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Society & Culture
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With Good Reason

Updated 4 days ago

Society & Culture
History
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Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

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Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
17
4
2
0
0

conversations for the curious

By lrnthedobro - Feb 04 2010
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i've been listening to this show for years! it covers such a wide range of subjects - you never know what you might hear about next but it's always fascinating. the host does a great job of asking the questions i want to hear answered most. great listening. keep up the good work!

Gems From the Dessert

By jaypine - Feb 04 2010
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With Good Reason finds amazing guests with knowledge, topics and opinions outside of those knocked back and forth by the usual talking heads. With Good Reason combs the desert for gems; people who should be on air but would be otherwise hidden in the sand: Mona Ternus, a veteran of several wars, nurse, and researcher explains how mothers who deploy to war can mitigate the effects on their families. Historian Cindy Wilkey recounts the adventures of the Wright Brothers from the perspective of their sister Katherine, who happenned to be their business manager. Stage and film fight director Greg Lloyd explains that the key to staging a fight scene is in the acting (or "selling") of the vicitm. Unexpected, unique insights.

iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
17
4
2
0
0

conversations for the curious

By lrnthedobro - Feb 04 2010
Read more
i've been listening to this show for years! it covers such a wide range of subjects - you never know what you might hear about next but it's always fascinating. the host does a great job of asking the questions i want to hear answered most. great listening. keep up the good work!

Gems From the Dessert

By jaypine - Feb 04 2010
Read more
With Good Reason finds amazing guests with knowledge, topics and opinions outside of those knocked back and forth by the usual talking heads. With Good Reason combs the desert for gems; people who should be on air but would be otherwise hidden in the sand: Mona Ternus, a veteran of several wars, nurse, and researcher explains how mothers who deploy to war can mitigate the effects on their families. Historian Cindy Wilkey recounts the adventures of the Wright Brothers from the perspective of their sister Katherine, who happenned to be their business manager. Stage and film fight director Greg Lloyd explains that the key to staging a fight scene is in the acting (or "selling") of the vicitm. Unexpected, unique insights.
Cover image of With Good Reason

With Good Reason

Latest release on Feb 20, 2020

All 350 episodes from oldest to newest

Gun Sense

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Student survivors of school shootings have made their voices heard, loud and clear. But the teacher's perspective of school shootings is less common. Megan Doney (New River Community College) is an English professor turned gun control activist who writes about her traumatic experience. Plus: Research suggests that a police strategy called "community policing" benefits those with mental illness. Charlotte Gill (George Mason University) rides along with a police officer and catches a surprisingly warm encounter. 

Later in the show: Hunting for evidence at a crime scene? Try E. coli. Biology professor Amorette Barber (Longwood University) is a 2020 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award recipient. She and analytical chemist Sarah Porter (Longwood University) are using bacteria to detect gunshot residue. And they get their students in on the action. Plus: Philip Mongan (Radford University) on predicting which students will become school shooters.

Feb 20 2020

52mins

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Social Mobility Through College

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One of the great American beliefs is that a college education gives us a better shot at moving up in life. But Scott Jaschik, editor of Inside Higher Ed, says social mobility has stalled and we should expand access to those universities admitting the largest numbers of low income students. That gets a big “yes” from Virginia State University President Makola Abdullah. He’s fighting for more resources for HBCUs in the higher education landscape to create social mobility for all students. And: Helping students succeed sometimes means support outside of the classroom. Lelia Bradshaw (Mountain Empire Community College) and Rachelle Thompson (Northern Virginia Community College) share what community colleges are doing to help keep students in school and on track to success.

Later in the show: Student loan numbers have skyrocketed in recent years, but some groups of students are affected more than others. Jason Houle (Dartmouth College) explains how the burden of student debt follows the same social divides that much else does: race and class. And: Stephanie Cellini (George Washington University) studies the rise and fall of for-profit colleges and universities. She says they often take advantage of the students who are most in need of a leg up.

Feb 13 2020

52mins

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Swipe Right For Love

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It’s 2020 and online dating isn’t special anymore--it’s the norm. But that doesn’t make it easy. We explore what researchers know about finding love online.

Also: Jennifer Rosier loves love and studies how to make it work better. She shares tips on forming healthy relationships and debunks the four myths about sex.

Plus: Physicist Joshua Erlich spends his days pondering dark matter. But he also explores the science of making chocolate.

And: Our wine expert shares his favorite wines for pairing with chocolates on Valentine’s Day.

Feb 06 2020

52mins

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Seeing the Future of Medicine

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Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati (University of Virginia) is an opthamologist who is dedicated to ending macular degeneration, which leads to sight loss, and affects more than 10 million Americans. Now, Dr Ambati believes a cure is on the way. Plus: The Escape Room craze, where people work together to solve puzzles that unlock a door, is now a new tool in health education. Janice Hawkins (Old Dominion University) says her nursing students are learning the fundamentals of patient care in a fun, interactive setting.

Later in the show:
Transplant surgeon Jose Oberholzer (University of Virginia) lies awake at night thinking about a cellular cure for diabetes. He founded the Chicago Diabetes Project to collaborate with the best minds in the country on a cure using cells rather than injections and surgery. And: Sharon Zook (James Madison University) is back from Tanzania with JMU nursing students where they helped people get what they need to control their diabetes.

Jan 30 2020

52mins

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The Future is Now

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AI technologies are really human issues. Sylvester Johnson (Virginia Tech) says we humans must decide for ourselves how to live in a world where intelligent machines and algorithmic systems are deciding issues of medicine, electricity, prison sentences and who is eligible for public assistance. Also: Google uses computer vision algorithms to filter out unwanted pornographic images from our search results. Alex Monea (George Mason University) explains how this filter is sometimes applied overbroadly, censoring LGBTQIA+ discourse and sex education.

Later in the show: When the Food and Drug Administration approved the production and sale of genetically modified salmon in 2015, some consumers were alarmed by the prospect of consuming “Frankenfish.” But are all genetically modified foods dangerous? Eric Hallerman (Virginia Tech) makes the case for accepting some of them. And: What if there was an app that worked like GoogleMaps, but for marine animals? Sara Maxwell (University of Washington-Bothell) is using satellite tracking to help fisheries avoid catching animals like whales, turtles, and sharks while they’re hunting for other fish.

Jan 23 2020

51mins

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Redlining and Reparations

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The homeownership gap between whites and African Americans has exploded since the housing bust. It’s now wider than it was during the Jim Crow era. LaDale Winling (Virginia Tech) says this has its roots in the redlining and race-based denial of home loans dating back to the 1930s. Also: We’re in the midst of a generational change in where we live. Tim Murray (Virginia Military Institute) says millennials, saddled with student loans, are delaying home-buying, while baby boomers are selling their over-large houses or downsizing.

Later in the show: There’s an eviction crisis in the United States, and it’s disproportionately affecting communities of color. Kathryn Howell and Ben Teresa are part of the RVA Eviction Lab which gathers data on eviction rates. They say high eviction rates destabilize communities, cause high turnover in student populations, and reduce community engagement and access to community networks and jobs. And: People who live on or near American Indian reservations are being denied access to consumer credit. Valentina Dimitrova-Grajzl (VMI) says redlining is a factor. Dimitrova-Grajzl has been named a 2019 outstanding faculty member by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

Jan 14 2020

51mins

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Disability Justice

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In recent years, ADAPT activists have made headlines for protests that helped stop the ACA repeal. Ruth Osorio (Old Dominion University) says their tactics fit into a long history of disability activism in the U.S., from the 504 occupation in 1977 to #actuallyautistic. Also: Julie DeLancey (University of Mary Washington) explains how people with different types of bodies organized and advocated for their rights hundreds of years ago, in Early Modern Italy.

Later in the show: For years, children with disabilities were taught in separate classrooms or even separate institutions, keeping them away from their peers. But more recently, experts and advocates have argued that this separation is actually a form of unjust segregation. Liz Altieri and Darren Minarik (Radford University) explain how accessible teaching methods can keep more disabled kids in the regular classroom.

Jan 10 2020

51mins

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Real Love

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In her book Real Love, Sharon Salzberg—one of the world’s leading authorities on love—shows us it isn’t just an emotion we feel when we’re in a romantic relationship. It’s an ability we can nurture and cultivate. Also: The idea of “The Pause,” where medical caregivers take a moment together at the bedside of a patient who has died, began with emergency care nurse Jonathan Bartels at the University of Virginia hospital. This quiet moment honors the life of the person who has died and the efforts made by the caretakers.

Later in the show: How do we go about creating a sense of self? Dr. Oliver Hill Jr. (Virginia State University) tells the story of his search for identity, first as a child caught up in a legal battle for school integration in the 1950s, then as a radical college student at a historically black university. After an unexpected connection at an ashram, he became a lifelong student of mindfulness and meditation practices he now brings into the lab and the classroom.

Jan 03 2020

51mins

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Enter the Subconscious

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Religious scholars, neuroscientists, and psychoanalysts agree – there is a deep reservoir of activity beneath our conscious minds. Peter Vishton (William & Mary) shares how the unconscious mind may be making decisions for us, too quick for our conscious mind to realize. And: Daniel Hirshberg (University of Mary Washington) explores the subconscious with his Contemplative Studies students by wiring meditating students up to brain-imaging headsets. Plus: Graham Schweig (Christopher Newport University) has been practicing meditation for more than 50 years. He says “deepening the heart” is the real aim of many of India’s yoga traditions.

Later in the Show: Listen to what more than a thousand women have to say about finding a balance between work, family, and self-care. Beth Cabrera (George Mason University) shares what she learned through interviews with women seeking a happy balance. Plus: Researchers have found specific genetic markers in a population of Chinese Han women that predispose them to the risk for clinical depression. Kenneth Kendler (Virginia Commonwealth University) was part of the team that made the breakthrough.

Dec 27 2019

51mins

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Stirring the Pot

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Although it was once an important part of feeding families, home canning in America has never been just about necessity. Danille Christensen (Virginia Tech) says a look back at home canning reveals the pride and creativity that went into stocking a pantry. And: Lilia Fuquen (Virginia Humanities) takes us inside a community cannery and a basement storeroom to hear from people who are keeping the tradition alive.

Later in the show:
Hunter Smith and Levi Duncan (Piedmont Virginia Community College and Champion Brewing Company) explain how a culture has grown up around brewing beer locally and at home. And: Susan Kern (College of William & Mary) says that just about everyone drank beer in early America—even for breakfast. We go to the site of a brewhouse that once existed on the campus of one of our nation’s oldest colleges. Plus: Paula Pando and Jesse Miller (Reynolds Community College) explain how a new culinary school aims to transform a food desert into a local food hub.

Dec 19 2019

51mins

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