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With Good Reason

Updated 7 days ago

Society & Culture
History
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Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

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Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
17
4
2
0
0

conversations for the curious

By lrnthedobro - Feb 04 2010
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i've been listening to this show for years! it covers such a wide range of subjects - you never know what you might hear about next but it's always fascinating. the host does a great job of asking the questions i want to hear answered most. great listening. keep up the good work!

Gems From the Dessert

By jaypine - Feb 04 2010
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With Good Reason finds amazing guests with knowledge, topics and opinions outside of those knocked back and forth by the usual talking heads. With Good Reason combs the desert for gems; people who should be on air but would be otherwise hidden in the sand: Mona Ternus, a veteran of several wars, nurse, and researcher explains how mothers who deploy to war can mitigate the effects on their families. Historian Cindy Wilkey recounts the adventures of the Wright Brothers from the perspective of their sister Katherine, who happenned to be their business manager. Stage and film fight director Greg Lloyd explains that the key to staging a fight scene is in the acting (or "selling") of the vicitm. Unexpected, unique insights.

iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
17
4
2
0
0

conversations for the curious

By lrnthedobro - Feb 04 2010
Read more
i've been listening to this show for years! it covers such a wide range of subjects - you never know what you might hear about next but it's always fascinating. the host does a great job of asking the questions i want to hear answered most. great listening. keep up the good work!

Gems From the Dessert

By jaypine - Feb 04 2010
Read more
With Good Reason finds amazing guests with knowledge, topics and opinions outside of those knocked back and forth by the usual talking heads. With Good Reason combs the desert for gems; people who should be on air but would be otherwise hidden in the sand: Mona Ternus, a veteran of several wars, nurse, and researcher explains how mothers who deploy to war can mitigate the effects on their families. Historian Cindy Wilkey recounts the adventures of the Wright Brothers from the perspective of their sister Katherine, who happenned to be their business manager. Stage and film fight director Greg Lloyd explains that the key to staging a fight scene is in the acting (or "selling") of the vicitm. Unexpected, unique insights.
Cover image of With Good Reason

With Good Reason

Latest release on Feb 20, 2020

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Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

Rank #1: Drink Local

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A culture has grown up around brewing beer locally and at home. Hunter Smith and Levi Duncan of Champion Brewery met in a brewing course where they now both teach. They say local breweries help foster community. Plus: In early America, just about everyone drank beer—even for breakfast. We go with Susan Kern to the site of a brew house that once existed on the campus of one of the nation’s oldest colleges. And: We all know of Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin, but few of us have heard of Robert Morris, who was also a founding father. Ryan Smith (tells the tale of this wealthy financier of the Revolution who signed the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, but ended up in financial ruin and public disgrace.

Later in the show: There is an extreme shortage of nurses in “bush” Alaska, a stunningly beautiful part of the world only reachable by plane or barge. Maria DeValpine spent three years learning why nurses elect to stay in this challenging environment on the edge of the earth. And: Courses that include service learning projects can have a profound effect on college students. While teaching at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, James Curiel had his students, who were predominately from the wealthiest Egyptian families, work with impoverished families who made their living by recycling the rubbish they collected. The lessons learned were invaluable.

Mar 31 2016

51mins

Play

Rank #2: Uptalk on Jeopardy

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Uptalk” is that rising, questioning tone some people use when ending a statement. It’s becoming so common that Thomas Linneman (College of William and Mary) studied its use by contestants on the game show Jeopardy. He found women use it more than men, but male contestants often use “uptalk” after a woman competitor gets a wrong answer. And: Most of us think the best way to motivate is with rewards like money. But best-selling author Dan Pink says that’s a mistake. He says the secret to high performance and satisfaction is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to create new things, and to better our world.

Also featured: First published in 1947, Goodnight Moon has become one of the most popular books for young children. Yet the book’s author, Margaret Wise Brown, always wanted to write for adults. With Good Reason’s Kelley Libby tells the story of Brown’s life, from Hollins College to her tragic early death. Also featured: After World War II, the International Youth Library in Munich was created to promote understanding by introducing Germany’s children to the literature of other cultures. It’s now the largest repository of children’s literature in the world. Dr. Osayimwense Osa (Virginia State University) is a former fellow at the library. He says the internationalizing of children’s literature is a step toward world peace. And: With busy schedules and media-soaked lives, have our children lost their ability to engage in moment-by-moment experiences? Michele Briggs and Tammy Gilligan (James Madison University) discuss the lost art of mindfulness, its importance to classroom decorum and academic achievement, and what teachers can do to help children learn this important skill.

Sep 04 2015

51mins

Play

Rank #3: Printed Organs - Coming to a Body Near You

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In 30 years, organ transplants may be taking a back seat to a serum grown from the patient’s own cells and administered to heal the damaged organ. And those who need new organs will be getting new biological parts from 3-D printers. That’s the vision of Kenneth Brayman, who heads Transplant Surgery at the University of Virginia. Brayman discusses recent advances in organ transplantation. Also: Allergic reactions to everything from pollen to peanuts are making life miserable for millions. Lawrence Schwartz explains why our bodies over-react to these seemingly benign substances. Schwartz was named Outstanding Faculty of 2016 by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

Later in the show: People who get a kick out of lying are said to have “duping delight.” Randy Boyle studies human deception at the Longwood Center for Cyber Security. He has devised a questionnaire that measures a person’s propensity to lie. Also: Each year there are many food recall or contamination alerts, but not everyone heeds the warnings. Christopher Brady looks at the psychological factors that determine which of us will act on the alerts. And: Researcher Andrew Neilson has found that certain flavanols in cocoa can reduce weight gain. His study identified one particular compound in cocoa prevented laboratory mice from gaining excess weight when fed a high-fat diet.

Apr 21 2016

51mins

Play

Rank #4: The Disappearing Lake

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There’s an iconic scene in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing in which a dance instructor practices a lift with his young student in a beautiful lake at sunset. The water in that lake is disappearing, and Skip Watts and George Stephenson (Radford University) are studying why. And: Virginia’s shoreline is expecting a sea level rise of as much as three feet or more by 2060. Ray Toll (Old Dominion University) says the White House has chosen ODU to lead a pilot project to create a comprehensive local response to the flooding to be used as a model for the rest of the nation. Plus: The earliest environmentalists weren’t tree-huggers; they were hunters and colonialists. Historian Stephen Macekura (Indiana University) traces how African conservation has been closely tied with colonialism and development.

Later in the show: Early struggles between Native Americans and the U.S. government centered on gold claims. But James Allison (Christopher Newport University) says the tension now centers on the new black gold—coal. Plus: Emily Satterwhite (Virginia Tech) talks about two very different images of Appalachia: the pastoral, small towns of literature and the often violent cannibals of horror films. And: In the mid-90s, Latino immigrants started to migrate to smaller towns in the South. Barbara Ellen Smith (Virginia Tech) says the new Appalachia includes chicken enchiladas and tamales.

Sep 18 2015

51mins

Play

Rank #5: Social Mobility Through College

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One of the great American beliefs is that a college education gives us a better shot at moving up in life. But some say that social mobility has stalled and we should expand access to those universities admitting the largest numbers of low income students.

Aug 31 2018

51mins

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Rank #6: Degrees of Separation: Secondary

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In the third episode of our special series on education, Degrees of Separation, we examine how inequality is at work in the high-stakes world of high school, from who we discipline, to the way we sort high-achieving students. Plus, we look at new techniques in engaging students and preventing conflict in classrooms.

May 26 2017

51mins

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Rank #7: A Cellular Cure for Diabetes

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Jose Oberholzer is a transplant surgeon who lies awake nights thinking about a cellular cure for diabetes. He created the Chicago Diabetes Project so the best minds in the country can work together on a cure. He says we're close!

Jun 29 2018

52mins

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Rank #8: Degrees of Separation: Origins

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The great promise of public education is equality–an excellent education for every child. And yet, there’s a sense — from nearly every side of the debate — that America is falling short of that promise. In the first of a special six-part series, With Good Reason traces the origins of education to ancient Mesopotamia and asks: how did education get so unequal?

Mar 24 2017

52mins

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Rank #9: 1619: Past and Present

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The first captive Africans arrived in the Jamestown settlement in Virginia in 1619. A shipload of women intended as mates for the male settlers also arrived that year. How should we be telling and commemorating this history in 2019?

May 25 2018

51mins

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Rank #10: Pulitzer 100: The Wondrous Junot Diaz

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"The half-life of love is forever,” writes Yunior, the serial-cheater protagonist of Junot Díaz’s This Is How You Lose Her. In this special episode, we talk with the Pulitzer Prize winning author about love, loss, and his New Jersey childhood. Díaz’s characters are not perfect people—they’re nerds, outsiders, and antiheroes--but their stories are written to perfection.

Later in the show: Jon Pineda is a poet, novelist. His latest memoir, Sleep in Me, chronicles his sister Rica’s sudden transformation from a vibrant high school cheerleader to a girl wheelchair bound and unable to talk. And: A story that explores the moral complexities of the ivory trade is told from an unconventional perspective. In her novel The Tusk That Did the Damage, author Tania James takes us into the hearts of minds of a homicidal elephant, a poacher, and a documentary filmmaker.

Sep 08 2016

51mins

Play

Rank #11: Short Listen: The Attack Party of Bulgaria

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While Marine le Pen failed to win the recent French presidential election, her increased popularity is just the most recent example of how far right nationalism has spread. Allison Quantz reports on what the right wing populist surge looks like in Eastern Europe.

From With Good Reason, the Short Listen combines short-form storytelling and compelling interviews to bring you the best of each week's episode in under 10 minutes.

May 10 2017

4mins

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Rank #12: The New Minority

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Donald Trump’s election was seen by many commentators as a decisive statement by a marginalized White working class. A new book The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality explains where this theory comes from and why so many White voters are feeling class and racial resentment. Plus we dive into the immigration debate and why good numbers are hard to find.

Jan 19 2018

29mins

Play

Rank #13: Enter the Subconscious

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Religious scholars, neuroscientists, and psychoanalysts agree – there is a deep reservoir of activity beneath our conscious minds. Peter Vishton (William & Mary) shares how the unconscious mind may be making decisions for us, too quick for our conscious mind to realize. And: Daniel Hirshberg (University of Mary Washington) explores the subconscious with his Contemplative Studies students by wiring meditating students up to brain-imaging headsets. Plus: Graham Schweig (Christopher Newport University) has been practicing meditation for more than 50 years. He says “deepening the heart” is the real aim of many of India’s yoga traditions.

Later in the Show: Listen to what more than a thousand women have to say about finding a balance between work, family, and self-care. Beth Cabrera (George Mason University) shares what she learned through interviews with women seeking a happy balance. Plus: Researchers have found specific genetic markers in a population of Chinese Han women that predispose them to the risk for clinical depression. Kenneth Kendler (Virginia Commonwealth University) was part of the team that made the breakthrough.

Dec 27 2019

51mins

Play

Rank #14: Under Magnolia

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When Frances Mayes moved to Tuscany in Italy, she left behind her family and roots in Fitzgerald, Georgia. In her new memoir Under Magnolia, the renowned author of Under the Tuscan Sun returns to her hometown to explore her coming of age in the Deep South. And: Since 2000, furniture imports from China have increased dramatically and offshoring has cost American furniture makers thousands of jobs. In her new book Factory Man, Beth Macy tells the remarkable story of John Bassett III’s battle to keep his family’s furniture business in southwest Virginia open.

Later in the show: In central Mexico, the work of preparing elaborate meals for fiestas involves many women working together. Maria Elisa Christie, author of Kitchenspace: Women, Fiestas, and Everyday Life in Central Mexico, says this work gives women status and a way to share traditions with younger generations. And: Residents of northern China prize individualism, while southerners value their sense of community. Thomas Talhelm has developed what he calls a “rice theory” to explain the cultural differences. Also: There’s no silver bullet for battling obesity, but Jamie Zoellner says studying different communities and their specific food and exercise resources can help jumpstart a solution

Sep 23 2016

52mins

Play

Rank #15: Stirring the Pot

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Although it was once an important part of feeding families, home canning in America has never been just about necessity. Danille Christensen (Virginia Tech) says a look back at home canning reveals the pride and creativity that went into stocking a pantry. And: Lilia Fuquen (Virginia Humanities) takes us inside a community cannery and a basement storeroom to hear from people who are keeping the tradition alive.

Later in the show:
Hunter Smith and Levi Duncan (Piedmont Virginia Community College and Champion Brewing Company) explain how a culture has grown up around brewing beer locally and at home. And: Susan Kern (College of William & Mary) says that just about everyone drank beer in early America—even for breakfast. We go to the site of a brewhouse that once existed on the campus of one of our nation’s oldest colleges. Plus: Paula Pando and Jesse Miller (Reynolds Community College) explain how a new culinary school aims to transform a food desert into a local food hub.

Dec 19 2019

51mins

Play

Rank #16: Real Love

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In her book Real Love, Sharon Salzberg—one of the world’s leading authorities on love—shows us it isn’t just an emotion we feel when we’re in a romantic relationship. It’s an ability we can nurture and cultivate. Also: The idea of “The Pause,” where medical caregivers take a moment together at the bedside of a patient who has died, began with emergency care nurse Jonathan Bartels at the University of Virginia hospital. This quiet moment honors the life of the person who has died and the efforts made by the caretakers.

Later in the show: How do we go about creating a sense of self? Dr. Oliver Hill Jr. (Virginia State University) tells the story of his search for identity, first as a child caught up in a legal battle for school integration in the 1950s, then as a radical college student at a historically black university. After an unexpected connection at an ashram, he became a lifelong student of mindfulness and meditation practices he now brings into the lab and the classroom.

Jan 03 2020

51mins

Play

Rank #17: Civil Rights and Civil War Monuments

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Maggie Walker was an African American teacher and businesswoman and the first woman of any race to charter a bank in the United States. There's now a statue of her in the former capital of the Confederacy. Plus: A town’s historical markers tell visitors the story of a place. But what do they leave out?

Feb 02 2018

28mins

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Rank #18: Invisible Founders

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Scholars, historic interpreters, and descendants of enslaved people recently gathered at Montpelier, the home of James Madison. They were there to create a rubric for historic sites who want to engage descendant communities in their work. We share stories and interviews from Montpelier's Summit on Slavery.

Feb 23 2018

51mins

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Rank #19: Do The Right Thing

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"Making Peace With Vietnam" is a documentary that chronicles life in that nation as Vietnam vets return to do humanitarian work. Plus, Ludwig Wittgenstein may be the greatest philosopher of the 20th century, but few people know about him.

Jun 14 2018

51mins

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Rank #20: Summer Reading Recs

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Summer reads from the With Good Reason universe! Inman Majors gives us some comedic escapism, Erin Jones is reading about mid-century women artists reclaiming the pin-up, and Sharon Jones shares why she, a black woman with a comfortable salary, is spending her summer reading about whiteness and poverty.

Jul 12 2018

51mins

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Gun Sense

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Student survivors of school shootings have made their voices heard, loud and clear. But the teacher's perspective of school shootings is less common. Megan Doney (New River Community College) is an English professor turned gun control activist who writes about her traumatic experience. Plus: Research suggests that a police strategy called "community policing" benefits those with mental illness. Charlotte Gill (George Mason University) rides along with a police officer and catches a surprisingly warm encounter. 

Later in the show: Hunting for evidence at a crime scene? Try E. coli. Biology professor Amorette Barber (Longwood University) is a 2020 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award recipient. She and analytical chemist Sarah Porter (Longwood University) are using bacteria to detect gunshot residue. And they get their students in on the action. Plus: Philip Mongan (Radford University) on predicting which students will become school shooters.

Feb 20 2020

52mins

Play

Social Mobility Through College

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One of the great American beliefs is that a college education gives us a better shot at moving up in life. But Scott Jaschik, editor of Inside Higher Ed, says social mobility has stalled and we should expand access to those universities admitting the largest numbers of low income students. That gets a big “yes” from Virginia State University President Makola Abdullah. He’s fighting for more resources for HBCUs in the higher education landscape to create social mobility for all students. And: Helping students succeed sometimes means support outside of the classroom. Lelia Bradshaw (Mountain Empire Community College) and Rachelle Thompson (Northern Virginia Community College) share what community colleges are doing to help keep students in school and on track to success.

Later in the show: Student loan numbers have skyrocketed in recent years, but some groups of students are affected more than others. Jason Houle (Dartmouth College) explains how the burden of student debt follows the same social divides that much else does: race and class. And: Stephanie Cellini (George Washington University) studies the rise and fall of for-profit colleges and universities. She says they often take advantage of the students who are most in need of a leg up.

Feb 13 2020

52mins

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Swipe Right For Love

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It’s 2020 and online dating isn’t special anymore--it’s the norm. But that doesn’t make it easy. We explore what researchers know about finding love online.

Also: Jennifer Rosier loves love and studies how to make it work better. She shares tips on forming healthy relationships and debunks the four myths about sex.

Plus: Physicist Joshua Erlich spends his days pondering dark matter. But he also explores the science of making chocolate.

And: Our wine expert shares his favorite wines for pairing with chocolates on Valentine’s Day.

Feb 06 2020

52mins

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Seeing the Future of Medicine

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Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati (University of Virginia) is an opthamologist who is dedicated to ending macular degeneration, which leads to sight loss, and affects more than 10 million Americans. Now, Dr Ambati believes a cure is on the way. Plus: The Escape Room craze, where people work together to solve puzzles that unlock a door, is now a new tool in health education. Janice Hawkins (Old Dominion University) says her nursing students are learning the fundamentals of patient care in a fun, interactive setting.

Later in the show:
Transplant surgeon Jose Oberholzer (University of Virginia) lies awake at night thinking about a cellular cure for diabetes. He founded the Chicago Diabetes Project to collaborate with the best minds in the country on a cure using cells rather than injections and surgery. And: Sharon Zook (James Madison University) is back from Tanzania with JMU nursing students where they helped people get what they need to control their diabetes.

Jan 30 2020

52mins

Play

The Future is Now

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AI technologies are really human issues. Sylvester Johnson (Virginia Tech) says we humans must decide for ourselves how to live in a world where intelligent machines and algorithmic systems are deciding issues of medicine, electricity, prison sentences and who is eligible for public assistance. Also: Google uses computer vision algorithms to filter out unwanted pornographic images from our search results. Alex Monea (George Mason University) explains how this filter is sometimes applied overbroadly, censoring LGBTQIA+ discourse and sex education.

Later in the show: When the Food and Drug Administration approved the production and sale of genetically modified salmon in 2015, some consumers were alarmed by the prospect of consuming “Frankenfish.” But are all genetically modified foods dangerous? Eric Hallerman (Virginia Tech) makes the case for accepting some of them. And: What if there was an app that worked like GoogleMaps, but for marine animals? Sara Maxwell (University of Washington-Bothell) is using satellite tracking to help fisheries avoid catching animals like whales, turtles, and sharks while they’re hunting for other fish.

Jan 23 2020

51mins

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Redlining and Reparations

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The homeownership gap between whites and African Americans has exploded since the housing bust. It’s now wider than it was during the Jim Crow era. LaDale Winling (Virginia Tech) says this has its roots in the redlining and race-based denial of home loans dating back to the 1930s. Also: We’re in the midst of a generational change in where we live. Tim Murray (Virginia Military Institute) says millennials, saddled with student loans, are delaying home-buying, while baby boomers are selling their over-large houses or downsizing.

Later in the show: There’s an eviction crisis in the United States, and it’s disproportionately affecting communities of color. Kathryn Howell and Ben Teresa are part of the RVA Eviction Lab which gathers data on eviction rates. They say high eviction rates destabilize communities, cause high turnover in student populations, and reduce community engagement and access to community networks and jobs. And: People who live on or near American Indian reservations are being denied access to consumer credit. Valentina Dimitrova-Grajzl (VMI) says redlining is a factor. Dimitrova-Grajzl has been named a 2019 outstanding faculty member by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

Jan 14 2020

51mins

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Disability Justice

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In recent years, ADAPT activists have made headlines for protests that helped stop the ACA repeal. Ruth Osorio (Old Dominion University) says their tactics fit into a long history of disability activism in the U.S., from the 504 occupation in 1977 to #actuallyautistic. Also: Julie DeLancey (University of Mary Washington) explains how people with different types of bodies organized and advocated for their rights hundreds of years ago, in Early Modern Italy.

Later in the show: For years, children with disabilities were taught in separate classrooms or even separate institutions, keeping them away from their peers. But more recently, experts and advocates have argued that this separation is actually a form of unjust segregation. Liz Altieri and Darren Minarik (Radford University) explain how accessible teaching methods can keep more disabled kids in the regular classroom.

Jan 10 2020

51mins

Play

Real Love

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In her book Real Love, Sharon Salzberg—one of the world’s leading authorities on love—shows us it isn’t just an emotion we feel when we’re in a romantic relationship. It’s an ability we can nurture and cultivate. Also: The idea of “The Pause,” where medical caregivers take a moment together at the bedside of a patient who has died, began with emergency care nurse Jonathan Bartels at the University of Virginia hospital. This quiet moment honors the life of the person who has died and the efforts made by the caretakers.

Later in the show: How do we go about creating a sense of self? Dr. Oliver Hill Jr. (Virginia State University) tells the story of his search for identity, first as a child caught up in a legal battle for school integration in the 1950s, then as a radical college student at a historically black university. After an unexpected connection at an ashram, he became a lifelong student of mindfulness and meditation practices he now brings into the lab and the classroom.

Jan 03 2020

51mins

Play

Enter the Subconscious

Podcast cover
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Religious scholars, neuroscientists, and psychoanalysts agree – there is a deep reservoir of activity beneath our conscious minds. Peter Vishton (William & Mary) shares how the unconscious mind may be making decisions for us, too quick for our conscious mind to realize. And: Daniel Hirshberg (University of Mary Washington) explores the subconscious with his Contemplative Studies students by wiring meditating students up to brain-imaging headsets. Plus: Graham Schweig (Christopher Newport University) has been practicing meditation for more than 50 years. He says “deepening the heart” is the real aim of many of India’s yoga traditions.

Later in the Show: Listen to what more than a thousand women have to say about finding a balance between work, family, and self-care. Beth Cabrera (George Mason University) shares what she learned through interviews with women seeking a happy balance. Plus: Researchers have found specific genetic markers in a population of Chinese Han women that predispose them to the risk for clinical depression. Kenneth Kendler (Virginia Commonwealth University) was part of the team that made the breakthrough.

Dec 27 2019

51mins

Play

Stirring the Pot

Podcast cover
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Although it was once an important part of feeding families, home canning in America has never been just about necessity. Danille Christensen (Virginia Tech) says a look back at home canning reveals the pride and creativity that went into stocking a pantry. And: Lilia Fuquen (Virginia Humanities) takes us inside a community cannery and a basement storeroom to hear from people who are keeping the tradition alive.

Later in the show:
Hunter Smith and Levi Duncan (Piedmont Virginia Community College and Champion Brewing Company) explain how a culture has grown up around brewing beer locally and at home. And: Susan Kern (College of William & Mary) says that just about everyone drank beer in early America—even for breakfast. We go to the site of a brewhouse that once existed on the campus of one of our nation’s oldest colleges. Plus: Paula Pando and Jesse Miller (Reynolds Community College) explain how a new culinary school aims to transform a food desert into a local food hub.

Dec 19 2019

51mins

Play

Gerry-Rigged

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Politicians from John F. Kennedy to Ronald Reagan have called gerrymandering a “cancer on our democracy.” It's not a new issue, but everything from the way we draw lines to what's considered legal has changed a lot in recent years. Michael Gilbert (University of Virginia) shares the latest on gerrymandering. And: Since 2016, states like Michigan and Ohio have made news for a turn to the Republican party. Democrats, meanwhile, see hope in traditionally red Southern states that have been turning blue. Quentin Kidd (Christopher Newport University) talks about what this process has looked like in Virginia and what’s spurring it on.

Later in the show: Fake news wasn't invented by the Internet. It has long been used as a way to demonize political opponents. Elizabeth Losh (William & Mary) says there are fake news stories that appeal to both the left and the right. Plus: Stephen Farnsworth (University of Mary Washington) traces the evolution of White House news management over the two decades from Bill Clinton and cable TV to Donald Trump and twitter. Farnsworth was named Outstanding Faculty by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

Dec 13 2019

51mins

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Emoji Evidence

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Be warned: everything you say on Facebook can and will be used against you in a court of law! Jeff Bellin (William & Mary) studies how courts handle digital evidence like social media posts and text messages. Bellin was named Outstanding Faculty by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. And: There’s a lot of talk about cybersecurity, but what about cybercrime? What qualifies as cybercrime and what’s being done to stop it? Rod Graham (Old Dominion University) and ‘Shawn Smith (Radford University) tell us what it’s like for these uniquely 21st century victims.

Later in the show: Robots built by Toyota will serve as guides during the 2020 Olympics in Japan. They’ll carry food, show visitors to their seats, and aid people in wheelchairs. As robots become ubiquitous, will humans trust or fear them? James Bliss (Old Dominion University) is studying how people might interact with robots that act as military peacekeepers. And: The near-Earth edge of space, where astronauts and low-orbiting spacecraft fly, is far from empty. Scott England (Virginia Tech) is part of a team that won an award for discoveries on Mars. Now he’s leading a new NASA mission to explore this lesser known upper atmosphere.

Dec 05 2019

51mins

Play

Science Out in the World

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There’s a lot to learn in science class: the periodic table, the stages of a butterfly, but also how to be an American citizen. Alix Fink (Longwood University) says learning science is also learning how to participate in our democracy. And: Ben Casteel (Virginia Highlands Community College) grew up with a passion for the Appalachian landscape all around him. He believes in the value of native plants and promoting biodiversity. Plus: After the 2011 earthquake in Japan, nematodes traveled all the way from Japan to California. Ashleigh Smythe (Virginia Military Institute) is studying the tiny worms and learning about their miraculous migration.

Later in the show: If you’re poor in Botswana, lions and elephants aren’t cool wildlife—they’re threats to your crops, your herds, and your family. But protecting a robust wildlife population is a high priority for a country whose wealthy and middle classes rely on tourism. Kathleen Alexander (Virginia Tech) is working in Botswana to bridge the gap between conserving wildlife and helping impoverished communities. Plus: Could creating an imbalance between the sexes in a mosquito population help solve the Zika problem? Zhijan Tu (Virginia Tech) says it might be possible to slow the spread of Zika and other viruses like Dengue and Chikungunya by making female mosquitos scarce.

Nov 25 2019

51mins

Play

Friendsgiving

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For many, the Thanksgiving holidays are a time to gather with your biological relatives. But what if you don’t have the traditional, Norman-Rockwell family? April Few-Demo (Virginia Tech) studies how queer families of color, especially Black lesbians, navigate biological and chosen family. She says that dialogue about identity and acceptance might happen in subtle ways during the holidays. And: Shannon Davis (George Mason University) argues that we should remember those families who can’t get together during the holidays at all, because time off work is too high a price to pay. Plus: Laura Heston (Oxford University Press) shares how they and their LGBTQ chosen family celebrate a “Friendsgiving,” complete with drama and drag.

Later in the show: Some scholars argue that what we call non-traditional families aren’t so non-traditional after all. Alicia Andrzejewski (William and Mary) has found chosen families and alternative bonds throughout the works of William Shakespeare. And: Before she became an instructor, Rosalyn Durham (Norfolk State) was a social worker helping families in crisis. She shares her strategies for supporting families experiencing trauma, including how families can stay connected when a child is placed into foster care.

Nov 22 2019

51mins

Play

Meet Your Maker

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During the holiday season, it feels like more and more consumers are skipping the department stores and opting for handcrafted goods instead. Ben Brewer (James Madison University) says this current “third wave” craft renaissance we’re experiencing is tied to politics. And: We visit mOb, an innovative design studio at Virginia Commonwealth University, where students in the disciplines of Graphic Design, Fashion Design, and Interior Design come together to solve design problems in the city of Richmond. Also: We stop in at the Virginia Center for the Book, where Kristin Keimu Adolfson is printing a collaborative book called Bird Talk using an antique Vandercook printing press. Plus: Craft brewer Gabe Mixon (Blue Ridge Community College in Flatrock, NC) shares a lesson in making beer.

Later in the show: Chef and food activist Alice Waters argues that every child in America should be fed free, organic food at schools. Waters speaks candidly about her life before she opened Chez Panisse, her seminal farm-to-table restaurant in Berkeley, California.

Nov 15 2019

51mins

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Meet Your Maker

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During the holiday season, it feels like more and more consumers are skipping the department stores and opting for handcrafted goods instead. Ben Brewer (James Madison University) says this current “third wave” craft renaissance we’re experiencing is tied to politics. And: We visit mOb, an innovative design studio at Virginia Commonwealth University, where students in the disciplines of Graphic Design, Fashion Design, and Interior Design come together to solve design problems in the city of Richmond. Also: We stop in at the Virginia Center for the Book, where Kristin Keimu Adolfson is printing a collaborative book called Bird Talk using an antique Vandercook printing press. Plus: Craft brewer Gabe Mixon (Blue Ridge Community College in Flatrock, NC) shares a lesson in making beer.

Later in the show: Chef and food activist Alice Waters argues that every child in America should be fed free, organic food at schools. Waters speaks candidly about her life before she opened Chez Panisse, her seminal farm-to-table restaurant in Berkeley, California.

Nov 14 2019

51mins

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Giving Birth While Black

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Dr. Rochanda Mitchell is an expert in fetal medicine. She’s also a black woman pregnant with her first child who understands all too well that even highly education African American women are three and a half times more likely to die in childbirth than white women. She tells us the steps she's taking to protect her life.

Nov 07 2019

51mins

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The Empathy Tours

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Jalane Schmidt (University of Virginia) recently brought a group of Virginia teachers to see Charlottesville’s tiny monument to its enslaved residents. One teacher had a startling personal revelation at that site. And: Elgin Cleckley (University of Virginia) is an architect who studies empathy. He says redesigning public space can help heal racial wounds. Plus: Danville, Virginia was once a Confederate capital. Now, teams of citizens are working together to tell the story of a different Danville: a city that hosted Martin Luther King Jr. and Thurgood Marshall, a city where brave teenagers forced the public library to integrate, and where opportunity for all is on the rise. Karise Luck-Brimmer (History United) recently took students and teachers from Averett University on an eye-opening tour of African American Danville.

Later in the show: In this intimate conversation, Chioke I’Anson (Virginia Commonwealth University) and producer Kelley Libby (UnMonumental) share their thoughts on Confederate statues and compare experiences growing up of different races in the deep South.

Oct 30 2019

51mins

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Stories to Tell in the Dark

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A yellow-eyed witch who sucks the life from unknowing strangers; fish-obsessed ghosts who lure lone men to a watery death; and ghosts who call out in the voice of a loved-one, sealing a murderous fate. Suchitra Samanta (Virginia Tech) says Bengali culture is filled with stories like these of ghostly women who wield supernatural powers after death. And: Horror films often mirror the anxieties and concerns of the times they were produced in. For example, the “creature films’ of the 50’s mirrored the fears of the post-atomic age. Todd Platts (Piedmont Virginia Community College) says the latest box office horror films like “Get Out” and “It” are a reflection of the political climate of the Trump presidency. Plus: When you think about theater, you might think of Shakespeare or Hamilton--but what about a haunted house? This year, theater professor Ben Mays (University of Virginia College at Wise) is working with his students to build an elaborate haunted house for their community, including all of the set design, costumes, and storytelling of a good stage performance.

Later in the show: Despite what many people believe, fall leaf color is remarkably consistent every year. Dendrologist John Seiler (Virginia Tech) has been studying fall leaf color for decades. Also: biologist Dan Cristol (William & Mary) says mercury pollution in waterways is not only bad for fish-eating birds, but for songbirds as well, who are absorbing the toxin through the spiders they eat.

Oct 23 2019

51mins

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The Conflicting Ideals of Jefferson's Architecture

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The most important architectural thinker of the young American republic was Thomas Jefferson. He also held captive more than 600 enslaved men, women, and children in his lifetime. Architects Mabel O. Wilson (Columbia University) and Louis Nelson (University of Virginia) discuss Jefferson’s conflicting ideals. Also featured: Erik Neil (Chrysler Museum of Art) takes us through the new Chrysler exhibit that explores the inherent conflict between Jefferson’s pursuit of liberty and democracy and his use of enslaved laborers to construct his monuments.

Later in the show: Phillip Herrington (James Madison University) says the white-columned plantation house is one of the most enduring and divisive icons of American architecture. Also: The history of segregation is not just in our architecture, but in other public arts. John Ott (James Madison University) is studying how artists in the early 20th century represented integration in their works, particularly in public murals and sculptures.

Oct 17 2019

51mins

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iTunes Ratings

23 Ratings
Average Ratings
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conversations for the curious

By lrnthedobro - Feb 04 2010
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i've been listening to this show for years! it covers such a wide range of subjects - you never know what you might hear about next but it's always fascinating. the host does a great job of asking the questions i want to hear answered most. great listening. keep up the good work!

Gems From the Dessert

By jaypine - Feb 04 2010
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With Good Reason finds amazing guests with knowledge, topics and opinions outside of those knocked back and forth by the usual talking heads. With Good Reason combs the desert for gems; people who should be on air but would be otherwise hidden in the sand: Mona Ternus, a veteran of several wars, nurse, and researcher explains how mothers who deploy to war can mitigate the effects on their families. Historian Cindy Wilkey recounts the adventures of the Wright Brothers from the perspective of their sister Katherine, who happenned to be their business manager. Stage and film fight director Greg Lloyd explains that the key to staging a fight scene is in the acting (or "selling") of the vicitm. Unexpected, unique insights.