone replacement [6:29]

Angie Alt: We’re going to do our very best to get through as many as we can, so let’s get started. Let’s see; so we have some thyroid questions. Mickey, let me ask you this first one. It looks like Hannah asked, “At what point should you ask to start taking thyroid hormone; especially if you feel good about 25% of the time and your labs are within normal range, and you’ve followed the protocol for a while. And once you start taking it, do you have to continue for a while? “

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so this is a really good question for anyone with thyroid issues or Hashimoto’s, listen up. The autoimmune protocol does a really great job for most people taking out that inflammatory process, and taking out all those foods that are irritating to the gut. It does not reverse the damage that has been done to your thyroid, and it is not a replacement for thyroid hormone therapy if you need it.

So, a lot of us; if you have thyroid disease, it’s possible that you have Hashimoto’s, which is an autoimmune thyroid disease. And Hashimoto’s is actually the cause of 80% of hypothyroidism. So if you’ve been diagnosed at any time in the past with hypothyroidism, and you haven’t really been told about the cause, but you’ve been told to take thyroid hormone, it’s very likely that you have Hashimoto’s. and you haven’t ever had your antibodies tested, it’s a good idea to get those checked.

So what happens in Hashimoto’s is your immune system starts to destroy your thyroid slowly, over time. For a lot of people, it can take decades before they even start to get symptoms. But by the time people get diagnosed, and they notice the symptoms, and they get their labs done and their thyroid is suboptimal, they usually get on thyroid medication. And this medication is to replace the thyroid hormone that their thyroid would normally be making. So a part of the casualty of Hashimoto’s; there are some other reasons for thyroid dysfunction, but a lot of the time, it just means that your thyroid is not making enough hormone. And that thyroid hormone is needed by every cell in your body. So it’s really important if you need it to get a prescription and take it.

So, I would encourage anyone who is on the autoimmune protocol, who knows that they have Hashimoto’s disease or thyroid dysfunction, if they’ve tried the elimination diet for a little while; like it sounds like Hannah, she’s been on the protocol for a while, and she is only feeling well 25% of the time. The catch here is she says her labs are within the normal range. Now, a lot of people are told their labs are within the normal range, when they aren’t.

so this is probably a situation where Hannah, you should find a more open minded doctor that is willing to do thorough testing. So for thyroid disease, you really want to be testing free hormone levels; so free T3, free T4, in addition to the usually ordered TSH, sometimes reverse T3 can be helpful; and then again those antibodies to kind of tell how the autoimmune process is going. And then, you want to find a doctor who doesn’t believe in the conventional ranges, but who treats based on a little bit more of a narrow, functional range. And this can be hard to find; it doesn’t have to be a functional medicine doctor. It can be a savvy regular medical doctor; it could be a naturopath.

But I’ll tell you; I went to 6 doctors who told me my levels were normal before I found the one who said; “You know what, they’re not.” And that thyroid hormone replacement, that medication, was the difference between me feeling 60-70% better and 90-95% better. So it can make a really big effect, even if you’re doing the diet and everything.

So, I don’t think that people should be denying themselves thyroid medication. Like I said, it is something that every cell in your body needs, and if you need that and you need to eat a certain way to feel well; that’s what I do personally, there is no harm in that. And you should continue as long as your doctor, and your labs, and your symptoms indicate that you should. So, I know that’s kind of a long answer, but the thyroid stuff can get kind of complicated. And a lot of times, it’s not either/or; a lot times, that’s just another tool that we have in our tool box to live well with thyroid conditions.

Angie Alt: Yeah, right. We’re fans of the both/and, right?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, totally. I mean, if you know that there is something you can do that’s going to help you feel better, why would you not use it? A lot of medications have side effects, but thyroid medication is actually a lot of times bioidentical to what your body would actually be producing. And so it doesn’t have the same mechanism. Most medications work by inhibiting something, or stopping something. But thyroid medication, it’s almost like a nutrient in that way. Your body needs a certain amount, and if you’re not getting enough, you’re just going to have symptoms. So I’m very pro- working that out.

And you know, some people might not need thyroid medication. But if you think you might need it, it’s really worthy of investigation. So, let’s move on to a question for you, Angie.

Angie Alt: Sure.

2. Dogmatic AIP; elimination and reintroduction [11:54]

Mickey Trescott: So we have a question from Jay, and it’s about balance, which is one of your awesome expertise. “I’d love to hear the benefits and problems with staying on AIP with no reintroductions. I’m hoping AIP is a bridge to healing, and that I can add back a lot of the foods I’ve eliminated. Eggs, nightshades, and occasional grains. But the AIP community at large seems so dogmatic about this being a lifestyle, and a forever thing. What’s the point of forever elimination?”

Angie Alt: Oh boy.

Mickey Trescott: Who are you talking about, Jay? {laughs} Hopefully not us.

Angie Alt: Jay, you need to give us their name and number, and we’re going to go tell them what we think about that. No, I’m just kidding. I’m really sorry that you’ve encountered this feeling in the AIP community that it’s dogmatic, and that we believe that you should be in the elimination phase forever. That’s definitely not what we’re hoping to promote in the community, and it’s definitely not how the protocol is laid out. So the protocol is an elimination AND reintroduction protocol; so that’s really important to understand that part of the healing process is reintroducing foods.

I think it could be maybe a little bit of a misunderstanding of the idea “lifestyle”, of making AIP a lifestyle. By that, it’s more talking about healing in general, and incorporating more than just diet into your autoimmune wellness journey. So hopefully it’s just a misunderstanding and you’re not, hopefully, running into too many people that are being super dogmatic about staying in elimination forever.

So, you know you wanted to hear about the benefits and problems of staying in AIP with no reintroductions. I honestly don’t think that there are benefits to staying on the elimination phase of AIP forever. I think, actually, you’re really limiting diversity in your diet, and it’s also psychologically really hard. Not to mention, in our modern world, it’s not the most convenient thing to have to be in that kind of restricted zone that long.

Generally, you’re looking to stay on the protocol; the elimination part of the protocol, for at least 30 days. That’s enough time to kind of clean your slate, and make it so that you can understand foods that are a problem for you as you begin to reintroduce, versus foods that really work for your body. Ideally, it would probably be better if you shot for more like 60 to 90 days. Most folks need a little more time than 30 days, so it’s not unusual to stay in that zone for another month to two months past the 30-day process.

If you get to 90 days, and you’re not having the kind of progress you would have expected with AIP, it’s a good time to get some people on your team who you can collaborate with. Doctors or other kinds of practitioners that can help you dig a little bit deeper, and see if there are some root issues that are kind of preventing progress with the protocol. You know, for instance, a really common example in the autoimmune community would be maybe having small intestine bacterial overgrowth, or something called SIBO. A lot of folks are dealing with an underlier there, and it can’t be corrected with diet alone, and it needs to be treated through either conventional or herbal antibiotics with a practitioner.

So there can be issues underlying like that that need to be uncovered. In that case, maybe you would stay on the elimination a little bit longer; so you kind of keep the process clean. You limit variables, and you kind of figure out what that root is. And then once you deal with those, you move on to reintroductions. Definitely; we don’t believe you should stay in elimination forever. The benefits of reintroducing foods is a lot of nutrient density, variety, it emotionally feels better to have a little wider diet, and it’s easier. It’s more convenient in our world.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, it really changes things when you can start to eat out, and you can start to experiment more with those gray-area foods. I think being too restricted usually comes from a place of fear for a lot of people, and we don’t want to have that relationship with our food. We want to think of our food as something that’s very powerful and lifegiving. I mean, we have this opportunity three or more times a day to actually decide how our body is going to interact with all of these chemicals and nutrients, and it’s a very powerful thing. But I don’t think it’s something we should be afraid of. We should see it as an opportunity.

And you know, the fear with reintroduction is a big thing with a lot of people, and they like to kind of make other people suffer by promoting that idea that they also need to be afraid and be on it forever; but it’s not like that. And Angie and I, hopefully, in what we’ve written in our books, and on the blog, and in the podcast, we’re trying to put this to rest that the reintroduction is 50% of the whole protocol. That’s why it’s called a protocol, and not a diet. A diet is something that people adopt for long-term, and a protocol is a process that you go through with an end result.

Angie Alt: Right. You know, Jay, I think the thing I say to my clients pretty often; probably I say this at least once a day. The point of this whole process is to help heal our bodies, not develop burdened hearts and minds.

Mickey Trescott: Well said.

3. Weaning off thyroid hormone replacement [17:21]

Angie Alt: Alright. Let’s see; so we’ve got some more thyroid questions Mickey, are you ready?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Angie Alt: Ok. So Julia wrote in and said, “A Hashimoto’s question. My doctor put me on medication, levothyroxine, a year ago when I got diagnosed, and I’ve since increased. I obviously wouldn’t stop taking it without doctor’s orders, but I was wondering if it is possible to get off of the thyroid hormone supplement after being on it. I’ve heard of people with stories of healing their bodies naturally without ever going on medication, but was wondering of the possibility of coming off of it after taking it for an extended period of time.”

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so this is a good question Julia, and you know, you’re right to know not to change anything up without your doctor. It sounds like you have a pretty reasonable expectation about what to expect; you’re knowing that maybe you will be able to go off it, maybe not. And honestly, no one will really be able to know until you try changing your diet and managing your lifestyle better. I have personally not been able to go off my thyroid medication, but I have changed my dose a lot.

So when I was first diagnosed, I was put on a certain blend of T4 and T3, and I stayed consistent on that for almost 2 years, and then I started reacting to the T3. And my suspicion is that the conversion of T4 to T3 is very dependent on a few nutrients; mostly zinc and selenium. The autoimmune protocol is actually really plentiful in these nutrients, and I think I had just started getting too much T3, because my body started converted sufficiently, something that a lot of people have, very poor conversion. So I started reacting to the T3, so my doctor took out that part of my prescription, and I’ve been on the same dose ever since.

I’ve remained pretty stable on my thyroid hormone, and I would say that the clients that I’ve worked with with Hashimoto’s tend to remain pretty stable, or decrease their medication. A lot of them aren’t every single year, you know, steadily going up and up and up. But that’s not to say that that’s you, that’s a failure. I would just be open to kind of whatever situation happens, because a lot of things can change over your life that would impact your need for thyroid medication. Certain factors might be kind of how that autoimmunity is progressing. I mean, a lot of people go to the point where they get that inflammation down so far that maybe they’re just kind of holding steady at whatever their thyroid is outputting.

And intuitively, not medically speaking because I’m not a medical practitioner, but intuitively I feel like that’s what’s going on in my body. But I’m not holding out hope that I can just one day ditch that thyroid medication so that I can feel good about myself. I, like I said before, I accept it as a part of my healing journey, and I’m grateful to have the opportunity to take that thyroid medication, and you know; I’m open to whatever happens in the future. Maybe if I go through a period of extreme stress, you know put some stress on the adrenals, that might be a situation where I might need some more thyroid hormone. Or you know, maybe I will start reacting to the amount of T4 I’m taking and I’ll need less. But I have no way of really knowing, and I guess I can just tell you as a practitioner, that I’ve kind of seen a lot of different things happen with people, and I have seen people try the autoimmune protocol and actually completely go off their medication. But I wouldn’t say that’s typical, so I would just be open minded and accept it as part of your healing process.

You know, for anyone with Hashimoto’s or thyroid disease; having a good doctor and being monitored regularly, and being willing to be open and change, depending on your symptoms and the seasons and whatever your going on in your life; that’s the best way to navigate it.

Angie Alt: Great answer, Mickey.

Mickey Trescott: Cool. Well, we’ve got another balance question for you.

Angie Alt: Sure; let’s hear it.

4. Mickey and Angie’s personal reintroduction journey [21:37]

Mickey Trescott: So Julie says, “Are you ladies AIP compliant all the time? Or have you reintroduced foods? If so, which ones have you been successful at reintroducing, and what are your recommendations? I’ve got Hashi’s.”

Angie Alt: Ok, so were we compliant with AIP while we were in the elimination phase? Sure we were. We were both pretty dedicated to the process, because we wanted to see if it could help us with our healing, and sure enough it did, which was very motivational to keep going. Now, we are still compliant with AIP; we are in the reintroduction phase. We’re well into the reintroduction phase; I would say actually Mickey and I are kind of post-reintroduction, actually. And we’ve sort of fine-tuned our diets, and found out what bioindividually works for each of us.

The foods that I’ve reintroduced are kind of across the board. Some examples are white rice, white potato; I can do quite a bit and variety of dairy. Let’s see; eggs are definitely in, I can do most of the nuts and seeds, I can do a little alcohol. There’s not really any super big standouts other than obviously I didn’t go with the grains beyond white rice, and I don’t do most of the legumes, and the nightshades other than white potato have not been my friend. How about you Mickey; can you tell her about your reintroductions?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. So the first foods I successfully reintroduced were egg yolks, seed spices; then whole nuts and seeds, the oils from them. That was, you know, probably the initial. It took me about a year and a half; so a little bit longer on the autoimmune protocol with those reintroductions before I started tolerating the egg whites. And then I started tolerating white rice and potatoes pretty shortly after. Small amounts of alcohol. I’ve never been able to tolerate even the most clarified ghee; I’m very allergic to dairy, still. So that’s never changed for me.

But the nightshades, at about 3 years in, I started experimenting with paprika and cayenne pepper in small quantities of the spices; and now I’m to the point where I can even have some raw peppers, but I cannot have tomatoes. So Angie and I are pretty different about what we can tolerate, but we’ve both been in this phase probably 3 or 4 years now. And I think post-reintroduction is a little bit more kind of knowing where your boundaries are and knowing quantities, and situations, and combinations. We’ve “reintroduced” so many times, because every time we’re at a conference, or we’re at a restaurant, and we’re like, “Hmm, should I have conventional eggs and potatoes in the same meal?” {laughs} You know, there has just been a lot of opportunity to kind of mix and match and kind of figure out. Since we already know the basics about those triggers, you know, we eat a pretty varied gluten free diet. Sometimes, for me, it’s not even paleo, and I’m still feeling great and I know my boundaries, you know?

Angie Alt: Right. I think once you kind of get into reintroduction, and especially kind of, I guess you would call it post-reintroduction; AIP becomes more about the ebb and flow. We write about this a lot in our new book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook, that you kind of start to realize when there will be points in your life where it’s better if you’re kind of tightening down things, and really careful and maybe even basically elimination phase style eating, just best support your health; and then you’re more aware of the times when you’re health is just in a really great place, and you’re stress is low, and it’s a time when you can open up and enjoy all those reintroduced foods fully and not really worry that it will impact your health too much. I think it’s the whole process of learning to hear your body talk, and have that communication going. Which, that’s the whole thing that happens, while you go through reintroductions.

You know; Julie did kind of mention that she has Hashimoto’s, and that’s one thing that we could probably touch on a little bit about reintroductions. For some folks, depending on their diseases and their disease presentations, sometimes the reintroduction process can be a little harder to gauge, and I think Hashi’s folks are among those people; because I think reactions can be a little slower. What do you have to say about that, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so what I recommend for people with Hashi’s is to get really into journaling, and really try to find as many concrete signs as you can. So, for instance, journaling and saying “My energy today was good,” is probably not going to help you over the long term. But saying, “My energy was 7,” or, “My energy was 6.” You can notice a trend over months when you use numbers.

You can also try things like taking your temperature first thing in the morning before you get out of bed. That’s a great indicator of thyroid function. It will go up and down a little bit as your cycle fluctuates, but for the most part, if you start tracking that over a period of months, you’ll start to see a warming trend when you are feeling a little bit better, having more energy.

Other things are like your bowel movements; so using Bristol stool chart, tracking your bowel movements. Noticing things like your mood. You can also say, how was my anxiety today, or was I feeling happy? You can notice your skin. That’s a big thing for thyroid people. Noticing your shedding. And again, you can rate it on a 1-10 scale to give yourself really a good scale of tracking that for the long-term, and kind of making those; connecting those dots. Because with Hashi’s, we have what are called nonspecific symptoms. So they’re things that, this is a reason why a lot of doctors don’t take us very seriously because we go in and we say; “oh, well I’m tired and I’m constipated, but not really constipated, and my skin is dull, and my hair is falling out.” And they’re kind of like; “well, that doesn’t really give me much to work with.” You know?

Angie Alt: Right. So, that can, yeah, kind of make it a little bit tough with the reintroduction process. But I think you had some good tips there.

Mickey Trescott: Cool.

5. Iodine supplementation for Hashimoto’s [28:13]

Angie Alt: Ok. Another Hashi’s question. Ashely asks; “Hashimoto’s question. My functional doctor has me taking iodine supplementation. In your opinion, is iodine supplementation a good or bad thing for someone with Hashimoto’s and adrenal fatigue?”

Mickey Trescott: In my opinion, it is a bad thing. So iodine, a lot of people think that taking iodine is good. There are a lot of practitioners out there that really believe in putting their Hashimoto’s patients on iodine. It’s kind of like pouring gasoline onto a fire. So it can really cause a bad flare. I personally have done this to myself. I did the iodine protocol; I read about how iodine can really screw with you when you have Hashimoto’s, then I read a lot of stories of people that were really raving about it and I tried it. I had a massive, massive flare. It took me 3 months to recover from it. And this is consistent with a lot of the research that I have read from really tried and true Hashi’s resources that iodine is really not a good idea.

I would just say that maybe in small doses, with a practitioner who is very knowledgeable and very willing to monitor you. But yeah; I would say no go on the iodine.

Angie Alt: Yeah, it is a little tricky; iodine.

6. Balance over perfection [29:32]

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm. So, Christine wants to know, Angie; “What does balance look like practically? How do you strive for balance over perfection? You can follow the right diet, take supplements, and change your lifestyle, but how does that all fit with seeking emotional and mental health, as well?”

Angie Alt: So, you know. What does this look like practically? This is a little bit tough, because it looks a little different for everyone. Everybody’s balance is going to be a little different. But I think the main thing is kind of what we were talking about with the earlier balance question about whether or not AIP is dogmatic, and that you should stay in elimination phase forever. It’s this whole idea that we’re seeking healing with this process; we’re not trying to burden our hearts and our minds. If you find that following this process is leading you down a path where you’re unable to think about anything else, or you’re kind of just emotionally weighted down by it day in and day out, I’d say that it’s time to get some people on your team who can help you make it a more balanced process, or consider coming back to AIP at a time when you’re more able to tackle it.

There’s probably a couple of people out there listening and going, “Oh my gosh, what’s going on? The AIP queens are telling us to maybe think about AIP at a later time, what’s going on?” {laughs} What I’m saying is, if it’s making you that imbalanced, and you’re struggling with it in that way, you’re not going to get the benefits of the process and the protocol. It would be better to return to it at a time when you’re more able to tackle it. That said, don’t just let any tiny challenge along the way kind of prevent you from really pursuing healing with this. If that’s the case; if it’s feeling a little overwhelming. If it’s feeling like a bigger challenge than you thought it would be, but you want to pursue it and you want to do it in a balanced and happy way; get support. You know? Find people to be your cheerleaders; maybe consider getting a coach to help you go through the process. You could join a group program, like my SAD to AIP in 6. Whatever will give you the support you need.

Tap into this big community that we have and find places where you can vent; and say, “Guys, this is so hard to do, and I’m really struggling with trying to do it perfectly!” And then this whole community, and there are thousands of us, can say, “Don’t worry about perfection! Just keep going!” we can help give you messages that can make it a little bit easier. I think supporting your mental and emotional health through the process is just as important, you know. Stress is not going to help you get any further down the healing road, no matter how perfect your diet and supplementation is. What do you think about that, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: I think that was a great answer. I mean, perfection has no role in this. It’s not about being perfect. I’ve noticed that’s kind of going back to the dogma question; some people use AIP as more perfect paleo, and it kind of satisfies a little bit of a disordered sensibility in them, and you know, like Angie said; if that’s kind of the road you’re going down; get help, get community, get support. But it’s really not about being perfect, it’s about living life. And we’re not perfect, you know?

Angie Alt: Yep, exactly. We’re human beings, not robots. Not AIP robots. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Nope.

7. Non-AIP fillers in medications [33.10]

Angie Alt: Alright, let’s see. We’ve got another thyroid question. This is our last thyroid question. The lady asks; “My thyroid medication, levothyroxine, contains lactose and corn starch. How important is full AIP compliance in a situation like this? How big an impact will it make on my chances of healing and remission?” What do you say, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so corn and dairy are pretty high up there in the potential triggers. That being said, it’s a pretty small amount in thyroid medication, and thyroid medication is usually necessary for people feeling their best. So what I would suggest, if this woman was my client and I had taken history and everything; I would probably say, you know, try AIP for 30 days and see how you feel. If you don’t feel any different after 30 days, then I would ask you to go back to your doctor, talk to them about the elimination diet you’re trying, seeing if they would be open to doing a trial of like a compounded medication where they put the levothyroxine in a filler that is a little bit more benign. Sometimes you can find a pharmacy that will put it in ginger powder; I have mine in microcrystalline cellulose, which some people are sensitive to if they have serious gut issues. But from an autoimmune standpoint it’s usually fine for most people. So that’s another option.

So yes, if you are sensitive to the lactose and the corn starch, that could be an issue for you. But I would probably give it 30 days before going through all that effort of going to your doctor and getting a new prescription and everything; because that is a really big change for your body. The way that your body actually digests and uses that thyroid medication, it changes with what it’s filled with. So it could be that that medication is actually working really well for you, and I’d hate to see you change it if that’s the case. So that’s what I would say.

Angie Alt: Great. What do you think, Mickey, should we move on to a few more questions?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, I think we have two more we have time to hit.

Angie Alt: Great.

8. Adrenal support [35:23]

Mickey Trescott: So Kate says; what are some of the best way to support the adrenals through diet and supplements, for someone with adrenal insufficiency that also has an underactive thyroid.

Angie Alt: Ok, so; Kate, this is all kind of interconnected. We sort of have a little bit of a triangle, for lack of a better term, that’s happening with our adrenals and our thyroid, and also another important part of our body; our blood sugar regulation.

So, the very first thing that somebody who is trying to support adrenal health would do is work on blood sugar regulation. You can think of this as, every time your blood sugar gets too low, your adrenal glands have to basically come to the rescue. They have to pump up a bunch of cortisol into your system to help your body release enough glucose to basically solve this low blood sugar crisis that you’re having. So you want to end that rollercoaster ride, where the adrenals have to hop in there and do that for.

Some ways to do that in the beginning are to eat within a half hour of getting out of bed; probably think about having six times a day that you’re eating; so every 3 hours eating something. So your three main meals, and then maybe some small snacks in between. Eventually you won’t have to do this as your blood sugar gets regulated, but these are some steps in the beginning. Make sure that those meals and snacks include a little bit of protein and fat, because that protein and fat is like a log on your internal fire, and it burns nice and steady and keeps your blood sugar really even, so it doesn’t have one of those dips where the adrenals have to work so hard and come to your rescue.

Another smart thing to do here is to avoid, obviously, lots of sugar. Because every time the blood sugar goes way, way up, what goes up must come down, and then you’ll have that crash and the adrenals will have to come to the rescue. That includes sugar from fruits, so you’ll want to keep your fruit consumption kind of limited. Maybe one to two pieces a day; preferably not dried fruits or the tropical fruits, which tend to be really high in sugar. You might want to think about things like berries and other kind of low-sugar fruits.

Those are kind of the big ideas about how to keep blood sugar regulated. You would want to kind of start there rather than start with supplementation. The other side of this equation is getting enough rest. There’s kind of this idea that certain people suffer from adrenal fatigue; but the reality is, pretty much all of us suffer from adrenal fatigue, and it’s because of the lifestyles that we lead in our modern lives. You know, we’re running around all the time, we don’t get enough sleep. We’re plugged into our devices all the time and not really ever resting our brains. Sometimes the things we’re seeing on our devices or on the TVs or hearing on the radio are very stressful things. We’re commuting; commutes are very stressful. We have really plugged in work lives that often don’t allow any downtime, you know? So the other side of this coin to help achieve some better balance with the adrenals is to really work on rest and relaxation; do things to manage our stress actively, so that those adrenals don’t have to fire so often. Mickey, how would you explain kind of the adrenal insufficiency running into the thyroid issue?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so the adrenals and the thyroid, this is really, really common for people with thyroid issues to even have more complicated adrenal issues, because they’re both the systems of the body that are responsible for energy production. And when one of them isn’t doing well, the other one kind of has to pick up the slack, and a lot of times when the thyroid starts to have dysfunction early on, the adrenals just pick up the slack and you don’t really know that that’s different. But over time, your adrenals burn out, and that’s usually when people get the first signs of thyroid disease. They get a diagnosis of thyroid issues, and then they kind of start there, but they don’t really realize that they kind of need to work on both systems and bring them both back to health before they’re going to really feel that complete return of their energy.

So, like we’ve been talking a lot about medication this episode, making sure that you are being properly treated for your underactive thyroid so your adrenals don’t have to do so much work. That is a really important part of the process.

Another thing that I would mention that can be kind of tricky with managing that blood sugar, is to make sure that you’re not going completely low carb of ketogenic.

Angie Alt: Ah, that’s a good one!

Mickey Trescott: It can be a really tricky line, because if you’re eating too many carbs and too much sugar, that’s going to make those peaks and valleys and make your blood sugar go up and down; but if you’re eating just enough complex carbohydrates to keep your insulin at a normal level, that’s going to keep your thyroid hormone conversion where it should be. So for a lot of people, they can get really sluggish, and their thyroid can put a lot of that work on the adrenals if they’re not eating enough carbs.

So a lot of people will say; “tell me exactly how much I need to eat?” This level is pretty individual. {laughs} So for some people, half a sweet potato, maybe one sweet potato a day does it; some people need a little bit more. So you might have to kind of play with that level and see where you’re at, track your food for a little while and kind of see what produces the most energy for you and also doesn’t really have you run into the blood sugar issues.

The other thing I want to say too is; a lot of people that reverse these adrenal issues, they don’t do it with supplements, right? There are a lot of products out on the market, and I want to send a warning for anyone with autoimmune disease. A lot of herbs, in particular that are helpful for the adrenals, are actually powerful immune stimulants, which can be really problematic for people with autoimmune disease. So for a lot of people, these supplements; especially things like ashwagandha; it’s a nightshade. So this is one of these herbs that a lot of these formulas use. It’s very hard to find a supplement that actually follows the autoimmune protocol, it doesn’t have any immune stimulating herbs, and honestly a lot of people that are recovering, are doing it through the diet and lifestyle changes. Supplement is sometimes a little bit helpful with some nutrients, but really if you’re not changing your lifestyle, it’s not going to be a sustainable change.

Angie Alt: Right.

Mickey Trescott: So that’s what I would say there.

Angie Alt: Womp, womp; we didn’t recommend a supplement. But no, seriously. Starting with your food, working on your diet and lifestyle; that’s the way to heal the adrenals.

Mickey Trescott: And I would say, too; people, I will mention rhodiola rosea is one herb that I have found that I’ve used with a few people, and I’ve used it personally that isn’t a nightshade. It is an adaptogen, meaning it kind of helps you find that even keel; and it’s not immune stimulating. So for what’s it worth, it might be one to look for blends with that herb in it. But like I said, I would probably save my money in the initial stages and work on some more self-care and stress management, and sleep before resorting to supplementation.

9. AIP and autoimmune neurological disorders [43:11]

Angie Alt: Right. Alright, one more question here. They say; it looks like her name might be Sylvia? She says, “My question is about specific recommendations for autoimmune neurological disorders. I was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis, and have been on immunosuppressants for almost one year. I feel better, although still on medication. I did the 8-week AIP elimination diet last October and November, and didn’t find major changes. I’m working on other key aspects of autoimmune wellness, such as sleep, rest, and exercise. Are there specific recommendations for neuromuscular conditions? Thanks.”

Mickey Trescott: Yes! So, what I would say with a disease like myasthenia gravis, or anyone else who is on an immunosuppressant medication; this is not to say that any other autoimmune diseases aren’t here yet, they are not severe. But a lot of these diseases have some pretty intense symptoms that could potentially be life threatening, and this is why the choice for using a very powerful immunosuppressant medication is warranted.

So for anyone in this situation, like what Sylvia is doing, trying to do some dietary changes in conjunction with conventional medication; always talking to your doctor about what you’re trying. This is always the best approach. You don’t need to feel like you need to go off your medication before you try AIP. Trying AIP with your doctor’s permission, while you’re on the medication, and having positive changes there is the way to go before you have the conversation with your doctor about potentially weaning. Some people might be able to wean, some people might not. That’s totally a discussion you have to have with your doctor. But I just wanted to say that note for anyone also there.

Some diseases are, depending on how long you’ve had this process going on in your body, for a long time it might be pretty severe, you know? Autoimmune neurological diseases. So things like multiple sclerosis; they take a little bit longer. Because you know, that myelin, that tissue in your brain; the nerve tissue, that is something that is actually very, very difficult for the body to heal. And it’s not to say that AIP doesn’t work; I mean, look at Terry Wahls. If you guys haven’t seen her TED Talk yet; which she has; what she has accomplished in the few years, even now when I’ve seen her in person, just year to year she just looks younger and younger and is more capable and more strong, and just incredible. It’s possible; but I want to say, too, that usually people dealing with these more complex and deeper seated conditions; time might be a variable for you.

So I would suggest making sure you have good help; so making sure have a functional medicine practitioner, making sure you have a doctor on your team who is open to advising you about the interaction between the diet, making sure that your medication is going to play nice with anything else that you’re trying on your own. So the other variable is time. So this is a case where I do think it’s necessary for some people to be on maybe a modified elimination diet for a longer period of time, just because of how difficult that nerve tissue is to heal. And so I would definitely try and work with someone; I wouldn’t try and do that on my own. Because like we’ve been talking about this whole episode; there is a lot of mental and emotional stuff you run up against when you try to do the elimination long term. So I wouldn’t do that without help.

The third thing is; you know, those key aspects that you’re talking about; that sleep, that rest, that exercise. That’s going to help you too, but also some nutrients might be really important to your healing process. So that’s where getting a practitioner involved. You know, like Terry Wahls, I know part of her protocol was taking large amounts of B vitamins, and some antioxidants like Glutathione and other things. So working with, like I said, a functional medicine practitioner who can help you maybe add in some of those nutrients and supplements that might actually help you get sufficient in that area a little faster.

And then I’ll end, too, by saying; for me personally, I never got diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, but there was a point in my journey where they suspected it; my doctors suspected it. I did have a lot of inflammation in my brain, and Angie and I shared this; we both had really bad nerve damage in our fingers and our feet; we started slurring our speech. And for me, one of the things that did not resolve very early when I started the autoimmune protocol was any of those symptoms. So I actually had this nerve damage in my fingers and my feet where I couldn’t really feel my fingertips. And even; gosh, I want to say a year and a half into AIP, I still had that feeling. And I even went to my doctor, and I said, “Doc, everything else has changed. Literally, my body feels like a completely new body except I cannot feel my fingertips. Is this ever going to go away?” And they said, “Oh, that nerve tissue, it doesn’t heal. It probably can’t come back; it’s probably damaged.” And I was grateful for what I had achieved, and ok fine.

But I can tell you 5 years later, slowly that went away and I have feeling there now, and I don’t have that problem anymore. So that healing came very late, and I’m guessing that it came from just eating a nutrient dense diet for so long. So going back to that balance between, “How long do I stay on the elimination diet;” I don’t think you necessarily need to be on the elimination diet forever to achieve a change like that. But trying to figure out which diet is best supportive of your health while reintroducing some foods and kind of focusing on that nutrient density; those organ meats and bone broth and all of that nutrient sufficiency, I think in the long term is the thing that really is going to help turn around these deeper seated, long-term, potentially serious conditions. So hopefully that’s helpful.

Angie Alt: That was great. Lots of good tips in there. Alright; our time is kind of up for answering questions today. We definitely didn’t get to all of them, so we’ll be addressing them in our next podcast. We’re going to be doing lots of these Q&As this season; we hope you guys will tune in again. Have a great day everyone, and we will see you next week with a personal interview.

Mickey Trescott: Bye guys!

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by ordering your copy today!

Check out the previous episode, Bonus Ep: Cooking For Life, Multiple Sclerosis, and a research update w/ Dr. Terry Wahls. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post S2 E1 Q + A #1 – Thyroid medication, Hashimoto’s remission, and finding balance with AIP appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Apr 17 2017

51mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #5: Step 2: In-Depth with Dr. Titus Chiu

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #5: Step 2: In-Depth with Dr. Titus Chiu is a conversation with award-winning professor, chiropractic neurologist, and functional medicine expert on practical collaboration and the overall collaborative spirit when it comes to healthcare. Titus talks with us about the specifics of collaboration between conventional and natural practitioners, including why the breakdowns in communication often occur. He also shares why he believes there is a new and positive future for a more collaborative healthcare environment. The best part of this episode comes at the end, when Titus talks about the deep root of meaningful collaboration (we wish every doctor approached communication like this!). This episode is awesome for insight into the healthcare experience from the “other side” of the exam table.

If you’d like to go more in-depth on Step 2: Collaborate, check out the “How Do You Build A Collaborative Team” section in Chapter 2. This section is very relevant to the guidance Titus shares in this episode.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:50 Introducing Titus
  • 3:20 Titus shares about his experience with illness and injury bringing him to healthcare
    • He was hit by a car in Japan and that changed everything!
  • 5:50 Titus tells us what an ideal patient looks like to a physician
    • Educated
    • Motivated
    • Enthusiastic
  • 9:23 Achieving deeper healing by facing our “demons” on the wellness journey
  • 10:03 What does collaboration with doctors in the conventional system look like?
    • Titus shares that this most often just looks like referrals
  • 11:38 How does practical communication occur between conventional and natural practitioners?
    • Titus reveals that it is a combination of sending reports on a patient’s progress and relaying information through the patient (this reinforces that we need to be the leaders of our healthcare teams!).
  • 14:53 Why is there a breakdown in communication between the two systems according to Titus?
    • Language
    • Goals
    • Approach
  • 16:20 Titus talks about why he believes there is a positive future for collaborative healthcare based on three points:
    • More open doctors
    • More open patients
    • Technology advances
  • 20:23 How should a patient handle a non-collaborative doctor?
  • 22:30 How can you effectively communicate your own knowledge when initiating a collaborative relationship with your doctor?
    • Titus talks about his very special, caring approach to patients who are overwhelming in their personal health research
  • 31:20 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #4: Step 2: Collaborate – Our Stories, and the next episode, Episode #6: Step 3: Nourish – Our Stories. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #5: Step 2: In-Depth with Dr. Titus Chiu appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 08 2016

32mins

Play

Bonus Ep: Hashimoto’s Protocol and Thyroid Wellness w/ Dr. Izabella Wentz

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 2!

Bonus Ep: Hashimoto’s Protocol and Thyroid Wellness w/ Dr. Izabella Wentz is our first episode in nearly 6 months (!) and we’re treating it as a little surprise introduction to Season 2. In this episode, we interview our close friend Izabella Wentz, also known as the thyroid pharmacist. We dig into her experience hacking her own thyroid disease, as well as the ways in which she is now giving thyroid disease patients the power to take back their health.

Topics we discuss include the uniqueness of Hashimoto’s in the chronic illness world, the importance of self-care, and most importantly, the multiple root causes of Hashimoto’s (Izabella’s specialty). This is a powerful episode with one of the foremost voices in the Hashimoto’s community, perfect for folks with thyroid disease who are looking for answers. Scroll down for the full episode transcript.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a complimentary resource for those on the road to recovery. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’ve got both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt, a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I have endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease. After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.Autimmune-Paleo.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

Mickey Trescott: This podcast is sponsored by The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook; our co-authored guide to living well with chronic illness. We saw the need for a comprehensive resource that goes beyond nutrition to connect savvy patients, just like you, to the resources they need to achieve vibrant health. Through the use of self assessments, checklists, handy guides and templates, you get to experience the joy of discovery; finding out which areas to prioritize on your healing journey. Pick up a copy wherever books are sold.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:
1. Introducing our guest, Dr. Izabella Wentz [2:36]
2. Hashimoto’s Protocol book release [9:58]
3. The uniqueness of Hashimoto’s [16:41]
4. The liver support protocol [19:36]
5. Self-care: You cannot pour from an empty cup [26:20]
6. The multiple root causes of Hashimoto’s [31:09]

Mickey Trescott: Hey everyone! Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast. Mickey here, and Angie and I are super excited to be back with you guys. We’ve taken 6 months off from our podcasting adventure. Can you believe it’s been that long, Angie?

Angie Alt: No, it feels like it was just a few weeks ago that we were releasing everything.

Mickey Trescott: Seriously.

Angie Alt: I mean, honestly we don’t really know how podcasters who have regular shows do it; putting all of this content, editing, and all the details. It’s kind of a lot of work, you guys! {laughs} We do much better producing and releasing our podcasts in batches and seasons. And we hope you guys are enjoying the seasonal format, too.

We’ve actually already recorded our entire second season, which we can’t wait to share with you guys. Because the format is going to be a little bit different this time around, we wanted to bring you two pre-season bonus episodes featuring interviews with two incredible women doing great work in our community as a way to whet your appetite for what’s to come. Mickey, do you want to tell your listeners about our first incredible woman?

1. Introducing our guest, Dr. Izabella Wentz [2:36]

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; so, our guest today is none other than Dr. Izabella Wentz, also known as the thyroid pharmacist and leader of the root cause rebels. Lest you guys think that is a clever band name; it actually stands for community of people who have successfully hacked their thyroid disease. Izabella has made quite a splash in the thyroid community in the last few years since the release of her bestselling book; Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Finding and Treating the Root Cause. And the release of The Thyroid Secret documentary series, which you guys, probably, if you’ve been following on our email list or have been on the internet at all in the last 3 months have heard about; hopefully you guys participated in. It was a really incredible experience for everyone. So informative.

And Izabella’s newest book that came out this week; Hashimoto’s Protocol. Izabella is definitely a lady on a mission to spread the word far and wide about healing from thyroid disease, and we feel absolutely blessed to call her a friend and have her in our community. Welcome, Izabella!

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Angie, Mickey, I’m so excited to be here with you ladies today. How are you?

Mickey Trescott: We are awesome.

Angie Alt: We’re great!

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Angie Alt: Even better with you on the show. So maybe we’ll just kind of get started. Izabella, you are fresh off the launch of your Thyroid Secret documentary; woot, woot! We promoted it and heard from our followers that it was one of the most thorough and informative resources on thyroid disease they had ever seen. You interviewed literally hundreds of experts as well as patients all over the world; it was really incredible. Can you tell us what inspired you to do a project on such a massive scale?

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Of course, and thank you for being a part of The Thyroid Secret, as well. We, of course, interviewed Mickey as part of that, and it was fantastic to have her share with people how effective the autoimmune paleo diet can be, and how important it can be as part of a healing protocol for people with thyroid disease.

Really, my big passion is ever since I got my health back; I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s in 2009 after almost a decade of some pretty debilitating symptoms, and kind of mystery symptoms, and I was told they were all in my head and all that good stuff. Until I actually took charge of my own health and was able to recover my health. From that point on, I wanted to spread the message to the world that recovering from autoimmune disease is possible, and that you can feel like yourself again, even if you’ve been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s or Graves’ disease. And really just trying everything that I could do to get this message out there.

The documentary series; I’ve written a book about Hashimoto’s; Hashimoto’s, the Root Cause was my first book, and I have Hashimoto’s Protocol which just came out this week, which is a protocol based book. But I wanted to get together with a group of like-minded individuals; so health care professionals and experts like you ladies, as well as patients who have taken back and recovered their health to create this community and create sort of a movement to share the best practices, to share our stories; to share our research, and inspire and really get the world moving and excited about health recovery, and giving them; raising that awareness and giving people and opportunity to understand and see that people are recovering from thyroid disease every day.

That was really my big motivation behind it; I wanted to get this message out into the broader world; and I know some people with thyroid disease, the brain fog prevents them from reading wonderful books such as ours, and even reading blogs, but sometimes just watching something on a screen can be really helpful in helping people absorb the information.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; Izabella, I think that the documentary format is just genius because it’s really visual. A lot of people are really visual learners, and seeing you interview and ask these questions, and seeing all these experts and hearing from all these patients; it’s so much more moving to a certain type of person; a certain type of learner that I think that connection is a lot deeper. And then it spurs action, not only in people’s own lives, but then the conversations that they’re having with their friends and family; maybe that’s even sharing the documentary and getting some validation in what they’re going through. And then going into their doctor’s offices and being informed; and saying, you know, “you’re not the only doctor on the planet that doesn’t believe in this. Look; there’s a whole movement of people out here that are fighting for our care,” and it just really empowers them. So it’s really, really awesome; they loved it.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Yeah, my goal is to create 10,000 success stories with The Thyroid Secret documentary and with my Hashimoto’s Protocol book, and it’s been really, really exciting to see the ripple effect of this. As your listeners know, nutrition is a really, really important part of recovering your health. I was really excited about one story; it was a woman who watched The Thyroid Secret; in episode 5, we focused on nutrition. Right after that episode, she changed over to the autoimmune paleo diet, and by episode 9, she said shew as feeling completely transformed. She had gotten her energy back, and joint pains, and all these symptoms started shedding away from her. And it’s like; the more we can spread awareness about all of these interventions that can change a person’s life, change how they feel, and prevent the progression of autoimmunity; then let’s get this out in a big way, right?

Angie Alt: Yeah, I love that. Those kind of stories; they don’t get old for me. It still gives me goosebumps to hear it, it still makes me; you know, I’m a crier, but it still makes me on the edge of tears. It’s dramatically changing people’s quality of life is such an awesome way to spend your life work, you know? You’re doing a great job on that massive scale. I love it.

Mickey Trescott: And you know, the social media, and implementing this kind of online business stuff; you and your husband have been really, really good at leveraging that tool that I think a lot of us get really burnt out and exhausted trying to get the word out through the online environment. It can be a little bit toxic at times; so you guys really figured out how to kind of hit that where you got people’s attention, you got a lot of building this massive community and people really excited about it, because this is what we need to change the symptoms. You know, we need a large movement of people that are ready to kind of go to battle and get that awareness out there. So it’s awesome.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Mm-hmm. Yeah, absolutely. We’ve reached 500,000 people with the documentary series; and it’s all a collaboration of our work together, and we’re all sharing our best practices with that.

2. Hashimoto’s Protocol book release [9:58]

Mickey Trescott: That’s just incredible. So, right on the heels of this massive launch, you also have a new book out. You sound like the same kind of crazy person cut from the same cloth that Angie and I are; called Hashimoto’s Protocol: A 90-day plan for reversing thyroid symptoms and getting your life back. So for any of you guys who are listening who may have read Izabella’s first book; you will know that she is very detailed, and there is a ton of information there. I remember when I first got my hands on that book, I was like; holy cow. This is a lot. So what inspired you to write the second book, and how are they different from each other?

Dr. Izabella Wentz: {laughs} So it was a reader, a Pilates teacher, and a discovery of liver support; plus all of my experience with working with over 1,000 people with Hashimoto’s.

To make kind of a long story short; my first book, Hashimoto’s, the Root Cause; it was me recovering my health, and the book was about my story and all the research that I did to help myself. And I just wanted to put it out there for people and say; “Hey, I don’t know every single root cause, and I don’t know what triggered your condition. Here are some things that worked for me, and these are some additional things that may work for you. These are all of the different things that I researched that could potentially help with autoimmune thyroid disease. Some of them work for me; others did not.”

So that was my first book. And I started speaking about Hashimoto’s after that point, and I started working exclusively with people with Hashimoto’s, and just really made it my life’s work, and my focus, and of course, my passion. And I was speaking at an event in Chicago; this was in 2014, early 2014. And I met this wonderful woman named Teresa, and she said, “You know, I really love digging for my health.” My first book talked about the dig at it approach, where you figure out what your individual triggers were, and you kind of dig for these triggers. I try to create a funky acronym, right? {laughs} For it, where it was digestion, infections, gut, adrenals, toxins, inflammation, so on and so forth.

And she said, “I really enjoy digging for my health; but I really wish you would just give me done for me protocols where you tell me exactly what to do. Tell me what I need to eat; tell me what I need to change. Can you give me a plan?” And at first I was like; yeah, I could give you a plan, but I don’t want people to think I’m biased, or I have all these competing interests or whatnot. And I’m like, I think maybe it’s best for people to learn as much as they can, and then pick out what works for them, right?

Then, a little bit after that I had a Pilates session with a pretty intense Pilates instructor who kept telling me which muscles I was using; she gave me Pilates homework, she tried to quiz me in anatomy. And at that point I was like, “oh. Well I don’t want to be a Pilates expert, I sort of just want to be in good shape.” Right? And then I realized that maybe not everybody wanted to necessarily be a Hashimoto’s expert, which my first book sort of taught people to be their own experts. The second book focuses on giving people protocols; so this is exactly the steps you need to take to recover your health.

And the steps I developed came from my work with clients, and these are the protocols that have worked for about 80% of people; we saw very positive significant results. One of these protocols is actually the very first of my fundamental protocols in Hashimoto’s protocol called the liver support protocol. This focuses on helping people support their liver through removing the low-hanging toxic fruit, adding specific nutrients to help themselves detoxify better, and removing specific foods, as well as adding other types of foods into their regimen, and what I’ve found is within 2 weeks of doing the liver support protocol, people see significant difference in their symptoms.

I first discovered this when I was working with a client that was really just reactive to everything; so I would recommend a B-vitamin to her, and she would say, “oh, I had a negative reaction.” Or a probiotic, and she had a negative reaction to that. And she had multiple chemical sensitivities; a lot of joint pains, very high thyroid antibodies and brain fog, and even depression. I wanted to figure out how I could help her right away and very quickly without necessarily doing protocols to rebalance her gut, which can take some time, or get rid of infections; that can actually weaken people in the short term.

So I started doing a little bit more research, and found that a lot of times when people have multiple chemical sensitivities, and a lot of sensitivities; it’s because their liver is overloaded with toxins and they’re not properly getting rid of them. So I put her on this liver support protocol hoping that it would help just a little bit, but I got a message from her within a week that said, “Oh my goodness! I’m at the shopping mall with my kids. I haven’t been able to walk past a Yankee Candle store in years because of my chemical sensitivities. And my joint pain is better; my headaches have resolved, I have more energy; I’m not as depressed.” And her thyroid antibodies also reduced the next time she had them done. So this is something that could help people within two weeks; and I really wanted to get this out into the world, as well as all of the other protocols that I discovered in working with over 1000 clients over the last few years.

Angie Alt: My gosh, I love that. I think the reality is that for all of us who write books, there’s probably kind of multiple threads that lead to that inspiration. But I love that you have pinpointed the three; you knew exactly how you got there.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: {laughs} Yeah, it’s been a lot of fun working on getting this information out into the world, and just trying to summarize everything I’ve learned since that point. I’ve uncovered additional protocols, and additional triggers that I didn’t know about a few years ago, just learning so much from my clients as well as some of the latest research that’s come out since my first book was published.

3. The uniqueness of Hashimoto’s [16:41]

Angie Alt: Right. So, we’d love to dig into some of the topics you cover in your book. Early on you make the distinction that Hashimoto’s disease has some unique symptoms compared to other thyroid disorders, including the ability to fluctuate between what is commonly known as hyper and hypothyroid symptoms. Can you tell us more about this, and give our listeners some background on this concept? I think it might ring some bells for some folks.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Yeah. I know when most people are diagnosed with a thyroid condition, the doctors tell them the thyroid is sluggish, or underactive; right? Or that it’s overactive. But with Hashimoto’s, what it is is an autoimmune attack on the thyroid gland. And definitely in the early stages, or when the attack is severe enough, we start seeing a rush of thyroid hormones into the blood stream. And this rush of thyroid hormones produces kind of a transient overactive thyroid or hyperthyroid; and we can feel like we’re on an emotional and physical roller coaster. Because we’ll have this influx of thyroid hormones, and we might feel anxious. We might have palpitations. We might feel really irritable. We might be losing weight.

And then once that gets cleared out of the body, we start having hypothyroid symptoms, so we may have depression, we may be really tired, we may have brain fog, we may feel really sluggish. So this is a part of Hashimoto’s that not many people are aware of, and in some cases they feel like they’re crazy. They don’t know why that’s happening to them. And this can happen for at least the first 10 years of when a person has Hashimoto’s, that they fluctuate between overactive and underactive.

Mickey Trescott: Izabella, I have a question too, as a thyroid patient who has definitely experienced this. It seemed to me, also, that it wouldn’t swing back and forth as clearly; sometimes I would have those hyper-ish symptoms, like the crazy heart palpitations and the anxiety along with that bone-crushing fatigue. Can you maybe talk a little bit about that, too?

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Yeah, absolutely. And that potentially could be because we might have too much thyroid hormone in one place, where as other parts of our body are not getting sufficient thyroid hormone, right? So, it’s not being distributed evenly, and then you end up with; and I say this sarcastically, but the best of both worlds.

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Because you end up with having hypothyroid and hyperthyroid symptoms all at once. You’re like; “Really, I’m anxious and exhausted?” I know certainly that was my experience, too, where I was like; how. How is this possible when I first got diagnosed, because I’m like; you’re telling me I have this, but half of my symptoms are on the over-active side. And this can be very confusing and frustrated, and that’s definitely a part of the condition, to understand.

4. The liver support protocol [19:36]

Mickey Trescott: So, Izabella, in your book you present three main protocols that those with Hashimoto’s can use to get their health on track. You already talked a little bit about liver, your liver protocol, and I want to talk about it a little more.

So, I will admit I was a little worried when I saw that you recommend a liver support protocol as a first step, because I personally was hospitalized because of a detoxification protocol gone wrong in the early days of my recovery. I was actually prescribed a smoothie based detox by my naturopath, and it did not end up well for me.

That being said, when I actually read that chapter in your book, I was so relieved and actually really impressed to see how on your recommendations are with kind of a gentle approach, not to overwhelm people. I think there’s a lot of detox crazy going out there right now that is really inappropriate for a lot of autoimmune people, but your four-step liver support protocol; I’d love for you to talk about it a little more. Because I think a lot of people are confused and don’t think they are detoxing unless they’re doing something that is really harsh and really producing even some really nasty negative symptoms, and what you’re proposing is actually very gentle and very level-headed, and a lot of people wouldn’t even consider it detox.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Right. And that’s why I call it the liver support protocol, and not the detox protocol. And some people; they don’t really understand the difference between the two, and I certainly didn’t when I was first starting on my healing journey. So detox is something that forces toxins out, right, and so let’s say I like to use the analogy of an over-worked kind of office worker at maybe a government job, right? And what’s happening to her in Hashimoto’s, is she just have way too much stuff to do. Way too many toxins to process. So if you could imagine her desk, it’s covered. Piles and piles of papers; and she has to process out all these papers, and somebody comes up to her with just one little thing to do, and she’s like, “Oh my gosh, I’m so overwhelmed, I can’t get this done for weeks!” Even though this one task would take her just a minute to complete.

And that’s sort of the same thing with Hashimoto’s; when you have a congested liver; the liver is so over-burdened with all these different things that it doesn’t have the right kind of nutrients or capacity to get rid of the toxins, and it doesn’t have the stamina. So a toxin that should normally leave your body in a relatively short amount of time sticks around for a really, really long time and just goes through your body and recirculates rather than getting removed properly. And then we end up being sensitive to things in our environment, like benign chemicals and what not. So that’s sort of the problem that you have.

Now, there are a few different ways that you can address this problem, and one of the ways is through liver support where you would bring in, like a support person, that could help this woman process and get all of her papers done, right? So you’re helping her a long, you’re making sure that your kind of doubling her workup. And that’s what liver support is, right?

What detox would be is if you were to come into her office in the middle of the night while she was at home, and just started cleaning all of her papers up and try to put them away in different places, and maybe threw some of them out. So that’s sort of what happens in detox; and as you can imagine, things can go crazy if you don’t have the right systems in place. I know some of the detox protocols out there, like doing chelation for example; this basically removes toxins from where they’re sitting in your body, and sort of recirculates them. And then you need; if your liver was perfectly fine, your liver would maybe get rid of them; but what happens in autoimmune disease is that these toxins can recirculate and get into another part of your body.

Now, this happened to me when I tried to take spirulina, which is a detox kind of molecule or whatnot. I tried to detox myself, and I ended up having a new autoimmune condition. So I ended up with giant papillary conjunctivitis; which was giant pimples on my eyelids; not fun, don’t recommend it. And what happened was the toxins were getting redistributed in my body; in my eyelids, specifically, and not getting cleared out.

There are other protocols, like coffee enemas. These can be really, really great for really healthy people; but a lot of people with autoimmune disease are very much debilitated and those can actually be potentially problematic. High dose iodine can detoxify, but that ends up stirring a lot of things in the meantime, and it can actually be inflammatory for people with Hashimoto’s.

With the liver support protocol, what I do with my clients is I give them nutrients and some liver supporting herbs to help them process that backlog. And it’s very, very gentle where we just kind of speed up your own body’s natural ways of getting rid of toxins. So part of that is moving them out of the liver but using specific liver nutrients, like milk thistle and various vitamins and amino acids that support those pathways. By introducing more sweat into your life. So the skin is our largest detox organ, and most people with an underactive thyroid don’t sweat enough. It’s not something they complain about, but it’s something that’s definitely deficient. So getting more sweat happening is going to be really, really positive.

The other big thing is removing those low-hanging fruits. So removing the foods that aren’t going to be potentially toxic; removing fluoride from your everyday use; that starts to free up the liver to start getting rid of that backlog, right? And then of course, I love utilizing supportive foods, so things like hot lemon water, green smoothies, so on and so-forth to help your own detox pathways; not do a forceful detox.

Angie Alt: Love it. I think Mickey and I were sitting over here in our nutritional therapy offices going, “Yes, yes! Totally right on.” I just love it. And your example of how this works; your office lady. This really gives a great illustration to people to understand why gentle is probably better.

5. Self-care: You cannot pour from an empty cup [26:20]

Angie Alt: Let’s talk a little bit about the surveys you did over your 2,000 Hashimoto’s patients. One of the not surprising but interesting results was in the adrenal recovery protocol, where you report your findings about lifestyle habits, and situations that make them feel better. I just want to read a few of these off. So, sleeping, 74%; spending time with loved ones, 73%, being in nature 71%, walking 66%; compared to things that make people feel worse. So, lack of sleep 95%, being stressed out 93%. For those of us with autoimmune disease, this may seem obvious, but it’s really interesting to look at the numbers here. Can you talk a little bit about the disconnect between what we know is better for us, and the lifestyle habits we actually engage in on a regular basis? And I think we’re probably all a little guilty. {laughs}

Dr. Izabella Wentz: You know, this is kind of a big passion point for me. I recently shared a meme to my Instagram page; and it was basically, I think women are especially at risk for this, and it said, “Calling a woman high maintenance is a great way to put down a woman who cares about herself.” And there’s this stigma around women caring for themselves. Our, I guess our value is derived in how we care for other people, and our accomplishments. And self-care, self-love, self-compassion is seen as selfish. It’s like, “Oh, well you’re spending all this money on yourself, and you’re resting when you could be volunteering somewhere and you’re doing all of this and all of that.”

I know for me, that was a huge reframe, where I was like; wow, maybe it’s ok for me not to take over the entire world and do every little thing by myself and actually let other people help. Maybe it’s ok for me to; I ended up working part time as part of my healing journey. And that, for me, I feel good because I felt like my accomplishments were what brought value to my life.

I think, for me, the big way to reframe that is thinking about how an empty cup can never fill another cup. So what we want to do is we want to fill our cups so full of self-love, self-care, and self-compassion, that we can just give from our overflow. Because then it’s not such a burden.

I know for me, if I’m ever not taking care of myself, I end up being resentful towards other people. I’m not the best Izabella to my loved ones; I’m not the best Izabella to anybody in my life if I’m not taking care of me first. And so I know this is a really big, big habit change. It’s one of those things, like stress; changing how you respond to stress and how much stress you take on, it’s one of those things that doesn’t require a fancy doctor or fancy supplements, or even necessarily a lot of money, but it’s one of the hardest things to do. It’s also one of the most important things.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; I mean when you look at these numbers, it’s like out of the 2,000 people that responded to your survey, 95% of them said lack of sleep they know make them feel worse, and being stressed out 93%. Those are 2 things that; not everything, but a lot of those things are within their control. They can set a bedtime, they can troubleshoot those sleep issues, they can acknowledge that stress and make a plan for trying to dial it down or manage it better. But it’s still surprising knowing how much better that makes us feel how high those numbers are, and it really tells me that; you know, everyone is suffering from this. Everyone is having a hard time. I think part of it is just cultural; what you said, Izabella, about women just over-doing it and not really taking that time for self-care because the stigma is totally spot-on.

Angie Alt: Maybe we need to start a girl’s club, ladies, where we cheer each other on for putting ourselves first and really diving into these self-care practices.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, I think that’s a great thing, maybe an action item for anyone listening. You know, if you notice someone else in your life taking some time to take care of themselves, cheer them on, you know! Say, “you know what, I noticed that you’re trying to take care of yourself,” and applaud them. They’re going to be a better friend, or a better wife, or a better teacher; whatever they do because they’re taking that effort, and I think we should acknowledge it more.

Angie Alt: #Selfcare.

Mickey Trescott: Yep.

Angie Alt: Right.

6. The multiple root causes of Hashimoto’s [31:09]

Mickey Trescott: So Izabella; a big misconception I’ve noticed kind of floating around our Hashimoto’s community is that there is one underlying magical root cause to anyone’s personal particular disease. And in the advanced protocol sections of your book, you provide a lot of self-tests people can use to uncover different areas they should look at. So maybe you could speak to those people who seem to be tirelessly looking for this one root cause; instead of looking at that bigger picture, and how to narrow that down with some of the advanced protocols you’ve given.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Sure. So, the 6 categories where I would put root causes are going to be food sensitivities, nutrient depletions, impaired ability handle stress, impaired ability to handle toxins, intestinal permeability, and chronic infections. And when I really thought about what all of those different root causes have in common; when you go back to it, all of them; whatever, if it’s toxins, or having food sensitivities, or not enough nutrients on board, or even stress in our lives. All of those messages send a signal to our body that we’re not safe. And that we need to conserve energy, and conserve resources.

Now, I consider this an adaptive physiology kind of genius development of the body where the body knows that in time of famine, where we might have nutrient depletions and a lot of stress, that we need to shut certain things down. The fastest way to shut down energy expenditure is going to be through slowing down thyroid function. So my kind of interpretation of what’s going on with thyroid disease and what’s going on in Hashimoto’s, is basically our bodies response to our current environment, right? So our body is interpreting these signs. So eating foods that are inflammatory to you; right now that seems like it’s a normal part of life. But if you were a caveman, there was never going to be a time that you would eat grass; which let’s face it, grains are; unless you were absolutely starving. Unless there was a famine. So this sends a signal to your body that you’re not safe, right.

Same with any kind of toxin. So the toxin within your body, or within your environment, it sends a signal to your body saying, “Hey, we’re not safe. Not a good time to be utilizing all of our resources. We need to conserve our resources.”

So how you back away from that is sending your body safety signals, and convincing your body that yes, it is safe. Right? That’s how you start rebalancing autoimmune thyroid disease. And you do that through making sure that you’re nourishing yourself; avoiding foods that are inflammatory to you; you’re addressing your stress, and then supporting the liver and supporting the adrenal glands. Supporting your gut is also going to be helpful for sending your body those safety signals to make yourself feel better.

As far as the root causes, a lot of times, it’s going to be a whole lifestyle overhaul when you have autoimmune thyroid disease, where you dial in all these moving pieces. Like the nutrients, and you want to dial in the food, and so on and so forth. And the liver, adrenal and gut protocols; my fundamental protocols actually result in improvement 80% of the time, where people feel significantly better and some people can even go into remission once they get these 3 elements dialed in.

Beyond that, there are various types of root causes. And some of the root causes we can absolutely figure out what they are and we can remove them. Gluten is a root cause for some people; once they get off of gluten, everything else comes into balance. The world comes back, and birds are singing everywhere, and you’re in complete remission, until you eat gluten again. For other people, breast implants may be an autoimmune trigger. They get their breast implants removed, and they no longer have autoimmune disease, right?

For other people, it might be a combination of different things. So they might have a few different infections, they may need to really work on rebalancing their stress response. For others, it might be things that we can’t necessarily get rid of. If a immunization triggered their thyroid disease, it’s not like you can undo it, right? So a matter of what you need to do when you have Hashimoto’s is you need to support your fundamentals, you need to work on building up your body, you need to work on that resilience to get yourself to feel well. Often times you also need to address hormones, and making sure you’re on proper thyroid hormone replacement in conjunction as you’re doing these lifestyle things.

And there’s fundamentals that I recommend, and I also recommend figuring out and addressing any kind of root causes or known triggers that you may have, and that’s why I have a root causes assessment in the second part of the book that goes through all these potential triggers that could be contributing. But what I’ve found is it’s oftentimes wiser to get the lifestyle and the strengthening protocols up, such as making sure you’re properly nourished, as you ladies know, before you start really going heavily after the different root causes.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome; love that approach, and I love you putting it together through all of the spectrum of root causes and things that can be combined, instead of a lot of practitioners now will go out and say, “Epstein Barr is the root cause of Hashimoto’s.” I can’t tell you how many people in the last week; it’s almost on a daily basis now that are coming up with this. And for some people; yes, dealing with a chronic infection is a part of their journey, but for a lot of people, it’s not, so you presented a really wide range, and you present even more in your book of things that some people wouldn’t even think of; like the breast implants or various thigs that people could be reacting to in their lifestyle, you know. Toxic mold in their house; whatever it is that they’re having trouble with.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Yeah, absolutely. And in some cases, there are somethings that you can’t get rid of necessarily out of our environment, so you can’t leave our planet and our planet really is full of toxins. So we have to do our best to survive in this world. And it’s a matter of sending safety signals to our body, and that’s going to be making sure you’re really nourished and well taken care of.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm. And not having too much fear about that, too; because I’ve seen a lot of people go off the deep end in that area, too; where when they start hearing stories, especially of other people where someone is having a problem with something really specific, they start to kind of get this bubble living, and afraid of the outside world. I think that really impacts our ability to live vibrant, healthy lives if we’re constantly afraid of everything we’ll come into contact with. So we have to have a balance there.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Yeah, I agree. And I know for myself, when I first started on the path to healing; I made a lot of mistakes, and that’s probably why I write about it all because I don’t want people to make the same mistakes I did. But I was on a dietary protocol; I was on the GAPS diet, which just wasn’t right for me. It works well for some people, right? But for me this diet wasn’t right because I was very sensitive to nuts, and nuts make me accumulate copper. My body tends to accumulate copper just in general, potentially because of some undiscovered genes that I have. And you can get into a place where you feel like you lose that connection, and you lose that communication with your body. And you’re no longer perceiving your body’s messages, and you become very fearful.

I know I became concerned when I was going; about eating sweet potatoes. And I was like; well they’re not GAPS compliant, and are they going to harm me because I lost that communication and that, I guess inner dialogue with my body. And that’s really what it is; and recovering, in my opinion, from Hashimoto’s, is remaking that connection with your body where you listen to its signs in terms of what foods are working for you, what foods aren’t working for you; what’s working in your life, and for most people being isolated and keeping themselves away from their community; that’s definitely not on the list of things that makes them feel better. So really going through and creating that little list for yourself; “things that make me feel better, things that make me feel worse” and doing more of the better and less of the worse is probably the most important thing you can do for your healing.

Mickey Trescott: I don’t know if this lady could be singing to our hearts any more clearly, you guys. We are always preaching the balance in this process, and she’s just really speaking some wise stuff here. Izabella, thank you so much for spending some time with us today. We know our Hashi’s brothers and sisters listening in will learn a lot from this episode. You guys, please pick up a copy of Izabella’s new book; Hashimoto’s Protocol: A 90-day plan for reversing thyroid symptoms and getting your life back. Izabella, can you let our listeners know where to follow you and what’s in store for your community of Root Cause Rebels?

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Yeah, absolutely. My website is www.ThyroidPharmacist.com, and as we talked a little bit at the beginning of the interview, I’m always coming out with new and exciting things for people with thyroid disease, and trying to get more information out into the world. One of these big projects was The Thyroid Secret, and if you want to be notified about if we ever do re-release that you can go to www.ThyroidPharmacist.com/gift. I also have some helpful things to get your started on your journal, including a guide on nutrient deficiencies, which are one of the fastest ways to get back your health. And I always keep; I’m sending out up to date research every week or so or every two weeks, if I’m in a book launch, to let people know about what all the different potential things that can be helpful for them to recover their health. And Hashimoto’s Protocol is available wherever books are sold. So if you go to Barnes and Noble, if you go to Amazon, if you go to any kind of bookstores you should be able to find it there. And I hope that you pick it up, and I hope that it helps you on your journey.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome; thank you so much, Izabella, for spending some time with us. We really appreciate it.

Dr. Izabella Wentz: Thank you so much for having me; it’s been such a pleasure chatting with you ladies.

Mickey Trescott: Bye guys.

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by ordering your copy today!

To check out Season 1 of the podcast, click here.

The post Bonus Ep: Hashimoto’s Protocol and Thyroid Wellness w/ Dr. Izabella Wentz appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Apr 03 2017

43mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #6: Step 3: Nourish – Our Stories

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #6: Step 3: Nourish – Our Stories is all about what the real-life process of using the elimination and reintroduction format of the Autoimmune Protocol has looked like for us. Although we started the journey close to five years ago, the actual process, beginning with those first steps, is still very fresh in our minds. We share how we found AIP (at a time when the abundant resources and large support community did not exist), what we really ate before adopting AIP (one of us was a junk-food junky!), and what transitioning was like. We also discuss how we approached the reintroduction process, what has and has not worked, and how we were able to discern reactions that can seem confusing to spot. If you’ve ever wondered what we honestly eat and whether or not this was ever tough for us too, this episode is for you!

If you’ve already tried AIP and would like to go more in-depth on Step 3: Nourish, check out the “Troubleshooting” section in Chapter 3 for ideas on underlying issues that could be preventing progress. This section is packed with valuable details, including food guidance to help ease symptoms of common roadblocks.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:51 The first concrete step toward wellness, Nourish
  • 2:48 How did Mickey find AIP?
  • 4:56 How did Angie find AIP?
  • 7:55 Mickey’s diet pre-AIP
  • 10:55 Angie’s diet pre-AIP
  • 13:41 Angie’s transition to AIP
    • The cold-turkey approach
  • 14:46 How long did the elimination phase last for Angie?
  • 15:15 Mickey’s transition and elimination phase length
    • The slow and steady approach
  • 17:36 A note of being aware of positive progress
  • 18:10 What changes made the biggest differences for Mickey?
    • The argument for nutrient density
  • 19:44 What changes made the biggest differences for Angie?
  • 20:32 Angie’s reintroduction experience and foods that produced reactions
    • Egg
    • White potato
    • Cumin
  • 23:18 Mickey’s reintroduction experience and foods that produced reactions
    • Nightshades
    • Eggs
    • Sesame Seed
    • Soy
  • 27:00 Balance with the AIP process
  • 28:14 Angie’s diet now
  • 29:40 Mickey’s diet now
  • 31:33 Noting the issue of “thresholds” with reintroduced foods overtime
  • 31:49 Bio-individuality in reintroduction (despite shared diagnosis)
  • 34:13 Your homework for Step 3, Nourish!
    • Take a look at the “Which Way Will Work for You” quiz in Chapter 3 of The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook to help you identify the transitioning style that is best for you if you want to take the plunge with AIP and use the handy guides after the quiz to show you how to get the ball rolling in a way best matched to your style.
  • 35:24 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #5: Titus Chiu, DC on Practitioner Collaboration, and the next episode, Episode #7: Aglaee Jacob, RD on Nourishing Diets. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #6: Step 3: Nourish – Our Stories appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 12 2016

36mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #17: Encore – The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part I

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

We are so grateful for all your positive feedback and interest in our very first podcast season! We created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our new book,The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #17: Encore – The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part I is a fun chat with our AIP blogging community friends from all over the globe. We take a few minutes to chat with ten different bloggers on one point each from our AIP Evolved Manifesto. They share with us how they have lived out that particular tenant in their own healing journeys. This encore episode is for you if you like “real life” perspectives on AIP and/or you want to virtually be introduced to some of your favorite bloggers.

If you’d like to share how you have lived out a tenant of the manifesto, please share in the comments here. Obviously, we are big fans of learning how folks everywhere are restoring their health using AIP.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our new book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by ordering your copy today!

Order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #16: Putting Together All the Steps of The Autoimmune Wellness Journey, and the next episode, Episode #18: Encore — The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part II. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #17: Encore – The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part I appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Nov 07 2016

45mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #4: Step 2: Collaborate – Our Stories

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #4: Step 2: Collaborate – Our Stories is centered on what collaboration with your healthcare team should look like and how that has realistically played out for us in our own journeys (hint: it was messy!). We discuss the types of healthcare practitioners out there and what it means to take responsibility for leading the collaborative effort in your own care. We even chat about nitty-gritty topics that aren’t often touch-on, like firing a provider, recognizing the need for medications or surgery, and the toll that medical debt can take on a person with chronic illness. Again, this is a personal episode, but meant to help our listeners be able to see this step on the wellness journey through an honest lens.

If you’d like to go more in-depth on Step 2: Collaborate, check out the “Evaluating Potential Providers Checklist” or the “Prioritizing Action Infographic,” both in Chapter 2. The checklist can help you ask the right questions as you seek to build a collaborative healthcare team, while the infographic helps you look at all the suggestions from Chapters 1 and 2 and then logically move forward on only those areas that are high priority for you.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 3:00 What is Collaborate?
  • 3:56 Mickey shares when she recognized collaborative care was necessary
    • The term “key player” is mentioned here, for more detail see the “How Do You Build A Collaborative Team” section of Chapter 2.
  • 6:30 Taking responsibility for leading collaboration in your care
  • 8:10 Describing the types of practitioners (understanding this allows you to choose the right people for the job, more detail can be found in Chapter 2)
    • Licensed Conventional Medical
    • Licensed Natural Medical
    • Licensed Complementary-Care
    • Non-medical, Non-Licensed
  • 10:00 Angie talks about her experience integrating care
  • 11:50 Patient lead open communication with providers
  • 13:50 Mickey talks about firing practitioners
  • 17:55 The need for medication and/or surgery and our experiences
  • 21:40 How to navigate healthcare spending
  • 25:15 Mickey shares about the toll medical debt took on her and her family
  • 29:00 Angie explains how medical debt stirred her to action in her journey
  • 31:20 Realistic look at transitioning a budget to focus on food/self-care
  • 34:13 Your homework for Step 2, Collaborate!
    • Take a look at the “Prioritizing Action Infographic” in Chapter 2 of The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook to prioritize areas explored in Chapter 1 and 2, before moving on to the next steps in the wellness journey.
  • 35:34 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #3: Sarah Ballantyne, PhD on Getting Informed, and the next episode, Episode #5: Titus Chiu, DC on Practitioner Collaboration. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #4: Step 2: Collaborate – Our Stories appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 05 2016

36mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #7: Step 3: In-Depth with Aglaée Jacob, MS, RD

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #7: Step 3: In-Depth with Aglaée Jacob, MS, RD is an episode dedicated to chatting with a well-known registered dietician in the “Real Foods” community. We greatly respect Aglaée’s work and asked her to join us in a conversation covering the deeper details of dietary healing, especially how to further modify AIP if healing is not as expected. Aglaée talks about FODMAP intolerance, starch intolerance, and histamine intolerance, all issues that can be uncovered while on AIP and may require specific modifications to help control uncomfortable symptoms. She also explores adding nutrient density with us and outlines new nutrition research she’s most interested in right now. One of the best parts of this episode is in the beginning, where Aglaée tells us about the powerful process she went through on the road to becoming a “Real Food” RD and the shift she sees happening years later in her profession. This episode is excellent if suspect that gut trouble is hindering your healing progress and need concrete details about tackling it.

If you’d like to go more in-depth on Step 3: Nourish, check out the “Nutrient Density” section in Chapter 3. This section gives even more detail on the nutrient density guidance that Aglaée shares in this episode.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:58 Introducing Aglaeée
  • 2:35 Aglaée shares about her experience with illness and how it inspired her work
    • A South American parasite helped her develop a new compassion for her patient’s struggles!
  • 5:40 How Aglaée discovered “Real Food” as an RD
    • The lack of results she saw following conventional guidelines with her patients made her start questioning the approach she’d been taught.
  • 9:38 Aglaée discusses the shift she sees other RDs making toward “Real Food”
  • 10:45 Aglaée talks AIP
  • 13:20 What are some specific modifications for gut dysbiosis?
    • Aglaée shares her positive mindset approach to elimination diets, “The goal of an elimination diet is not about the food, but to eliminate symptoms!”
    • FODMAP stands for Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols
  • 17:33 Should people remove additional foods if they suspect a FODMAP intolerance?
    • Aglaée’s advice is that it is best to work with a practitioner.
  • 19:40 What causes FODMAP intolerance?
    • Just eliminating foods is not a long-term solution to FODMAP intolerance, as it indicates an underlying imbalance.
    • SIBO stands for Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth
  • 21:10 Angie gives a special thanks to Aglaée for her awesome FODMAP guide
  • 21:45 What are some other dietary modifications to help with uncomfortable symptoms?
  • 26:02 Tips for focusing on nutrient density
  • 29:44 Aglaée shares new nutrition research she is exploring right now
  • 34:20 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #6: Step 3: Nourish – Our Stories, and the next episode, Episode #8: Step 4: Rest – Our Stories. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #7: Step 3: In-Depth with Aglaée Jacob, MS, RD appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 15 2016

35mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #16: Putting Together The Steps of the Autoimmune Wellness Journey

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #16: Putting Together the Steps of The Autoimmune Wellness Journey starts with a look at how our personal healing timelines unfolded. We discuss how long each of the seven steps; inform, collaborate, nourish, rest, breathe, move, and connect, took us to implement as we sought wellness. The second half of this episode is about the “big idea” we are hoping to convey with the book and podcast series, the ebb and flow nature of a healing with autoimmune disease, ditching perfectionism, and shifting what we see as “normal” in order to focus on health. The very best part of this episode comes in the last 15 minutes where we share loads of inspiration on joining the community.

If you’d like to go more in-depth, check out the “Conclusion” section at the end of The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook. It will help solidify this exciting, renewing process for you and add depth to our chat during this episode.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:30 Welcome to the final episode
  • 2:57 We talk about “healing timelines”
  • 3:29 Mickey shares how long the Inform step took her
    • One year
  • 5:14 Angie shares how long the Inform step took her
    • 11 years (She had a complex situation.)
  • 6:36 Angie shares how long the Collaborate step took her
    • One-two years
  • 7:44 Mickey shares how long the Collaborate step took her
    • She’s still working this step
  • 10:22 Mickey shares how long the Nourish step took her
    • Three-six months
  • 11:28 Angie shares how long the Nourish step took her
    • Overnight
  • 12:32 Angie shares how long the Rest step took her
    • Roughly one year, but there were big improvements immediately with dietary changes
  • 13:37 Mickey shares how long the Rest step took her
    • Roughly a couple months with a breakthrough following some neurotransmitter testing and supplementation
    • Has required continual maintenance
  • 15:31 Mickey shares how long the Breathe step took her
    • She’s still working this step
  • 16:13 Angie shares how long the Breathe step took her
    • She’s still working this step, but there were big improvements immediately with diagnosis, because unexplained illness was a major source of stress
  • 17:50 Mickey shares how long the Move step took her
    • She had a routine within one month, but it took longer for her to transition the way she thought of it
  • 19:21 Angie shares how long the Move step took her
    • She’s still working on this step
  • 20:33 Angie shares how long the Connect step took her
    • She was able to dial in this step immediately
  • 21:44 Mickey shares how long the Connect step took her
    • She had some initial stumbles with her friends around socializing
  • 23:40 The big idea of this episode is that the process takes time and looks different for every individual
  • 24:30 The Autoimmune Wellness Journey is a journey of ebbing and flowing
  • 25:05 Mickey shares personal examples of ebb and flow
  • 26:33 Angie shares personal examples of ebb and flow
    • Over time we can learn to proactively use the protocol to support ourselves through things we recognize as likely health challenges
  • 29:29 Learning to spot “engine trouble”
  • 30:20 Perfectionism has no place in the Autoimmune Wellness Journey
  • 32:20 Being open to shifting what we see as “normal”
  • 34:08 Joining the Autoimmune Wellness community
    • Community groups
    • Online groups
    • Social media (hashtags: #autoimmunepaleo #autoimmunewellness #totesaip #bonebrothheals and specific disease tags, like #celiac)
    • Consider starting a blog or social media account to share your story and inspire the next person to change their life
    • Talk to your doctor about your diet and lifestyle
  • 45:10 Our hopes for your healing journey
    • Empowerment
    • Action
    • Wellness
    • Vitality
  • 47:15 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #15: Angelo Coppola on Connecting with Humans and Nature, and the next episode, Episode #17: Encore — The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part I. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #16: Putting Together The Steps of the Autoimmune Wellness Journey appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Oct 17 2016

49mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #15: Step 7: In-Depth with Angelo Coppola

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #15: Step 7: In-Depth with Angelo Coppola is an episode with a popular, and very unique voice, in the wider Paleo community about how connection with others and nature deeply impacts not just our wellness, but our whole lives. Angelo discusses leaving his high-powered career to focus on family and his place in the natural world, his philosophy of “humans are not broken,” and exploring how removing some things from his life actually expanded it greatly. He also talks with us about a really refreshing view he has about not seeing our bodies, especially those with autoimmune disease, as broken, but seeing disease as warning signs of environmental inputs that need to change. Angelo also explores with us the relationship humans have to the natural world (his take is that we are nature) and his ideas about “ambient anxiety.” This is a great episode for anyone who wants to think about connection in a whole new light.

If you want to explore some of our conversation more, take a look at the “How to Start Connecting with Nature” section in Chapter 7. This section provides ideas on getting started with simple connection to nature.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 2:00 Introducing Angelo
  • 2:30 Angelo shares about how his connections changed after he left his high-powered career
    • He feels those connections actually helped him connect more to himself
  • 6:09 What it felt like when Angelo made the decision to shift his lifestyle
    • He is always focused on “tweaking in the right direction,” rather than perfectionism in his life
  • 10:00 What is Angelo’s philosophy “humans are not broken?”
    • Be careful of the often used marketing idea that you are inadequate
    • Explore the idea that you may need to reduce, rather than increase in life
  • 14:30 Angelo discusses how we can reject the idea that our bodies are broken, but instead consider environmental inputs that may be negative
  • 16:00 Angelo shares his view that humans and nature are not in relationship
    • He believes we are the same as nature
    • He shares his great quote, “Our modern lives are a dumbing down of nature.”
  • 22:20 The key components that Angelo sees as contributing to autoimmune disease
    • Diet
    • Lack of “baked right in” natural experiences
  • 28:08 “Ambient Anxiety” and whether or not we should look for an anxiety to it?
    • Angelo suggests seeing stress/anxiety as a pain response pointing to a root cause
  • 36:00 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #14: Step 7: Connect – Our Stories, and the next episode, Episode #16: Putting Together All the Steps of The Autoimmune Wellness Journey. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #15: Step 7: In-Depth with Angelo Coppola appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Oct 13 2016

37mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #14: Step 7: Connect – Our Stories

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #14: Step 7: Connect – Our Stories is an episode all about an often unexplored, but vitally important, piece of the healing process, connection. In this episode we talk not only about connection with other people and its role in healing, but connection with the natural world. We start with a chat about how our illnesses initially impacted our support networks, how things changed after diagnosis and when realization that this was chronic set-in. We address the awkward, depressing, and often stressful truth behind trying to articulate the experience of autoimmune disease to those close to us, plus how the experience can expose weaknesses in our connections with others. We also talk about transitioning our social lives to support healing, finding new connections through online support, and avoiding the trap of adopting illness as an identity. Next we move on to exploring the role connection with nature had in our recoveries and wrap up with ways to experience the benefits of that connection even when you can’t get out in the woods regularly. This episode is a great match for listeners that are wondering if the strain illness has taken on their “people” connections is normal or what they can do to enhance their nature connections.

If you want to dig in check-out the ideas in the “Building a Support Network” section in Chapter 7. This is a good place to help you get the gears turning about forming or strengthening relationships, if it feels like this area could use some attention for you.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:31 Introducing the Connect topic
  • 2:26 Angie shares about what her support network was like early in her journey
    • Strong, but confused
  • 5:26 Mickey shares about what her support network was like early in her journey
    • Strong, but tense
  • 7:50 Mickey talks about key relationships that were under stress due to her illness
  • 9:17 We don’t have rituals for acknowledging chronic illness in our society
  • 10:18 The awkward and depressing side of discussing your autoimmune disease
  • 11:18 The importance of adding people who “get it” on a personal level to your support network
  • 12:29 Mickey’s social life now
  • 13:26 Angie shares about transitioning her social life to support healing
    • Working to inspire others to support her choices by projecting confidence about her journey
  • 15:54 Mickey shares about avoiding long explanations with all but the most important people
  • 17:48 Mickey shares about connections she found online
    • She was looking for empowered people
  • 19:30 Angie shares about connections she found online
    • Her virtual relationships turned into real world connections
  • 21:25 How to avoid adopting illness as our identities
    • Consider ways autoimmune disease has expanded your life
    • Consider how it could actually shut you off from connection with others
    • Consider meeting new people and letting your illness take a backseat in how you define yourself to them
  • 25:00 The powerful role connection with nature can play in healing
  • 25:38 Angie shares about her experience with nature and healing
    • It gave her a renewed energy
  • 27:00 Mickey shares about her experience with nature and healing
    • She had a similar sense of drawing energy
  • 28:20 The inescapable connection we have to the natural world
  • 28:52 How Angie connects with nature now
  • 30:05 How Mickey connects with nature now
    • She moved to a farm
  • 31:30 Experiencing the elements of nature when we can’t get out
  • 34:14 Your homework for Step 7, Connect!
  • 34:34 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #13: Noelle Tarr, NTP on Autoimmune-Friendly Movement, and the next episode, Episode #15: Angelo Coppola on Connecting with Humans and Nature. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #14: Step 7: Connect – Our Stories appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Oct 10 2016

36mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #8: Step 4: Rest – Our Stories

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #8: Step 4: Rest – Our Stories is an episode focused on our early sleep struggles, breakthroughs that helped us sleep more and speed healing, and what our sleep routines are like now. We also talk about autoimmune disease symptoms and the intimate role they can play in disrupting much needed sleep and how we tackle prioritizing sleep in a culture that seriously undervalues it. This episode is for you if you’d like insider deets on troubleshooting steps that paid big dividends for us when we were first working to improve our sleep or if you are looking for tips on staying on track with your sleep routine once it’s in place.

If you aren’t sure how much energy you need to put into Step 4: Rest, check out the “Where Are You on the Sleep-Quality Spectrum” self-test in Chapter 4. This test will help you identify if this is a low, moderate, or high-priority area. If you score low-priority, high-five! You’ve already got this area dialed in!

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:51 The importance of Rest
  • 2:42 Mickey’s early sleep struggles
    • She worked as a barista for years and had to be up by 3:15 AM!
  • 4:42 Angie’s early sleep struggles
    • Panic attacks and anxiety plagued her sleep
  • 6:54 When autoimmune symptoms create sleep disturbances
    • Peripheral neuropathy
    • Blood pressure irregularity
    • Pain
  • 8:44 Mickey’s first sleep troubleshooting steps and breakthroughs
  • 11:26 Angie’s first sleep troubleshooting steps and breakthroughs
    • Blood sugar regulation (This blog post has great tips on blood sugar balance)
  • 13:00 Angie’s sleep now and struggles
  • 15:30 Sleep schedule with a family
  • 17:30 Mickey’s sleep now and struggles
  • 23:27 Dealing with the cultural message of “sleep can wait”
    • Mickey on social pressures
    • Angie on professional pressures
  • 27:33 Tips for staying on track with sleep routines
    • Phone zone
    • End of work day boundaries
    • Beginning of work day boundaries
  • 29:44 Your homework for Step 4, Rest!
    • Take a look at the “Sleep Troubleshooting Checklist” in Chapter 4 of The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook to help you evaluate if you are taking all the traditional steps for improving sleep and if there are any remaining areas to explore.
  • 30:49 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #7: Aglaee Jacob, RD on Nourishing Diets, and the next episode, Episode #9: Dan Pardi on Sleeping Optimally. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #8: Step 4: Rest – Our Stories appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 19 2016

32mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #11: Step 5: In-Depth with Jason Handler, L.Ac

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #11: Step 5: In-Depth with Jason Handler, L.Ac is an episode about managing stress with a board-certified Acupuncturist and Chinese Medicinal Herbalist. Jason discusses his approach to managing stress with a very unique approach of seeing it as simply the raw material for a journey towards reaching our greatest potential. Jason chats with us about his philosophy of “cultivating a daily practice,” approaching wellness as an investigation, and how mindset affects biology. We also get into a surprising discussion about where Jason starts when teaching his patients to manage stress, as well as his tips for managing the stress of chronic illness itself. This is a deep episode with a deep guy!

If you want to go deeper, take a look at the “What Can You Do to Manage Your Stress” section in Chapter 5. This section touches on many of the approaches raised by Jason during our discussion, specifically the steps of “practice” and “reframe.”

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:59 Introducing Jason
  • 2:54 Jason’s experience with chronic illness
    • Collapse of his health first year after college
    • Eventually met a healer, who became his teacher, and told him, “Patients transform into students. Students transform into teachers,” which lead to his career.
  • 6:40 The unique perspective illness at a young age imparts
    • Jason sees it as humbling and an opportunity to understand your relationship to suffering.
  • 8:26 Jason explains his philosophy of “cultivating a daily practice”
    • Qigong
    • Importance of repetition
  • 12:10 Jason discusses keeping things simple and focusing on just starting
  • 12:42 Jason’s definition of self-care and why it’s important
    • He approaches it as an investigation
  • 14:16 Approaching wellness without a sense of desperation
  • 15:30 How our mindsets affect our biology
  • 16:53 Jason talks about the Nanjing (a classical Chinese medical text) and it’s steps toward treating illness
    • Intention
    • Cultivation
    • Technique
    • Diagnosis
  • 17:40 Jason’s unique approach to teaching beginner’s to manage stress
    • Define the stress
    • “Mindcare” (Jason’s term for focusing on the ideal frame of mind and physical feelings)
    • Awareness of breath
  • 20:38 Importance of placing parameters on our mind
    • Talking back to our thoughts with “yes” or “no”
    • Thought training
  • 24:02 Mickey shares the tips Jason gave to her at her sickest point
    • Concentrate on lymph flow
    • Qigong standing meditation
  • 24:48 Jason shares his transformative experience with “stance training”
    • Stillness in the body helps create stillness in the mind.
  • 26:47 Tips for managing the stress of chronic illness itself
    • Seek support from inspiring people
    • Eat nutrient-dense foods
    • Focus on gratitude
    • Frame the experience as an opportunity for growth
  • 30:00 Angie shares how the depths of illness turned out to be one of the most incredible periods of personal growth she’s experienced
  • 31:00 Jason discusses commitment to small steps
  • 32:15 Staying in touch with Jason
  • 33:08 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #10: Step 5: Breathe – Our Stories, and the next episode, Episode #12: Step 6: Move – Our Stories. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #11: Step 5: In-Depth with Jason Handler, L.Ac appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 29 2016

34mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #18: Encore – The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part II

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

We are so grateful for all your positive feedback and interest in our very first podcast season! We created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our new book,The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #18: Encore – The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part II is another fun chat with our AIP blogging community friends from all over the globe. We take a few minutes to chat with ten different bloggers on one point each from our AIP Evolved Manifesto. They share with us how they have lived out that particular tenant in their own healing journeys. Once again, this encore episode is for you if you like “real life” perspectives on AIP and/or you want to virtually be introduced to some of your favorite bloggers.

If you’d like to share how you have lived out a tenant of the manifesto, please share in the comments here. Obviously, we are big fans of learning how folks everywhere are restoring their health using AIP.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our new book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by ordering your copy today!

Order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #17: Encore — The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part I. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #18: Encore – The AIP Evolved Manifesto Part II appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Nov 14 2016

46mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #9: Step 4: In-Depth with Dan Pardi, MS

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #9: Step 4: In-Depth with Dan Pardi, M.S. is an episode with some truly mind-blowing information about sleep from a well-known sleep researcher in the Ancestral Health community. We’ve been following Dan for a long time and were lucky enough to have him as a guest to chat all things sleep. Dan discusses how he found himself steeped in sleep research, his basic recommendations for good sleep, and then he gets into some fascinating detail on everything from our internal “master clocks” to how sleep hormones directly impact the bacteria in our gut. This episode is for those who want to learn new and very interesting things when it comes to sleep!

If you want to understand more of what Dan talks about in this episode, but in “non-scientist speak,” check out the “How Does Sleep Work?” section in Chapter 4. It offers a simple, but thorough explanation of cycles and biological processes that work to produce sleep.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:53 Introducing Dan
  • 2:45 Dan’s personal experience with sleep disturbance
  • 6:15 Dan’s path into sleep research
    • Dan mentions the term “social jet lag,” which is a syndrome that occurs when our internal clocks and our sleep schedules are not aligned.
  • 7:29 Dan describes how he recognized his research could help others
    • Dan uses the term “orphan disorder,” which is a term describing very rare diseases (and sometimes more common, but ignored diseases) that aren’t well researched due to lack of financial incentive for drug development.
  • 10:57 The power of going from a bystander to a participant in your health
  • 14:03 Why tracking helps improve health outcomes
  • 16:15 Dan’s basic recommendations for good sleep
    • Start with an aspiration (“I want to wake refreshed.”)
    • Timing (this is about consistency)
    • Intensity
    • Duration
  • 20:50 What is the maximum variation we can shift our sleep schedules with the minimal effects?
    • Dan’s Answer? Three hours.
  • 24:51 Sleep consistency vs. other concerns with other areas of sleep and/or social concerns
    • There is a time to say “yes” to special occasions, despite the sleep schedule disruption.
  • 27:50 Dan shares an interesting tidbit about the consequences to siesta cultures as they lose the daytime nap in the competitive modern economy, but continue the nighttime socializing.
  • 28:35 Light and sleep
    • Dan uses the word, “suprachiasmatic nucleus,” which is our body’s master clock.
    • Loss of sleep eventually effects the immune system, leading to inflammation, and in time can lead to autoimmune disease.
    • We need light to act as an anchor to our circadian rhythm.
    • Melatonin directly impacts our gut health.
    • Blue light exposure 
    • Amber glasses 
  • 38:47 Wrapping up with Dan (including some interesting research he shares on drinking champagne . . . we recommend going slow in the AIP community!)
  • 40:26 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #8: Step 4: Rest – Our Stories, and the next episode, Episode #10: Step 5: Breathe – Our Stories. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #9: Step 4: In-Depth with Dan Pardi, MS appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 22 2016

41mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #13: Step 6: In-Depth with Noelle Tarr, NTP, Certified Personal Trainer

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #13: Step 6: In-Depth with Noelle Tarr, NTP, Certified Personal Trainer is an episode about fitness and wellness recovery with a personal trainer who has dedicated her work to approaching movement with a balanced perspective. Noelle discusses what inspired her to combine a career in both fitness and nutrition. She also chats with us about how both under- and overdoing it with movement can be a problem and ways to tackle “too much” and “too little” struggles. Noelle takes time to chat with us about getting away from “fitspo” and finding realistic sources of fitness inspiration. We also get into the best place to restart a fitness routine while dealing with autoimmune disease and how to assess how much recovery time is necessary. This is an episode for those that love to move and those that are struggling with it after years of illness. Noelle’s professional experience shines as she helps us navigate what can be a tricky area of recovery for those on the autoimmune wellness journey.

If you want to explore some our conversation more, take a look at the “Fitspo and Shame” section in Chapter 6. This section digs into the highlight of our conversation with Noelle on the harmful side of the fitness world and the emotional toll it can take.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 2:04 Introducing Noelle
  • 2:40 Noelle shares what inspired her combined career of fitness and nutrition
  • 4:55 Where does Noelle see the fine line with exercise and autoimmune disease?
  • Too Much Movement
    • Don’t push through pain
    • Remember your worth is not related to your ability to workout
    • Practice “intuitive fitness”
    • Feeling sore or fatigued after working out and in the presence of chronic illness is a sign to rest (When Exercise Recovery Becomes Harder to Handle)
  • Too Little Movement
    • This may be a struggle with motivation
    • Create an environment and system that make it easy
    • Add accountability
  • 14:11 Noelle discusses how we can find more realistic fitness inspiration
    • The problems with “fitspo” culture
    • Don’t expose yourself to social media personalities that make you feel bad about yourself
    • Engage with body positive messages
  • 20:48 Noelle talks about the best place to start a fitness routine for those with autoimmune disease
  • 26:47 Assessing recovery time needs with autoimmune disease
    • Tracking via a workout calendar
    • Taking time to listen to your body
    • Three days/week is enough
  • 37:07 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #12: Step 6: Move – Our Stories, and the next episode, Episode #14: Step 7: Connect – Our Stories. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #13: Step 6: In-Depth with Noelle Tarr, NTP, Certified Personal Trainer appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Oct 06 2016

38mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #10: Step 5: Breathe – Our Stories

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #10: Step 5: Breathe – Our Stories is an episode all about our real experiences with stress, from how things look when stress is seriously mismanaged to the impact of our ideal routines. We talk about how autoimmune disease itself is a source of stress that cannot be changed and how we’ve approached that, as well as “good” stress like parenting or running a successful business. We both share the things we do that are most effective in our efforts to control stress and give tips for you to try out in your own stress management process. This episode is a great match for listeners who want to know if we are zen masters or real human beings!

If you aren’t sure if Step 5: Breathe, needs your attention, check out the “Where Are You on the Stress-Management Spectrum” self-test in Chapter 5. This test will help you identify if this is a low, moderate, or high-priority area. Moderate and high-priority scores means this area needs your action.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:51 The importance of Breathe
  • 2:23 Angie shares what happens when she mismanages stress
  • 4:03 Mickey shares what happens when she mismanages stress
  • 5:30 Physical illness as the result of run-away stress
    • Angie shares about coming down with Mono
  • 9:13 Parenting and other sources of “good” stress
  • 11:23 Mickey’s stress management routine
    • Prioritization
    • Choices
    • Calendaring
  • 14:51 Angie’s stress management routine
    • Prioritization
    • Scheduling
    • Connecting
    • Practicing Gratitude (public expressions of appreciation)
    • Praying/Meditating
  • 17:23 Angie talks about finding ways to disconnect even as a business owner
    • Taking personal breaks results in professional rewards
  • 19:06 Mickey talks about finding great joy in work with boundaries
  • 20:04 “The Friday Feeling” (you guys know what we’re talking about!)
  • 21:41 Specific stress management steps mentioned in The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook that have meant to most for us
    • Identify
    • Eliminate
    • Reframe (and the positive impact on dealing with autoimmune disease)
  • 24:56 The power of reframing for managing stress that cannot be changed
  • 25:24 Self-care is not selfish (specifically for mothers)
    • Angie discusses “The Plane Crash” scenario
  • 27:40 Daily/Weekly/Monthly/Yearly habits to cultivate for stress management
  • 32:00 The importance of vacations, both short and longer breaks
  • 35:00 Your homework for Step 5, Breathe!
    • Try out the “Mindfulness Tips” in Chapter 5 of The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook to try out ways to bring your mind into greater awareness of your present experiences.
  • 35:21 Outro

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our forthcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by pre-ordering your copy today!

Pre-order your copy:

// Amazon
// Barnes & Noble
// iBooks
// Books-a-Million
// Indiebound
// Powell’s

Check out the previous episode, Episode #9: Dan Pardi on Sleeping Optimally, and the next episode, Episode #11: Jason Handler, Lac. on Stress Management. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #10: Step 5: Breathe – Our Stories appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Sep 26 2016

37mins

Play

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #12: Step 6: Move – Our Stories

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 1! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our upcoming book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Episode #12: Step 6: Move – Our Stories is an episode dedicated to talking about our histories with exercise, as well as, where we are today in this area of our lives. We start with discussion of what it was like when we first realized we were losing physical ability as our autoimmune struggles deepened. Next we move on to exploring the two ends of the movement spectrum, too little and too much, and where each of were pre-diagnosis versus where we are today. We also chat about our movement routines before we got sick and our routines now. We wrap up with a look at why we believe walking is ideal for those with autoimmune disease and how we gauge if we are under or overdoing it with movement. This episode is a chance for listeners to understand totally opposite sides of the movement conundrum that those with autoimmune disease face.

If you want to know more about why exactly the balance with exercise and autoimmune disease is such a fine one, check out the section, “Why Is Exercise Difficult for Those with Autoimmune Disease” in Chapter 6. This section adds a little science background to this issue.

How to listen:

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If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

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Show Notes:

  • 0:00 Intro
  • 1:29 Opening the Move topic
  • 2:25 Angie shares what it was like to realize she was losing physical ability due to illness
    • She recognized her body no longer had additional energy reserves for workout routines.
    • Experienced a lot of shame with not being able to keep up with others.
  • 4:58 Mickey shares what it was like to realize she was losing physical ability due to illness
  • 6:58 Both Mickey and Angie describe the fear that came with muscle wasting
  • 8:08 Mickey talks about exercise obsession pre-diagnosis
    • This was the result of her lacking other more appropriate stress management tools.
  • 10:30 Angie’s struggle with moving too little
  • There are complex barriers for those who move too little with autoimmune disease:
    • Fears/Shame
    • Incorrect intensity level
    • Fatigue
    • Injury
    • Pain
    • Overwhelm
  • 13:30 Mickey’s exercise routine pre-diagnosis
    • Biking over 100 miles/week
    • Running/gym/yoga 3x/week
    • Multiple routines per day
    • Cardio-obsession
    • She feels she used this to “numb” herself.
  • 15:58 Angie’s exercise routine pre-diagnosis
    • Hiking
    • Backpacking
  • 16:42 Angie’s exercise routine now
    • Walking
  • 17:18 Mickey’s exercise routine now
    • Walking
    • Horseback riding
    • Yoga
    • Touching on the negative cultural messages about how intense exercise needs to be
  • 19:24 Why walking is so great for those with autoimmune disease?
  • 27:23 How we assess where the “line” is for physical activity
  • 30:20 Your homework for Step 6, Move!
    • Try out the “Where Are You on the Movement Spectrum” self-test in Chapter 6 of The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook to assess how much attention this area of your healing journey needs.
  • 31:15 Outro

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Check out the previous episode, Episode #11: Jason Handler, Lac. on Stress Management, and the next episode, Episode #13: Noelle Tarr, NTP on Autoimmune-Friendly Movement. For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Episode #12: Step 6: Move – Our Stories appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Oct 03 2016

32mins

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S2 E2 Mickey interviews Susan McCauley, who is recovering from ulcerative proctitis

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This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

That being said, we only promote authors, products, and services that we wholeheartedly stand by!

Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 2! We’ve created this podcast as a free resource to accompany our book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

Season 2 Episode 2 is the first of our interview episodes this season! This week, Mickey sits down with her friend Susan McCauley to discuss Susan’s experience managing an unidentified autoimmune condition for many years. Susan was eventually diagnosed with ulcerative proctitis, but her healing approach has been all about addressing the root causes from the beginning.

Susan and Mickey dig into what it was like for Susan to finally receive a diagnosis, they myriad treatments and tests she underwent, low-dose naltrexone, stress management, and the importance of a support system. Scroll down for the full episode transcript.

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a complimentary resource for those on the road to recovery. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’ve got both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt, a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I have endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease. After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.Autimmune-Paleo.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

Mickey Trescott: This podcast is sponsored by The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook; our co-authored guide to living well with chronic illness. We saw the need for a comprehensive resource that goes beyond nutrition to connect savvy patients, just like you, to the resources they need to achieve vibrant health. Through the use of self assessments, checklists, handy guides and templates, you get to experience the joy of discovery; finding out which areas to prioritize on your healing journey. Pick up a copy wherever books are sold.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:
1. Introducing our guest, Susan, and her autoimmune wellness story [3:19]
2. Officially a diagnosis [8:14]
3. Varying treatments and testing [18:07]
4. Low-dose naltrexone [24:24]
5. Stress management and sleep [28:31]
6. Having a support system [35:48]
7. Tips for the beginning of your autoimmune journey [40:21]

Mickey Trescott: Hey everyone! Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast. We are in season 2 of the podcast. This is Mickey if you guys haven’t figured out the differences between Angie and mine voice yet. Today I am doing a personal interview with my friend Susan; hey Susan.

Susan: Hey Mickey! How’s it going?

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. Susan is one of my AIP and paleo BFFs. We met at PaleoFx; gosh, 3 years ago?

Susan: It was actually AHS.

Mickey Trescott: Oh! AHS, yep. So there we go.

Susan: And it was longer than that.

Mickey Trescott: Four!

Susan: I think it was 4 years ago.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Susan: Yeah, 4 years ago.

Mickey Trescott: I was looking for a ride home from the airport, and Susan had a rental car, and she was also picking up Ben Greenfield, so I got to meet him. So Susan was one of my first paleo friends.

Susan: And Mickey was one of mine. And we had the same shoes on, and it was like; BFFs at first site.

Mickey Trescott: Yep! {laughs}

Susan: {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Basically. We couldn’t not be friends.

Susan: Yes, exactly. It was meant to be.

Mickey Trescott: So I’m really excited to share a little bit of Susan’s story today because Susan is one of these people who hasn’t had a clear autoimmune diagnosis from the outset, but she has done a really great job at kind of tirelessly working out some of these root causes and kind of still working on some of that; we’ll talk about that. And I think she just has such a great attitude about the healing journey. She’s also a coach, so she has a lot of experience about this stuff. But Susan, thank you so much for being here; joining us from California. You ready to get started?

Susan: Sure; shoot. Go ahead.

1. Introducing our guest, Susan, and her autoimmune wellness story [3:19]

Mickey Trescott: Alright. So, I know that this question is a little bit more complicated for you; but tell me a little bit about your autoimmune disease, and what you first noticed when you first realized maybe that’s something you were struggling with.

Susan: Well, I first had symptoms a long time ago. I kind of am the example of what not to do, or how to go about everything backwards. I didn’t come to paleo because I was sick; I came to paleo because I wanted to lose weight, and because I had kind of developed a binge eating disorder from all the yo-yo dieting, so I was trying to change my relationship with food. But my first autoimmune symptoms; I have ulcerative proctitis, which is like the cousin of ulcerative colitis. It’s just less severe, and in the lower part; the distal part of the colon. I had symptoms as early as probably 10 years ago; which I don’t know how much TMI about symptoms is on your podcast {laughs}.

Mickey Trescott: Anything goes. We talk about poop all the time.

Susan: So basically, bleeding; rectal bleeding, bleeding when you have your bowel movements, and it started when I was doing the yo-yo dieting and the Weight Watchers; and paid attention to conventional wisdom on things like fiber. And I remember one time I ate four Fiber One bars; and I don’t know if you’ve ever had one of those, but they have like; I don’t know how much fiber in them, but they’re like a cookie, you know? And I had a binge eating problem. So one is delicious; four even more delicious. And that’s when the gut problems started.

I went to Kaiser, and they did a sigmoidoscopy; I think that’s what you call it, it’s been so long. And then they gave me some medication and told me not to eat too many vegetables; that was it. You know; it was basically, “take some medication; you have to take it, and you might have ulcerative colitis, right now we’re just going to call it undetermined.”

Mickey Trescott: And you got this diagnosis once you had been paleo for a little while, too, right?

Susan: I didn’t get the official diagnosis until much later. This was way before paleo, when I was doing the yo-yo dieting. I didn’t know it was autoimmune; it didn’t have a name. It said, you might have ulcerative colitis, but you’re too old to get ulcerative colitis. Most people get it in their 20s.

Mickey Trescott: Isn’t that funny how you need to be a picture of a disease when you walk into a doctor’s office; otherwise you get kind of thrown out, door slammed behind you?

Susan: Yeah. So they just gave me the suppositories and told me I had to take them every day, so I took them for a little bit and of course it worked. And then I kind of forgot about it; and it would come and go over the years. Enter paleo, and I think in a way, paleo prevented me from getting my diagnosis as soon as I probably would have gotten it if I would have kept eating the Standard American Diet. Because I took gluten out; and I had some other health issues, inflammatory issues, pain related, so I decided that I was not; even though when I ate gluten I didn’t immediately feel bad, but once I took it out, a lot of things got better including my UP symptoms. And so I would go for 3, 4, 5, 6 months without any symptoms; and then they would come, and then they would go.

But I was a bandwagon jumper in early paleo days; whatever the newest thing that came down the road; Susan was like, potato starch; if you have ulcerative proctitis, potato starch is probably one of the last things that you {laughs} should do. And of course I would be doubled over in pain.

Mickey Trescott: You didn’t jump on the AIP bandwagon back then, though.

Susan: I did though.

Mickey Trescott: Eventually. {laughs}

Susan: I didn’t jump on the bandwagon, but of course I was one of those people; and this is what I totally tried to make sure people understand about AIP now; AIP is not more perfect paleo.

Mickey Trescott: Amen, sister.

Susan: You know? So when I wasn’t losing weight, and I’m using my little air quotes, well I just needed to eat less foods. So I did do 30 days of AIP, but never the full Sarah Ballantyne AIP where you take out all seed spices. I took out the bases; the Robb Wolf, Whole30 AIP list, you know what I mean.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

Susan: And I never planned my reintroductions correctly, because I always had; like, I did AIP 30 days before Thanksgiving. And then of course, you can’t just do one thing at a time, so I never really got the full impact of what I think AIP could have been for me. And I still didn’t have an AIP diagnosis.

2. Officially a diagnosis [8:14]

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, I was going to say, that was at a point where you still didn’t even really know that you had an autoimmune disease. Tell me about how you got the official diagnosis, and what that felt like when you made the connection that it was actually an autoimmune disease.

Susan: So, my chief symptoms, the reason I came to paleo; I talk about the binge eating disorder. I also suffer from severe fatigue. So my digestive symptoms always made it lower on the symptom list, whenever I talked to any kind of functional medicine person. So they were never really; and I think that’s my fault, and that’s part of the communication and collaboration; sometimes we don’t know that those symptoms are part of something bigger. And to me, losing weight was really important, and my fatigue was really important, so I was always trying to focus. That’s where that bandwagon jumping comes on. Adrenals, thyroid; what could it be? Going through all that whole list.

It wasn’t until, I think it was Mickey; it was Mickey. It was at AHS in Berkeley, which was how many years ago? 2014.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, 2.5 years, yeah.

Susan: It was 2014, and that was right around when I decided that the pain was back, the blood; the bleeding was really quite severe. And I knew I was getting older, and I knew the implications. The colon isn’t a thing to mess with; when you’re pushing towards; I’m going to be 50 this year.

Mickey Trescott: Well and with some of those diseases, they take it away when it’s really inflamed. They remove it.

Susan: And Mickey said something to me; because she saw how many tomatoes I was actually eating back then, and she said; “Maybe you might want to think about cutting out nightshades.” And of all the things on the autoimmune protocol that I don’t want to give up; and sometimes it’s that thing that you don’t want to give up, is the thing that you need to give up; was nightshades, because I love Mexican food; I love tomatoes. We used to grow 3 tomato plants every year, my husband and I; and I would fill up big huge Tupperware full of cherry tomatoes and just eat on them all day. That was August 2014; and then I decided to talk to my doctor; my regular old, MD. And he referred me to a GI doctor who said I needed a colonoscopy. Because I thought I had SIBO, because that was the bandwagon I was jumping on then, you know what I mean? {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm.

Susan: And he’s like; no, see that’s not where; even though, to me still, where he said I was bloated. To me still, that is still part of my small intestine, as well, so it could have been. So he did the colonoscopy, and then he said, “You don’t have cancer” which I think is what every doctor, after they do a colonoscopy, tells people. “Don’t worry, you don’t have cancer, but you have ulcerative proctitis.” And he was Indian, with a very heavy accent, and I said; I knew about ulcerative colitis, but I’d never heard of ulcerative proctitis, and I said, “Is that an autoimmune disease?” And he said yes; and then he said, “Here’s your prescription, you need to take this medicine every day for the rest of your life; and here’s a low-residue, low-fiber diet protocol.” And handed it to me.

Luckily; I had known Mickey {laughs}, and luckily all the places we’d gone to; all the seminars, and conventions, and conferences, is that I kind of, through Mickey, surrounded myself with AIP people. So I did cut the nightshades out, and I don’t eat a lot of nuts still to this day. I know that I don’t digest them well so I don’t really eat them often. I’ve learned, though; I just can’t eat anything every day. I can’t eat eggs every day; I can eat eggs occasionally. But the nightshades were the magic bullet, you know. And it was hard; and I didn’t eat a tomato for 2 years, and I didn’t eat a pepper or anything; and at home I still don’t.

But I did some more research; and I didn’t go back to that doctor because I didn’t understand the whole collaboration thing until Autoimmune Wellness Handbook, and I just thought I could do it on my own, you know.

Mickey Trescott: Well part of it; part of it is guiding that process. But I think, too, when you’re presented with only conventional options and no input from a doctor as far as, “Hey I’m trying this thing for myself, and it’s kind of working, can you keep monitoring?” A lot of doctors don’t really care to follow-up with a patient who is working like that, you know, so it’s hard.

Susan: Yeah.

Mickey Trescott: And I think too; Susan, you and I are pretty similar in the sense that we went off, and we studied nutrition, and we go to conferences, and we do a lot of reading; like, self-knowledge is really important to us, so it’s tempted to just be like, “I got this. I got this.” You know?

Susan: Yeah.

Mickey Trescott: And I do it too; still.

Susan: And I did, and the nightshades were huge, but I would still have periods; like I had a flare last, right before NTA conference last year. I had a really bad flare; and I don’t know if I had gotten glutened or what had happened. So when I had that flare, it was kind of a wakeup call that I needed to find a new GI doc, and I needed to find one that specialized in my autoimmune; that recognized autoimmune for what it was, and just, “Here’s a medication to take every day for the rest of your life.”

So my husband actually did the research, and found me a doc at Stanford, which I live in the Silicon Valley/San Francisco Bay area, so Stanford is like the gold standard. We had a great talk about my autoimmune disease. He said how far along; further along I was than any of his patients, because I had gotten the diet down. He recognized that certain foods weren’t good for people with ulcerative proctitis; although he also wanted me to get a flu shot and make sure to wear SPF 80 on my face.

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Susan: Because {laughs} people with autoimmune disease can get sick more often. {laughing}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Susan: But he does have me on a regimen now, where we’re going to; he brought to my attention the fact that just because I don’t have symptoms, doesn’t mean that the tissue in my colon is healthy.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm.

Susan: It’s a sign that it could be; but it still could not. It could be just that it’s not unhealthy enough to bleed, it could still be inflamed. So he said what we needed to do, is he has me on a regimen where I took my medication every day for 30 days; then it was every other day for 30 days; and now I’m on every; he didn’t recommend going to every 3 days, but I’m on every 3 days {laughs}.

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Susan: And I have to say that it’s been the time that it’s been, at the same time keeping my diet super clean; is that I’ve been, my digestion has probably been better than it ever has been. And I’m scheduled to go in for a colonoscopy; we haven’t met our deductible yet, so I’m kind of procrastinating at the moment. I know it’s going to take up the whole deductible, so we have some financial insecurity at the moment. To be able to see; now I know I’ve been asymptomatic for going on 4 months; what does that tissue look like under the microscope? And that is the true definition of remission. So that’s kind of where I’m at right now and working towards.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, I think that’s good for a lot of people to hear, too. Because I think when they find something that’s kind of working for them; whether it’s a combination of medications and diet, maybe it’s just diet; it’s tempting to say, “Well the symptoms went away. This is great, I’m fine, I’m free.” A lot of times, there’s that really deep, that inside out; that kind of healing takes a lot longer, and sometimes it might take a combination of therapies. I think that’s helpful for people to hear; even someone like you, who is very into the real food nutrition; you live and breathe this stuff, but you’re still getting help from a conventional doctor and integrating that with what you’re learning and what you’re doing for yourself.

Susan: And the crazy thing is; the medication; so like I said we haven’t met our deductible yet this year, so I had to refill. Well, I’m supposed to refill the medication, and I still have some left, I’m not going to go without it. But without my deductible, 30 days of that medication is $950.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Susan: And that’s just ridiculous; I can’t imagine how people do it, that don’t have the diet locked in, that are able to go to every 3 days, and to make that $900 stretch for 3 months, or 4 months instead of having to reup every 30 days. And you know; in all honesty, and this might be too TMI. Putting a suppository in every night is not fun. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs} Yeah. I mean, a lot of, from a lot of angles, we would save our entire healthcare system so much money if people got the prevention part and kind of were taking the things that they could do more seriously, and not needing to take so much medication. I mean, a lot of people think of the side effects and the long-term stuff that comes along with taking medication, but the toll that it takes on your finances, and your health insurance plan, is totally another angle of it; depending that people live in the US, you know how tricky it is right now with healthcare for us.

Susan: Right.

3. Varying treatments and testing [18:07]

Mickey Trescott: So, talk to me a little bit about some of the other things that you’ve trouble shooted along the way. Is there anything that you’ve done, or any kind of treatments; it doesn’t have to be completely related to the autoimmune thing, but what kind of deeper testing have you done to kind of get to the root of different things.

Susan: Well, most recently it was a year ago; actually more than a year ago, it was in August 2015. I’m sorry, no, January 2016; so just over a year ago, I started seeing Dr. Amy Net, who is part of Chris Kresser’s practice, about my fatigue. Because my fatigue in all reality, it ebbs and flows, but for the last couple of years it’s been pretty down. I’ve had a lot of stress; which we can talk about lifestyle and stress management later, but I was just continually seeking the, “Is my fatigue something that there’s a deeper root cause?” And we didn’t mention this, but in my past life, I’m actually in recovery from drugs and alcohol. So over almost 20 years ago, I did a lot of methamphetamine. And I’m not sure if that has a possibility; because I stayed awake for a lot of days in a row at some point.

Mickey Trescott: So you’re paying for it now maybe.

Susan: Am I paying for it; you know, I don’t know? What does that do to your brain? I don’t think anybody really knows. But is that a possibility? Is that something at some point I’m just going to say; Ok, I’m just going to live with kind of being sluggish and fatigued a lot of the time?

So I went to Dr. Net as my last-ditch effort. I’m going to go, and I’m going to have her go through everything, and see if there’s anything. Because I know autoimmune, fatigue is part of the symptoms of autoimmune. Even though I’m not having GI symptoms; fatigue and taking care of that part of yourself is super important; and she ran some tests for chronic inflammatory response syndrome; CIRS; and I tested off the charts. Which is a biotoxin illness, usually predicated by some kind of mold or mold exposure, which could have been at any time in my life. I live in a new house; it’s only 8 years old. It’s not my house. I’ve had my house tested; which was a big chunk of change, if anybody has to do that.

And I went on the beginning of the protocol; and so far, it just seems like my numbers haven’t gone done. We’re still trying to peel back that onion. I leave the rabbit-holing now to my doctor, because I get too wrapped up in things, and I have to kind of step back. So yes, there are some genetic markers that they test you for, and I have been negative for all of those. So it’s one of those things that I was probably just exposed; but it’s kind of the better of the two. You can have been exposed, and your exposure was such that you are sick; but you aren’t exposed as such that every little thing is going to make you sick moving forward. Which a lot of people with CIRS; it does happen. They go to a hotel, and there might be a little bit of mold, and they end up really sick.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm. What I think is most interesting is that a lot of these people, just removing themselves from the situation, or the space, it doesn’t go away. Sometimes they can have it for decades until they actually treat that underlying root cause, and kind of get their inflammation down and get them healthy again, which I find fascinating.

Susan: Yeah. I even had a brain MRI to look; because it does affect your brain, and I do have this, what they call atrophy, which is really scary. Your brain has some atrophy. So the next step is something called VIP spray; and I haven’t started that because it can affect smooth muscle tissue; which it can affect your pancreas, and my fasting lipase has been high, and I can’t take it while that’s high, so we’re trying to figure out what that’s high. Because I don’t do drugs, and I don’t have any kind of pain, so the next step is either to get my pancreas ultrasound; or Dr. Net digging; Dr. Schumacher is the pioneer all this stuff; digging in deep with him to kind of see if he has anybody else that has chronic, elevated fasting lipase.

Mickey Trescott: It’s so interesting; what is your feeling working with someone who, Dr. Net is kind of at the cutting edge of this stuff. Do you feel like that is reducing your tendency to figure that out for yourself online?

Susan: Yes.

Mickey Trescott: Just kind of set back and let her guide it.

Susan: Let her drive.

Mickey Trescott: How does that feel?

Susan: it feels good. In recent; I think over the last year, I’ve had to really take stock that I have to stay; I can’t listen to every paleo and real food and nutritional and medical podcast out there. I can’t read every book that’s there. That kind of contributes to my stress, and I really had to find somebody able to drive to cart for me, and that’s Dr. Net. She; it’s kind of relaxing, you know. She makes the decisions, and I start Googling stuff and it’s like; “Susan, you have an appointment in 3 weeks with Dr. Net.” I had a thing on my brain MRI that said I had white lesions, and I started Googling that; and I’m like, you know what, you need to stop. And you know what; we haven’t even brought it up. Because obviously, she’s a radiologist; she saw my MRI. If she thought it was something to be concerned about, she would have brought it up with me.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm.

Susan: So, I really had to step back, and like I said, let her drive and let her make the decisions and just recently, less than 2 weeks ago, we started on LDN, for my ulcerative proctitis, and I also have some chronic pain.

4. Low-dose naltrexone [24:24]

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; so I don’t think we talked about LDN at all yet on the podcast; do you want to give people a little overview of what it is and how it works; just really, really simply.

Susan: So LDN; I’ll do it simply because I might not have all the techy information.

Mickey Trescott: Oh you’re so smart, Susan.

Susan: {laughs} It’s low-dose naltrexone, and naltrexone is a drug; and I might get it wrong, is it, it’s an opiate agonist. So what that means in layman’s terms is that it helps your endorphins and it helps your own immune system kind of calm things down. And when you have autoimmune, we know that your immune system is upregulated, and it’s sensitive. And we want to kind of calm things down. It works with dopamine, it works with your endorphins. To do that; it’s a very inexpensive drug. Even compounded, 3 months is $80, so that’s a pretty good deal. The drug has been around for a really long time for drug and alcohol treatment, so people take that because if they take that and then they take opiate medication, it doesn’t do anything for them. So naltrexone itself has been around for a really time.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, and it’s had quite a buzz, I think, in the community just because people’s experiences vary; some people have almost miraculous results using it, and some people don’t notice any changes. But it really doesn’t have any side effects, and what’s been your experience transitioning to it? I’ll be there are some people that are curious.

Susan: There are side effects. And the side effects are sleep related. So you have to be very vigilant, which brings to the whole lifestyle factor. Sleep is my number one, on my list of priorities; above food. Above food. Sleep is my number one priority, so my sleep is dialed in, which is good. So if your sleep wasn’t dialed in; what happens is, you take the medication before you go to bed, and you start at a small dose. You start at 1.5 mg for 30 days, then you go to 3, then to 4.5, which is the actual dose. Dr. Net says sometimes you can be at 3, and a lot of patients feel good just right there. They don’t feel any different between 4.5 and 3, so they back down to 3.

So what happens is you take it before you go to bed, and you go to sleep fine, but it could wake up around 3 or 4 o’clock, and it has to do with the endorphins and the dopamine, and how it works in different people’s bodies.

Mickey Trescott: Some people have dreams; have you been having dreams.

Susan: Yeah, I have dreams. I’m a crazy dreamer to begin with. I sat this morning; my husband came back up when I was getting up and crawled into bed, and I started telling him all my crazy dreams. He’s like, “Wow! You have really crazy dreams!” {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Susan: But I’ve always been that way. But it does wake you up, and you have kind of vivid dreams. And then it makes it kind of hard to go back to sleep, because it’s kind of woken you up. But it doesn’t last. The first day was fine; and then days 2 through 8 kind of sucked, but now it seems to have rectified itself.

Mickey Trescott: Ok.

Susan: But I haven’t noticed any difference. Usually takes weeks or months.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm; yeah, I’ve usually heard with people that I’ve worked with at least a month, maybe the 6-week mark is when they start to notice some changes, and they can be subtle at first.

Susan: Yeah. And I want to be on it for a significant amount of time before I get my colonoscopy, so then it’s kind of in there with maybe my regimen is the LDN and maybe taking the Canasa, which is the name of the medication, once or twice a week. Who knows.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. Hack all the things to make a blend; that’s what we teach here. A blend of the best of conventional; the best of natural, the best of the things you could do for yourself to kind of figure out what works for you. I love that.

Susan: Mm-hmm; definitely.

5. Stress management and sleep [28:31]

Mickey Trescott: So, you’ve alluded a little bit to the stress management piece and sleep. Talk a little bit about some of your routines around stress management and sleep; because podcast listeners have heard a lot about diet, and a lot of things they can do to transition to the diet. But I think consistently, once people change their diets, this is where they have the hardest time. So I’m interested in hearing your biggest tips and things that really work for you.

Susan: So; sleep is like my thing. I had a horrible sleep regimen before, and I didn’t even know. I didn’t understand; I thought you went to bed; it’s because I’m older, so people are going to go; “Oh my god, she is really old.” I thought you went to bed after Jay Leno was on. It was like Jay Leno…

Mickey Trescott: You want to hear something sad? I don’t know when Jay Leno is on.

Susan: {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Susan: I know, and I used to fall asleep to the TV every night. You’d put on Jay Leno, or whatever, and then later on.

Mickey Trescott: Was that like midnight?

Susan: It’s like 11:30; I think he’s on after the 11 o’clock news. I don’t even watch; I don’t know what we did before DVRs and the internet TV-wise, because I can’t watch those shows that are very intense at 10 o’clock at night, which is the time the good ones are on.

So when we first started eating paleo and reading about sleep, this was our sleep regimen. We watched TV in bed until we fell asleep and set the time; and then I got up to an alarm, hitting the snooze probably 7-8 times, and was always sleepy. And then we instituted little things a little bit at a time.

The first thing was a bedtime. You figure out your bedtime by what time you need to get up; you figure out what time you need to get up, and you subtract 8 hours, and that’s what time you need to go to bed; not when Jay Leno is over, or Jimmy Fallon, or Steven Colbert. You pick your bedtime; if you have to get up at 6, your bedtime is 10 o’clock; or sometimes people need a little bit more. But 8 hours is a good start. So we started with bedtime.

Oh, first of all we stopped watching TV in bed. Which was funny because my husband {laughs} thought that he needed the TV to fall asleep, because he suffered from insomnia before he met me, he had a big battle with insomnia. And he goes, “But it really helps me fall asleep.” And I said, can we just try it for one week? And I encourage people, if they’re dealing with a significant other, just ask them to try something for a week. Then there’s no skin in the game; it’s a week. You can do anything for a week, right. So we stopped the TV for a week; that was our plan, and 3 days into it we woke up, and he goes, “I hate it when they’re right about stuff like this.” {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Susan: He goes, “I have never slept better in my life.” So the TV has been off since then. Of course when we’re sick, or on the weekend or something. But, during the week, no TV in bed. Bedtime, then I got the orange goggles; and they really work people. If you haven’t tried the orange goggles, they are; I can say, “I think I’m not going to be able to go to sleep tonight” and right after dinner I put my orange goggles on, and sure enough it starts making my drowsy. My cousin calls them the sleeping pill of eyewear. I even have, now that I have readers, I have tinted readers that I use to read in bed at night.

Mickey Trescott: I need to get a pair of those.

Susan: Yeah, they’re pretty awesome. Readers.com has a couple of different tinted lenses, and they’re pretty cheap. So the orange goggles; as soon as dinner is over, all the lights go down in our house. We have dimmers. The kitchen lights go off, dimmers; no electronics or anything an hour before that bedtime. So I have an old-school back-lit kindle that I read in bed, and I never get to that 10 o’clock, really. I start to read an hour before bed, and 9:30 comes, and I’m usually ready to turn the light out. Turn the Kindle light out and go to bed. We have an orange-amber lightbulb in my nightstand, so that’s the light that’s in the bedroom at night.

And then I wake up with a vibrating alarm. I still use an alarm; I’ve gone a year without one, but now I have to get up so early to battle the traffic of the Silicon Valley that I have to set an alarm. But I using a vibrating Fitbit alarm instead of that big loud iPhone alarm, and I think that really helps. I don’t snooze an alarm ever; it goes off, I get up.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, we put our alarms in the other room so we have to get up to turn it off.

Susan: Yeah. And all my electronics are out of the bedroom. We still have a TV in the bedroom, but it’s not on. But my phone, my iPad, everything is nowhere near my bed so I have no reason to look at in the middle of the night. And then we’ve taped over every single light; even our, what is it, smoke alarm, has a little blinking light. Everything has a light these days. So we’ve got black tape over everything; we have blackout curtains. I keep earplugs next to my bed, because I have cats that like to scratch and purr and yowl in the middle of the night; and I sleep with something over my eyes, whether it’s a soft T-shirt or an eye mask; those kinds of things. And when I travel, earplugs and eye mask.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm.

Susan: Always come with me.

Mickey Trescott: Yep. I love that. Great tips. You’ve got all the tools in the toolbox. But when you know that sleep is the most important thing. Like you said, for you, it’s even more important than food; a lot of people might be listening and be like; “wow, that’s a lot of routine for the sleep.” But it’s like being that organized, and meal planning, and batch cooking for the food. You just have to set yourself up for success, and be ready.

Susan: And once you get used to it, I just do it. Like the glasses; they’re on the kitchen table. So we finish dinner; I do the cooking and he does the cleaning; and so I grab the glasses. 9 o’clock, we watch a couple of shows at night; at 9 o’clock or before the TV goes off. And we go upstairs.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, when it’s a routine and you do it together, it doesn’t seem that weird.

Susan: Yeah. And it doesn’t seem hard, because we’ve been doing it. And it helps us. I know when I get less than 7.5 hours of sleep, first of all it’s hard for me to eat correctly because I crave all kinds of carbs and fat together, and my body does not run well on both carbs and fat together in huge amounts. But your body is looking for energy, and those are the biggest; the sources of energy. And I just feel horrible; I’m foggy headed, besides being a nutrition coach, I’m also an accountant and I have to look at detailed numbers and be very on, and fuzzy headed and accounting does not work. And it gets my clients mad at me, and I don’t like that.

6. Having a support system [35:48]

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; totally. Well, talk to me a little bit about support. Have you had any stand out supporters; anyone who’s kind of cheer-leaded you through all the phases of your journey?

Susan: Well I’ve had you, Mickey. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Oh my gosh, you can’t see me, that doesn’t work.

Susan: Well you helped because of the whole nightshade thing.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, we support each other.

Susan: Yeah. It’s so crazy; I think about going to the conferences, and I don’t drink; sometimes that’s the only; it’s not hard for me because I’ve been not drinking for a really long time, and I don’t need to change the way I feel to have fun or be happy; but when I hang around the AIP people they’re not really big drinkers either.

Mickey Trescott: {laughs} Well, if they’re on the elimination diet, they’re not drinkers {laughs}.

Susan: Exactly.

Mickey Trescott: They shouldn’t be.

Susan: So we’ve had an Air BNB where other paleo people have come over to our house and said our garbage looks a lot different than their garbage {laughs}.

Mickey Trescott: Oh my gosh. {laughs}

Susan: Because they’re on conference, they’re having a good time.

Mickey Trescott: Our garbage has like kombucha and Hail Mary’s.

Susan: Yeah, kombucha and sauerkraut.

Mickey Trescott: And sauerkraut.

Susan: But my husband has been; you know, ever since forever, since I’ve known him. Which I’ve only known him 9 years; but through my whole journey, through the binge eating. He’s the one that found Whole30; that’s how I started paleo. I couldn’t control what I was eating any longer. I was doing Weight Watchers; I was doing CrossFit and Weight Watchers at the same time. I advise you to never try anything like that; severely undereating and doing crazy exercise do not go well together; there’s never a good end to that.

But he’s the one; and when I said at the time, this is funny. He was drinking; literally, not figuratively, literally a 12-pack of diet coke a day.

Mickey Trescott: Is anyone ringing the bell with the insomnia? {laughs}

Susan: I know! When I first met him, and when he first moved in with me I didn’t realize how much diet coke he was drinking. And then I realized he was drinking it up until he went to bed. And I said, “Did you ever think to maybe not drink diet coke after lunch, and see if it helped?” And it really helped him a lot. He doesn’t have insomnia anymore, but yeah; the ding-ding-ding. And then I said; “Well you can’t drink diet coke on Whole30.” And he said, “I can do anything for 30 days.” And you know what; he doesn’t drink diet coke today. He doesn’t. And it’s just not a part of; it’s not a treat for him, it’s not anything for him. And he actually used to have; not a tic, but he would stop on words sometimes. He would hiccup through words, and that went down like 99%.

But he’s just cheered me on through the whole thing. Every time I need to make a change for my health, he is right there willing to do it with me. He never says, “Make me something else to eat.” You know, he’s not that kind of husband that wants his pizza and beer, at least once a week. He’s never somebody who says, “I can’t.” I know, my dad used to do this when I was growing up. He would come home from work, and he would say, “What’s for dinner?” And my mom would say, “Spaghetti.” And he would say, “I had Italian for lunch.” You know?

Mickey Trescott: My dad did the same thing. “I had that for lunch.”

Susan: Yeah. He’ll eat whatever is in the house, and he’s always been there, driving me to doctor’s appointments. Letting me spend money on autoimmune disease; and natural medicine and functional medicine is not cheap. And he’s never complained; said, no, you can’t go to that doctor, no you can’t have that test. And he’s held my hand when I wanted to give up. You know, Christmas this year; December was hard. My fatigue was really bad, and I just sometimes feel like giving up. And he’s like, “No you can’t, what does that mean, giving up?” You know?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, it’s really; it’s been really sweet to watch you two, and I think that he has supported you a lot because he sees the change in you and he sees how much happier it is to be married to someone I think is feeling their best, you know, and kind of following their path and their dreams and discovering things together. You both have a lot of joy in kind of learning new things, and that tweaking; and that attitude isn’t everyone’s, but I’ve definitely noticed it in you guys, and I think it’s really great.

Susan: Yeah.

7. Tips for the beginning of your autoimmune journey [40:21]

Mickey Trescott: So, just to wrap up, do you have any tips or takeaways for anyone who is just kind of at the beginning of their autoimmune journey?

Susan: I say get a good functional medicine provider. And I know in your book you go over all the steps to find and to work. And you do need a really good doctor; and you need to listen to what that medical doctor says, but you also need to realize what frame of mind they’re working in. My first doctor, “here, just take this medicine for the rest of your life.” You’re going to get those medical doctors; and if you do get that kind of doctor, you need to find another doctor. Because, except for things like thyroid where you need to take medicine, and insulin when people need insulin; there’s not a lot of diseases where you just take medicine for the rest of your life and that’s the only thing you do.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm.

Susan: It just doesn’t work that way. And the other thing is; try to stay away from Dr. Google. Really try to stay away. I’ve got the whole methylation stuff, and the whole gene variance, and falling down that rabbit hole of thinking I’m going to find some magic answer somewhere.

Mickey Trescott: Would you say, Susan; this has been my experience as kind of an ex-Dr. Google addict. I find that the solutions to my problems are actually quite simple and mostly kind of in plain sight, and a lot of them haven’t come as a result of following some rabbit trail online.

Susan: Exactly. It all boils down to sleep, real food, finding out what foods work for you and what don’t; and in reality, coming up with the broadest diet possible, because for me especially with the history of binge eating; the feeling of restriction is not good for my brain. So I need to feel; when I can eat white rice and white potatoes, I need to eat those things. Not every day; never every day. I don’t eat anything every day except drink water. Oh, coffee I do drink every day; which is on my list. But yeah, finding that broadest diet possible, and finding out what foods hurt you. Just eat foods that don’t hurt you.

Mickey Trescott: And then what quantities, I think you telling your story a little bit about how those reintroductions have gone for you, and how you’ve noticed this threshold; that’s something that’s a really common theme for people. They like to think of everything in terms of black and white, and I think the more we get into this we realize that’s kind of not how it is, you know?

Susan: Yeah. And you know, for me, keeping my house pretty much; except for eggs, white potatoes, and rice; keeping my house pretty much nightshade free. I don’t eat nightshades at home; I save that for the occasional time we go out. I ate fresh tomatoes for the first time after 2 years this summer, and I just eat a couple at a time. I don’t eat; my husband gets a little thing from the farmer’s market, and I probably put 3 cherry tomatoes on my salad, or three bites of a chopped-up tomato. And I savor it. And you know what, people say, “I’d die if I couldn’t eat tomatoes!” Well, I didn’t eat tomatoes for 2 years, and I’m still standing. Because I felt like I’d die without tomatoes, but you start to appreciate things more.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm.

Susan: When you don’t eat them every day, and it just works. But yeah, get the food dialed in, step out of that rabbit hole. Like I said, there isn’t some magic formula out there. They may be able to do it; but take all your genes, and lab work, and come up for the magic pill for you. It just isn’t out there, I don’t think.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, people have got to find it for themselves.

Susan: Yeah.

Mickey Trescott: Well thank you so much, Susan. This was an awesome interview. I think people are really going to enjoy hearing about your experiences and hearing you tell your story. If people want to keep up with you, do you want to tell them a little bit about how they can get in touch with you, where they can find you?

Susan: Sure. I have a website; it’s www.EvolveNutrition.com, and also on Facebook. I have been kind of in a life transition right now, where we’re going to the simplify route. So I’m working an accounting job right now because we’re about to sell our house and move. So I haven’t really been keeping up with that, but you can still contact me through that.

Mickey Trescott: You have such great; she has really great articles, especially for anyone that struggles with sugar addiction or drug and alcohol addiction. She has a great podcast series, Evolved Recovery Podcast; is that what it’s called?

Susan: Yeah, the Evolved Recovery. And I have also a website called. www.EvolvedRecovery.com. And a podcast. But you can all get there through Evolved Nutrition; the links are all there.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, it’s a great resource. Awesome. Well thank you guys so much for listening. We’ll be back next time with a question and answer episode, so I’ll have my buddy Angie back. And we will be answering your questions. You guys take care; see you next time. Bye guys.

Susan: Thanks; bye-bye.

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The post S2 E2 Mickey interviews Susan McCauley, who is recovering from ulcerative proctitis appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Apr 24 2017

46mins

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Bonus Ep: Cooking For Life, Multiple Sclerosis, and a research update w/ Dr. Terry Wahls

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Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 2!

Bonus Ep: Cooking For Life, Multiple Sclerosis, and a research update w/ Dr. Terry Wahls is our second bonus episode, and an introduction to Season 2 of the podcast. In this episode, we interview our personal inspiration, Dr. Terry Wahls, the creator of The Wahls Protocol and the author of the new book, The Wahls Protocol Cooking For Life.

In addition to discussing Dr. Wahls’ new book, topics we cover include how to embrace a healing diet on a budget, approaching your doctor about utilizing nutrition for health, why we believe in templates over recipes, Dr. Wahls’ go-to meal, and much more. This is a juicy and informative episode with one of the most inspirational voices in the chronic illness community. It’s perfect for folks looking for some practical advice on how to sustain a healing lifestyle. Scroll down for the full episode transcript.

How to listen:

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If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

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Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a complimentary resource for those on the road to recovery. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’ve got both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt, a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I have endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease. After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.Autimmune-Paleo.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

Mickey Trescott: This podcast is sponsored by The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook; our co-authored guide to living well with chronic illness. We saw the need for a comprehensive resource that goes beyond nutrition to connect savvy patients, just like you, to the resources they need to achieve vibrant health. Through the use of self assessments, checklists, handy guides and templates, you get to experience the joy of discovery; finding out which areas to prioritize on your healing journey. Pick up a copy wherever books are sold.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:
1. Introducing our guest, Dr. Terry Wahls [2:20]
2. Utilizing a healing diet on a budget [6:56]
3. The importance of diet shift in the medical community [11:01]
4. Approaching your doctor about utilizing nutrition for health [16:32]
5. Dr. Wahls’ newest book [19:55]
6. Templates, not recipes [23:26]
7. Dr. Wahls’ go-to meal [27:15]
8. Success stories from the Lifestyle Clinic [31:42]
9. Response to the naysayers [34:08]
10. What’s coming up for Dr. Wahls [38:12]

Angie Alt: Hi everyone! Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast. Angie here; today we are bringing you the second of our pre-season bonus interview episodes, so you guys are super lucky, these are going to be great. Mickey, how are you doing today?

Mickey Trescott: Super awesome, especially because I am so excited about chatting our guest today. She’s one of our favorite people in the autoimmune world. And we got feedback from you guys last season that you really value these expert interviews, and we didn’t really have any in the can for you guys for season 2; but then we decided we had this incredible opportunity to interview a couple of really awesome people; one of them today. And we got her on the line for you. So, Angie, do you want to tell our listeners about who this super special, amazing person is, who happens to be a total rockstar in our world?

1. Introducing our guest, Dr. Terry Wahls [2:20]

Angie Alt: Yeah, sure I would love to. Our guest today is the amazing Dr. Terry Wahls, a fellow autoimmune warrior, who went from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis that had left her in a wheelchair in 2003, to the vibrant, dancing; more on that in a minute; and world-changing lady we are honored to speak with today. Terry is the author of several books, including The Wahls Protocol, and her latest, The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life. In addition to over 60 peer-reviewed abstracts, papers, and posters. She also runs a groundbreaking lifestyle clinic in Iowa, and conducts clinical research that is changing how we treat MS and other autoimmune diseases. Additionally, she is behind the Wahls Foundation, a nonprofit created in 2011 whose mission is to replace the epidemic of chronic disease with an epidemic of health; I love that. To say Terry is purpose driven is basically an understatement, you guys. Thanks so much for being on the show today, Terry!

Dr. Terry Wahls: Hey, thank you so much for having me.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. So Terry, most of our readers are familiar with your story at this point, and your TED Talk. And if anyone listening goes; “Wait a minute; I haven’t heard about that.” You guys should definitely check it out. Just Google Terry Wahls TED Talk and start there; it’s awesome.

So we know; your healing has progressed considerably over time. When I actually met you at the Ancestral Health Symposium a few years ago, you showed the audience that you weren’t able to raise your arms over your head. And last month, Angie and I were hanging out with you at the NTA conference, and you were pulling some dance moves where your hands were definitely over your head.

Dr. Terry Wahls: {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: So, you know, your healing has increased a lot even since you’ve been on this journey. I am always shocked at how you look younger and more vibrant as time goes on. Can you give everyone a little bit of an update about those changes that you’ve noticed in your long-term healing; especially since you gave your TED Talk.

Dr. Terry Wahls: Sure. So, I’ll sort of give a quick high-level synopsis. I do this wonderful thing with biological age; and there are several online calculators that you can use, it’s pretty fun. I did mine based on what my answer would have been at 52, which was at my worst, and my biological age at that point was 69. Which is probably pretty accurate; I couldn’t sit up, I couldn’t do a pushup; I was struggling to walk 10 feet, I had all these markers. So, I have since calculated that biologic age using that marker, and I’m down to the age of 39.

Mickey Trescott: Wow!

Dr. Terry Wahls: And that’s pretty cool. When I was 39, I was developing my MS symptoms. I was still skiing, still jogging, still biking, but I certainly could not bike as far as I can now. So already I was beginning to have problems with the MS, that had not yet come to diagnosis. And if we line up photos of me, you see that rapid aging, that aggressive decline; and then you see what literally looks like this stunning recovery from 2007 to 2008; the wheelchair, looking pretty sickly, to being on my bike. But people noticed that if you line up photos from 2008, and keep going; I just keep looking younger and younger.

Now, my hair is still graying, so we have to take the hair out. But the quality of my skin looks younger and younger; I can walk further, I can get my arms up over my head. I’m doing pushups; and I’m up to 10, so that’s pretty exciting for me. And you know, I keep working closely with physical therapy, and they can keep advancing the exercises that I do.

I did get sidelined last year, because I ended up having surgery for some severe back pain. So since I was 60 when I had that, that has taken a little bit longer to recover from than I expected, but still, I’m out on the floor dancing; I’m walking, hiking, and biking once again.

Mickey Trescott: That’s so amazing. I better stay on my game, Terry; because your biological age is only a year older than me. You’re going to be younger than me soon! {laughs}

Dr. Terry Wahls: You know, my kids are laughing. They’re like, “Oh my god, mom. Are you like Merlin? You keep getting younger and younger.” So.

Mickey Trescott: Right.

Dr. Terry Wahls: We have a lot of laughter with that.

2. Utilizing a healing diet on a limited budget [6:56]

Angie Alt: So Terry; at the Nutritional Therapy Conference, one of the talks I attended was the panel discussion you were on about serving diverse and working class groups. That conversation is one that is just really extra close to my heart, because I don’t think healing has to be limited to certain groups, or those with upper class incomes. What are your kind of top 3 pointers on how to make a healing diet and lifestyle work, even on limited budgets, or in challenging settings; maybe geographic locations with limited access.

Dr. Terry Wahls: Oh sure. For years I worked at the VA, and in both my Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic and in my Therapeutic Lifestyle Clinic at the VA. Most of my patients did not have money; they were on fixed incomes. What they did have, was they had access to me, so they could come see me; Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic I would see them once every 6 months. The Lifestyle Clinic we could see them monthly for a year. And we could give cooking classes in my lifestyle clinic.

So in the cooking class, we taught people how to cook at home. I helped them understand that the food budget is everything you put in your mouth. It’s your alcohol, tobacco, fancy drinks, fancy coffees, lattes, fast food, restaurant meals; plus your grocery bill. And we total all of that up to get a food budget. Then I let people know what we have to do is begin cooking at home with vegetables and your source of meat. We had a different plan if you were a meat eater, or if you were vegetarian or vegan. We certainly still had people, even in the VA, who were vegetarian and vegan.

But really, the very most important thing is, most people had forgotten how to cook. Or their lives are too pressed for time, or for money. So they aren’t cooking. So we spent a lot of time teaching cooking skills, and we spent time teaching menu planning, prioritizing, and most importantly, how to eliminate food waste. Because most Americans are throwing away 40% of our food; whether we’re buying it in the grocery store, or at the restaurant. So learning how to better plan, so we actually consume all the food we buy, saves a considerable amount of money.

We were quite successful. We had many of our patients tell us; in the group classes the more senior folks would tell the newbies that you can do this and save money, but you’re going to have to plan. You’re going to have to pay attention in our cooking classes.

Angie Alt: Right. Those are such great tips, just kind of going back to; basically home economics 101 right there.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, I can definitely also resonate with taking all of the restaurant meals and all of the stuff that people think of as an additional budget expense and really looping that into the entire food budget; and a lot of people on low incomes think that the grocery budget and maybe that other budget is separate. But when you put that all together, and you prepare all your food at home, and you brown-bag it for lunch, and you don’t do those extras that are also not helping your situation when you have health problems, like cigarettes and alcohol and coffees, and that kind of stuff; people find that they have a little more wiggle room there to actually afford that real food.

Dr. Terry Wahls: It’s really important to have that conversation of, “What is your food budget?” Because if you don’t, people will see the grocery bill doubling, and feel very uncomfortable with that. So, we learned that it was very important to have that big conversation about what’s in your food budget first. And then, we talk about planning, menus, and how we’re going to make this change in an affordable way.

3. The importance of diet shift in the medical community [11:01]

Mickey Trescott: That’s great. So Terry; one of the things that really impresses me about you is your willingness to work within disastrously broken system with both creativity and perseverance. I don’t know anyone like you who is just like willing to dig in and get this work done. At the NTA conference, you told the story about how you figured out how to recommend dietary and lifestyle modifications while working with veterans; it was a little unconventional and kind of; it was hard to do within that system. And I think a lot of practitioners get discouraged or lose hope when they run up against the system.

So you recently received a $1 million grant from the National MS Society to further your research on dietary and lifestyle interventions with MS. That is so fantastic; we’re so excited for you. Can you tell us how you think things are shifting in the medical community to accommodate more of this research and recommendations for diet and lifestyle changes?

Dr. Terry Wahls: I think it’s very helpful to have the public awareness; of course, the medical community, the scientific community. I think it’s also incredibly helpful that our awareness of how the environment is speaking to our genes through epigenetics, and creating either an inflamed, sickly, disease prone-body, or a resilient disease resistant body. So the epigenetic insights are helpful. The microbiome insights are helpful, and understanding how food changes the microbiome; and you change the microbiome, of course changes the risk for autoimmune disease and the severity of the autoimmune disease, as well as many other complicated, chronic health problems.

So, as my scientific colleagues could now measure the mechanisms by which diet and lifestyle works, they began to realize that we are not so crazy in our approaches. The public pressure goes to their various non-profit organizations, insisting that you need to support these researchers.

And another thing I think is very telling; and I heard from people who are big donors with some of these nonprofits, that these major donors went to the organizations to say, “If you want to continue receiving our support, you’re going to have to fund diet and lifestyle research.”

So I became aware of that; I wrote my protocol when they put out their call for research in the dietary realm, and I was funded. And I should be, because I’m one of the few people who have actually studied it in the last few years. So it’s no surprise that our research lab is very competitive.

Mickey Trescott: That’s so great. Terry, what do you think is the key to having the public be so well-informed and push?

Dr. Terry Wahls: Well, I think the key is having people who develop untreatable, incurable, devastating diseases, get hopelessly disabled, recover, have the extraordinary good fortune to do a TED Talk that has 3 million views.

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Dr. Terry Wahls: That created; that experience, difficult as it was at the time, has been this incredible gift to me, and probably to humanity, because it put me in a position to learn all this stuff, experience all this stuff, recover, and because I happen to be well connected and I speak well. I told this story that’s deeply resonating; and then the public spread it in this pretty amazing way. I think this led then, I’m sure, to millions of conversations in doctors’ offices around the globe, saying, “What about diet?” And physician had to see that some of their patients would ignore the physician’s advice, do the diet that the 3 of us talk about, and see whatever their health problem was get under better control.

So physicians; I’ve been contacted by hundreds of physicians, maybe thousands now, who said, they thought it was pretty daft at first, but then they saw their patients were adopting these dietary recommendations, and their patients were improving, so the doctors; at least some of them, get on board and start handing the books out.

It’s really the beauty of the internet. It allows the spread of knowledge, of change, very, very rapidly. And without the internet, I could not have recovered. So that’s the good side; we could talk about the downside of the internet, which allows the spread of not helpful information, also. But the internet is what allows this amazing speed of change to occur.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, it is this incredible, incredible tool. {laughs} I mean, obviously Angie and I would also not; probably neither of us would have healed if we hadn’t seen your TED Talk, Terry. Honestly, for both of us, that was really instrumental in the beginning in inspiring us; so you’ve inspired another whole generation of people who are out there and writing and building this community, too.

4. Approaching your doctor about utilizing nutrition for health [16:32]

Mickey Trescott: I have one more follow-up question on that research piece, because I really do think this is where we take this from kind of a fringe, you know; anecdote kind of situation to actually being in doctor’s offices and being recommended. Do you have any advice for people that have diseases that are not multiple sclerosis, where maybe they can’t go to their doctor and say, “Hey look at this research,” how maybe they can be a part of this process to bringing the greater awareness?

Dr. Terry Wahls: I think you could still take the grant proposal linked to clinicaltrials.gov that describes my study, and the patients could still say, “Scientists are studying this diet. So we know it’s safe, and it has a reasonable possibility of helping people. I want to use this diet, here’s the book; do you have to do any special lab tests if I’m going to eat all these vegetables?” That’s the whole question you have to ask. “Do we need special lab tests? Do I have to be monitored?” Because there are some conditions where in fact they will need some additional lab monitoring on those extra vegetables. Or if you have kidney stones, you’d have to have a specific type of greens. And that’s really it.

I think the medical community would want to think we’re taking out grains, legumes, and dairy; we call that “fad diet”; it surely has to be nutritionally harmful. If we can go to our physician saying; “This diet is being studied; here’s the clinical trials. So we know it’s reasonably safe, and they have to think it has a good chance of helping people. And here’s a book about that diet; I want to follow it, is there any lab testing that needs to be done?” And of course the vast majority of the time, the answer would be no; we just watch you and adjust your medicines up or down as needed.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, really asking the patients to go for it and push it forward in their doctor’s offices. I love that empowerment piece. I think we autoimmune folks are often disempowered in our doctor’s offices, and then feeling like we should be put in the driver’s seat; I love that.

Dr. Terry Wahls: You know; the other thing I remind people is; the specialist was your dermatologist, your rheumatologist; your neurologist; isn’t going to feel comfortable knowing much about diet, and knowing much about vegetables. So that’s fine; just go to your primary care physician; nurse practitioner; physician’s assistant. Say, “I’m going to eat 9 cups of vegetables a day”; or try to; start off small, build up to all 9 cups. And if they aren’t excited about your eating more vegetables, fire them and get a new medical team.

Mickey Trescott: You heard it here, you guys!

Dr. Terry Wahls: Because universally, across many, many scientific studies; eating more vegetables lowers your risks of cancers, heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, obesity, autoimmunity, mental health problems. And so if you have someone who is not behind you on that, they are, in my mind, not in your best interest and you should go find another provider.

5. Dr. Wahls’ newest book [19:55]

Angie Alt: Right. Exactly. I love it. Great advice, Terry. Ok, so kind of transitioning a little bit. We would love to talk to you about this new book. Your first book was kind of focused on the protocol itself, and this book is sort of all about actually preparing this amazing food that you can eat to heal. There are some super delicious recipes included in the book, and it got me thinking; what inspires you in the kitchen? Is it a certain ingredient? A cooking technique? A cooking occasion? What is it that got your juices flowing for this newest book?

Dr. Terry Wahls: I really enjoy cooking. I’m a farm kid, so we ate all the meals at home, and it was very important that I know how to cook and feel comfortable with that. So I’ve always enjoyed cooking; I was very glad as I healed that I could get back into cooking. But I wrote this book because of my experience in the lifestyle clinic. What my vets taught me is that for many, many people, the single most important health-giving act I could give them was teaching them how to cook again, and having them be comfortable that they could learn these skills and making that use; learn how to start with a recipe and then feel comfortable with improvising off a recipe with what’s available in season; what your preferences are; what you have on hand; and teaching people how to do this within their economic reality.

Now my vets taught me that that was a vitally important thing to do. And now I’m thinking; well the next thing, because I’d been talking with my co-writer and my publisher about what is the next book; and then it just became apparent that the next book was teaching people how to take the next step.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, people love action. They love to be able to do something; and the cooking is actually the first thing they can do, right?

Dr. Terry Wahls: Absolutely. The cooking is so powerful, and I am very mindful that people may be pressed for money, or they may be pressed for time, or they may be pressed for energy because they are fatigued. So I tried very much to write this book assuming that people would be having to struggle with one or all three of those areas.

Mickey Trescott: I think that is actually one of the most incredible gifts of this book, Terry; is actually that you have written it from the assumption that your readers, you know intimately what they’re experiencing, and that is a huge part of what we work on with people in our world, too. Just being sick and fatigued and having to spend a lot of money on health care that you don’t have. It’s just a lot to kind of fulfill all those goals, and it can be really overwhelming for a lot of people.

Dr. Terry Wahls: You know; you work with a chef that make these wonderful, wonderful meals that takes me 10 hours to prepare. It’s like; it’s just not, I don’t have 10 hours. I don’t have 3 hours. We need to have things that people can enjoy in half an hour.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Dr. Terry Wahls: And an occasional special event that, yes, you can get some help and spend a couple more hours to make a very special event, but we need day in, day out simple easy food that people can enjoy.

6. Templates, not recipes [23:26]

Mickey Trescott: Totally agree. So Terry, one of my favorite aspects of your book is that you include templates instead of straight recipes throughout. I’ve taught a lot of people to cook over the years, and one of the biggest barriers that I see in people learning how to cook for themselves long-term is people who are only comfortable cooking from recipes that call for specific ingredients they have on hand. So I have this big long list of why this is a problem; it doesn’t’ account for flexibility, it contributes to food waste; it can be more costly for them. It really teaches people to rely on these instructions instead of using their brain, being creative, all of those things. So can you tell us a little bit about your reasons using templates, and kind of how that works in your own kitchen?

Dr. Terry Wahls: Because I want people to feel comfortable moving into a place where they don’t need a recipe to cook. And to do that, it’s always much easier if you can break it down into steps. So the first step was to create a template for each major food category, and I would do it according to my level 1 diet, level 2, level 3 diet. And then I gave examples of how I take the same recipe and I might transition between the 3 levels. If you want to be ketogenic, or you weren’t ketogenic.

So we’d have several examples of different meals you could make from that template, and then we’d move on to; “Ok, it’s time for you to adapt this to your personal taste.” So we give people very clear directions for simple, enjoyable recipes, that they can follow step by step. We tell them how many vegetables are going to be in that recipe, so they have a sense of where they’re at in their 9 cups; then we invite them to personalize this. The herbs, the meats, the vegetables, according to what’s in season and what is their culinary tradition.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome; I love that Terry. Are there any special kitchen tools that you recommend that make this a lot easier for people?

Dr. Terry Wahls: Sure. So this is going to depend on hand function. And certainly in the autoimmune world, gripping can become difficult. So we have some links to occupational resources for hand gadgets to make it easier to cut, to hold knives, forks, etc. So that was one set of tools.

I think a high-powered blender, like a Vitamix or a Blendmaster, Nutribullet, can be very helpful. A food processor to do your grating and shredding can be helpful. I didn’t want to spend all that money on a fancy Vitamix; I thought, you know, who’s going to spend $300 on a blender. So I waited until my original blender had died, then I got the Vitamix, and I so enjoyed it, and I thought, “Now why on earth did I wait a year and a half? This was just silly of me.” If you have the resources, go get a reconditioned one. I think you’ll be surprised at how much you enjoy it. They are really, really nice. I still have mine now; it’s on 6 years, doing great.

The other gadget I think would be very helpful is a food processor for grating, chopping. Its’ really nice for making pesto, the Wahls fudge, which is a treat every family that has grandchildren should have, because then you could give those kids something that they’ll really enjoy; and if you have some, as well, it’s going to be good for you as well.

7. Dr. Wahls’ go-to meal [27:15]

Angie Alt: I would agree with pretty much all of those kitchen gadgets there. Terry; do you have a favorite dish that you kind of repeatedly go back to? It’s healing, it’s comforting, it’s kind of the thing that’s at the top of your list?

Dr. Terry Wahls: It’s going to be sort of a long list here.

Angie Alt: {laughs}

Dr. Terry Wahls: I love to have bone broth; so during the winter we always have some bone broth going, and I’ll go between chicken broth and beef broth. So a beef hoof is ideal; chicken feet are ideal, you can get that from your butcher. So that’s just a lovely winter time food. Liver and onions is so healing. We really like to have liver and onions once a week, so I’ll rotate between bison, lamb, and chicken liver. Beef and pork are fine, too, but those are probably my 3 favorites. And day in and day out, we make skillet meals. So I’ll cook some meat; might be lamp chops, then I’ll add vegetables for 2 more minutes, and then I serve. So I can have that whole meal done, including chopping my vegetables, within 30 minutes. So, a skillet meal in my mind is a huge workhorse kind of meal that I have.

And when I’m having friends and family over, I like to make Wahls fudge, and then open up a can of coconut milk, whip that up in my Vitamix, put it in a wide-mouth jar in the refrigerator, get it cold; it’s like a lovely whipped cream. Put a dollop of that on the Wahls fudge; and people are like, “Oh my god this is… is this really legal for you?” {laughs}

Angie Alt: {laughs}

Dr. Terry Wahls: I’m like, oh yeah, it’s strictly legal, it’s really good for your, it’s really great for your brain. So I think it’s important to have some treats like that that can be very special food; can be great for your grandchildren and your kids; and it actually is healing.

Angie Alt: Right; I love that. I love when you can prepare something that’s kind of a delicious dessert; a special treat for a special occasion, but it still fits into that healing template. It doesn’t have to be all boring, or not exciting and fun to eat and share with family and friends.

Dr. Terry Wahls: Correct. Correct.

Angie Alt: Terry, I saw that recently you took a trip to Italy on Instagram.

Dr. Terry Wahls: Yes!

Angie Alt: That seems like a lot of fun, with your family. Did you learn anything about healing or food culture there that you could share?

Dr. Terry Wahls: Well, as a matter of fact I did. We went out to some olive ranches, or olive farms. So they were picking their olives, and the olives that are used for olive oil are a little different than olives that are going to be used for just munching on for pleasure. So that was a very interesting thing to observe. And many of these farms will have their olives pressed, will make their own small, high-end olive oil.

You know, there’s a lot of controversy about olive oil in the United States being diluted with less valuable oils that are not as healing as the high-end extra virgin olive oils. So it’s worth paying attention to the quality of your olive oil; and it is a fabulous, healing food. It tastes pretty good too.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah I love; I mean, you can really taste a really nice high quality olive oil; it just adds a lot of flavor. Especially made in dressings on salads and stuff; that’s my favorite way to get it.

Dr. Terry Wahls: It’s sort of like the Vitamix thing; I thought that high-end olive oil was sort of a waste of money, and then I had some. And we’ve never gone back to the other stuff since I tasted it.

Angie Alt: Right! {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: You know, and people can find some creatively sourced, better olive oil. So if you go to Whole Foods or something, they’re going to have some over-priced stuff; but I’ve actually found some great olive oils at Trader Joes and Thrive Market online. And there’s even some direct to consumer, mail order, that you can buy online options that are just way cheaper than if you were going to buy them in a specialty store.

Dr. Terry Wahls: Yeah, absolutely.

8. Success stories from the Lifestyle Clinic [31:42]

Mickey Trescott: So Terry; can you share with us some success stories from your Lifestyle Clinic?

Dr. Terry Wahls: Sure. So, there’s a person I’m thinking of who had rheumatoid arthritis, had severe pain, and was greatly, greatly struggling to walk in to the hospital from the car; was consulting getting a walker; a scooter. She got referred to our clinic. We put her on what really is the level 4 Wahls diet; so Wahls paleo, but we took out nightshades, as well. And her pain steadily went down, she lost 60 pounds. She too looked younger and younger, and was up walking around, looking really great. She went to see her daughter, who didn’t recognize her in the airport because mom had lost all this weight, and mom was looking well, and she was up walking around really very well.

Mickey Trescott: Wow.

Dr. Terry Wahls: We’ve had a number of folks with; I’d say the most common people reason came to us in the Lifestyle Clinic was uncontrolled pain. So success stories with many types of neuropathies; people had chronic pain because of shrapnel and war injuries; residuals from the amputations; these folks getting their lives back, getting off narcotics, doing well.

Diabetes, obesity, fatty liver; that was pretty easy. We’ve had several folks with end-stage heart failure, who were on the waiting list for heart transplants, who we turned around, and they are functioning much better again. Doing very, very well. Traumatic brain injury folks; and you can really tell in the traumatic brain injury; the folks who would embrace our program, they’re much more likely to be done with their headaches, be done with the light sensitivity; still employed, and still with their family. The folks who couldn’t make that change were far more likely to continue to spiral down in a very negative way.

9. Response to the naysayers [34:08]

Mickey Trescott: Terry, what do you say to doctors, or people in the medical community, who are like, “There is no way this can work for that many things.” People might be listening and they’re like, “Really? End stage heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis.”

Dr. Terry Wahls: And dementia, and Alzheimer’s. Wahls; this is crazy. That approach; when I would talk this way in the beginning in 2008, it drove my colleagues crazy. Because it just did not make sense to them. Now, in 2017, people are like; you are such a brilliant visionary. So I think the public has shifted many more of my scientific colleagues because of the advances of the microbiome, epigenetics, see the mechanisms by which this could work.

And I’m also careful to say, “Yep. All these things have reduced the symptom burden of these diseases. They have reduced the need for medications. As long as they follow these dietary changes, they do well. If they stop, they’re symptoms will of course, flare.” So I try to be very careful to not say, “I cure these diseases. I can say that “We’ll reduce the symptom burden by improving diet and lifestyle.” And people seem to be pretty comfortable with that.

But the acceptance in the medical community is markedly different. Now of course, that could be an impact being at the VA and being at the University, and them seeing our research program do well with successful grants. And you and I will see; many folks find the Wahls diet, and the consumption of greens is definitely increased; and the consumption of vegetables have increased.

It’s a hoot when I go to the grocery store, the produce managers come out and tell me; “Dr. Wahls, every year, year after year, the vegetable and the green consumption goes up in this town.” And it’s because; it is so cool.

Angie Alt: They have you to thank, Terry. {laughs}

Dr. Terry Wahls: And the internet, and all of that. It’s just such a wonderful thing. Which leaves me very optimistic about the health care crisis epidemic that we’re all having to deal with that more and more of the public is getting the message that food matters.

Mickey Trescott: I love that. And Terry, I’ve also noticed the same thing in my small town. I live in a little bit rural Oregon, and the local grocery store is like our local version of a Walmart, and they have the most incredible organic fruit and vegetable section, and they actually recently started having fresh raw whole turmeric, and I was saying to my husband, “Things are changing.” When you know that kind of, basically department store, has bulk turmeric in their organic fruits and vegetables section, people are demanding it, and they’re asking for it, and they’re eating real food. Which is awesome.

Dr. Terry Wahls: Exactly. It is a very exciting time, because of the internet, people are noticing everyone’s stories of healing. And we’re shifting public expectations around food. Now, of course, we all wish it would happen more quickly. But still, it is happening. And when I think of where we were at in 2008 and 2009 when I was being warned for talking about vegetables and B vitamins and fish oil; to being heralded now as this brilliant visionary at the university. Wonderful things are happening.

Angie Alt: Right, I’m actually really excited at the speed it’s going at. You know, I used to feel I think a little more downhearted about it, Terry, and then we talked to you a few years ago, and you were like, you know, being in that system and having a much more longer view than we had, you were saying, “No, it’s happening actually at breathtaking speed right now.” That really changed my outlook on it, and I’ve had a lot more hope since then. It’s awesome to watch it.

10. What’s coming up for Dr. Wahls [38:12]

Angie Alt: Maybe, Terry, you could tell us, what have you got up your sleeve after launching this book into the world. Do you have more plans still?

Dr. Terry Wahls: Yeah, wonderfully exciting things are happening. So I’m working on my book; I’m also working on opening up a very limited private practice. So I encourage your listeners to sign up to my newsletter so they can get the announcement about what we’re offering in the private practice world. We have the seminar; every year in August we have people coming from around the globe to hang out with us, where I teach people what I’ve learned in the last year, and how to implement the protocol. And we’re also trying to work on creating more online tools to support people as they try to implement these dietary measures. So more ways to get help from me and my team.

Angie Alt: Well, there she is, you guys; being purpose driven as always. We didn’t expect her to just be sitting around. {laughs} Terry, thank you so much for spending some time with us today. You are probably sick of us fawning over you every chance we get, but we really believe it is people like you who are going to help turn the tide of disease around the world.

You guys; please pick up a copy of Terry’s book. It’s out now; it’s titled The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life. Terry, can you let our listeners know where they can follow up with you?

Dr. Terry Wahls: You can go to www.TerryWahls.com. You can follow me on Facebook; Terry Wahls, MD. On Twitter @TerryWahls; or on Instagram @DrTerryWahls.

Angie Alt: Thanks so much, Terry.

Mickey Trescott: Thank you, Terry. Bye.

Dr. Terry Wahls: Thank you.

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast is a complimentary resource to our book, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness. Support us in our mission to revolutionize how autoimmune disease is viewed and treated by ordering your copy today!

To check out Season 1 of the podcast, click here.

The post Bonus Ep: Cooking For Life, Multiple Sclerosis, and a research update w/ Dr. Terry Wahls appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Apr 10 2017

41mins

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Announcing The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen by Mickey Trescott!

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"ThisIn order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog."}" data-sheets-userformat="{"2":2561,"3":[null,0],"12":0,"14":[null,2,3289907]}">This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means!In order to support our blogging activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types or remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services from this blog. 

I have HUGE news today–I’m coming out with a brand-new AIP cookbook!

It’s called The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen and it releases March 2019 (details below on how you can order a signed, pre-release copy!).

Angie and I both know from personal experience that being successful on AIP is much more than simply eliminating foods. Healing is both quickened and deepened when you ensure that in addition to avoiding your food triggers, your make an effort to maximize nutrient density in the diet.

But what exactly is nutrient density? Simply put, it is the amount of micronutrients a food contains relative to the energy it provides. Not only does my new book teach you about getting good nutrition in an approachable way, but I have developed all of the recipes so you’ll be maximizing nutrient density with every bite.

Inside The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen, you’ll find:

  • 125 Autoimmune Protocol compliant recipes (free from gluten, grains, dairy, eggs, nuts, seeds, and nightshades)
  • Recipes that satisfy low-FODMAP, low-carb, or coconut-free diets
  • Recipes that take 45 minutes (or less) to prepare, can be made in one pot, or can be made in an Instant Pot
  • 5 meal plan and shopping list combinations, including budget and two-person options

In order to create a book I believe in and maintain complete control over the content, I am self-publishing The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen. By pre-ordering your copy directly from me, you get some awesome perks!

Your pre-order bonuses include:

  • A signed copy of the first hardcover printing
  • Early delivery of the book (up to a month before traditional release)
  • Membership to a private insider FB group (Dec-Feb)
  • Access to pre-release recipes from the book

Be one of the first to get your hands on The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen! Only a limited number of books are available for pre-order so reserve your copy now!

Click here to learn more and pre-order! >>

The post Announcing The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen by Mickey Trescott! appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Nov 09 2018

14mins

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S3 E8 – Money-Saving Tips From The AIP Community

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Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 3: Real Food on a Budget. We’re dedicating this season to discussing an aspect of natural healing that often gets left out of the conversation: affordability. We’ll be chatting with experts and peers from the AIP community about how to best balance money with your health priorities.

This season is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association (NTA), a holistic nutrition school that trains and certifies nutritional therapy practitioners and consultants with an emphasis on bioindividual nutrition. Learn more about them by visiting NutritionalTherapy.com, or read about our experiences going through their NTP and NTC programs in our comparison article.

Season 3 Episode 8 is our final episode of the season! In this episode, we’re giving the floor to five members of the autoimmune community to hear their number one piece of advice when it comes to saving money on the AIP.

Since these recommendations can be so individual, we wanted to see what was getting the AIP community actual mileage when they put it into practice. Scroll down for the full episode transcript!

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a resource for those seeking to live well with chronic illness. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’m the author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt. I’m a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I’m the author of The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage my endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease.

After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.AutoimmuneWellness.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

We also wrote a book called The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook together that serves as a do-it-yourself guidebook to living well with chronic illness.

Mickey Trescott: If you’re looking for more information about the autoimmune protocol, make sure to sign up for our newsletter at autoimmunewellness.com, so we can send you our free quick start guide. It contains printable AIP food lists, a 2-week food plan, a 90-minute batch cooking video, a mindset video, and food reintroduction guides.

This season of the podcast, real food on a budget is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:

1. Mitch Hankins, Instinctual Wellbeing [3:46]
2. Sophie Van Tiggelen of A Squirrel in the Kitchen [8:43]
3. Anne Marie Garland from Grass-fed Salsa [15:51]
4. Samantha Jo Teague of the Unskilled Cavewoman [20:56]
5. Kerry Jeffery of Emotional Autoimmunity [24:27]

Angie Alt: Hi everyone! Angie here. Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, season 3. How are you doing, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: I’m feeling a little bit sad because we’re almost done with this podcast series, and it’s been really fun.

Angie Alt: I know. This was a really new topic for us to explore so in-depth. And it’s been pretty rewarding to talk to all these folks.

Mickey Trescott: I agree.

Angie Alt: So today we have a really fun episode for you guys. As you know, with this season of the podcast we’ve been on a mission to dig into the nitty gritty of how to make eating a nourishing, real foods diet both affordable and sustainable.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. If you guys haven’t been following along, we covered the following topics in our previous episodes. We talked about sourcing affordable, highest quality meats, vegetables, and fats. Tips and tricks for effective meal planning, batch cooking, and minimizing food waste. Creative food sourcing options, like buying clubs and online shopping. How to minimize waste and reimagine leftovers. Creating a food budget and prioritizing your food spending. And also how to do AIP on an extremely low budget, like fixed income or food stamps.

I think we’ve done a really good job covering these bases. If you guys haven’t heard any of the episodes in this series, make sure to go back and listen to them. There’s a ton of really great info there. Info that I think is new territory for our movement our community. It’s been really fun.

Angie Alt: Right. We hope there’s something there for everybody. So, if there has been one recurring message this season, it has been that not every one of these recommendations is going to work for everyone, obviously. We’re all at different places with our health, our finances, our support systems and even our access based on the areas where we live. We thought it would be a good idea to round out this season of the podcast by devoting a whole episode to chatting with some of the members of the AIP blogging community about their number one money saving tip.

Since these recommendations can be so individual, we wanted to see what was getting the AIP community actual mileage when they put it into practice.

1. Mitch Hankins, Instinctual Wellbeing [3:46]

Mickey Trescott: Alright. So let’s move on and talk to our first guest.

So you guys; the first community member that we’re going to chat with today is Mitch Hankins from the blog Instinctual Wellbeing. Mitch, what is your number one tip for saving money on AIP?

Mitch Hankins: There are so many good ones. When my wife and I were kind of going through financial stuff a few years ago, we definitely had to get creative with sticking to an AIP and whole foods diet on a very limited budget. And very quickly, I think the thing we realized that was most helpful was not being afraid to grocery shop hop; or grocery store hop.

Basically, what we ended up doing is just taking note of maybe two or even three grocery stores in our area, and what products did we regularly use from each of those, and finding which store had the best prices for that particular item. Maybe we’d get a certain percentage of things from Whole Foods. And then for us, we’d drive down the road and hit up Trader Joe’s for 30 minutes and grab some things there. Sometimes we’d go to the Asian mart to pick up a few items there, like coconut milk and even some sweet potato noodles and things of that nature.

So, really just learning where we could get the best deals. And then taking advantage of that. One thing I would say; we did live in a pretty large metropolitan area, and I know some people don’t. So one thing you could do if you live in a more rural or smaller town, could be to do that same thing, but online.

I know there’s lots of great shops nowadays online where you can buy AIP products, and even meats. You could meet your local farmers in your area. But again, it all comes back to this putting pieces together of a puzzle, instead of just trying to get everything at one store, and fit that into your budget when it might not work as well.

Angie Alt: I love this tip, Mitch. Because actually my husband and I do it, too. And again, you know, we’re lucky to live in a kind of urban/suburban area. So we have Whole Foods and we have Trader Joe’s and we have all the places. So we can kind of hop around. But it really allows us to take advantage of the lowest price on an item in whatever store. So I totally agree that this is a smart one.

Mickey Trescott: And a lot of stores have rotating sales, too. So by going to multiple stores, you can actually see; you have a greater chance of being able to pick up some of the things they have on sale that are maybe time sensitive. And another thing, is that actually grocery stores make their money by putting certain things on sale, and then keeping other staples at a high price to basically round it out. It’s almost like; it’s not really cheating, but you’re paying for that convenience of getting every single thing at the same store. You’ll notice that certain things are marked down to kind of lure you to shop there, and then other staples are right at the highest price. That’s how they make their money. Great tip, Mitch.

Mitch Hankins: Absolutely. And just one other note on that; I’m glad you brought up the sales thing. Because some grocery stores will have regular, like weekly sales. For instance, during that period of our lives, we would go to our Whole Foods and have rotisserie chicken Wednesday. Because every Wednesday at our particular Whole Foods, rotisserie chickens were $2 off normal.

And then they had a lot of other things. I think for a while they were doing fresh salmon on Tuesdays was like $2 or $3 off per filet. So looking for those recurring deals as well. And maybe scheduling your meal plan, or scheduling your dinners around that can be helpful.

Angie Alt: Yeah. So smart. I did this even before AIP. I really would use; and Mickey and I talked about this in an earlier episode. But I would really use those flyers with the sales to plan my meals. Proactively around what stores were offering what discounts.

Mitch Hankins: Absolutely. That’s a great point.

Angie Alt: Mitch, will you let our listeners know where people can find you?

Mitch Hankins: Absolutely. My blog is InstinctualWellbeing.com. and similarly, uncreatively, my Instagram is also @InstinctualWellbeing. And Facebook is Instinctual Wellbeing. So you can find me and connect with me there. You can also shoot me an email if you really wanted to chat more about budget friendly tips, or anything, at mitch@instinctualwellbeing.com. That’s where you can connect with me.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. Thank you so much for chatting with us today, Mitch.

Mitch Hankins: Absolutely. Thank you!

2. Sophie Van Tiggelen of A Squirrel in the Kitchen [8:43]

Mickey Trescott: Next up, we’re going to chat with Sophie Van Tiggelen of A Squirrel in the Kitchen. Sophie, what is your number one tip for saving money on AIP?

Sophie Van Tiggelen: My very first tip I think that eating vegetables and fruit is very important. You need to eat as much vegetables and fruit as you can. Like, try to fill up your plate with at least three-quarters of vegetables. They are a great source of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. And the fiber content of vegetables is really important for healthy gut microflora.

So I’m always trying to eat a maximum of vegetables and fruit to have the full spectrum of nutrients. But then the problem is; how can you eat good quality vegetables and fruit on a budget without breaking the bank? So my first tip would be to eat seasonal. For example, there is no point wanting to eat delicious raspberries in the middle of winter. They are super expensive. I would advise you to try to eat fall and winter produce. Like apples, oranges, and pears. So that really helps to reduce your grocery bill.

Then I would say try to take advantage of promotions that you see in stores. And this is great, because it’s going to push you to expand your veggie repertoire, and try new things that you might now have thought about before.

I would also try to avoid fancy or exotic produce. I know that when I’m grocery shopping, I’m always attracted by those exotic and tropical fruits, because they’re all colorful and they look so good. But usually they are very expensive.

Also, I try to avoid special vegetables or unusual vegetables that come from far away. So I would advise here to eat local. It’s less expensive. They come from your neighborhood; the farmers around you. And it’s cheaper to produce them.

You can usually find local produce at your health food store. Here in Colorado, I like either Whole Foods or Vitamin Cottage. Or you can also try to find a farmer’s market in your area. That’s a very good way to eat local produce.

To keep your budget low, I would also advise to think about the food return you’re going to get when you buy something. Try to stretch your dollars, and stretch your meals. For example, I love to buy spaghetti squash because I know they will go a long way. And I will be able to use them for several meals. It’s the same for cabbage, collard greens, carrots, broccoli, or sweet potatoes. They are easy to prepare. They reheat well. And you can stretch them for several meals.

Another big one for me is to be smart and to avoid waste. I try to never, ever throw food away. And before I buy something new or start on a new vegetable, I will make sure that I eat everything I have prepared. All these little pieces that are left over in your fridge; every two to three days I will put everything together and reheat the plate and just eat it. Because we can lose a lot of money, also, in the long run by just throwing food away.

Angie Alt: Yeah, these are great tips, Sophie!

Sophie Van Tiggelen: And I have one last point about the quality of the food that you buy. Do you have to buy organic? Let’s face it; it’s not always possible to buy organic. We know it’s better for you because you want to avoid pesticides because they have a negative impact on your health and immune system. But it’s not always possible. So I would advise people to refer to the famous Dirty Dozen/Clean 15 lists, and try to do the best you can. And if you have to buy conventional, that’s just fine. It’s alright. It’s better to eat conventional vegetables than just go to fast food. So yeah, these are my tips.

Angie Alt: This is a lady after our own heart, Mickey.

Mickey Trescott: I know. I love it.

Angie Alt: They’re all so good, and I love the focus on budgeting around the veggies. You know, we tend to think of the meats in this diet as being the big hefty expenditure on the budget, and that’s true. But, you can really get out of control with the veggies, too. Like you were talking about, Sophie. Buying berries out of season. You could practically need a credit card for it!

Sophie Van Tiggelen: Yes, definitely.

Angie Alt: Sophie, will you let our listeners know where people can find you?

Sophie Van Tiggelen: Oh, yes, certainly. Everyone can find me first on my blog, which is A Squirrel in the Kitchen. I’m also very active on Instagram and Facebook. You can find me there. And I would like to mention that I’m very excited about my upcoming second cookbook, which is coming out June 12th. It’s called The Autoimmune Protocol Made Simple. And it’s a whole new set of fresh and appealing recipes for the autoimmune protocol.

Mickey Trescott: We’re so excited about it, Sophie. Thanks so much for talking with us today.

Sophie Van Tiggelen: Thank you.

Mickey Trescott: A final word from our title sponsor this season, the Nutritional Therapy Association. We wanted to take a moment to publicly thank NTA for graciously sponsoring this podcast season; real food on a budget. Producing, editing, and transcribing this podcast is a big job for both us and our team, and their support means we can offer all of this to you guys at no cost.

Angie Alt: We also want to thank them for the quality of both the NTP and the NTC programs that Mickey and I have benefited from, and the incredible community of coaches they have trained that are truly changing the world.

The NTP and NTC programs changed our lives, and we’re talking about more than career here, you guys. Of course, the training and education took us to a whole other level in our work; but the life-changing stuff is in feeling you’re part of a tribe who cares deeply about health and wellness. It’s in joining and association filled with intelligent people who are changing the way we do health care. And it’s in the pride that comes from knowing you and your classmates, soon to be colleagues, are part of a cutting-edge profession. So yeah; life-changing.

Mickey Trescott: And if any of you guys are looking into transforming your career, or simply learning more so that you can better help yourself and your community, check out everything the Nutritional Therapy Association has to offer at the website www.NutritionalTherapy.com.

3. Anne Marie Garland from Grass-fed Salsa [15:51]

Angie Alt: Next up, we are going to chat with Anne Marie Garland from Grass-fed Salsa. Anne Marie; what is your number one tip for saving money on AIP?

Anne Marie Garland: This is something that my husband and I have been doing for probably four years now. We try to do one meal a day that is vegetarian. And we do this for a couple of reasons, but primarily it started for budgetary reasons. And we found that it works best when we do it for dinner. So if we have protein with breakfast; like animal protein with breakfast and lunch. And then dinner ends up being entirely vegetarian.

And for us, it makes us feel more energized throughout the day to have protein with breakfast and lunch. I also feel like it helps support my adrenals better when I have protein with breakfast and lunch. But then at dinner, because we’re eating it later in the day and then we’re going to sleep shortly after. As long as we have enough protein and enough fat, we seem to be really satiated. And the bonus there is that we’re actually eating a ton of veggies during that meal.

We’ll make; I don’t even know. One or two pounds of beet fries. That’s one of our favorite ways to do this. And beet fries are something that I feel like most people kind of have a negative opinion about beets. But if you scrub them really well, they don’t taste as earthy as they do if you just kind of cook them right off; without washing and without scrubbing them.

So we scrub them really well, and then we coat them in bacon grease. And I think the bacon grease is the trick with this. It helps them get really crispy, and not feel really soggy. And we just kind of cut them into fries type shapes. And then we just bake them like that. So we coat them in bacon grease, put salt and maybe some chives on them. Chives is a really good addition. And then we can make that with an avocado mayo. I have an avocado mayo that’s egg-free on my recipes. So we’ll just use that. It’s kind of like an aioli dipping sauce for them. It’s really good. That’s pretty much our trick.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. I mean, Anne Marie, I think this is a super savvy hack. Because we all know, from talking about budgeting for AIP and food sourcing, that high quality meat is often the most expensive part about doing this diet. And we actually get a lot of confusion from people that think they need to be eating large amounts of protein every single meal.

I think for some people; like I was vegan for 10 years before I transitioned to AIP. So there was a phase where I felt like I was eating a lot of meat, because nutritionally I needed it. But after about a year of that, I really backed off a lot. And I did something similar to you. Having one meal a day meat free. For me, often it’s lunch. Different strokes for different folks. Whatever works for people. But just not having to have that meat prepared; either the energy to actually make it, and also not having to pay for the protein for that meal. And then getting all those veggies. I think it’s a win for all angles.

Angie Alt: My favorite part of this is the amount of veggies you’re going to get in. Right? You’re talking about one to two pounds of beets, along with other vegetables, in the form of avocado mayo or whatever you’re having at that particular meal. You’re winning the veggie contest.

Anne Marie Garland: Totally. And we usually do make it along side a nonstarchy veggie, as well. So maybe we’ll have it with a salad. Or we’ll sauté some greens. Green beans is also another one we like to bake along with the beet fries.

Mickey Trescott: Really cool. I like your suggestion, too, of kind of front loading the protein. Just because that’s actually a nice way to go with your digestive flow throughout the day, and also blood sugar. So a lot us find that more of the starchy carbs at the end of the day with dinner can actually help us sleep. And some people actually don’t really digest protein that well towards the end of the day, just because they’ve got so much food in their system and their body’s already kind of working on all that other stuff. So I can see why a lighter dinner without the protein might actually help there. I think I’m going to try it.

Anne Marie Garland: Yeah, that makes sense too, for me, since my diagnosis is celiac. Maybe just with my digestion, it works really well.

Mickey Trescott: Well thank you so much, Anne Marie, for sharing that tip with us. Will you let our listeners know where they can find you?

Anne Marie Garland: Yes. You can find me anywhere on social media and on the internet at Grass-fed Salsa. And on the website it’s just GrassfedSalsa.com.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. Thanks so much.

Anne Marie Garland: Thank you.

4. Samantha Jo Teague of the Unskilled Cavewoman [20:56]

Angie Alt: Next up, we’re going to chat with Samantha Jo Teague of the Unskilled Cavewoman. Samantha Jo, what is your number one tip for saving money on AIP?

Samantha Jo Teague: I love using dried herbs. Instead of spending about $7 or so on a tiny little jar of organic dried parsley or basil, I can get a one-pound bulk bag from your various online venders from anywhere from $15-20.

Mickey Trescott: Where online are you shopping for your bulk herbs?

Samantha Jo Teague: I tend to bounce between either iHerb, VitaCost, and Amazon. I’m constantly price checking and comparing. Because if you’re going to buy a handful of spices, and as long as you meet their shipping requirement. Because I like to get the free shipping, too, otherwise it’s not really worth it. You bounce between those three vendors, and you can find really good prices.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. We talked a little bit earlier in this season about shopping for food online, but we didn’t mention iHerb or VitaCost, which I think both of those I’ve used a little bit in the past. And it’s awesome to see that you’re finding that they have really good prices on bulk spices.

Samantha Jo Teague: Definitely. It saves a ton of money. Especially when you season everything, and you’re cooking almost every day. Or doing bulk cooking every few days. You end up using a lot more of those dried spices than you would think you do. And having that extra, you just store it in an airtight bag while you fill up the tiny jar again. I like to reuse the jars, too. When that’s empty you just fill it on up.

And I also like to pull from the larger bag, and I’ll make blends. Like an Italian blend. Or an herbs de Provence. Or Greek seasoning. And you keep those on hand for when you need to make something even more quickly, and you don’t want to drag out #allthejars.

Angie Alt: I love it. I love the tip on reusing the jars, too. I was just about to ask you how you kind of store everything and if you had any tips there. So I love the reusing of the jars. And you’re totally right. On AIP, you really rely on these herbs for the real taste and pleasure of the food, right. So we go through a ton of it.

Samantha Jo Teague: Oh yes. Tons and tons. And I like using fresh herbs, and fresh ginger, and things like that. But if you’re going through a flare. Or even if you’re just forgetful or busy, quite often those tend to go bad quickly in the fridge and then you end up throwing it away. And with the dried herbs, those aren’t going to go bad for a long time.

Mickey Trescott: Thank you so much for that tip, Samantha Jo. Will you let our listeners know where people can find you?

Samantha Jo Teague: Yes ma’am. I blog over at theUnskilledCavewoman.com. I’m also on Instagram and Facebook as the Unskilled Cavewoman. And occasionally I do a little tweeting on over at Cavewoman Skills. It was too long to write the Unskilled Cavewoman on Twitter.

Mickey Trescott: Well thank you so much for having this chat with us.

Samantha Jo Teague: Thanks! It was fun talking to you ladies.

5. Kerry Jeffery of Emotional Autoimmunity [24:27]

Mickey Trescott: Alright you guys, last up we’re going to be chatting with Kerry Jeffery of Emotional Autoimmunity. So Kerry, what is your number one tip for saving money on AIP?

Kerry Jeffery: My number one tip for everybody is that I use what is called minced meat, here in Australia. I think you guys call it ground meat. It’s really cheap. It’s really versatile for stir fries, one pan meals, burgers. All different sorts of things. And what I really love about using the minced meat, or the ground meat, is that if you’re marinating, like for doing a stir fry, and using things like ginger and garlic. If you massage that through the meat and leave that for a couple of hours, then the flavor really goes in so you get a big flavor bang for very little expense.

And the other thing I wanted to mention, too, is most supermarkets mark down their meat when it’s getting close to the use by date. So I have a couple of supermarkets that I stalk pretty regularly. Particularly if they’ve got things like organic chicken thighs or drumsticks or other cuts of meat. Then I buy a whole lot, put them in the freezer, and that keeps us going for a while.

One of the biggest tricks I found was, I was losing track of what was in my freezer. Especially if I got a big tray of steaks or meat or something, and I was wrapping it up individually to freeze. I would forget what it was. So now I’m really good at putting a little label on. You can even just write what the meat is on a piece of paper, sort of wrap that up in a layer of the Glad wrap or whatever you’re freezing it in, with the date. And that means you save a lot of waste. Because there’s nothing worse than going to the freezer and finding this mystery meat, and you don’t know how long it’s been there for. Or even what it is or how to use it. So there are the tips that I really recommend for everybody, if you want to save a bit of money on AIP.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome! Kerry, I can definitely resonate with that recommendation to just make sure that you’re labeling. I know a lot of us; we’ve talked a lot about the leftovers, and just making sure that we’re using up all of that before we buy more. But the same applies with the freezer. And I think sometimes people think that if you throw something in your freezer, it will last forever, so it doesn’t really matter if you’re not organized or aren’t tracking it. But things do go bad in the freezer, especially if they’ve been there for a while. If you pull it out, and you’re like; what is this? I don’t know how long it’s been here. You’re much more likely to be like; I think I might need to toss this. Right?

Kerry Jeffery: Exactly. And every now and then, just plan to go through your freezer, and just use everything before you buy everything else. Because the trap I fell into was, I kept buying this meat, and then putting it in the freezer on the top. And I lost track of what was down on the bottom. And then when I did decide to do a big clean out in the freezer; I had meat that had been there over a year! So it was a massive waste. So it’s just a really good idea to keep track of what you’ve got in the freezer. And use it all up, and then start again.

Angie Alt: Right. I imagine this helps you rotate the meat pretty quickly.

Kerry Jeffery: It does.

Angie Alt: Using the oldest stuff first. I also love the tip about the minced meat; AKA ground meat. Definitely way back, even before I started AIP, the ground meat was the lifesaver.

Kerry Jeffery: For sure. Another thing, a trap that I fell into earlier in the day was buying what I thought were the veggies and stuff that I had to eat, like kale, because it’s so nutritious. And I even do that now. I bought a big bunch of kale that I was going to make some juice with and do some other things. And when I went to use it, it had just gone off. Because it’s unfamiliar to me.

So for people first trying AIP, don’t automatically buy stuff just because we say it’s really nutritious or you should eat that. If it’s not something that you’re actually going to eat, or if it’s something you’ve got to learn a new way to cook with, or new recipes, you’re more likely to put it off and then it’s just going to go to that big graveyard in the sky of expired veggies in your vegetable crisper.

Angie Alt: The big graveyard in the sky. Love it. Kerry, will you let our listeners know where people can find you?

Kerry Jeffery: Yes! They can find me at www.EmotionalAutoimmunity.com for my website. I’m also on Facebook. I also run a free support group for anybody who is struggling with the emotional side of life with chronic illness. And that’s called Emotional Autoimmunity Recovery Support. You can just put that into the search on Facebook and find me.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. Thank you so much for chatting with us today, Kerry.

Kerry Jeffery: You’re so welcome.

Mickey Trescott: Alright you guys, that’s it for this episode, and season, of the Autoimmune Wellness podcast. We hope you guys have learned a lot from our fellow AIP bloggers, and from this season as a whole. As always, we appreciate your support. You guys are such an engaged and passionate community, and we love being able to collaborate with and support you guys on your journeys.

Although this season of the podcast has come to a close, we have some really great ideas brewing about how we can bring value to your lives in future seasons. So make sure to keep in touch with us by signing up for our newsletter, on the blog, and following us on social media. We’ll see you guys next time.

Angie Alt: Bye!

Angie Alt: Thanks for joining us on this episode of the Autoimmune Wellness podcast. We’re honored to have you as a listener, and we hope that you’ve gained some useful information.

Mickey Trescott: Did you know that we have dozens of informative articles about living well with autoimmune disease, and over 250 elimination phase compliant recipes on our website, updated multiple times per week? Make sure to click on over to AutoimmuneWellness.com. Follow us on social media. And sign up for our newsletter to find out about all of this new content.

We’re either at Autoimmune Paleo, or at Autoimmune Wellness on any of these channels. You can sign up for our newsletter at the bottom of any page on our website. Don’t forget to connect with the AIP community by using the hashtag #AutoimmuneWellness.

Angie Alt: If you enjoyed the podcast, please leave us a review in iTunes, as this helps others find us. See you next time!

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post S3 E8 – Money-Saving Tips From The AIP Community appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

May 21 2018

31mins

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S3 E7 – Food Budgeting + Prioritizing w/ Jenny Harris

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Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 3: Real Food on a Budget. We’re dedicating this season to discussing an aspect of natural healing that often gets left out of the conversation: affordability. We’ll be chatting with experts and peers from the AIP community about how to best balance money with your health priorities.

This season is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association (NTA), a holistic nutrition school that trains and certifies nutritional therapy practitioners and consultants with an emphasis on bioindividual nutrition. Learn more about them by visiting NutritionalTherapy.com, or read about our experiences going through their NTP and NTC programs in our comparison article.

Season 3 Episode 7 is focused on how to both prioritize your food choices, and make a budget for eating this way that is sustainable longterm. Angie and Mickey share their personal stories of budgeting and managing medical expenses and debt. They also chat with guest Jenny Harris about how to modify AIP for lower budgets, and how to find local assistance for food budgeting concerns.

This is a bit of a tricky topic but we hope sharing our experiences and ideas will help you feel supported wherever you find yourself in your journey. Scroll down for the full episode transcript!

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a resource for those seeking to live well with chronic illness. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’m the author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt. I’m a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I’m the author of The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage my endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease.

After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.AutoimmuneWellness.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

We also wrote a book called The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook together that serves as a do-it-yourself guidebook to living well with chronic illness.

Mickey Trescott: If you’re looking for more information about the autoimmune protocol, make sure to sign up for our newsletter at autoimmunewellness.com, so we can send you our free quick start guide. It contains printable AIP food lists, a 2-week food plan, a 90-minute batch cooking video, a mindset video, and food reintroduction guides.

This season of the podcast, real food on a budget is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:

1. Different levels of budget concerns [2:19]

2. Budgeting benefits on AIP [7:13]

3. Personal budgeting stories [9:41]

4. Benefit of minimalism [15:58]

5. An investment in your future health [18:53]

6. Introducing our guest, Jenny Harris [23:41]

7. Roadblocks and challenges [29:05]

8. Finding local assistance [31:05]

9. AIP modifications on low-budget [35:44]

Mickey Trescott: Hey guys! Mickey here. Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, season 3. How are you doing today, Angie?

Angie Alt: I’m good. Hopefully there won’t be any puppy noise in the background. My puppy is being very naughty today, you guys.

Mickey Trescott: Sometimes it happens. You know, those animals.

Angie Alt: Mm-hmm.

Mickey Trescott: So today we are continuing our discussion related to the topic this season. Real food on a budget. This episode is going to be about how to both prioritize your food choices, and make a budget for eating this way. Today we’re tackling a little bit of a tricky topic, but we hope that sharing some of our experiences and ideas will help you guys feel supported wherever you find yourself in your journey.

1. Different levels of budget concerns [2:19]

Mickey Trescott: So first, let’s talk about the three main categories that people find themselves in when we talk about budgeting concerns. The first, of course, are people who are wealthy. They can afford anything. There really aren’t any barriers to getting what they want, because they can go to Whole Foods and get whatever they want. Or they can afford the functional medicine practitioner. Most of us, sadly, don’t find ourselves in this situation.

The middle is actually where most of us are probably at. That’s where people have resources to allocate towards maybe eating better or better medical care, but it means almost always you’re going to have to make some strategic planning. There is flexibility. So there’s a lot of choices sometimes. And maybe going without something so that you can get something else. There are those options to kind of move things around a little bit, and prioritize.

And then lastly there are people who are low income. So those are people who face significant challenges and stress around budgeting for food. And it involves fixed resources without flexibility. So that’s an important distinguishing characteristic between those who truly are low-income. I would say that a lot of people in the middle maybe think they’re a little more low-income than they really are. But the truth is, a lot of us have some flexibility. And that is where a lot of the difficulties come up.

Angie Alt: So in the second segment of the podcast, we’ll be talking a lot more about those in the lowest income group, and some strategies that they can use. We really believe everyone should have access to healing foods. And we want to talk about the ways to make that reality for those in that challenging circumstance.

But in this first segment, we want to focus on the middle category of folks. Because probably most of you guys listening to this podcast find yourselves here. It’s where Mickey and I ourselves land. So we just want to kind of take a stab at the topic that is probably most of us are facing.

We also want to acknowledge that having a chronic illness alone can be limiting to the budget. It’s expensive to be sick. And we totally get that.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. The different ways even just having an autoimmune disease before you get into some of the diet and lifestyle stuff that you might want to do. I mean, medical bills and medications are expensive. So a lot of that, if you’re someone who has just gone through a diagnosis, you know how front loaded those costs can be. So all at once, you might be going to see different doctors and specialists. Burning through maybe a high deductible, or something. Which is sadly very common these days. Getting through all of that testing, and some of those initial treatments.

Angie Alt: Right. And then there’s also the higher cost of insurance. Even though we have laws that guard against things like preexisting conditions with coinsurance and high deductibles, it means that usually folks with chronic illness do end up paying more.

Mickey Trescott: Yep. There’s also an income loss due to lack of ability to work. A lot of people don’t really realize this lack of opportunity cost. But really, sometimes it can involve the work of your partner or your spouse. Sometimes it can affect your ability to do childcare or household duties. Most autoimmune diseases come with some level of disability, and that can come through in either a lack of ability to actually hold a job at a certain amount of hours per week. It can also mean that you have to pay others or get help from other people in your family to do work around the house, which can be expensive. Both emotionally and financially.

Angie Alt: Right. And then there’s the cost of natural or alternative treatments. Which, unfortunately, means usually paying out of pocket. We don’t have good systems in place that allow proper reimbursement through our insurance system for most of those kinds of treatments. And the fact is that combining the best of those natural and alternative treatments with conventional and do-it-yourself methods means that this can be really; a no-brainer. Something you definitely want to take on so you can heal. But it can be really expensive. This includes things like paying for supplements, and paying for different kinds of therapies. Maybe massage, acupuncture, things of that nature.

2. Budgeting benefits on AIP [7:13]

Mickey Trescott: All these things considered, why those of us with autoimmune disease have a little more of a tricky time making a budget. Why should we do it in the first place? We have some reasons for you guys.

Budgeting really stops overspending and prevents debt. So when you know exactly how much money you have coming in, and you’ve planned to use that money in a variety of categories and predictably. Of course, you can’t control the future, and you never really know exactly what’s going to happen. But that act of actually planning helps you not to spend too much of your money, and prevents you from needing to go into debt.

How many of us have not made a plan and then unexpectedly, but then actually kind of expectedly being like; oh, this expense came up. And I kind of knew it was coming but I didn’t really plan for it. You might end up in a situation where you have to go into debt for that.

Angie Alt: Right. Also budgeting can help us reach our goals. For instance, proactively saving. Having that budgetary line item in place helps us kind of get there and reach those goals in reasonable timelines instead of haphazardly putting $10 in the savings account every couple of months.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. It also helps you stop worrying. So, I don’t know about you, but I’ve had a lot of anxiety since my diagnosis and initial path with autoimmune disease. Just because, financially it was really difficult for me back then. And even though I’m healthy now, sometimes I worry that if I got sick again, I wouldn’t have the money to kind of figure it out. And I’m anticipating that stress.

So, being able to move towards and reach some of those savings goals might help you stop worrying and relieve some of that anxiety related to it.

Angie Alt: Right. And kind of along those same lines, it helps you have more flexibility. I think when you kind of have planned your expenses, and you have allocated pots of money that are there for certain kind of expenses, it just allows you to be a lot more flexible. And should something really large and unexpected come up, you have more leeway between those different budget line items to kind of move things around, if necessary.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. And lastly, it gives you more control over your money. You know exactly where it’s going, instead of feeling kind of like a passenger every month, paying all your bills and kind of not understanding where everything goes. You understand, actually, now that I have a budget, I know exactly where everything is going. And you can make changes and be informed in that way.

3. Personal budgeting stories [9:41]

Angie Alt: Right. So, Mickey, maybe we can share a little bit about our personal approaches to budgeting and especially how things looked when we first started on this path.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. So I talked a little bit about my diagnosis, and how that financially impacted us. It was very stressful, understandably. Just the diagnosis in and of itself is really stressful. But at the time, my husband and I were both working minimum wage plus tips jobs in a major city. Living paycheck to paycheck. By all means, we were not poor. We were able to pay the bills that we had. We were able to have a great lifestyle that we were happy with.

But when I started to get sick and I wasn’t able to bring in that income, I lost my job. And then we added in all the medical stuff. Which, when I got diagnosed, I didn’t have insurance. So I was paying everything out of pocket. I ended up going into a lot of debt because I didn’t really have any savings, and I didn’t really have a budget, and I didn’t really plan. That kind of threw me for a loop, that six months of my life.

But coming out of it, I learned that I needed to make some big decisions. Like that flexibility piece we were talking about. My husband and I made some decisions that were able to help us pay back that debt just by choosing to go without certain things. For instance, we didn’t have a car. At one point we relied on just using the bus or riding our bike.

Another thing we did was we had roommates in a house that we rented instead of having the house to ourselves. Another thing we did was not go out to eat ever. And we didn’t go on any vacations. So I consider even making so little money in that phase of my life, I realized the position of privilege that I was in being able to be flexible in that way. And yes it was stressful. My husband was then the sole provider. We were taking on debt. We didn’t know how long I would be sick. And then the food budget was just increasing, increasing, increasing. Which is really what we’re going to be talking about today.

But in the end, it all worked out. We were able to pay off that debt. I was able to go back to work. And me feeling better was a really important part of that process; to realize that I was one day going to be able to recover enough to then go back to work and kind of get the cycle working out. So I kind of didn’t have a plan. And got caught in a little bit of a hard place. But that flexibility was really how we got unstuck. What about you, Angie?

Angie Alt: So, for me, the flexibility piece didn’t exist as much. When I started to get sick, we had already come into our marriage with pretty significant education debt. And we had good jobs. Especially my husband, had a great job. And we had really great insurance. We were very, very lucky to have such good insurance coverage. But it meant that I was really limited to pursue anything kind of outside of what was covered within our insurance situation, because we had a lot of debt already to deal with.

So it meant that I had to be really creative within the insurance; what was covered within the insurance. And I had to get really high mileage, basically, out of all of my appointments with my doctors, and be really, really well prepared, and be a really strong advocate for myself. I had to spend a lot of time working with the insurance company, trying to navigate that process. Which can be really frustrating and really difficult, especially when you’re sick. But I was limited in terms of the flexibility.

And later, when we decided that we would choose to take on some more debt for some of those treatments and some of that help that was outside of the insurance system, we really had to buckle down in other areas in order to be able to meet all of our responsibilities with that debt.

Over time, that has eased a lot. We’re not in quite the same situation as we were before. Especially because I was able to go back to work and make a better living than I did previously, when I wasn’t so sick anymore. That made a really big difference for us. But it was not a simple process.

Mickey Trescott: And a lot of these transitions, and during the diagnosis and kind of what followed. We’ve gone without a lot of things and made a lot of choices so that we could afford good food. Would you say that applies to you, Angie?

Angie Alt: Yeah, for sure. For instance, until only about three years ago, we only had one car. We drove an early 2000 Honda Civic, and that’s all we had. My husband commuted back and forth to his work in the city using the commuter buses, or the train. We were really just relying on that. We didn’t really take any significant vacations. Anything that was more than a weekend drive or something away. We also really kind of cut certain line items from our budget. Things like new clothes and those kinds of extras. We just made do the best we could with what was in front of us.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, something that really shifted for us, as far as that flexibility pieces. Before I got sick, I wouldn’t say we ate out an incredible amount. But we definitely were doing a lot of the quick, fast-ish food, but not quite fast food. Like Chipotle type eating out. Fairly often. And when I got sick and I had to change everything about what I ate, one of those unintended benefits was that we kind of wiped out the whole restaurants and eating out.

And like I said, we didn’t really have a lot of money to spend on eating out. But just transitioning that to the food budget actually ended up making it so that we were spending the same amount of money that we’ve always been spending on food. We’re just spending it on better, higher quality groceries, and cooking the food instead of going out to eat.

Angie Alt: Yeah, that’s absolutely true for us, as well. I mean, we probably went out four to five times a month on average, and that changed to four to five times, maybe, a year on average.

4. Benefit of minimalism [15:58]

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. And something else that happened for us, personally. We started to kind of take on and embrace minimalism. So we didn’t give away or sell everything that we owned and live in a tiny house, by any means. But we definitely made a conscious effort to buy durable and affordable products that last, and usually on sale. So actually some of them ended up not being that affordable.

But things like cast iron Dutch oven. I would know that would make cooking for AIP be so much easier. And yes, it’s a few hundred dollars for a really high quality one. But what I would do is save up, and wait until I got it, and then look at Sur La Table when they’re having their 40% off sale. Go in and grab that, knowing that I’m going to have it for maybe 10, 20 years.

And when you break down that few hundred-dollar cost by that amount of time; as long as you buy the right one, and it’s well made, and durable, and has a great warranty, and you’re actually going to use it. Those types of things; I still have a lot of those great cooking tools that I bought piece by piece in the beginning. Because of that minimalism thing. And then also with the clothes. Not shopping, not having too much stuff. Only having the stuff that we need. I think that relieves a lot of stress in a different way. Not having clutter and stuff. But that’s another topic.

Angie Alt: Yeah. I mean, we’ve done that probably to an extent that worked for our family at the time. And at different points, it was more a match to our lifestyle than others. It’s hard to go too minimalist with a child in the house. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Angie Alt: There’s all kinds of things that go along with that. But I mean, for instance. While we were living in Africa, that was definitely a part of our life. And for that very, very early part of me getting sick, it definitely made a difference.

We also minimized a lot of repeat expenses that add up. For instance, we didn’t go out for cocktails all the time. We didn’t go to the movies. We didn’t go to the salon. I didn’t get my nails done regularly. Honestly, probably I should have gotten my hair cut a little more often than I did. We minimized all that as much as possible.

I didn’t spend a lot on any beauty products. And you know, I really still don’t. That kind of became something that, even when my budget could maybe afford a bit more of that, I still didn’t really bring that on board. We weren’t running to the store and grabbing 8 bottles of kombucha a week. Things like that. Those little expenses seem very small in the moment, but it can add up to hundreds of dollars in a year.

5. An investment in your future health [18:53]

Angie Alt: You can kind of comment here, too, Mickey and let them know if you feel this way. But I feel like investing up front in my healing meant that I could work more in the future. And I had more energy to give to my work. I had more ability to be pretty darned productive and very creative in ways that I wasn’t able to be before. So even though it was probably costing money that was really stretching us thin in the beginning. In the end, it has paid off because I was able to really start a whole new career and pour a lot of my life blood, basically, into it. That I couldn’t have done before, had I not put this much into my healing.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, I totally agree. And I definitely remember a time in my life and my recovery where I made the decision to continue the level of eating well and medical care, like natural treatments that were out of pocket. Even though that month to month period, we couldn’t afford it. We were going into debt every month. Just having faith that in three or six months, I would hopefully be on the same trajectory that I had experienced early with AIP, and that I would be able to go to work. So, that was definitely a conscious effort. And you know, definitely an act of faith.

We’re not saying you can just say, I’m going to pay for this and you’re guaranteed results. Definitely investing up front, I knew if the quality of the food went up and I did the right things, then hopefully that would give me more energy. And it did. I was able to go back to work part time, and then full time. And then also back to school, and all that stuff. And then I met this lady. We haven’t stopped since. {laughs}

Angie Alt: {laughs} But I guess, the thing for me too. In hindsight, I realize that I probably have more energy and ability and clear thought and creativity and all those things than I even did before I got sick. I’m not saying; just like you said. I’m not saying that this happens for everyone. And that it will supercharge you into some amazing career. Or you’ll go back to your former job and be like a rocket ship to the top, and get all these raises and promotions or anything like that.

I’m not saying that that necessarily happens to everybody. But it really transformed my ability. My baseline is totally different. I didn’t even consider before I got sick that I would ever work at the level that I do now. And I think that’s all down to that investment that I put into my health.

Mickey Trescott: Mm-hmm. And continued investment. I feel the same way, Angie. I feel like my brain works completely differently, like it did. Sometimes the body is a little far behind and that’s kind of a Hashi thing. But my brain works again. And I’m able to do a level of critical thinking and planning that I just wasn’t capable of for years.

Angie Alt: Right.

Mickey Trescott: And that’s very useful. That’s an asset.

Alright. So we know that there are situations where some of these simple, low-lying adjustments are not enough. We can’t speak for everyone. Our personal experience is what it is. But digging in to make AIP, or any healing dietary protocol work, for those with extremely limited incomes and other financial barriers to wellness is up next. So if you guys are kind of listening to us; and you’re like; man, that sounds nice. We’ve got some info for you in our next segment. See you soon.

Mickey Trescott: A quick work from our title sponsor this season, the Nutritional Therapy Association. The NTA is a holistic nutrition school that reconnects people to healing foods and vibrant health. They provide practical, affordable, and transformative nutrition education through their courses, empowering you to launch a new career and heal yourself, your community, and the world.

The NTA trains and certifies nutritional therapy practitioners; like me, I’m an NTP; and consultants, like Angie, she’s an NTC. Emphasizing a bioindividual nutrition. The NTC program is fully online, and the NTP program has workshops in the US, Canada, and Australia. There are scholarships, payment plans, and financial aid available to make both programs accessible to all who desire a comprehensive, holistic nutrition education.

To learn more, visit their website at www.NutritionalTherapy.com. Be sure to check out their free 7-day nutritional therapy 101 course.

6. Introducing our guest, Jenny Harris [23:41]

Angie Alt: Hey everybody! We’re back. Today we are speaking to Jenny Harris, who is a registered dietician nutritionist and trained chef, living in Seattle, Washington. She received her masters of science in nutrition from Bastyr University. Her Bachelors degree of nutrition in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. And completed her dietetic internship at Virginia Polytech Institute and State University.

She also holds an associates degree in culinary arts from the New England Culinary Institute. She’s a member of the dietitians in integrative and functional medicine and the food and culinary professional dietetic practice groups of the academy of nutrition and dietetics. And if that isn’t enough, for the last 10 years, Jenny has mainly worked in community health. Serving low income women and families through the WIC program in Seattle, Washington. Last year, she became one of our very first graduates of the AIP Certified Coach program, and that is how we found out about the awesome work she does.

Today, we’re going to go deep with Jenny about how to make healing protocols work, even on very low and fixed incomes. She’ll be sharing with us the specifics of government assistance programs in the US. The realities that people are facing when they need the assistance, and how eating a healing diet should not be exclusive. Welcome, Jenny.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. Yeah, welcome Jenny. Thanks so much for being here.

Jenny Harris: Thanks for having me.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. So the first question, a lot of our audience like we talked about in the first half of this podcast. A lot of us find ourselves in the middle, and maybe not knowing a lot about these government assistant programs. Can you maybe give us a little bit more of a definition of some of these programs and kind of what they entail?

Jenny Harris: Sure, sure. My experience has mainly been working with the WIC program, as it’s mostly known. The full name is the supplemental nutrition program for women, children, and infants. And it is mainly geared towards anyone that’s pregnant, or postpartum, and then infants, and children under age 5. Specifically, you look at your gross income to meet guidelines for that program. And you’d be at or below 185% of the federal poverty level. In addition, you would have to meet a nutrition risk. Also have a proof of address, in a particular state where you are applying.

In addition to that, there is the SNAP program, which is the supplemental nutrition assistance program, known as food stamps. It was previously known as. You would go in and your income would be assessed as well. And for that program, you would be at or below 130%. There are some other qualifications for that program.

And then in addition, there’s social security. And that program, the lowest age you would need to be is 62. It’s based on the number of years that you’re working, and you receive credits that you would need to get retirement benefits.

Mickey Trescott: Great. And the difference maybe between WIC and SNAP and social security, as far as what people can get for food. My understanding is that WIC has the strictest list of maybe what people can buy with the money, and then food stamps is a little bit more lax. And then social security, people can use that money for whatever they want. Is that right?

Jenny Harris: Sure. Yes, that is correct. The WIC program has specific foods that have been chosen to meet certain nutrition requirements for those particular times in life. Whether you’re pregnant or postpartum, as a child or an infant. The SNAP benefits, it’s a little bit more broad range of items to choose from. And as far as social security goes, I’m not quite as familiar with that. But that sounds right.

Mickey Trescott: And as far as WIC, that might provide the most difficulty, I think, with working within a healing diet. Because they do have certain foods that you can buy. And then with food stamps, I think most programs; at least the ones that I know of here in Oregon where I live. As long as they’re buying food, it doesn’t matter what they’re buying.

Jenny Harris: Yeah, you would have to look at; WIC is evolving more and more. But they have, now, substitutions for different things. For example, if you’re a vegetarian you can choose to get soy milk now, instead of just regular milk, as an option. So there are different options you can look at within the program.

Mickey Trescott: OK. And I’m just kind of looking up some of these requirements. The gross income below 185% of poverty level for WIC, and 130%. The 2017 numbers are looking at $20,000 to $15,000 for food stamps. So those are pretty low-income levels. But just for anyone listening, if they’re thinking maybe they might qualify for that and they don’t know. That might be something to look into.

Jenny Harris: Definitely. And you can do that all online. You can go in and look at your eligibility.

7. Roadblocks and challenges [29:05]

Angie Alt: So, Jenny, we were talking in the last segment about some of the realities that come up for folks like us, who have autoimmune disease or chronic illness of some kind. And the challenges that that presents just all on its own, in terms of budget considerations when we’re getting ready to adopt a healing protocol. And I think there’s probably some special stressors and issues that come up for folks with a really limited income, or even no income. And maybe you can talk with us about that a little bit. I think it’s good for everybody to have a little bit of a reality check about the extra barriers we’re talking about here.

Jenny Harris: You know, looking at housing situation. With a special diet, and you’re living or you’re not knowing where you’re living. Moving from place to place, or possibly staying with friends. Or you have a large group of people living together. Even the possibility of being in a shelter. You have some limitations on what’s available to you, as far as a kitchen. Or how you can store your food, particularly. Depending on where you’re living.

I think some other things to think about would be just families that are working and possibly going to school at the same time. Which I know, a lot of people do. That just brings up some limited time for meal prep and shopping. And also thinking about the idea, now, of food deserts. Where just access to a grocery store, you may be looking at shopping at a convenience store, or possibly using a food bank for your grocery needs.

When you’re looking for a provider, just looking at your accessibility. And then I think, just something to think about, looking at cultural needs. Food needs related to religion. Think all of those can factor in with someone who is potentially wanting to do AIP or a healing diet.

Angie Alt: Thanks so much. I think that’s good for everybody to kind of think about that long list of extra barriers that might exist there.

8. Finding local assistance [31:05]

Mickey Trescott: Can you tell us a little bit more about how people can become more aware of some local, low or no-cost healthcare resources? Because, like we talked about before. The healthcare part and the food budget part are usually competing. And sometimes if people can take advantage of some of these programs where they get assistance in the food side, if they can also make that happen in the healthcare side, that might help them have more access to all of this.

Jenny Harris: I do think that’s really important to consider. Making that first step, whether it’s connecting to a WIC clinic or a public health clinic. Your local community center. Those are great places to start. Anyone that’s in need of medical care, or needs a provider. A great place to start is to go into a public health clinic. All kinds of services there. Seeing a nurse. Many times these clinics also have medical clinics available. And they also have services where they can help you get signed up for health care.

Beyond that, there are programs out there. Even connected to your local hospital. I did some research, and actually didn’t even realize this. But I looked into a Swedish medical center, which is where I used to work in Seattle. They actually cover healthcare costs for anyone that would meet that profile.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; Jenny, actually I have a personal story to talk about Swedish. Actually, when I was very sick, one of my ER visits was actually at Swedish when I lived in Seattle. And at that time, I didn’t make a lot of money. Angie and I talked about in the first section of this podcast. My husband and I both made minimum wage. And when I got that bill from the emergency room, I didn’t have insurance. And I talked to their billing department, and they said; oh, you should submit a request for financial assistance. And I did that. And they actually covered 90% of the bill.

At that time, I wasn’t below the federal poverty line. But I found their assistance was much more generous. And that actually ended up working out really well for me. And actually, my next two hospital visits, I had insurance, and financially it was much worse for me because of coinsurance and that kind of stuff. So yeah, definitely people should reach out to the different institutions that they’re getting health care from. Because you never really know what kind of programs they have in place.

Jenny Harris: It was exciting to see that, yes. They have such a generous beyond to help people. I think when I was looking; I looked up a few programs. Even just Googling in your local area. Low income, health care assistance. Along those lines. I was able to find, within the Seattle area, there are some organizations like Bastyr that have clinics. They actually go into different community clinic sites around the city and provide, in many cases, free health care services.

So, I think that depending on where you’re living. It would just be a matter of researching that. But I think reaching out to different clinics and just asking is a great place to start.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, and even some of these natural health care centers. I know Bastyr up in Washington state, and a lot of schools will offer acupuncture or massage therapy or whatever for a reduced rate for working with a student. I’ve known people that have seen doctors at the Bastyr clinic that are still in their training. Obviously supervised by licensed doctors. But those kinds of options too, are totally out there and available for people that need it.

Jenny Harris: Also looking into if you’re a senior or that age group, you can look at senior nutrition services that are out there.

Mickey Trescott: Sometimes for people, it’s a matter of pride and looking out for these resources and asking. But I’ve seen signs. My local dental clinic had a sign a couple of weeks ago that said; “Free community tooth check in.” So anyone could go in and see kind of what they’re dealing with in their mouth. A lot of practitioners offer charity work. Be on the look out for that. Because even my grandfather, who is a rheumatologist. He sees patients one day a week that are low income at no cost. So that can be really helpful.

9. AIP modifications on low-budget [35:44]

Angie Alt: Ok. So, that’s a really interesting discussion about the healthcare side of it. And all the different possibilities for folks to explore out there. But let’s get into the meat of this discussion. How do we make AIP work for folks on very low budget? Jenny, we’d love to kind of dig into this with you and talk about some ideas. I think for Mickey and mine point of view, there are some smart modifications to make here. But we’d love to hear your ideas.

Jenny Harris: I think in thinking about this, I feel like I went back to thinking about how my grandmother used to cook.

Mickey Trescott: Right.

Jenny Harris: Thinking about ways that she would be efficient and save. Really, the things that you all highlight in your book, as far as the nutrient powerhouse foods, really are, for the most part, very affordable. When you’re looking at organ meats. If you’re using bones for broths. That was one thing that my grandmother always did. Depending on where you’re located or what’s available to you. Fish, whether you’re in the interior of the country, or the exterior. You can potentially find those, depending on the season, at a decent cost.

And then also looking at, if you have homemade fermented foods. And also just vegetables in season. But I think all of those things; if you’re working with AIP, I think it would be just a matter of cooking technique.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. I think that’s really valid, Jenny. I know we kind of have a part to play in setting the framework of kind of what AIP is and what it isn’t. But I think this is kind of a great situation to modify the AIP template. And some of you guys listening might find it a little controversial. But I think if someone is faced with the decision of doing a healing diet that is heavily modified to fit their income and not doing it all. They should try to do that modification.

I definitely think things like white rice; which people can cook that in broth and fat. That might not even; just allowing it in the elimination diet for people that don’t have access to enough meet and vegetables to fill their diet. That could totally be possible. Even some properly prepared beans. So soaked, sprouted, that kind of thing. Which I know beans are included on WIC, so it’s one of those foods that might be hard for some people to figure out which foods qualify.

Eggs, too. A lot of people are very sensitive to them. What do you guys think?

Angie Alt: Right. I think if I was working with a client who was very low income, and they had the opportunity to get eggs. Either with their WIC benefits or food stamp benefits, I would be encouraging them to find the best quality that they can afford within that food budget. And give them a shot. Because they are so nutrient dense, and they are a good source of inexpensive protein.

Of course, if it turns out that they have some really obvious sensitivities, we might want to work around that. But I think they’re one of the potential modifications that are probably worth making.

Jenny Harris: I can agree with all of that. There’s definitely another source of protein that I think a lot of people have access to. I know through WIC you receive peanut butter. So that would be something also to think about.

Angie Alt: I remember, too. There was definitely a part of my life where I needed both WIC and SNAP benefits. And it was when my daughter was quite young. And I remember that there was a lot of canned seafood products that were available with the WIC checks. Tuna and things like that. If you just look carefully for brands without additives like soy and everything, I think that’s a great way to get in some inexpensive protein and stretch those benefits.

Jenny Harris: Yes, definitely. And I think that’s a great source of fish and those omega-3s that aren’t as easily accessible.

Angie Alt: I mean, if you’re trying to go to the fish counter and get wild-caught salmon filets, that almost blows my budget. So I can totally understand that. I think there’s also an important piece to raise here, you guys. Which is; conventionally raised meats, fruits, and vegetables are acceptable. I think we get a little too caught up in perfectionism when it comes to AIP. And there definitely are levels of good, better, and best.

And if you choose conventionally raised, because that’s the most affordable, and not organic, then go for it. It’s better that you’re eating some kind of protein, and you’re getting some kind of fruits and vegetables, then you’re totally avoiding them because they’re not perfectly grass-fed or organic or whatever.

If you’re going to go for conventionally raised meats, you’re going to want to trim the fat, and kind of try to avoid that fat. If you’re going to go for conventionally raised, non-organic fruits and vegetables, then whenever possible choose produce that can be peeled. A lot of the pesticides and other chemicals that we’re trying to avoid in non-organic fruits and vegetables are there with that peel. So if you can peel, that will help reduce your exposure to it.

But I think, if you can buy a bunch of non-organic carrots that are on sale and stretch your meals for a whole week, and contribute to your overall healing that way, it’s much better to do that than to hold out to save up enough money for the organic.

Jenny Harris: Sure. And I do think just learning, too, what fruits and vegetables are in season. And also, if you are using the SNAP benefits. Those are actually, in various programs across the country, you can use those at farmer’s markets. You can actually get double the amount. If you’re spending $10, you can actually get $20 worth of fruits and vegetables using those SNAP benefits.

Angie Alt: Yeah, that’s such a big change to the program from when I needed to access it. And I think it’s awesome, and so wonderful that we’re putting that opportunity out there.

You know, I saw another idea that I think is such a good one. I think you kind of pointed us out to a little bit earlier, Jenny. Looking for discount stores, or grocery outlets or shopping Asian or Hispanic markets. When I first started AIP, I was living in the Bay area in California, and I found some Hispanic and Asian markets that were incredible in terms of what I could get with the produce. I mean, I could go in there with like $50 and come out with so much produce. It was way more than I really thought I could get at a regular store. And it stretched our family’s food budget really far. And made a huge difference. So I don’t think folks should write off those stores.

Jenny Harris: In my experience with WIC, and working with a lot of families from different cultures, often I would be asking what they eat. A lot of cultures will eat just basically meat and vegetables, for the most part, with spices. I love going in and being kind of pushed to try new and different vegetables.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, it’s really exciting, too, now that we have some different resources in the AIP community with different recipe developers that are kind of coming up with some of these more ethnically inspired meals that I think make people from those communities feel a little bit more like they can cook in the flavors that feel traditional and good to them without so much having to come up with it themselves, you know what I mean.

Jenny Harris: I feel similarly, Angie, when I go shopping at the Asian market here that’s close by my house. I do feel similarly, as far as feeling like I’m really getting a lot more for my money.

Angie Alt: Yeah, a lot of bang for your buck. Well, Jenny will you let our listeners know what your up to in your work currently, and where they can find you online?

Jenny Harris: Sure. Currently I’m transitioning. I have been a stay at home mom for a little over a year. And have now started up a website and a blog; FoodyNutrition.com. And I’m just starting there. I’m hoping to work with the public in the future. I’m excited and learning more about functional medicine.

Mickey Trescott: That’s awesome. We definitely need more functional medicine real food RDs. So we’re super excited about what you’re doing, Jenny.

Angie Alt: Yeah.

Jenny Harris: Thanks.

Angie Alt: Thanks again for agreeing to have this conversation with us today, Jenny. You guys, we’ll be back next week. Take care everyone.

Mickey Trescott: Bye!

Jenny Harris: Bye.

Angie Alt: Thanks for joining us on this episode of the Autoimmune Wellness podcast. We’re honored to have you as a listener, and we hope that you’ve gained some useful information.

Mickey Trescott: Did you know that we have dozens of informative articles about living well with autoimmune disease, and over 250 elimination phase compliant recipes on our website, updated multiple times per week? Make sure to click on over to AutoimmuneWellness.com. Follow us on social media. And sign up for our newsletter to find out about all of this new content.

We’re either at Autoimmune Paleo, or at Autoimmune Wellness on any of these channels. You can sign up for our newsletter at the bottom of any page on our website. Don’t forget to connect with the AIP community by using the hashtag #AutoimmuneWellness.

Angie Alt: If you enjoyed the podcast, please leave us a review in iTunes, as this helps others find us. See you next time!

Wait–before you go!

If you enjoyed the podcast, would you mind leaving us a review in iTunes? This helps introduce our work to a new audience as we climb the ranks in their system.

For the full podcast archive, click here.

The post S3 E7 – Food Budgeting + Prioritizing w/ Jenny Harris appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

May 14 2018

46mins

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S3 E6 – Minimizing Waste w/ Rachael Bryant

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Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 3: Real Food on a Budget. We’re dedicating this season to discussing an aspect of natural healing that often gets left out of the conversation: affordability. We’ll be chatting with experts and peers from the AIP community about how to best balance money with your health priorities.

This season is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association (NTA), a holistic nutrition school that trains and certifies nutritional therapy practitioners and consultants with an emphasis on bioindividual nutrition. Learn more about them by visiting NutritionalTherapy.com, or read about our experiences going through their NTP and NTC programs in our comparison article.

Season 3 Episode 6 is not just about a clever way to maximize your food budget, but one of the biggest struggles our culture faces when it comes to sustainable food production: reducing food waste.

We are discussing how to make the most of all the ingredients we’ve talked about sourcing in the previous episodes so you can best minimize waste and reuse leftovers. Our guest is Rachael Bryant from the blog Meatified, who shares some excellent advice and personal experience around creating a low-waste kitchen. Scroll down for the full episode transcript!

How to listen:

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If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

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Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a resource for those seeking to live well with chronic illness. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’m the author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt. I’m a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I’m the author of The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage my endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease.

After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.AutoimmuneWellness.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

We also wrote a book called The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook together that serves as a do-it-yourself guidebook to living well with chronic illness.

Mickey Trescott: If you’re looking for more information about the autoimmune protocol, make sure to sign up for our newsletter at autoimmunewellness.com, so we can send you our free quick start guide. It contains printable AIP food lists, a 2-week food plan, a 90-minute batch cooking video, a mindset video, and food reintroduction guides.

This season of the podcast, real food on a budget is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:

1. Ways to reduce waste [4:23]
2. Food storage methods [12:52]
3. Our guest, Rachael Bryant from Meatified [22:44]
4. Reimagining leftovers [29:30]
5. Using food “scraps” [39:23]

Angie Alt: Hi everyone! Angie here. Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, season 3. How are you doing today, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: I’m doing great. Cozied up here on kind of a cool day. Ready for some warmer weather in the Pacific Northwest.

Angie Alt: Oh, gosh. Me too. I feel like it’s the longest winter. Which is ridiculous, because it really hasn’t been that bad. But I’m really ready for the sun.

Mickey Trescott: Me too.

Angie Alt: Ok. Today we’re continuing our discussion related to the topic this season; real food on a budget. This episode is going to be about how to make the most out of all of the ingredients we’ve talked about sourcing in the previous episodes. It’s all about minimizing waste, and reusing leftovers.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. So after we figured out how to get our hands on all of these really well-sourced, healthy, nutrient dense, and sometimes a little bit expensive ingredients, depending on kind of how we’ve sourced. We have to figure out how we’re going to maximize them, and use every last bit.

So, you guys. We as a culture have a really massive problem with food waste. I looked up a couple of stats, and globally we waste 1.3 trillion tons of food per year. Which, that is just insane. And it’s estimated that up to 50% of food that’s produced; that’s either meat that’s raised or produce that’s grown, or processed food that’s made, is not even eaten. So, I don’t know how that makes you guys feel, but I feel kind of disgusted by that.

Angie Alt: Yeah, it makes mew ant to cry, to be honest. Especially; my experience living in developing countries and everything and seeing this problem. In the United States we have a particularly bad problem with food waste. So much so that our government even has an initiative to try to reduce it by the year 2020, I believe. I have to check in on that and read that again.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, I think it’s 30% by 2030.

Angie Alt: 30% by 2030. Ok. Yeah, when I reflect on all of that, it’s literally heart breaking for me. And I kind of have a little bit of a problem about it.

Mickey Trescott: Part of it is within the food system. Part of that food isn’t even being purchased. So a lot of it is wasted in the field. Maybe because of the timing of harvesting, or the market, or in the factory where they process food, or whatever. But we have a lot of angles to tackle this. And the on that we are most poised to handle is actually in our own homes, and our kitchens, and how we waste food through the course of planning and cooking our meals every day.

Angie Alt: Right. We could make a big impact. If we each did that, it would be huge!

1. Ways to reduce waste [4:23]

Mickey Trescott: Today we’re going to talk in this first segment of this episode about some ways that we can reduce waste. And so the first one; we’re going to sound like a broken record, guys. But planning. Planning is really key. Right Angie?

Angie Alt: Yep. Meal planning all the way. I know we’ve talked about it like 800 times this season, you guys. But it’s absolutely key.

Mickey Trescott: You know, meal planning; Angie’s a little more of a meal planner than I am. But I do know that when I make a meal plan, what I tend to do is take inventory of what I have and when it expires. How I can use it up before it goes bad. And then also making a list of what to buy. I’m not just wandering around the grocery store being like; oh, these Brussel sprouts look good. I have a list, and I know exactly the quantities that I need. And that first act of meal planning; it organizes all of that into a plan that I can follow. And I’m much less likely to have waste at the end of it.

Angie Alt: Yep. Really the smart way to go. And you can pay attention to what’s in your deep freeze, and what’s in your pantry before you go so that you don’t end up with doubles of things and then some of it going bad because you forgot what you had available. It’s just really the smart way to go in terms of planning.

The next step that kind of goes along with meal planning is batch cooking. Which we’ve talked about before. Mickey does a little more batch cooking than I do. We’re kind of opposite in that way. I do a little more meal planning and a little less batch cooking; she does more batch cooking and less meal planning. But this is kind of the next important step in trying to reduce waste at home.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. When you batch cook, you’re using a larger quantity of ingredients. So I find if I make a batch of chili I might use one or two whole yellow onions, for example. Where if I’m making like a one-off meal, that’s not a big batch, I might use a quarter or half of an onion. And then that onion is sitting in my fridge.

Or, if I have a bag of carrots, I might use the whole bag of carrots in a batch cook versus a couple of carrots and then having the rest of them potentially go bad. So, through batch cooking you can make a bunch of food. And then whatever you’re not going to eat in the next few days, you can just freeze immediately. So you can really visually see; ok, all of those ingredients that I bought have been turned into meals. Which are perfectly portioned. I can visualize them in the fridge. And then whatever I’m not going to use, I can freeze either immediately or if I get a couple of days in, maybe I unexpectedly eat out and I don’t need one of those meals. Guess what? Pop it in the freezer. You know? It’s a really easy way to kind of get a handle on that whole meal situation.

Angie Alt: Right. The next topic in terms of reducing waste is how you shop, right?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. And if you meal plan, or batch cook, or both, I think that can really inform your shopping in a way that, like I said before, avoids impulse buys. When I’m doing more meal planning, I’m definitely going right for the things I’m looking for. And I’m buying exactly what I need. So like I was talking about with the carrots; if I only need a couple of carrots for a recipe and I have all my meals planned for the week, I know that that bag of carrots, unless I’m maybe going to want to be eating carrots as a snack with some pate or something, I’m not really going to need that whole bag. So I might just go for the bulk carrots and get a couple.

Same thing with beets. I might get one beet for a chili instead of getting a whole bunch of beets. So I don’t know if you have any experiences like that, but getting exactly what you need is definitely the way to prevent waste from happening.

Angie Alt: Yeah, for sure. In fact; my husband and I always have a little bit of a disagreement here. Because if I send him out to shop, he’s the guy going out to get the bounty for the family, right, and he buys whatever. If I say, buy apples. I’ll say 4, and he’ll buy 8. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Just in case.

Angie Alt: Yeah, just getting the most in case. So I really pay close attention to the numbers we need, and what we can go through realistically in a week so that there’s no waste.

Mickey Trescott: Or even if there’s a trip coming up. Something that happens a lot in our household. We’ll go out of town for a few days. Which is, you know, not really long enough to have to completely clear your fridge. But it is long enough to where a lot of things don’t last for a few days. And if we do a shop a couple of days before we go out of town, I have to tell my husband; hey. We need to not buy a huge thing of bananas. {laughs} Those are not going to last. So just thinking ahead a little bit with that shopping is really important.

Angie Alt: Right. I think you had some tips, too, Mickey about fridge organization when you’re bringing home all of those groceries. How do you arrange?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so it can be really tempting to put all of that new, fresh stuff kind of throw it right in the front and throw it on top of what’s there. But that’s kind of how things get buried. So, even the way that you organize your fridge and the way that you put your ingredients away can affect how you use them.

Something that I do; I have a very small fridge, so I have to really maximize the way that I use the space. But I only have one drawer, and that’s where I keep all my produce. So what I’ll do is I’ll pull out the drawer, and I’ll put out anything that’s aged in there. And then I’ll put all of the brand new stuff right in the bottom, and I’ll put the stuff that’s older on top so that when I go into the fridge, I see it. And I remember; ok, I need to use those greens up. Or those mushrooms are ready to go. So everything at the top is kind of the priority. And those oldest items are kind of the most visible.

Angie Alt: Right. Super smart.

Mickey Trescott: If you guys have done some reintros, and you’re eating a little bit more of some of the packaged perishables. These might be things like eggs, or yogurt, or things that you’re going to be going through more frequently. There aren’t a lot of those things on the elimination phase. But when you reintroduce foods, that might become an option for you. A good thing is just to make sure that you rotate those.

So like when I buy eggs, I don’t want to put the new eggs on the top. Because then the eggs that are below it might not get eaten in time. So that’s another way to think about it.

Angie Alt: Yeah, I totally do that too. How about using up all the fresh ingredients before you go shopping again? How do you make sure you do this? I know how we approach it in our house. How do you do it in your house, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: You know, we do kind of a fridge dump soup. And something actually going back to batch cooking; I always have batch cooked meals in the freezer available. So when we end up on that last meal, sometimes it’s not literally the last meal. Sometimes I can do a fridge dump soup, which is basically every vegetable or meat that’s in the fridge. I just figure out how to make a soup with that with some broth and some spices. That’s a way to use up all the perishables. And if we’re not literally going to the store that day, I can get us by one more meal with what I have in the freezer. That’s kind of how we do it, making sure all those perishables are totally eaten through.

And sometimes, it’s like a game. Sometimes it’s really fun to kind of figure out; “What can I make with a sweet potato, some broth, and some leftover chicken.” You know?

Angie Alt: Yeah. I actually kind of like that feeling. And it makes my daughter kind of crazy, but we definitely use everything, right down to the very last. My fridge is literally empty. My pantry, other than bulk stuff like maybe some cassava flour is literally empty. We use everything before we go and shop again. And if I have those weird odds and ends, yeah I love the challenge of kind of coming up with that last meal before you shop that’s all the weird stuff. That’s a good feeling to use it up.

I usually will try to make a little bit of a baked something. A little bit of a casserole type thing. Or some kind of a hash with those last bits.

2. Food storage methods [12:52].

Angie Alt: Another important part of reducing waste is storing food correctly, and I think a lot of people might not know about some of these options. And I think, especially in the US. We probably tend to throw stuff out too soon thinking that it’s gone bad. And really, if we would have taken just a little care with storing the food, it would have lasted for a long time.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, there are lots of resources online for you guys, if you’re really curious about storing food. I think Angie and I tend to be on the less conservative side. As far as meat and leftovers and stuff, I would totally agree with Angie. I definitely let my leftovers go sometimes up to a week and it’s fine. Sometimes it needs a little refresh with maybe some new spices and add some different flavors, a sauce or something. But I have no problem eating leftovers. Which I know we’ll talk about in a little bit.

But some things that you guys can do to kind of make the food that you buy last longer; a trick that I learned with herbs. Like fresh cilantro, fresh parsley, fresh basil. The best way to keep those is actually to put them in a little glass or jar of water, kind of like you would a flower arrangement. And then cover them with a plastic bag and kind of tie it tight so they both have that water and a little humidity. It will kind of keep them alive. Because you know how quickly those herbs can go wilty and slimy. They’re so flavorful, and so important in AIP cooking, that I just like to snip a little bit to use in a recipe, and then kind of keep the rest of them alive.

Some things that you might not be aware of actually last a lot longer in the refrigerator. So, while avocados you’re going to want to keep on the counter if you’re ripening them, once they’re close to or they are ripe, they’re going to last a little bit longer in the fridge. Same thing with citrus. I always; and I don’t know if this is just because I live in the Pacific Northwest, and it’s kind of damp here. But my citrus does not last out on the counter more than a few days without going moldy. So I’ll put it in the fridge along with some other fruits, like apples. They tend to stay much more crisp and last longer in there.

And then, if you store your greens with a damp paper towel, that can keep them fresh. I don’t know; do you have any other storage tips, Angie?

Angie Alt: Yeah, you know you can store cooked ground meat, fish, and poultry for about two days. And then you need to use it. Red meat is ok up to five days. And like Mickey said, I think she and I tend to be a little less conservative here. I’ll sometimes go up to 7 days there.

Regular leftovers just already prepared meals are usually good for five days in the fridge. Covered in good containers. You can make crackers, or those kinds of foods. Which we don’t tend to eat as much on strict elimination phase AIP. But there are some recipes out there. They’ll stay better longer in airtight containers so they don’t go stale.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. And just preventing your food from going bad in the first place, before you get a chance to eat it, that’s a part of reducing waste. Because especially; I don’t buy those clamshell packs of greens just because unless I’m hosting a dinner party and I know that I’m going to have 8 people eating a ton of salad, they just don’t keep for me more than 2 days, and they go slimy, and I end up having to throw some of it away.

So I prefer instead getting a big head of lettuce and chopping it. It’s a little more work, but I don’t have that food waste that way. So you guys just kind of have to figure out what works for you there to store things.

Angie Alt: Right. I think we kind of already touched on freezing meals and ingredients before they go bad. That’s always smart. What about eating the odd bits of vegetables. Do you have some thoughts here, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: Well, you know, I think sometimes we have such a sterile approach to food. Especially; we’re talking organically produced food. So this recommendation definitely changes if you can’t afford organic vegetables and you’re buying some conventional, we definitely advocate for peeling in that case. But if you’re buying organic fruits and veggies, I am definitely known to eat some of the odd bits of the vegetables. So things like kiwi skins.

Now they actually have those kiwis that are actually smooth on the outside. Bit I’ve always, even the fuzzy ones. I don’t mind the way it tastes. And there’s nutrients there, and fiber. Just peeling a kiwi, you lose a lot of it there. So, that also applies to other vegetables. I don’t peel carrots. I only peel the very top of beets. So I just slice the very top off. And any of that part that’s maybe kind of muddy where it was on the surface of the soil. Sometimes it’s a little mossy or muddy there. I’ll kind of slice that part off. But anything under there, you know, I just scrub it really well. Make sure there’s no dirt there. But I don’t peel it, because that creates waste.

Same thing if you’re going to be buying some fresh bunches of farm carrots or farm beets. You can actually eat carrot tops. I actually think Sarah Ballantyne has some recipes for sautéed carrot greens. Same thing with the beet greens. They’re just like chard. They don’t save very long, so when you buy them attached to the beet. I’ll usually cook the beet, and then use the greens in the same recipe. But just making sure to kind of use all of those odd bits, and waste as little as we can. You can even go as far as using orange peels and lemon peels to preserve them and use them in other recipes and things like that.

Angie Alt: Right. I think lastly is kind of buying the “ugly” veggies or discounted meat. This is a biggie for me. I do this a lot. This produce isn’t really sold. It’s usually wasted, because it doesn’t look perfect enough. And that to me is crime number one. I literally feel like it’s criminal. So I’ll grab that stuff, and buy it on purpose. And I have, more than once, had a checker say; “Oh, these apples are bruised.” Or whatever. “Do you want to get rid of these and replace them with something nicer.” And I always say no. I want it. Because I know it’s just going to get thrown away.

And if you really are opposed to that, you can cut those little ugly bits off and use the rest of the fruit.

Mickey Trescott: Totally. And the best-case scenario, the stores will have; and I think this is becoming more common. Where they’ll separate out the ugly veggies or fruits, and have them at a discounted price. Because a lot of people aren’t going to be activists, like you are Angie, and buy ugly produce just because they want to. If they’re incentivized with a lower cost. Or if you frequent your grocer and you’re like; “Hey, if you guys end up with a bunch of ugly apples at the end of the season, I’ll buy them at a discount.” Maybe you can use a dehydrator, or make some applesauce and freeze it. Whatever. Be creative that way. That’s definitely a great way to even save money, and reduce the waste there.

Angie Alt: That’s it for the first half of this episode. You guys, we’ll be back after the break with a guest who will help us talk about even more creative and specific ways to reduce our waste. She is a maven in this area. Be right back.

Mickey Trescott: A quick word from our title sponsor this season,The Nutritional Therapy Association. Angie and I both graduated from two different NTA programs. And even though that was a while ago, we can still remember what it was like to be students. Angie, what made you go down this path in the first place?

Angie Alt: Well it was you, Mick. I could see that their programs had greatly expanded your knowledge base and expertise. And I was already familiar with, and aligned with, their philosophy. I was kind of sold. But then I realized that their NTC course was perfect for my virtual coaching work, I was totally in. How did you decide between the various programs?

Mickey Trescott: What really sealed the deal for me was the NTA’s focus on real food and nutrient density. So, I also found the program really affordable and convenient with the online component. Which they’ve even made a lot easier now with their fully online NTC course that doesn’t have any in-person requirements. So, Angie do you have any favorite memories from your time as a student?

Angie Alt: Oh gosh, this is really hard to narrow down. I had a fantastic, really seasoned instructor, Caroline Berringer, who was so full of information. The way she taught was very enthusiastic, and it made everything stick. And I felt like she embodied the passion I had for helping others with their health.

And it was also my classmates. I went through the program with some really smart and motivated people, and it made me want to give it my all. Mickey, how about you?

Mickey Trescott: I started my NTA training while I was still in the very early days of my recovery. And at the beginning of my 9-month program, I was definitely still having a hard time physically making it through those workshop weekends. But by the end of the program, my health had improved so much that the workshop weekends were feeling really energizing and fun for me, and not draining. Which was really cool to see that transition. And a lot of my classmates, also, noticed a big difference. So that was really fun.

If you guys thing that you might be a good fit for one of NTA’s programs, you can check out their free 7-day nutritional therapy 101 course, and more program information, at www.NutritionalTherapy.com.

3. Our guest, Rachael Bryant from Meatified [22:44]

Angie Alt: Alright, you guys. On to our interview today. We are speaking with the incredible Rachael Bryant. She is the food blogger and recipe developer behind Meatified.com, which is probably the most fun food blog name ever. She’s also the author of the AIP cookbook, Nourish. And she’s also a fantastic food photographer. If you guys aren’t following her on Instagram at Meatified, you need to do yourself a favor and go check it out.

Rachael’s childhood involved a totally different style of eating and “convenience store cooking”, but in adulthood, she took those challenges and transformed her diet and kitchen skills, all while beating back an autoimmune disease. Thanks so much, Rachael, for joining us today.

Rachael Bryant: Hi Mickey and Angie. Thank you so much for having me.

Mickey Trescott: We know that minimizing waste and creative use of leftovers is an area of expertise for you. So we are super excited to pick your brain today.

Angie Alt: Yay! Ok, so let’s jump right in, here. Rachael, let’s start from the top. How did you first get inspired to be so creative in this area of minimizing waste and reusing leftovers?

Rachael Bryant: Honestly, there are two strands to this. Growing up, my mom did not cook at all. So my only real experience of home cooking came from my grandma. She’s the sort of person who, honestly, could make a meal out of nothing. And out of a kitchen that was probably; would probably fit into my guest bathroom two or three times over. I’m not sure how she managed it. So she was this very, very creative person.

But also, growing up in England, she lived through the war and she lived through rationing. You didn’t waste anything. I grew up around that environment where food was precious. Which maybe sounds a bit strange to us now. But it was something that you didn’t take for granted, and you always had to do something with. The way that she did that, in all very practical utilitarian way. But she also did it in such a creative way, and could bring meals to the table based on the contents of a tiny little under the counter fridge and some magic in the background.

That’s really what I wanted to bring into my own kitchen. That mix of practicality, but also creativity, and also fun. She might have been making meals that were very practical, but they were never boring. They were made with love, and that came through.

But the other aspect of cooking for me, in terms of keeping my kitchen stocked, is that I actually live about an hour; at least an hour away, from the nearest grocery store. So when I go grocery shopping, I go, and I try to be prepared for about a week at a time. If I’ve forgotten something, or if I need something, I can’t just zip out and go grab it. So I’ve learned over the years to be adaptable and to be able to work with what I have.

It used to stress me out, I’ll be honest. It’s not all roses. I didn’t pop out of the cooking womb, and be like, “I can do it all, and I’m good at it straight away!” Because I wasn’t. The way I sort of make it fun is I treat it a little bit like a puzzle or a game. It’s like problem solving. I will start with what’s seasonal, or what is on sale, or what I can afford that week, and then sort of build my cart from there. I don’t necessarily go into a grocery store or into the kitchen and have this prearranged idea of what I’m going to do. Does that make sense?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, totally. And actually, that’s something that’s a big reason why we wanted to talk to you, Rachael. Because we know that, Angie and I are more of the meal planning kind of followers. We have more plan based on what we do, and we know that you’re a little more creative, and you like to wing it on the spot. And we realize that there are people out there that like cooking that way, and don’t like adhering to kind of a rigid plan and everything. So I think that speaks to a lot.

Part of eating this way, even if you plan and you have a bunch of food leftover, or if you don’t plan. You’re going to be eating a lot of leftovers. And one of the things we’ve noticed; I don’t know if you’ve noticed this in the community. But some people who say that they don’t like leftovers, or they get sick of eating leftovers. Do you have any comments about that?

Rachael Bryant: Ok, see. I love leftovers. The reason I love leftovers, is the way I look at it, it’s a free meal. You’ve practically got a meal, right there, ready to go that you don’t have to cook. And to be honest, when you have to, like we do, make so much of what we eat from scratch. If I’ve got half a meal, or part of a meal, or a whole meal in the fridge ready to go, I am happy. I am really, really happy, you know?

But I think part of the reason some people feel; “Leftovers; ugh!” Is because they have this idea that it has to mean eating the exact same thing 14 times in a row until it’s gone. You know? They expect to be sick of it because it is repetitive. But I like to think of leftovers more as a starting point. It’s like a base that you have that you can build on. You don’t necessarily have to eat the same thing over and over.

It’s like a choose your own adventure kind of deal, except with food. Which is like two of my favorite things. You’ve got a puzzle and a creative thing over here. And you’ve got the, “I need to eat, where’s my food?” Part of it over here. So like, you know, say you’ve got a whole bunch of roast chicken leftover. And you could sit there and you could eat that roast chicken exactly as it is several times over until you probably never want to see roast chicken again. At least for a couple of weeks, right?

You don’t have to eat it that exact same way. You could shred it and add it to a soup. You could have some cauliflower rice left over, and then the chicken comes into play with that. Maybe you bring in some pesto that you’ve got in the fridge, too. Maybe you’ve got some olives lingering around in your pantry. Maybe you’ve got some lemon. By the time you’ve added a couple of different elements, you can have a completely different dish. So it doesn’t have to be the same thing over and over.

4. Reimagining leftovers [29:30]

Angie Alt: I love that! I love this idea of using leftovers as the starting point. That’s a much more creative way to think about it. I really love that. Maybe, Rachael, you could get into telling us a little bit about that. Reimagining the leftovers. I see you sharing all the time on that amazing Instagram account of yours about different sauces, and marinades, and soups, and spice mixtures that you’ve put together. Maybe you can give us some ideas about how you reimagine leftovers.

Rachael Bryant: So what I like to do; I’m a weirdo, I think, in some respects. Because I don’t like to be super planned out and super organized. It sounds kind of odd when I say it out loud. I don’t like to get into a lot of details. I don’t want to have to make out a weeks’ worth of shopping list, right down to the tiny, tiny details.

What I like to do is always have an assortment of different sauces, or spice blends, or condiments. Basically anything you can add to a meal that would sort of jazz it up without too much effort. So maybe; I have a cheese sauce recipe on my blog. Which is a terrible misnomer, because there’s not really any cheese in it. But it’s like a cheesy, creamy sauce that you can make ahead of time. You can put it in the freezer. You can keep it in the fridge. Or maybe I will have a jar of pesto. Or maybe I might make a double batch of my barbecue sauce.

And I’ve found if you’ve got a couple of different things like that in your fridge, and your freezer, then you can take a very plan base. A protein and a veggie. And then you can start to jazz it up with very little effort. So you’ve got this tool to hand; these condiments. I just call them flavor boosters. Which sounds a little pretentious, but it’s a lot easier than saying sauces, condiments, seasoning blends, oh my!

If you’ve got a couple of these things, you can make them ahead of time. But you’re not stuck in the kitchen for hours batch cooking. It takes maybe 20 minutes to make a batch of cheese sauce and some pesto. Right? So that way I’ve got some things to hand, and I’ve kind of got a plan. But I’m not completely tied down to one set meal, or one way of doing things. Does that make sense?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. It totally makes sense. And actually, I like to kind of play in the balance in between the two. I like to have a little bit of planned stuff, and then I like to see what happens with having some sauces. A lot of times, Rachael, I’ll actually make some little pesto ice cubes or something and even put them in the freezer, so it’s even that one step easier. So I can just pull that out, throw it, and sauté it up with some leftover chicken or whatever.

Rachael Bryant: Exactly. I think there’s this thing that people assume. I think especially because we’re food bloggers. There’s maybe this assumption that I’m cooking a meal every night that has three different elements, and I’m making all of them from scratch. But really, I have a kind of unspoken, unwritten rule where probably for each meal I’m probably only cooking one thing. And then maybe the other elements of my meal are coming from leftovers or coming from things I can make simply.

So, say tonight I’m roasting chicken thighs. Right? I’m only cooking for two people, so I probably only need two or three. But I’ll probably cook myself a whole tray, or 8 or 9. So that I have leftovers. So to start off, maybe I’m cooking that chicken and that’s the one element that I’m making for this meal that I’m actually cooking right this second this evening. Then to round it out, maybe I’ve got some sweet potato in the fridge. Or some rice. Or something that you’ve reintroduced that’s going to add that carb element to the plate. Then maybe I’ll add myself a side salad. Then I’ve got a meal right there, but I’ve only really cooked one thing.

The next day, I can roll this forward. I’ve got this leftover cold chicken. So maybe what I’ll do is I will reheat that in some of my cheese sauce. I can add in maybe some sliced mushrooms and some spinach. And then I’ve got this creamy chicken casserole. But I haven’t really cooked, so much as I’ve brought other elements together. So that’s sort of my base method.

Angie Alt: I love this! It’s like; you’re kind of having the sauces and things like that ready to go to kind of jazz up things as you move forward. It’s like, your batch cooking actually includes a little bit of those things that are helping make the leftovers that much better.

Rachael Bryant: For me, it helps me avoid being bored, but it also helps me from feeling really overwhelmed. Like, oh my goodness. I have to make a meal. Meal capital M. You know? If I think of it less as something that I have to sort of conceive of all at once and it has to be this cohesive fancy thing. And if instead I think of building it as a plate, then that sort of helps me become less overwhelmed.

Again, sometimes I think people assume that I love being in the kitchen. And I’m a food blogger, sure. And I love food, definitely. But even I don’t always want to be in the kitchen. When I started cooking, I didn’t have a clue what I was doing. So if you can get to a point where you are comfortable with just pulling things together and not feel like everything you make has to be perfect or have a recipe title. Or be this massively cohesive thing. I think it frees you up of a lot of emotional energy, too.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Rachael Bryant: Which maybe sounds a little silly when I say “emotional energy.” But I think when you are, maybe really tired and exhausted. Maybe you’re really overwhelmed. Maybe emotionally you know your autoimmune issues are taking a toll in that respect. If you can sort of leg go a little of the weight of expectations, and be like; it is just a meal. You’re building a plate. A little bit at a time. I think that helps to not be so overwhelmed and intimidated.

Angie Alt: Yep. I totally think this is a thing. There are a lot of emotions that go into food, and preparing foods. You have some really good points there, Rachael.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, and I think it’s important for people to realize, too, that food bloggers are not eating these perfectly curated plates of food three meals a day. That’s a big misconception. I’ve met a lot of food bloggers. And while there are people who I think have a little bit more of a visual approach, and enjoy cooking more, and are a little bit more of that kind of foodie type, most people are very utilitarian when it comes to their cooking and getting food on their plates. I’ve been really refreshed, actually, meeting a lot of people in real life and just realize that they, most of the time, eat chicken thighs and broccoli, and a carb on the side of something like I do. You know?

Angie Alt: Right.

Rachael Bryant: Definitely. I think that’s part of something; I have a little bit of internal conflict on, too. Because I do like to make pretty food photos. And for me, it’s a creative outlet for someone who, honestly I never considered myself creative at all before I started food blogging. So for me it’s like this fun thing, and I like to make these pretty food photos. But then on the other hand, sometimes I almost feel like; I don’t want to say I feel guilty. But I am aware that those very same food photos can be very intimidating.

Like if I think of where I started; I would have gone, “Psh! I can’t make food like that.” Or if I had made a recipe and it hadn’t turned out like the photo, I probably would have assumed that it was me. You know? I do find that hard to sort of balance. I don’t know. I don’t have an answer for that, really.

Mickey Trescott: You know, Rachael, I’m kind of in a similar boat. I love photography, and I think of it as kind of an art for me. But at the same time, a lot of people are unable to mentally say, “I can do this.” Unless they see something that looks good to them. And I think part of the images are inspiring to people to understanding that even though this diet has this long list of foods they can’t have.

If they see some beautiful imagery, like our books or our Instagram feeds, or anything. And they’re like; “Wow, this food looks incredibly delicious.” They might make that mental shift. Like, “Maybe I can actually do that.” And I think that’s the important role it plays, and where the line, that boundary is in then having them think I need to be eating this Instagram worthy food every single meal. That’s not realistic.

And that’s where I think sharing some more of the real life behind the scenes type stuff is important, too. But, you know, I think both are really valuable, and I wouldn’t feel bad at all about doing the great work that you do and showing people how beautiful eating this way can be. Because for some people, that is really important. That inspiration.

Rachael Bryant: It’s true, isn’t it? Because the visual is kind of significant. I think it helps for people to see that it’s not all about the list of what you can’t have. Mindset is so important. The longer I do this, the longer I’m invested in my own health. The longer I’m cooking for myself, that becomes more significant to me. It’s not about what you can’t have, it’s about what you’re choosing to do for yourself. It’s about the choices that you can make. The ways that you can work with what you do have and can have. And I think that applies to cooking, but it applies to everything, really.

5. Using food “scraps” [39:23]

Angie Alt: Right. Ok, Rachael. How about, you talk to us about using food scraps. I think that you’re very talented in this. Again, we see this reflected in your recipe creations and your food photography and the things that you’re sharing with the community. Can you tell us about how your kind of minimizing waste, and making that food budget go really far in terms of reusing food scraps?

Rachael Bryant: The main two things I probably do here when it comes to cleaning out the fridge at the end of the week. And I am a weirdo. I take a kind of strange pride in getting to the end of the week and getting that fridge right down to it’s sort of bare, empty…

Angie Alt: Mickey and I totally do too. We totally talked about this earlier. {laughs}

Rachael Bryant: It’s like it’s looking at you, and you’re feeling really good. Because it’s like; almost gone. And then you have that last challenge at the end and you’re like; ok, can I actually make another meal now, or have I pushed this too far? {laughs}

What I do to really make use of everything, two main things that I do. One, this isn’t rocket science, but making broth. My husband is now well used to the fact the freezer at any point is probably 40% bits of bones or random things that I can’t throw away or an ice cube tray of something that I could throw into vegetables or whatever later on. So broth is my key thing.

I think a lot of people have this idea. I don’t know; I think maybe it’s because a lot of recipes or methods you see online, where people teach you about how to make broth. You very often see whole chicken carcasses, or specific bones that people have gone out. Go out and buy soup bones. But obviously we’re not all doing that. I try to use up what I have.

I think my favorite way to make broth right now is with pork bones. Specifically rib bones. Whenever there’s a sale on pork ribs, I’m there. Not just because I like ribs. Because they make really, really good broth. But you don’t see people talking about pork broth. People tend to think chicken or beef.

But with broth, I’m using little bits of vegetable scraps that I will save. So say carrot tops, or the end of leeks, or the odd onion, or what have you. But I’m also making use of all of the bones from meat that we’re using to make meals throughout the week.

Mickey Trescott: I love this reusing bone conversation. I think it’s something that can’t be said enough. Because I do the exact same thing as you, Rachael. I have a bag or four at all times in the freezer.

Rachael Bryant: It’s terrible! {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Once you realize how many bones you can save and you start saving them, it becomes like a hoarding problem.

Rachael Bryant: It is! Then I have this separate baggie. And it’s like, the separate baggie. Once I’ve made broth with you once and you’re real clean and defuzzed. Then I’m like; you’re going in the special bag to be reused.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. And I don’t know about you, but I mix, like half and half. I mix types of bones. I don’t ever buy bones for broth. And I know part of that is because I buy whole animals, so I end up getting a bunch of bones when I get my order. But just from cooking chickens, or chicken thighs. I usually eat bone-in meat. So when people are like; you know, bones are expensive. Beef knuckle bones at Whole Foods. I’m always like; I haven’t bought bones in forever, just because I’m always reusing them. You know?

Rachael Bryant: I do the same thing. I always prioritize those bone-in meats. And often, they’re cheaper, too. Because you’re not paying for them to debone and de-skin. And you’re not paying the premium on the lean meats. Which, a lot of the time I don’t want.

Mickey Trescott: And you get all those little scraps of meat, and that connective tissue, that’s still attached to the bone that’s then going to go into your broth. So that meat is going to add flavor, and all of that connective tissue is going to add some more gelatin and collagen and everything. I can’t really see an argument for doing it any other way. It’s not only the cheapest, but I think you end up with a better tasting and nutritious broth in the end, too.

Rachael Bryant: The other thing that I do. Probably other people do it, too, but I don’t see anybody talking about it. {laughs} So maybe I have a little bit of a weird hoarding problem in this respect, too. But if I roast a chicken. Or if I’ve cooked any kind of meat, and it’s done on a pan. It’s got all those; it’s got all that fat and roasting pan juices or whatever. I will pour that off into a freezer container. I will freeze that too.

And then once I; I usually make broth in my Instant Pot. So once I’ve gone through that process, and I’ve strained it, and I’ve gotten rid of the bits and the bones and things and I’m just left with the broth that I’m going to put into jars, then what I’ll do is I’ll take some of these frozen reserved pan juices, and I’ll put those back into the mix and heat that up again.

And it does two things. One, I’m not wasting anything. Two, it adds a lot more flavor. Because you’re not just getting the bones. You’re getting that kind of more meaty depth of flavor. But also, and this is especially true, something like chicken or pork or more fatty cuts in general. Is that way you’re getting all the fat that’s sort of left behind after you’ve roasted and cooked. And that makes a really, really nice seal. Once you’ve poured off your broth, and put it in the fridge, or whatever. I end up with a really nice fat cap there, more than I would necessarily just making the straight broth. And that helps to preserve it, to keep it longer. So it’s helping to avoid waste from that perspective, too. You’re also grossing out your husband, again. But by now, he’s used to it.

Angie Alt: {laughs} Yeah. I love the fat cap thing, too. I feel like your broth keeps longer that way.

Rachael Bryant: Yep. Definitely. It really does help. People have asked me; “how long should I keep it?” And I know technically I should probably tell you like a week, but honestly in my own house, I couldn’t tell you how long some of that broth lasts. And I use it. I wouldn’t necessarily tell someone else to do it. But I do it with no shame. It lasts a long time.

Mickey Trescott: That’s so {laughs} funny, Rachael, because we were just talking earlier about this in the first section of this podcast. And we were like; you know, the government recommends a few days with leftovers, but I definitely leave things for a week, sometimes even more. Especially broth.

Rachael Bryant: Oh broth has been in my fridge for more weeks than I probably even am aware of. Don’t do what I do, but maybe think about doing what I do? {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Exactly. Everyone’s doing their own thing. But I think a lot of people, too, are unnecessarily skeeved out by food safety, when there’s some other things that are a little more sketch than leaving something in your fridge for a couple of days too long.

Rachael Bryant: I think, too, part of that is distance from food. For a lot of people coming into AIP or just real food, just cooking in general. Maybe you’ve come from an environment like me. When I was a kid, when I was a teenager. I didn’t really start to cook for myself until I was in college. And I was ruled by the dates on packages, because I didn’t know how to differentiate any of the stuff for myself. So I probably threw away lots of perfectly fine food, because I didn’t really understand how to tell if something was still good.

The other thing that I do, in fact probably the main thing that I do that’s the mainstay of the food that I eat each day. I always make a soup. Usually it’s the weekend. Usually cleaning out the fridge with whatever I’ve got left. Very often it’s got a kind of root vegetable base. Usually because those are the things that last longest, you know. Because I have to shop for a week or so once. The way I sort of rotate through my food is I’ll eat the fresher, more delicate things first. Like lighter leaves and salads and stuff like that. Certain fruits, and then sort of as the week progresses, I’ll work my way through the more hardy stuff. The stuff that keeps longer.

So usually at the end of the week I’ve got some parsnips, or carrots. Something like that. And then I will clean out the fridge with whatever else I have left, and I will make myself a very simple pureed vegetable soup. I usually keep it very neutral in seasoning, and the reason is that soup sort of becomes the base for my next weeks’ breakfast. I know some people are probably making a face right now. “Soup for breakfast, really?”

But for me, it helps on a couple of levels. First of all, I’m not wasting anything, it helps me clean out that fridge at the end of the week. But also it gives me a really nice base in the morning for a very simple meal that I don’t have to cook; that I can just reheat. But what I like to do is start off with this base soup and then kind of jazz it up different ways throughout the week, dependent on things I have to hand. So, I don’t necessarily have to have the exact same soup each time.

And so, this kind of sums up my approach in a nutshell. It’s like; I’ve got a base level of planning, in this case the soup. And then I sort of wing it each day so that I don’t get bored.

Mickey Trescott: I love that, Rachael.

Angie Alt: I love it.

Mickey Trescott: Thanks so much for sharing in detail the way that you would work through what we call a fridge dump soup, and then use that as a base for recipes going forward in your week. That’s awesome.

Angie Alt: Yay!

Mickey Trescott: So, Rachael, will you let our listeners know just kind of what you’re up to in your work currently, and where they can find you online?

Rachael Bryant: You can find all of my recipes on my blog. It’s Meatified.com. and it’s a bit of a nonsense word. It’s sort of like a little mini in-joke. Because I used to be vegetarian. Many years ago. And when I started to eat meat again, I was joking to my husband about how I’ve meatified my diet. So it’s a little bit of a nonsense made up word. So that’s where you can find me, anyway.

On social media, you can find me on Instagram. It’s where I post more of my day-to-day things. I’m really terrible at stories, but I’m trying to get better, so that I can show more of the real meals I make, the less styled food that I eat. And you can find me on Instagram at Meatified, as well. I’m also on Facebook, but I’m really bad at keeping up with that, truth be told. But if you want to follow me there, that’s where you’ll find me.

To be honest, I’m not really working on anything special right now.

Mickey Trescott: What about your cookbook? I mean, your cookbook just came out. Again, it’s a really incredible resource. I just made the chili a couple of weeks ago. Super tasty.

Rachael Bryant: I love that recipe! Although I hated making it at the time. My husband; he’s not even Texan. Right? He’s from California. But he lived in Texas for 30 years, so he has really, very specific thoughts about chili. And that chili, and the barbecue sauce in my cookbook. He sent me back into the kitchen, I’m not even joking, about 30 times. It was ridiculous. I was beginning to curse his name, and chili, and everything barbecue.

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Rachael Bryant: By the time I was done. But yes. My cookbook; the original version of my cookbook is called Nourish. And it’s got a subtitle of The Paleo Healing Cookbook. And it’s a hardcover edition. This year, we actually did come up, because a lot of saying were saying, “We love your cookbook, but we don’t really love hardcover.” Or, “We want a paperback we can lay open in the kitchen a bit better or get a bit messy.” So we’ve actually just launched a paperback edition. And it’s just called The Paleo Healing Cookbook. It has the updated cover, and it’s the paperback edition. But the recipes are the same.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. If you guys are interested in checking out Rachael’s stuff, we definitely encourage you to do that. She’s a really important part of our AIP community. We’re really grateful for her work.

Thank you again for agreeing to chat with us today, Rachael. And for everybody else, we’ll be back next week with a new episode. Take care!

Angie Alt: Bye everybody!

Angie Alt: Thanks for joining us on this episode of The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast. We’re honored to have you as a listener, and we hope that you’ve gained some useful information.

Mickey Trescott: Did you know that we have dozens of informative articles about living well with autoimmune disease, and over 250 elimination phase compliant recipes on our website, updated multiple times per week? Make sure to click on over to AutoimmuneWellness.com. Follow us on social media. And sign up for our newsletter to find out about all of this new content.

We’re either at Autoimmune Paleo, or at Autoimmune Wellness on any of these channels. You can sign up for our newsletter at the bottom of any page on our website. Don’t forget to connect with the AIP community by using the hashtag #AutoimmuneWellness.

Angie Alt: If you enjoyed the podcast, please leave us a review in iTunes, as this helps others find us. See you next time!

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The post S3 E6 – Minimizing Waste w/ Rachael Bryant appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

May 07 2018

53mins

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S3 E5 – Buying Clubs + Online Markets

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Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 3: Real Food on a Budget. We’re dedicating this season to discussing an aspect of natural healing that often gets left out of the conversation: affordability. We’ll be chatting with experts and peers from the AIP community about how to best balance money with your health priorities.

This season is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association (NTA), a holistic nutrition school that trains and certifies nutritional therapy practitioners and consultants with an emphasis on bioindividual nutrition. Learn more about them by visiting NutritionalTherapy.com, or read about our experiences going through their NTP and NTC programs in our comparison article.

Season 3 Episode 5 is all about buying clubs and online markets that will help you strategically stretch your budget and adopt the AIP sustainably for the long term. We discuss the pros and cons of local buying clubs, co-ops, membership programs, and bulk meat sources, as well as our favorite online shopping portals.

Our hope is that this episode will help you best leverage all of these resources so you can stretch your budget as far as it will go. Scroll down for the full episode transcript!

How to listen:

If you’d like to have our podcasts sent directly to your device, subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher!

If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

If you’d like to play the episode right now in your browser, use the player below!

Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a resource for those seeking to live well with chronic illness. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’m the author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt. I’m a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I’m the author of The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage my endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease.

After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.AutoimmuneWellness.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

We also wrote a book called The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook together that serves as a do-it-yourself guidebook to living well with chronic illness.

Mickey Trescott: If you’re looking for more information about the autoimmune protocol, make sure to sign up for our newsletter at autoimmunewellness.com, so we can send you our free quick start guide. It contains printable AIP food lists, a 2-week food plan, a 90-minute batch cooking video, a mindset video, and food reintroduction guides.

This season of the podcast, real food on a budget is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:

1. Local buying clubs and food co-ops [2:45]
2. A hybrid option [7:04]
3. Bulk membership stores [11:39]
4. Online buying options [16:34]
5. Buying meat online [31:32]

Mickey Trescott: Hey, everybody! Mickey here. Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, season 3. How’s it going over there in DC, Angie?

Angie Alt: It’s going pretty well. I’m sad to report that it’s still winter. But we seem to be getting closer to spring, so that is making me a little bit happier.

Mickey Trescott: Yay for sunshine coming!

Angie Alt: Yay for sunshine! Vitamin D please.

Mickey Trescott: I know. Today we are continuing our discussion related to the topic this season. If you guys haven’t been paying attention, we are talking about real food on a budget. Which is really an important concept to a lot of us, if we want to be able to be eating this way long-term, right?

This episode is going to be about buying clubs and online markets. And how we can best leverage these resources to strategically help out with our sourcing needs and stretching our budgets. It can be super easy to overdo it with either of these options; I mean, hello. Amazon Prime, we’re looking at you!

But we hope that this episode will give you guys some great ideas about how you can use online shopping to your advantage.

1. Local buying clubs and food co-ops [2:45]

Angie Alt: So, maybe we can start with buying clubs. Mick, do you want to talk about that first?

Mickey Trescott: So a buying club is just any time you band together with either community members, or a company, and you get bulk pricing on foods and home goods. So when you go to a grocery store and you buy one unit of something. Like one apple, or one little six-ounce applesauce or something. You’re getting actually the highest price for that, because you’re buying it in the smallest quantity.

So the grocery store, obviously they have a wholesale account. They’re able to buy food from distributors or farmers at a really good price. And their service is that they’re bringing it in, sorting it, putting it out for you, and you’re able to buy it in a really small quantity.

If you kind of reverse that, and you figure out how to band with other people in order to buy the biggest quantity of something, you can get a really good deal. So this might take the form of, say, a local Facebook group. So I’m the member of a local real food buying club on Facebook in my local area. It has over a couple of thousand members. And there are certain people in the community that will coordinate with local farmers to engage in bulk buys. So this might look like, you know, maybe they’re buying a cow and they want to split it with a few families. That would be kind of like a small share.

Sometimes they’ll even go to a honey vender, and they’ll get 100 jars of honey and everyone will split it. They do charge $20 a year to be a member. I know there are some groups out there that are nonprofits or free. Sometimes it’s just collections of neighbors. But this is definitely something to look into, especially if you live somewhere like I do. Where there’s a lot of food production locally. It’s hard for me to actually get that high-quality food in the store.

I think some of you guys in rural area will understand that disconnect. You think that living in an area where all the food is produced, you have great access to it. But it’s actually the other way around. My local grocery store is the equivalent of a Walmart. So these local food buying clubs can really help get that high-quality food at a better cost.

Angie Alt: I don’t belong to a formal group like Mickey does, through Facebook. But I have informally joined groups in the past where, for instance, I got maple syrup that was bought in bulk from the producer. And sometimes I do this with fish. I’ve done it to get salmon from Alaska.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. Banding together, guys, can definitely save you some money. And honestly it doesn’t have to be a formal Facebook group. It can even be your family. So, something that I do because I live on property with my mom, her sister and her partner. We all actually band together to buy meat. And my brother actually lives a few hours away in Seattle. So between the four different families, we’ll buy a whole cow every year, and then split it into quarters. If we were just buying a quarter of a cow, the price is higher than if you buy the whole thing. So even your family can work like a buying club.

Angie Alt: Right. What about co-ops? Let’s explain and talk about co-ops.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, co-ops are an awesome business model for like a grocery store. There can also be more informal co-ops that don’t have a storefront. But basically, they function differently from a corporation because they are member or employee owned. So this means if you have a local food co-op, they might ask you to pay a member fee. It might be a one-time fee up front.

I think when I lived in California, I paid $75 once to be a member, and that gets you a share. So you can actually vote on leadership, and then you get discounts on all the food they buy. Sometimes they have you pay per year. Sometimes you don’t even have to pay, but it just means that the store is actually owned by the employees and the people that run it.

So there’s a few different models. But really, the point of a co-op is to get the highest quality food at a price that is lower than normal. So by paying into the co-op system, you know that that money, that profit that the store is making, isn’t actually going to some shareholder’s pockets. It’s actually going to reinvest in the business and keep the price down for the people that shop there. So co-ops can be a really fun option, also.

2. A hybrid option [7:04]

Angie Alt: Yeah. It’s a great way to really get engaged with your community and good quality food providers. Here’s an interesting set up. And I actually don’t do this as an adult. But when I was a kid, my mom and aunt and grandmother belonged to Azure Standard. Can you tell us about Azure Standard?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; actually, I didn’t know that about your family, Angie, but I actually used them a lot about 5 or 6 years ago when I first started getting into real food. Especially with the online buying. So they’re a little bit of a hybrid.

They are a major real food distributor in the United States. They have an online store. But instead of shipping directly to you; which I think they do now. But they didn’t in the past, 5 or 6 years ago. What you had to do, was it was a buying club. They had no fee to join. You sign up, you join what’s called a drop.

Which is, basically someone in your community who has arranged an area where a semi can come drop off some orders. So everyone that is a member of that drop; they order all their food online. I think each drop has like a $500 minimum from the company. And then a truck shows up at, usually a church parking lot or some area that’s easily accessible to a lot of people.

Our drop in Seattle had about 20 or 30 families that would then show up, meet the truck. It would be the same time every couple of weeks or every month. And they would just get their order that literally came straight off a palate. And you can get some amazing bulk goods for crazy, crazy low prices.

So I would get things like gallons of coconut oil, apple cider vinegar, some of the flours. And actually, Azure standard has an organic farm here in Oregon, and they grow a lot of herbs, and spices. And they even have pastured meat and lamb. So I was ordering a lot of frozen meat from them.

Angie Alt: You know, Azure Standard has been around for a really long time. I mean, way back when my family was doing when I was a kid, they didn’t even offer non-GMO products, because there wasn’t GMO yet.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Angie Alt: They were always kind of the number one place to go if you wanted really high quality, organic food that was really inexpensive. And you know, my aunt and my mom and my grandma would band together and get these big orders. My family and my aunt and uncle’s family both had four kids, so they were trying to feed 8 kids on really good quality food. We would use the food we got there to supplement the hunting and fishing that my dad and uncle were doing. And the garden that we grew.

My grandma was really into herbal and medicinal teas, and she could get big bulk orders of that from Azure Standard. It was really great.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, it’s like Christmas. Meeting the truck, and having all your bulk groceries.

Angie Alt: Yeah!

Mickey Trescott: And they actually have a lot of stuff that, if anyone lives rurally, maybe you’re on a farm or you have some animals. They have a lot of goods that are really good for animals. So back when I lived in Seattle and had chickens, they had the only non-GMO soy-free chicken feed at a price that I could afford. So I ordered our chicken feed from them, and all that kind of stuff.

They even sold like root vegetables, and pantry storage foods. So I would get a lot of onions. Things that we’ve talked about this before; not really worrying too much if there’s a blemish on your veggies. It’s totally normal, and especially with those root veggies. It does not matter. So you can get an amazing price on that stuff from them.

Angie Alt: Right. And it’s a really good chance to meet your kind of local real food advocate community. I remember when we would go to the semi to pick up the foods. There would be all these other people that were kind of into that same health conscious lifestyle.

Mickey Trescott: You’re kind of like; “What did you get?” {laughs}

Angie Alt: Right.

Mickey Trescott: Like swapping stories of what they’re getting and what they’re doing with it. It’s really fun.

Angie Alt: Right. I remember I used to love; even when I was a kid, I used to love to browse their catalog. Which I don’t even know if they put out a catalog, anymore. Maybe you just order everything on their online site. But yeah; great resource, you guys.

Mickey Trescott: And it’s pretty cool that it’s been around so long. So www.AzureStandard.com is their website if you guys want to check it out. And they have some videos online. Trust us; it’s not scary to join a drop. I remember the first time I did it, I was like; who are these people, and how does this work? They explain everything on the website. And the prices are probably in line with the cheapest you can get for some of these high-quality foods. So they do a really great service for our community.

3. Bulk membership stores [11:39]

Angie Alt: Ok, so another possibility, which is kind of the opposite of Azure Standards in terms of everybody knowing about it, is Costco. Costco is a members-only, big box, discount retailer. You have to pay a membership fee every year. But there is quite a bit of benefit to having that Costco membership.

The standard membership is just $60 per year. It let’s you purchase products for your home and family at Costco locations and on their website. And the prices are greatly reduced, because again they’re buying these such huge bulk quantities. And then you can get an executive membership for $120 per year. And that membership gives you a 2% reward, up to $1000. So you can kind of earn money a little bit, as your spending money.

The Paleo Mom has a guide on her website to AIP Costco shopping that is a very helpful resource.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah; are you a Costco shopper, Angie? What’s been your experience with them?

Angie Alt: Well, so this is interesting. We used to be Costco members, but my husband is kind of a Costco fanatic. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

Angie Alt: So, it didn’t really work that well for us. Because he’d be like; “Oh, look at this, a 2-gallon jar of pickled eggs!”

Mickey Trescott: Oh my gosh.

Angie Alt: And I would be like; “We do not need this.” So we have a small family, and we don’t live close to our extended family. So sharing all of that with other people didn’t really make sense for us in the long-term. But I know that for families that are a little bit bigger, or have an extended family around them, Costco can be an enormous win. How about you?

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, we don’t have a Costco membership. But both my mom and my dad have Costco memberships, and I will kind of tag along with them when they go. Maybe once or twice a year just to pick up a few things.

I’ve actually been really impressed, as the years have gone on, at their selection of more real food options. So things that I see really frequently are some high-quality cooking oil. So things like gallons of coconut oil, avocado oil. Sometimes they have good olive oil, but you know, you’ve got to kind of do your research on the supplier there.

As far as meat, I’ve heard that they have a lot more grass-fed meat. It’s pretty reliable to find there. Pasture raised chicken, and some frozen, wild-caught salmon. So those are all things that you would be eating on AIP, and by buying in bulk and having a deep freezer you could definitely save there.

During the summer, they have amazing prices on organic berries. So they’ll have organic strawberries, raspberries. Sometimes even blueberries, which is really fun if you’re going to do any kind of making gummies, or freezing for the winter. That can be a really great source there.

And then they have some great home goods. They have a nice stainless pot and pan set that I bought. They have a Vitamix that they occasionally will sell for a really great price. Magic Bullet, some of those sorts of things. So if you’re kind of outfitting your kitchen, too, Costco can be a great place to think about. Maybe picking up some of those home goods, too.

Angie Alt: Right. Right. The avocado oil is the one that stands out. When we did have a membership, I don’t think there’s a better price on avocado oil than what Costco offers.

Mickey Trescott: Yep.

Angie Alt: Yep. I think people should definitely check it out if they can really benefit from those big bulk orders of stuff.

Mickey Trescott: Next we’re going to chat about some of the different online options. This can be really huge for any of you that have limited access to shopping due to where you live. And when used carefully, some of them can actually equal a really big savings. So we’ll be talking about that next.

Angie Alt: A quick word from our title sponsor this season; The Nutritional Therapy Association. How you plan and purchase food can significantly affect your health; both in body and budget. Well-informed, proactive planning makes a big difference. Our sponsor, the Nutritional Therapy Association, launched a new, fully online, nutritional therapy consultant course that emphasizes a wide-range of integrated nutrition and lifestyle strategies to transform health.

The new curriculum includes culinary healing modules that empower NTCs with practical knowledge and skills necessary to source, prep, and plan meals for themselves and their nutrition clients. Covering everything from shopping practices to knife skills, from meal prep to fermentation.

It also trains NTCs to address the wider context of health and healing with lifestyle strategies. I completed my NTC training in 2016, and it has been enormously positive for my practice and my ability to help others achieve their wellness goals. If you guys want to learn more about how to become an NTC, and check out their free, Nutritional Therapy 101 course, go to www.NutritionalTherapy.com.

4. Online buying options [16:34]

Angie Alt: OK, you guys. So now that we’ve covered some of the in-person buying club options, we wanted to continue the discussion and talk about some of the options out there for buying food online. Mickey, when did buying food and supplements online not seem weird to you anymore?

Mickey Trescott: It’s weird. Because since getting into the whole real food movement, we also, around that 2012 time, there was a really big shift in the concept that you could actually be buying food and supplements online. And I definitely remember that. It was kind of like; go back to eating real foods that are not packaged and not processed. But also, there’s this other whole source that is on the internet that seemed a little bit strange.

So, I actually started ordering supplements on Amazon when I was going through my illness. I think that’s around 2013. And back then, when we started AIP, there really weren’t any snacky, shelf-stable options out there.

Angie Alt: No. Nothing.

Mickey Trescott: There was no cassava flour. There were no Power Balls. There was nothing like that. So those kind of fun snacky options were not an option. And supplements are actually really expensive in the store, so I figured that out pretty quick and I started saving money there pretty early on.

I’d say around 2015 was the year that I really started buying food online. I had gone to PaleoFx, and I was introduced to Thrive Market through them. And I kind of went online. I definitely didn’t jump on the bandwagon right away. I think it took me another whole year to really come around to the concept that I could actually be saving money by ordering a bunch of stuff online. But then I was getting epic bars and things on Amazon, so it was kind of a slow roll.

But I’m at the point now where I do a lot of my shopping, especially for things that are not shelf stable and household goods, online. What about you, Angie?

Angie Alt: I think I started in about 2012 with Tropical Traditions. And then not very long after that, I started buying some fat from FatWorks, too, online. At the time, sourcing the high-quality fat, especially, still wasn’t that easy in my local grocery stores and through my farmers. Like getting palm shortening, or coconut oil. Especially in bulk, because I was using so much of that kind of stuff at that time. Being able to find really high-quality olive oil that I trusted. And then animal fats like lard, or tallow. That just really wasn’t available quite yet.

I also started used Tropical Traditions later when I was trying to figure out egg reintroductions. I realized that I might have a soy issue, and not really an egg issue. A lot of you will know that chickens are often fed a diet that has some soy in it, and that can come through in the egg itself and cause issues when you’re trying to reintroduce. And Tropical Traditions was the only source out there that I could find with 100% soy-free eggs.

It was a little too expensive to maintain over the long-term, but I did it a few times. Ordered eggs from them, so I could test out my theory and figure out if it was soy or eggs. It turned out to be soy, guys.

And then in 2015, I started using other online retailers. There were just more options. And in the past year, we started expanding a lot, my husband and I, in an effort to not only save money, but also we both have very committed passionate full-time careers in our home. So we were trying to save time. Being able to order things online really made a big difference. I think I’ve mentioned it before; shopping in my neck of the woods is very time intensive because of the population density. So ordering online has been a lifesaver.

Mickey Trescott: I actually forgot about Tropical Traditions, but I definitely ordered a lot of coconut oil from them. Actually, I still order coconut oil from them, because I think it has the best flavor and it’s the cleanest. And that era of the soy-free eggs; that’s when I was ordering the feed from Azure Standard. Because I was in the same boat, trying to re-intro eggs and figure out; is this because my chickens are eating soy feed, or because I’m allergic to the eggs?

Angie Alt: Right.

Mickey Trescott: And, same deal. It was the soy.

Angie Alt: Yep.

Mickey Trescott: Really funny.

Angie Alt: Ok, so what are some options for people to use to buy food online?

Mickey Trescott: Thrive Market is something that I love. It’s an online store. It’s kind of like a Costco. So there’s a $60 membership, but they do have a 30-day free trial. So you can go on and you can make as many orders as you want. And I think if you hit $50, it’s free shipping. So it’s very affordable to try. When you buy a membership, your membership actually sponsors one for a low-income family. So we love that charity component that they have.

Their prices are about 25-50% off the list price for natural products. So I would say if you live in an urban area and you have a variety of stores that have competitive pricing, their prices might not be mind-blowing for you. But for me, I live in a rural area. So any of the stores around here, I don’t have a specialty grocer that puts things on sale at all. So all of those natural products in my local stores are like the exact highest price they could possibly be. So I save a lot of money by shopping with Thrive Market.

And I actually get every pantry item I possibly can from them. Spices, nuts, alternative flours like cassava flour. I get a lot of oils from them. They have a great olive oil that I love. I get vinegars there. Chocolate, of course.

And then, actually, I think the area where I save the most money using their service is by getting all of my personal care products and my natural cleaning products. So this is things like the 7th generation dish soap that I use, and the laundry soap, and Dr. Bronner’s, and that kind of thing. A bottle of Dr. Bronner’s at my local store is $16 for one of those big bottles. And on thrive, they’re usually like $11 or $12. So that’s a big savings.

And then the convenience, for me. Just the regular grocery store is a half-hour away. Specialty grocer is an hour away. So in addition to that cost savings, I get a big savings just in having that stuff delivered to my house.

The biggest downside in the beginning with Thrive was actually their shipping was very slow. So it used to take a week to 10 days to get an order from them. Which, when you’re used to working with Amazon, which we’re going to talk about in a minute, is a little frustrating. But I’ve actually noticed, I think their warehouses have expanded. Because I’ve been getting my orders in three to four days, recently.

Angie Alt: That’s nice. So I think your point about whether or not you live in an urban area with a lot of different grocery store options and competitive pricing was a really good one. I don’t use Thrive as much as you. I don’t have it dialed in like Mickey does; in part because some of the prices are actually better in my stores. Dr. Bronner’s is a really good example. I can usually find it for $11 or $12 on sale somewhere, for one of those big bottles.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, like Trader Joe’s is where I used to buy it. And I don’t have a Trader Joe’s by me. So, I actually added up all of my savings. I’ve been ordering roughly once a month for all of 2017, and I saved $900 by shopping with them.

Angie Alt: That’s awesome.

Mickey Trescott: So definitely worth that $60 membership. But I think it matters if you use it, and what you get from them. Because I’ve definitely heard from other people like you, Angie, if you’re in an urban area and you have some areas with good prices, it might not work out to be that cheap. And also, it depends what you buy from them, too.

Angie Alt: Yeah. I do still order some of my personal care products through them, from time to time. Because it is a great option.

Ok, let’s talk about the infamous Amazon. Of course.

Mickey Trescott: I have to be honest; I’ve always been a little weirded out by ordering food on Amazon. I haven’t totally gotten into it. But if there’s ever something I can’t get anywhere else, I get it on Amazon.

Angie Alt: Right. It’s like; if you’ve scoured every other option and you just can’t find it, it’s probably on Amazon.

Mickey Trescott: It’s free to shop. If you pay $100 a year for Amazon Prime, which most of us do, you get free 2-day shipping. Which is really convenient. I’ll run my supplements until literally I have two days left, and then reorder. {laughs}

Angie Alt: I do the same thing.

Mickey Trescott: I don’t know. You’re maximizing your warehouse space in your kitchen.

Angie Alt: Right.

Mickey Trescott: And then if you live in an area where they have Amazon Fresh, a Prime membership gets you some mileage there. I definitely don’t live anywhere near somewhere where anyone would deliver groceries to me.

Angie Alt: So, we do have the option for Amazon Fresh in our area, and we recently tried it out. And I have to say, there were some bumps, for sure. Because it’s a new service. They’re just doing this as they kind of team up with Whole Foods. So it wasn’t completely accident free, getting our order. But we did give it a shot. I think they’ll probably improve as they roll out the service. And it was handy.

The things that I usually rely on more, for Amazon, are the shelf-stable stuff that I want to have. Things like Yucan Crunch. Things like KC Natural’s barbecue sauces; AIP barbecue sauces. I order them every couple of months, and have a little pack in my cupboard. Things like that.

Also, I tend to order a lot of my cooking tools off of Amazon.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, they have some really great prices. Especially during their sales season. So like Prime Day and Black Friday, you guys can be on the lookout for things like crazy deals on Instant Pots, stuff like that, if whatever you’re looking for happens to be on sale. You can get super lucky with an Amazon super sale.

Angie Alt: And they have hundreds of really cute gummy molds. I got all of my gummy molds from Amazon. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Oh yeah. Oh yeah. You’ll never find a selection of really specific cookware anywhere like Amazon. It just blows stores out of the water.

Angie Alt: Yeah. OK, how about Tropical Traditions? Let’s tell everybody about them. We kind of alluded to them earlier.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. So Tropical Traditions is a company that; what I love about them is they kind of narrowed their focus. They’re not trying to be a purveyor of every food. But they just have really high-quality source of tropical oils. So they have great coconut oils and coconut products. This is how I first got introduced to them. I use their gold label coconut oil, which is the least heat processed, the least refined. It’s really creamy, and it has a really good flavor. They also have varying grades, so depending on what you’re going to use it for. And they also have other coconut products. Like coconut butter, coconut flakes. I absolutely love their stuff.

They also have some high-quality meat and fish and soy free eggs. I haven’t purchased their meat. Actually, I’ve purchased turkeys from them. One thanksgiving I tried out their turkeys. They had pasture raised, completely free-range turkey. Super delicious. I find the prices of their meat and fish to be a lot higher than what I can find locally. So that doesn’t work as a source for me. But if you’re in an area that it’s kind of hard to find, and you’re willing to pay what they’re asking, I think they’re a good source there.

And they do have those soy free eggs. Which if you’re doing reintroductions, that can really be a great source for people that are worried about maybe the soy and the eggs. To test that out.

Angie Alt: And they do have; they offer discounted products and coupons really often. So what I do is I usually, once a year, order a big bulk order of palm shortening and coconut oil. I kind of wait and watch for when they run great discounts or have coupons.

One of the discounts they run is free shipping on those big gallon-sized containers of palm shortening and coconut oil. Which is really great, because they’re huge. So the shipping can be kind of pricey on them. But I’ll do that. At the beginning of the year, I ordered palm shortening. You could buy three gallons for free shipping. It was really inexpensive to do that, and then I shared with a friend.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, another thing to know about them is they run tons of sales all the time. So I will never go to their website and just buy everything list price without free shipping. I wait and if you follow them on Facebook or you get their newsletter. I find their newsletter a little bit overwhelming, because they send it a lot. But they always have a deal going on.

Like their coconut oil, I actually wait until they have the two for one. So they’ll do the gallon of gold coconut oil, and then they’ll throw in a second one for free.

Angie Alt: Yep. I do the same thing.

Mickey Trescott: And then if you find a coupon for free shipping, you’re kind of in super luck. I only order from them once or twice a year. But again, it’s that bulk. And the quality; I’ve never had a coconut oil that tastes as great as theirs. So I love it.

Angie Alt: Yeah, and I’ve kind of got it timed now. Like, a gallon of each of those. A gallon of the palm shortening definitely lasts me a full year. A gallon of the coconut oil probably lasts me around 6 to 7 months, I guess. I usually go through about two a year. So a really good option there.

Angie Alt: Ok. So there’s also a few online specialty stores. They don’t really have a membership. Usually have free shipping over a certain amount. Let’s talk about a few of those.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, we just wanted to mention some of these. They’re not all the same, but they have the same idea where they’re trying to create a nice, online store that’s curated with really high-quality products. The first one we’re going to mention is ShopAIP. They are the first ever, 100% AIP compliant online shop. They donate 5% of their products annually to autoimmune related causes. So obviously they’re kind of in this community with us. They’re offering a lot of products that are of interest to people that are on AIP, and if you guys want to have a shopping experience that is 100% AIP, it’s definitely the place to go.

Similarly, there are a couple of other companies. One is Barefoot Provisions. And another is called Wild Mountain Paleo Market. So these places both have online stores. You guys can Google them and look them up. They both offer more wider paleo type options. They all have different offerings from each other. So if you’re kind of like an Epic person, you might find one of these stores has more of the goods that you’re looking for. But they all have really well curated stuff. And some of those hardest to find specialty items that you might not find on Thrive or Amazon.

I know Wild Mountain Paleo Market has their own AIP compliant pemmican bar, that’s kind of similar to an Epic bar that is super tasty. I actually prefer the flavor of it over the Epic bars. So they have some things like that that are a little bit unusual that you’ll only find there.

5. Buying meat online [31:32]

Angie Alt: OK, last but not least. Let’s talk about buying meat online. Which can be a little crazy. In the beginning, it seems a little crazy. But there are some really great options out there.

Mickey Trescott: You know, I love all of these new companies that are trying to think about how we buy meat. Because that’s one of the hardest things about transitioning to this lifestyle, is just finding a really good source of meat. And not everyone has a farmer in their backyard.

So Butcher Box is the first company we’re going to talk about. They have a monthly subscription box with a variety of meats that are great for people that don’t have a freezer. So how it works is you pick out the size of box. It’s almost like a CSA. Like an online meat CSA. They source a variety of proteins from really great farms in the US. So they might send you a couple of pork chops. Maybe a chicken. Maybe some ground beef. Depending on the size of the box that you’re getting. And they’ll mail it to you in a cooler box once a month. So that’s really great for people that don’t have a lot of space to store things.

I know Angie and I have both tried their service. I’m like a bulk meat hoarder, so I don’t need a service like that. But I thought that the quality of the meat was really top notch.

Angie Alt: Yeah, I thought the quality of the meat was really great too. And I used it for a short time back in; hmm, I don’t remember if that 2017 or 2016. All the years are blurring together, Mick.

Mickey Trescott: I know. We’ve been at this for a while.

Angie Alt: We’ve been at this for a while. But anyway. I tried it out for a while while I was kind of waiting for my farmer, who was getting together a meat CSA for herself. And then once she got that together, I of course wanted to support somebody local. And you know, a farm that I could see and I could see those animals and how they were living and everything. It turned out to be an option that I didn’t need in the long term. But in that interim piece, it was great. It was really helpful.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. So also, there’s a company called Crowd Cow. This is a really interesting startup that allows people to purchase a portion of a cow online. So they’ll put on their website that a farm has a certain amount of shares. And then you can purchase as much of the cow that works for you. And they kind of crowd source the selling of all of the cow so that everyone gets a really great price. It’s almost like an online cow-buying club.

Angie Alt: Yeah. And I love the name. Crowd Cow. It’s so cute and fun. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. It really is.

Angie Alt: Ok, so the old standby that a lot of us know about in the community, because they’ve kind of been around with us all for quite a while is US Wellness Meats. They sell meat by the cut online. I think pretty much everybody in the AIP community knows that they’re a great source of sugar-free bacon, and they also have a lot of pastured organ meats.

Mickey Trescott: Yep. They sell meat by the cut. So they have more of a traditional store. When you go to US Wellness; I think it’s actually grasslandbeef.com. You’ll see the meat being sold by the cut. Which, for me, when I’m doing recipe development, a lot of times I run out of organ meats because I buy the whole animals and I actually always buy from US Wellness when that happens. Because they have a really great, clean source. Their poultry is all pastured. And everything is a great high quality. And I think their prices on the organ meats are really good.

They also have a great sugar-free uncured bacon ends, which are kind of like the random pieces left over from when they slice and package the regular bacon. And when I make pate, it doesn’t matter, I can just chop that up, fry it up, and use that fat to make that recipe. It doesn’t have to be in a perfectly cut strip. So that’s a little hack there. I like that they sell those ends. It provides an affordable way for people to get their hands on some great bacon.

Angie Alt: Yeah. And a few times in the past, when I’ve kind of been in desperation for bones, and things like that for bone broth, I’ve ordered from them. When I was working on my first cookbook, I kind of ran into a tight spot, and needed some specialty cuts, and I got them from them, too. So very helpful.

And then for seafood, a great option online is Vital Choice Seafood. This is really high-quality seafood sold online.

Mickey Trescott: Yep. They have a great store, and some great products. Both frozen and then they also have some canned products, as well.

Angie Alt: Yeah. And I think, if I remember right, Vital Choice was started by an actual fisherman. He was really wanting to make sure that people had this option.

Mickey Trescott: That’s awesome. I know there’s a lot of you guys in the middle of the country that don’t have the access to high-quality seafood that we do living on the coast. So having frozen seafood is a really great option. Especially because if the company is doing it right, which I think this is Vital Choices’ practice. They’ll freeze the fish on the boat, so it’s super, super fresh. I have a little bit of an issue with histamine with seafoods, and I can definitely tell when I don’t get seafood that has been handled properly. So I actually almost exclusively eat frozen seafood, because it minimizes that risk of having a histamine reaction.

Angie Alt: Right. Ok, so hopefully you guys aren’t going to find this list of options too overwhelming. We recommend you check out all of these options, and pick one or two to test out for a while and see if you like their system, if you like their products. And if it actually helps you save money. Mickey and I are definitely not using all of these options all the time ourselves. It was about finding out what was the most convenient and affordable for us. And we hope that you’ll be able to take these choices and do something similar to kind of tweak your budget and stay with the real food approach. So, we’ll be back next week with another episode, you guys. Take care everyone.

Mickey Trescott: Bye guys!

Angie Alt: Thanks for joining us on this episode of the Autoimmune Wellness podcast. We’re honored to have you as a listener, and we hope that you’ve gained some useful information.

Mickey Trescott: Did you know that we have dozens of informative articles about living well with autoimmune disease, and over 250 elimination phase compliant recipes on our website, updated multiple times per week? Make sure to click on over to AutoimmuneWellness.com. Follow us on social media. And sign up for our newsletter to find out about all of this new content.

We’re either at Autoimmune Paleo, or at Autoimmune Wellness on any of these channels. You can sign up for our newsletter at the bottom of any page on our website. Don’t forget to connect with the AIP community by using the hashtag #AutoimmuneWellness.

Angie Alt: If you enjoyed the podcast, please leave us a review in iTunes, as this helps others find us. See you next time!

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The post S3 E5 – Buying Clubs + Online Markets appeared first on Autoimmune Wellness.

Apr 30 2018

38mins

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S3 E4 – Sourcing Vegetables w/ Tyler Boggs

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Welcome to The Autoimmune Wellness Podcast Season 3: Real Food on a Budget. We’re dedicating this season to discussing an aspect of natural healing that often gets left out of the conversation: affordability. We’ll be chatting with experts and peers from the AIP community about how to best balance money with your health priorities.

This season is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association (NTA), a holistic nutrition school that trains and certifies nutritional therapy practitioners and consultants with an emphasis on bioindividual nutrition. Learn more about them by visiting NutritionalTherapy.com, or read about our experiences going through their NTP and NTC programs in our comparison article.

Season 3 Episode 4 is all about the best ways to source produce — veggies and fruit — with budget in mind. This is a deep dive into all things produce sourcing! We cover our personal sourcing tips and how we personally save money, and we chat with our guest, Tyler Boggs of Heart2Heart Farms, about the benefits of CSAs and how to source your fruits and veggies if you can’t afford organic. Scroll down for the full episode transcript!

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If you’d like to download the .mp3, you can do so by following this link.

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Full Transcript:

Mickey Trescott: Welcome to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast, a resource for those seeking to live well with chronic illness. I’m Mickey Trescott, a nutritional therapy practitioner living well with autoimmune disease in Oregon. I’m the author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage both Hashimoto’s and Celiac disease.

Angie Alt: And I’m Angie Alt. I’m a certified health coach and nutritional therapy consultant, also living well with autoimmune disease in Maryland. I’m the author of The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook, and I’m using diet and lifestyle to best manage my endometriosis, lichen sclerosis, and Celiac disease.

After recovering our health by combining the best of conventional medicine with effective and natural dietary and lifestyle interventions, Mickey and I started blogging at www.AutoimmuneWellness.com, where our collective mission is seeking wellness and building community.

We also wrote a book called The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook together that serves as a do-it-yourself guidebook to living well with chronic illness.

Mickey Trescott: If you’re looking for more information about the autoimmune protocol, make sure to sign up for our newsletter at autoimmunewellness.com, so we can send you our free quick start guide. It contains printable AIP food lists, a 2-week food plan, a 90-minute batch cooking video, a mindset video, and food reintroduction guides.

This season of the podcast, real food on a budget is brought to you by our title sponsor, The Nutritional Therapy Association.

Angie Alt: A quick disclaimer: The content in this podcast is intended as general information only, and is not to be substituted for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Onto the podcast!

Topics:

1. Budget friendly sourcing of produce [2:14]
2. Personal sourcing tips from Mickey and Angie [8:40]
3. Guest interview with Tyler Boggs of Heart2Heart Farms [14:22]
4. Personal approach to budgeting for produce [18:54]
5. Produce scoring stories [24:24]
6. Sourcing when you can’t afford organic [29:45]
7. Benefits of a CSA [34:01]

Angie Alt: Hi everyone! Angie here. Welcome back to the Autoimmune Wellness podcast season 3. How are you doing, Mickey?

Mickey Trescott: I’m doing great, how about you Angie?

Angie Alt: I’m good. I’ve been flying around to the West Coast a bunch, but I am home today and ready to chat about our next topic.

Mickey Trescott: I know, Angie’s been like a little ping-pong ball, back and forth.

Angie Alt: It’s been kind of crazy. I just traveled out to the West three times in three weeks, you guys. But I’m ready to do it. Anything for the cause. {laughs}

Mickey Trescott: {laughs}

1. Budget friendly sourcing of produce [2:14]

Angie Alt: Ok, so today we’re continuing our discussion related to the topic this season, real food on a budget. This episode is going to be about how to source produce. From veggies to fruit with a budget in mind.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, so we really wanted to take a deep dive into all things produce sourcing. Because there’s kind of a lot of nuance here. So if you guys have the Autoimmune Wellness Handbook, you will be familiar with the concept of good, better, and best that we talk about when it comes to food sourcing in general. But we kind of wanted to go over it in terms of produce.

So what this means is that you have a few different layers of quality that you can choose to buy your produce. So instead of saying everybody needs to buy the highest level, and this is the only way to heal. We’re kind of presenting a variety of ways that you guys can plan your sourcing. So that you can make the most use of the resources that you have.

So first category is good. This is for those of you who can’t get all organic fruits and vegetables. What we recommend doing is to start with the Environmental Working Groups list of dirtiest and cleanest produce. If you guys do a quick Google, type in EWG dirty dozen, and clean 15, you’ll come up with a cute little chart where the Environmental Working Group has tested all the fruits and vegetables in production in the US, and they’ve identified the ones that have the highest chemical residue of pesticides and stuff.

So, this is a really great way to kind of prioritize your fruit and veggie choices, right Angie?

Angie Alt: Yeah. Well, this is a way for you to kind of get the max out of the foods that you can afford to buy organic, and kind of be really strategic about those purchases, so you’re not having to spend so much money on totally organic and utilizing the research to do that.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. So the 2017 dirty dozen list; I have it pulled up here. They don’t have the 2018 list out yet. I think it’s coming out soon. But the dirty dozen. These are the fruits and vegetables with the highest amount of pesticides. Strawberries, apples, nectarines, peaches, celery, grapes, cherries, spinach, tomatoes, sweet bell peppers, cherry tomatoes, and cucumbers. We know you guys are probably not eating tomatoes and sweet bell peppers, if you’re on AIP. But those are going to be foods that have the highest pesticides. And you know, some of those are pretty surprising to me. Like cucumbers, I maybe wouldn’t have thought. But you know, those are the ones that were tested.

The clean 15 list has avocados, sweet corn, pineapple, cabbage, sweet peas, onions, mangos, asparagus, papaya, kiwi, eggplant, honeydew, grapefruit, cantaloupe, and cauliflower. So these were the vegetables that were shown to have the least amount of pesticides. So they might be ok for you to get conventional.

So some things like cauliflower, or cabbage, or onions. These are vegetables that are AIP friendly. Avocado. I buy conventional avocados a lot just because they’re on the top of the clean 15 list, they don’t have a lot of pesticides, and also they have a nice thick skin. And organic avocados; super expensive.

Angie Alt: Super expensive. Yeah, I do totally the same thing. One thing I didn’t realize, though. I hadn’t realized that cauliflower was on the clean 15 list, and I’ve been buying organic. So I’ll probably switch up. Because I like to use a lot of different cauliflower in my cooking.

Mickey Trescott: Yep. Yeah, so in addition to the dirty dozen and the clean 15 and kind of being able to prioritize there; something else you can do is watch for some sales on organic local in-season produce. So it’s usually way more economical to buy this way and checking out frozen vegetables. A lot of times freezing preserves nutrients, and is also lower cost. So if you guys are just getting started with upping the quality of your food, some of those recommendations might work for you.

Angie Alt: Right. So moving onto the better category. So this is the next step up in terms of budgeting and sourcing. If you can avoid some organic produce, you can focus on organic versions of those on the dirty dozen list. And round out a variety with the non-organic fruits and vegetables from that clean 15 list that we talked about. And you can shop at your local farmer’s market, and look for great deals on organic local produce.

If you focus on the local produce, the idea here is that you might find that your budget actually accommodates more of the organic. Because you won’t have the shipping cost as part of the premium you’re paying at the store.

Mickey Trescott: And then the best. So if you’re going to go all out and get the best produce you possibly can, which we recommend over the long term the more you can shift that budget to kind of up the food quality all across the board, you would be getting all, or as much of your produce as possible, organic, local, and in season. A great way to do this is by joining a CSA, which stands for community supported agriculture. This is when you pay the share of a farmer’s produce at the beginning of the season, and then the farmer has that money to invest and creating that harvest. And then you pick it up weekly. Sometimes they’ll deliver it to you. And then filling in whatever you’re not getting there with a variety at the farmer’s market co-op, natural food store.

I would also add her that the very, very best is actually growing your own. Right? So if you have complete control over all aspects of producing your food, that’s the most sustainable and it’s going to be the freshest. It’s going to be, obviously, the most in-season because you don’t have all the tricks that all the industrial even organic food growers have up their sleeves. And it’s going to be really convenient; it’s going to be right at home.

2. Personal sourcing tips from Mickey and Angie [8:30]

Angie Alt: Right. So great option if you can do that. So maybe we should talk about how we source our produce, Mickey.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. So I live in Willamette Valley in Oregon. I live in an area where I can grow a lot. And actually something that I am striving to do better every single year is to become more self-reliant and grow my own food. So, we have a big herb garden that we use year-round. I grow lots of greens like kale, chard, lettuces, and zucchini.

Something that I learned, even when I lived in Seattle in the city when I really didn’t have a lot of food budget for good produce, was I actually found a chart online that said the most expensive produce per ounce from high to low. And actually, the highest cost that we pay in the store is actually herbs and greens. So things like cilantro, rosemary, thyme. And then the greens like the baby lettuces, spinach, kale, chard. And those are actually the easiest things to grow and they take the smallest amount of room. They don’t need a super deep bed. A lot of them can be grown in pots. So those are things that I prioritize growing just because of cost.

Another thing that I do is I pick my own in the summer. In the summer, there’s a crazy bounty of things like berries. My husband and I will go to the farm and we’ll pick pounds and pounds of blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and then we’ll freeze them. And like right now, it’s the middle of winter, and we still have a bunch of frozen berries from the summer. Something else we do is we harvest persimmons from a persimmon tree in the winter, and so kind of the flip side.

And then I have different produce sourcing depending on if it’s summer or if it’s winter. Because even though we live somewhere that food grows, it’s not totally year-round. So in the summer, that’s when it’s amazing bounty all the time. I like to go to the farmer’s market. I haven’t been doing a CSA the last couple of years because I’ve been traveling so much that it’s a little complicated trying to figure out what to do with that food. I’m considering it this year because I’m not traveling as much.

In the winter, I fill in the gaps with like a Fred Myers, which for those of you who don’t live in the Northwest, it’s kind of like a Walmart. I don’t actually have a great specialty grocer where I live. I don’t have a Whole Foods, or even a Sprouts or Trader Joe’s. So actually surprisingly, they have a pretty good selection of organic produce in the winter. It’s the same industrial organic stuff that you find at Whole Foods. Honestly, it’s a lot cheaper because it’s not in a fancy store. But that’s where I kind of round out my produce when I have to.

Angie Alt: Awesome. So, I also have a mix, depending on the season. In the summertime, I get 100% organic CSA from my local farmer. The same farmer that I get most of my meat from. And she grows a bunch of different herbs, greens, onions, some fruits. Honestly, there’s a lot of nightshades in that CSA, but my husband and daughter can enjoy some of that. or we share it with neighbors or friends.

Even when I travel, I like having the weekly CSA. I usually arrange with a friend of mine who also enjoys this quality of food and have her pick up my CSA, and basically share it with her family. Like a little gift to her when I’m traveling.

And then in the winter, I mostly use Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods, and I get a combination of organic and non-organic fruits and vegetables. Usually based on that Environmental Working Groups guide. I don’t grow a lot of my own, because I live in a pretty urban/suburban area and I don’t really have a space for that. I have done a little bit of pot gardening in the past. Growing some greens in pots and stuff on our balcony. Mostly I stick to purchasing from my local farms, or the Trader Joe’s/Whole Foods combo. So that’s it. That’s my produce sourcing.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. I think it’s good to just share with people the different ways that we get our hands on this stuff. I am blessed to live kind of in farm country, but I also don’t have a good grocery store right by me. So by necessity, I’m forced to be a little more self-reliant. And Angie, I know you have a lot of options as far as stores around you, and you can actually leverage that and shop around. It’s more convenient for you to kind of see where you can get for the best price.

Angie Alt: Right. Right. Ok, so that’s it for the first half of this episode, you guys. We’ll be back after the break with a guest who is going to help us expand these ideas. He’s kind of amazing. We can’t wait to share.

Mickey Trescott: A quick word from our title sponsor this season, the Nutritional Therapy Association. The NTA empowers it’s graduates to source, prepare, and integrate a variety of well-sourced plant foods as part of a nutrient dense diet. For example, did you know that the betaine in beets aids digestion? Chromium in romaine lettuce can help regulate blood sugar? And that brussels sprouts have been found to boost beneficial gut bacteria? Through their nutritional therapy practitioner training program, which I took in 2012, and the nutritional therapy consultant program, which Angie took in 2015, the NTA teaches students to use foods therapeutically and focuses on building foundational health by integrating customized diets based on everybody’s unique needs.

For more information on the NTA’s nutritional therapy programs, and to access their free 7-day 101 course, check out their website at www.NutritionalTherapy.com.

3. Guest interview with Tyler Boggs of Heart2Heart Farms [14:22]

Mickey Trescott: Alright guys, onto our interview for today. It’s just Mickey for this segment. Today we are speaking with Tyler Boggs, one half of the duo behind the incredible Heart2Heart Farms here in Oregon, with his wife, Elizabeth. Tyler and Elizabeth started raising animals and growing food after they converted to a real food lifestyle, but found that it was difficult to afford it. Not only did they start their farm to produce food for themselves, but they passionately developed a barter and work-trade systems to allow those in need to feed those they love.

A few short years later, Tyler has never been happier, sharing what he has and providing a sanctuary where people can nourish their bodies, minds, hearts, and souls. Other than being a good husband and father, there is no higher caller in the world to him than that. Thank you so much, Tyler, for joining us from Sherwood, Oregon. Your neighbor! As you know, we’re just kicking off a very focused podcast season dedicated to helping people making a healing diet and lifestyle fit into their budget. We know this is an area that you have a ton of expertise in, and I’m really excited to get started talking to you today.

Tyler Boggs: Thank you, Mickey. We’re super excited as well.

Mickey Trescott: Awesome. So, first we know that your farm was born out of a personal struggle to afford this high-quality food. We know a lot of other people struggle with this, too, and they might resonate with your story. So can you tell us a little bit about how those circumstances lead to the creation of Heart2Heart farms?

Tyler Boggs: Yeah. Tight budget leads to necessity. So when we decided to eat organic; it started with just becoming jaded with the food industry in general and deciding enough is enough. And we needed to get the chemicals out of our food.

And when we did that, our food bill went up to over $1400 a month. Almost immediately. And that just wasn’t sustainable. So we immediately just started to get creative. And the first thing that we thought of; I mean, a seed packet was $2. And we didn’t really know anything. I mean, I grew up on a farm. but I deployed very early and spent a bunch of years overseas. So I didn’t have much experience personally farming. So we just got on Google. We bought some seed packets and got on Google, and started planting and failing miserably. But at $2 a seed packet, you can have a lot of failure and still produce a bunch of food.

And the result was, we actually ended up producing more than we needed in many areas, and giving that away. and then people would request. Once we started doing that, people would say; I’d like something of this, and I’d like some of this. And it grew, no pun intended, organically. And then we started the farm just through that. So believe it or not, it was seed packets and Google.

Mickey Trescott: Wow.

Tyler Boggs: Desperation. We made the commitment that we were done with the food industry. And we would do whatever it takes. You would be surprised at what $20 in seed will buy. A weekly grocery budget for us would produce a whole season full of food.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, that’s really interesting. I think a lot of people aren’t really even familiar with those seed packets. But what would you even ballpark estimate one of those $2 packets of seeds; for something even as expensive at the store as like kale or lettuce or something. What’s the dollar value ballpark for something like that?

Tyler Boggs: You’re looking at probably 1000%.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Tyler Boggs: It’s 100 times. It’s super, super; at retail prices, that $2 seed packet will produce hundreds and hundreds of dollars’ worth of produce at a retail rate. Especially if you’re talking about organic produce.

And for us, it was really just the scary piece was that we’d never done it and we didn’t want to mess it up. And not having the basic foundation really prevented us, for a long time, from just starting to put seeds in the ground. But really, that’s it. It’s just starting to put seeds in the ground.

My wife is a part of all of these wonderful Facebook groups where she can just take a picture of the plant, and post it to this group, and they can tell her what it needs. At the very beginning, that was critical. They’d say; it needs more water. The soil doesn’t have enough nitrogen. And these plant experts were just willing to give all their incredible advice. I mean, it really didn’t take much. It was just the getting started and overcoming that fear of messing it up.

4. Personal approach to budgeting for produce [18:54]

Mickey Trescott: I love that. that’s so cool. So, can you tell me a little bit about your family’s personal approach to stretching your food budget, especially in terms of produce. How do you make the most of what you’ve got?

Tyler Boggs: That’s a super great question. And that was probably the biggest challenge up front. Number one was self-reliance. Really deciding that we were going to be the beginning and end. We were going to take whatever action we needed to to make sure that our family was eating chemical free. So self-reliance, and then that action step. We were going to act, even if we didn’t have all the information. We were just going to get started.

But the other piece that was really important, was seasonal abundance and eating seasonally. One of the things that we’ve found is, whether it’s a farmer or somebody who just has a garden in their back yard. There are crops that over produce. Whether it’s tomatoes in the late summer, or whether it’s zucchini in the early fall. It doesn’t take; one bush will provide more than a family needs. So there are lots and lots and lots of people. As long as you’re willing to eat what’s available seasonally and search that stuff out. In the summer you’ve got pears and apple trees all down the highway and the roads. It’s just a matter of finding them. And they’ll drop far more fruit than anybody generally uses. So if we’re willing to shift our diet and eat what’s in season, and what’s abundant; that really helped immensely, as well. Just looking for those opportunities. Finding out what gets ripe and when.

I remember, every time we’d go for a walk or go for a drive, we’d write down where apple trees, and pear trees, and fruit trees were on the sides of the road. Because inevitably, all you’ve got to know is when they get ripe, and they just drop the fruit. 90% of it rots on the ground. So self-reliance, seasonal eating.

Preserving; preservation. Liz is a fermentationist. So preservation is a huge piece of what she does in fermentation. But also drying and dehydrating. And then pressure canning, and even water bath canning. So, preserve, preserve, preserve. When those things are in abundance, and you get 100 pounds of apples, obviously we can’t eat those before they go bad. So finding a way to make sure that they last. Even if you can get them to last a couple of months. But ideally, last until the next harvest. So increasing our knowledge in preservation.

And then building community I think is the next step. Because it’s challenging to go this road alone. So we started with one other family. As soon as we got really excited about it, we found a really close friend that was in the same boat. Hurting financially but really wanted to improve their health and change their lifestyle. It’s amazing how much more energy you have working with one other couple. And instead of doing it just for yourself, which can become monotonous and tiresome; now all of a sudden, you’re kind of the champion and cheerleader for somebody else who you know is hurting as well. And it makes it much harder to quit.

And then ultimately building a network. Three, four, five families where we can all keep our eyes out for trees that are going into harvest and abundances becoming available. And then, eventually reaching out and developing a gleaning network with farmers. Where, when you’ve got a team of three or four or five families; now all of a sudden you can be super useful to a farmer when they have abundance, either gather that or get it to families in need.

So I would say, if I were to really boil it down as far as our personal approach, it would be just those five areas. Self-reliance, eating seasonally and taking advantage of seasonal abundance that’s wasted, preservation, building community, and then ultimately developing a larger network that can keep their eyes open for stuff that’s going to waste.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. I love that, Tyler. And something that I’m noticing. There’s a really strong theme in personal responsibility. It really sounds like you guys didn’t allow yourselves to be victim to not having enough money to afford what you want. You really were willing to go out and figure out a system in some very unconventional ways to make this work for you. And I think that’s really interesting.

A lot of people go to the store, and we have everything in all seasons. So we’re kind of lulled into thinking we can get whatever we want whenever we want. And we don’t really realize how against nature that is, right? Zucchini in January is just like; when you see things grow in the ground, you just realize how unusual that is. So I think that’s really awesome advice. And I would really encourage people to just kind of start thinking about seasonally. And how much extra there is at certain times of the year, and how they could take advantage of that. that is really smart thinking.

Tyler Boggs: And being easy on yourself. This desperation was born out of a victim mindset that had been in place for years. And so just because; so we took action once. It doesn’t mean we always took action. I think we were just kind of fed up. We were sick and tired of being sick and tired, we knew we needed to make a change, and nobody else was going to make it for us.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah.

Tyler Boggs: It just takes that one decision to go from that mindset of; we can’t afford it. To.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. What am I going to do to fix it?

Tyler Boggs: How can we figure this out.

5. Produce scoring stories [24:24]

Mickey Trescott: I love that. that’s so empowering. That’s what we’re all about. So we know that you specialize in some really creative food sourcing, and you have some opportunities for people in our community. Can you share an interesting story of scoring some delicious food for very little or no money?

Tyler Boggs: {laughs} I could bore you with probably hours of stories. When it comes to; I think as you build a network and community, and really develop the mindset. Or as we developed the mindset that we were going to do this no matter what, doors started opening. And we started talking about sharing abundance with the community. And that was inspirational to many people.

So I had a gentleman call me and say; hey, I’ve got a guy and he works in sales for this company and they sell produce. There’s a bunch of waste, and here’s his name. And when we gave him a call, that developed into a relationship with our first wholesaler, which was Nasdaq produce.

We just gave him a call and said; hey, this is what we’re doing. We’ve got a farm. we’re feeding the community. We’re upcycling and gleaning, so if there’s anything that you guys ever have that goes to waste. And this was our first wholesale account. So we would pick up 55-gallon drums. We provided them with 55-gallon drums, and they would fill them with scraps and produce that they were throwing away. and we would bring it back to the farm, and the community would sort through them and pick out anything that was good.

And that ultimately; it started in a pickup truck, and then it went to a pickup truck and horse trailer, and it eventually went to a box truck. But that was thousands and thousands of pounds, just because we made the commitment that anything we had in abundance we were going to share with the community first. And that was a 3-year relationship, which actually opened the door to most of our other relationships.

And we had a similar story where a friend had a plum tree. Or a friend of a friend of a friend was actually I think how it went. But once people heard that we were sharing; gleaning and sharing with the community. Plum trees are one of those things that are super obnoxious to people in their backyard. Because when they fall, the yellow jackets get all over, and then their kids get stung with bees. So I’ve found everybody with pear and plum trees; everybody wants you to help with because they drop massive amounts in a very short period of time, because the bees go crazy and their kids get stung.

We actually were able to go and harvest hundreds and hundreds of pounds of these plums. We did it a separate time with pear trees, as well. And we just bring it back. We dry a bunch. We gave a bunch out fresh. The ones that weren’t super pretty we dried and dehydrated. And the ones that were even less pretty, we ended up pressing. We made the apples into apple cider vinegar, and the pears into… it’s amazing what you can do with a backyard and a couple of fruit trees.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. I love that. the Pacific Northwest, especially. It kind of depends where people live. But I feel like we live in this climate that produces a bounty whether or not someone is tending or not. So between the blackberries and all the fruit trees. Even some of the greens, like dandelion greens and miner’s lettuce. Just the stuff that kind of grows as weeds everywhere. We have a bounty, whether or not we even put it there, you know?

Tyler Boggs: Absolutely. And the same is true, believe it or not, for livestock. We were talking about seasonal eating earlier. I think one of the things that happened early on for us is that I got a call from somebody that had pigs. And in the winter, pigs become super challenging. Especially if people aren’t prepared. And this person had had a couple of litters of pigs, and they weren’t prepared. And then in the middle of winter they needed to get rid of them. So they had four pigs. And they asked if we could take them. And I said; well we don’t really have room for them but I could probably find somebody that does.

So we created a relationship where if we found homes for three we would get one for free. And for us, that was a huge deal. So it just took some leg work to find homes for three pigs. Find three people that wanted; essentially they were selling them for half of what the market was selling at. So all we had to do was do a little bit of leg work, and to get a free pig out of the deal was just super incredible. And that’s hundreds and hundreds of dollars’ worth of meat.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, totally. Actually, Tyler, I don’t know if you know this, but we got a pig from you last year. My mom did. And she bred it, and now we have 9 pigs.

Tyler Boggs: {laughs} It happens quickly!

Mickey Trescott: She paid for the pig, but all of a sudden we’ve got all this meat running around. And she’s going to sell most of them. But what ended up as a couple-hundred dollar investment has turned into thousands of dollars. And they’re eating all of our waste. All of the scraps. Running around the farm, kind of taking over. So it’s kind of fun.

Tyler Boggs: That’s so good to hear. And I love that. the whole goal is to help people get self-sufficient. And it’s amazing how little it takes. People were so intimidated by it. But if we just decide that we’re going to do it, and then seek out the information. It really is simple. So great job; that’s super exciting to hear.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah! Well, I’ll tell you how it is on the other side when we’re all done with the pig experiment. But right now, it’s at peak cute. They’re really fun to have around.

Tyler Boggs: That’s awesome.

6. Sourcing when you can’t afford organic [29:45]

Mickey Trescott: So if people can’t afford only organic fruits and vegetables; this is a big topic in our community. What are your tips for sourcing?

Tyler Boggs: Oh wow. Well, sourcing. Specifically. I would say; I mean, we made a list of the top 20. You get the top 20 most toxic, and you just make sure that no matter what, those are 100% organic. And the good news is almost all of them grow incredibly well here. In your backyard. Like strawberries, and spinach, and apples, and peaches, and pears, grapes, and celery and tomatoes are on there. And potatoes. But all those things are really simple to grow and they grow really, really well here. So just making sure, whatever you do, the sourcing of those is super, super careful.

And then from there, I just really go back to question number two. Focusing on seasonal abundance. Preserving. Building community. Buying seed for those things first. Those are the most toxic. So if those are things that you’re committed to being part of your diet, go get an apple tree.

Better yet, here’s an idea. You can go get a willow branch, and soak it in water, and make willow tea. And then you can take a cutting off of an apple tree, cut a branch off, soak it in the tea for 24 hours and root it in the ground and make your own apple tree. You can make hundreds. We actually just did our starts for grapes and for figs this year. And for trimming, we found one gentleman that was pruning a fig tree. This was a couple of years back. And he just hated throwing it all on the burn pile. So we developed a relationship with him. So he would prune his fig trees. And we would come on pruning days, and we’d help him a little bit. And we’d pick up all the starts. And we just made over 800 fig trees from his pruning of his one tree this year.

Mickey Trescott: I love that. that’s super creative.

Tyler Boggs: The total cost; if you don’t’ want to make willow bark tea, you can actually buy rooting compound at a store. A bottle of it is like $6. So for $6 you create 600 trees. And it will feed hundreds of families. Anyway. That would be my recommendation, is start with the top 20. Make sure you get seeds for those.

Start talking to somebody that’s doing it so that you can get a coach, you can get a mentor. Or join a couple of Facebook groups. And really just put some seeds in the ground. Get some stuff started. The most important part is taking a step.

Mickey Trescott: I love that. Super awesome. It really shows you what you can do with a little creativity and a little work, starting to plant stuff. I know a lot of people are probably really intimidated. And I would say to any of you guys listening that has some space to grow stuff and you’re still feeling intimidated. Think of maybe how you felt before changing your diet. It was scary and unknown, and you did it, and now it’s not that hard. And I feel it’s really similar with growing things, you know. You might even start with just some herbs in a window sill before you kind of dip your toes into something like growing some of your greens or lettuces or planting a tree.

Tyler Boggs: And calling a friend, I think, is really important, as well. Every one of us knows somebody that gardens. And I felt kind of stupid calling. But just saying; hey look. Just putting it out there, and making a phone call. And saying; I’m committed to growing food for my family, but I’m really nervous about this. And I want to be transparent about my feelings. If I have questions, can I call you? And chances are great they’re going to be super excited for you and super willing to help.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah, this is a lot of people’s hobby, you know. My grandma, that’s her hobby.

Tyler Boggs: Yeah. And that support system is important.

Mickey Trescott: Yeah. I love that.

Tyler Boggs: Whether it’s in nutrition and diet, and health, or whether it’s in gardening and growing food. Having somebody that’s a mentor that you can call when you get frustrated I think is really, really wonderful.

7. Benefits of a CSA [34:01]

Mickey Trescott: I love that. So Tyler, can you talk to us about the unique opportunities that CSAs present for both farmer’s and customers? We’d like to help people understand the risk and reward trust that goes into this arrangement. So with a CSA, people are paying a lot of money up front, and that actually helps the farmers be able to produce that harvest for the rest of the year.

Tyler Boggs: Yeah, the CSA, the community supported agriculture concept is super phenomenal. My experience is that risk is pretty minimal as long as you’re dealing with somebody that has been farming for a while. Risk is that I will get less broccoli and I will get more cabbage. So if that’s the risk to you, then maybe that’s something to take into consideration.

But the opportunity is really for people to save money. Generally speaking, CSAs are a fraction of what it would be to buy at the farmer’s market, or even buy local organic. Huge increase in quality, because you’re getting stuff that’s fresh from the land. Usually it’s picked that morning, and there’s no preservation methods. No shipping. So your quality is through the roof. And then you really get to eat seasonally. You get to eat what the land is producing.

Especially if you pick a farm that’s really doing soil building and regenerative farming. If they’re focused on vermiculture and increasing mycelium mycorrhizal cultures. The organic matter in the soil is really important. Then you’re getting a higher nutritional value. Because plant can’t create nutrients out of nothing. So if you’re really careful about the soil that’s being built underneath it and the farmer’s practices, then you’re getting, in your head of lettuce, up to 5-10 times more nutrients than you would be getting even in organic commercial products. Because it’s grown consciously, and the farmer is focused on soil building.

So there’s a big difference. With the CSA specifically, the farmer gets to plan their crops. Plan in advance. People don’t realize how expensive and how time-consuming farmer’s markets are. When we did; I don’t know, our first year we did farmer’s markets I think we did 6 or 8 of them. And it was amazing in talking to the other farmers; almost all of them, their goal was to break even. And it was really scary.

Because it was so expensive and so time consuming, that their goal was just to get the word out for their farm. and they literally didn’t make any money. So people are spending tons. They’re really paying top dollar at these farmer’s markets, not realizing that the farmer is not getting any of it. Because the cost to the farmer is so expensive.

So the CSA allows the farmer to do what a farmer does. Which is farm. He gets to focus on growing his food. He doesn’t have to go to the farmer’s market. He doesn’t have to stress about low-producing crops. He can focus on what’s really doing well that season. And really do what he does best, which is nourish the soil and grow crops and healthy livestock. As opposed to marketing.

Mickey Trescott: I love that. that’s really great, Tyler. Thank you so much for that, and thank you so much for this conversation. I think that this has been really eye opening for me. I feel really excited to get some more plants in the ground this year. And renewed in my excitement to just kind of support the local food system and kind of what you’re doing.

Will you let our listeners know what you and Elizabeth are working on right now, and kind of where they can find you guys, and how they can support you?

Tyler Boggs: OH, yeah, that would be wonderful. So we’ve got the food pantry, which is for everybody in need. There is no restriction. And that’s Good Neighbor Family Pantry. And that’s at www. GoodNeighborFamilyPantry.org. Or obviously on Facebook. Just Good Neighbor Family Pantry. And then the farm is Heart2Heart Farms. And that’s again on Facebook and on the web.

The farm has the work for livestock and work for meats program, where we allow people to show up. We set aside about 50% of everything that we produce for people to work-trade for and low-income families. We also do bartering for people that have old things they’re not using. Whether it’s tools or firearms and ammunition. Anything we can use out here on the farm. Just bartering.

We currently just launched a meat buyers club, which was previously a meat CSA. I’m not even sure if the website is up to date on it yet. But it allows people to have a 6-month subscription. And it saves them as much as 70% off of retail rates when it comes to meat. Which is really, really wonderful for a lot of folks that are hurting financially. And we’re finally delivering. We’re delivering all along the I-5 corridor. So all the way up to Olympia and all the way down to Roseburg, which is really kind of neat.

But the goal, everything that we do is really to help create self-sufficiency. We had a client that just reached out. He was buying rabbits every week. So I just asked him; I pulled him aside and said; look, you’re spending a bunch of money on rabbit every week. And he said, well it’s the only meat that doesn’t make me sick. We had a wonderful conversation about his health and about his goals. And I said; look. If you just spent what you would spend in two weeks on rabbits, I could get you a breeding trio, and I’ll teach you how to breed them. Because a lot of what we do is consultation. My goal is really to help people get self-sufficient.

So he bought a trio of rabbits, and I taught him how to breed. He just had his first litter of babies. So now he’s able to supply his family and his community with chemical-free meats from his backyard. And he’s no longer purchasing meat on a regular basis.

So that’s the other piece. If people are really serious about this, don’t be afraid to reach out to us. Send me a message on Facebook, or send us a message on the website. We do a lot of consultation. We do basic farm tours for people that are really serious about creating this lifestyle and want to come out and kind of see what we’re doing.

And then, of course, we try to provide resources that equip people. Ever