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VeloNews Podcasts

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Bike racing at its finest. VeloNews podcasts utilize our network of reporters, commentators, and coaches to bring you inside pro cycling and improve your own riding and racing.

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Bike racing at its finest. VeloNews podcasts utilize our network of reporters, commentators, and coaches to bring you inside pro cycling and improve your own riding and racing.

iTunes Ratings

397 Ratings
Average Ratings
304
48
20
9
16

More Juli Young 👍

By Hughes225 - Jan 03 2020
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Really like hearing Julie Young’s perspectives on training in episode 91 👍

Good Pocsast on Supplements

By Rando Richard - Mar 15 2019
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Fast Talk #65 on pickle juice, beetroot juice and dark chocolate rocks!

iTunes Ratings

397 Ratings
Average Ratings
304
48
20
9
16

More Juli Young 👍

By Hughes225 - Jan 03 2020
Read more
Really like hearing Julie Young’s perspectives on training in episode 91 👍

Good Pocsast on Supplements

By Rando Richard - Mar 15 2019
Read more
Fast Talk #65 on pickle juice, beetroot juice and dark chocolate rocks!
Cover image of VeloNews Podcasts

VeloNews Podcasts

Latest release on Jan 16, 2020

Read more

Bike racing at its finest. VeloNews podcasts utilize our network of reporters, commentators, and coaches to bring you inside pro cycling and improve your own riding and racing.

Rank #1: Fast Talk, ep. 90: Innovative approaches to base training

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Base training has traditionally been all about long, slow rides. But that's tough if you live in the northern hemisphere and you hate the cold, or lack the necessary equipment to ride safely outdoors when road conditions might be perilous and light is limited.

Today, we’re discussing how best to deal with those challenges that plague the northern hemisphere this time of year. (Apologies to all of our friends in the southern hemisphere!) Does it kill your motivation to ride? Do you feel the fitness literally draining from your body? Don't let it!

The darkness, cold temperatures, and perilous road conditions of the winter months don’t have to be any sort of barrier. In fact, as you’ll learn in this episode, this time of year is the perfect time to find a host of new ways to stay motivated, add variety to your training methods, try something new, reinvigorate your work ethic, and, ultimately, set yourself up to improve performance when the racing begins later in the year.

Our primary guests today are Andrew Randell and Steve Neal, the owners of Toronto's The Cycling Gym, joined by one of their athletes, Jeremiah Groen, someone who we imagine is similar to a lot of our listeners: "I'm a very amateur cyclist, don't do many races; I mostly just want to be fit."

These three Canadians don’t care about the winter blues! Their advice? Get brave and get outside. Yes, even in the dark and even in the snow. But if you can’t or won’t go outside, they have plenty of sage advice on how best to hit the gym, the trainer, or the weight room to get the most, and the most balance, out of your training sessions.

We’ll also hear from pro roadie Erica Clevenger. She divulges some of her favorite methods of cross training. All that and much more, including some tech advice from Lennard Zinn.

By the end of this episode, you’ll understand that using the base season properly to prepare for the build to come and the all-important race season to follow can be a very enjoyable time of year.

Now, let's make you fast!

Dec 20 2019

1hr 9mins

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Rank #2: Fast Talk, ep. 39: The secrets to staying strong as you age with Ned Overend

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Is aging as bad as everyone thinks it is? Are our rides doomed to slowness and pain after 35? Don't despair, on this podcast we give you some answers. Throughout, we talk to Ned Overend about how he's managed to stay fast into his 60s.

We first address what the research says, and why even past research painted a much grimmer picture than reality. We’ll explore the science with Dr. Jason Glowney and coach Frank Overton who know how to help masters athletes get the most out of their aging bodies. Don't sweat it, folks — age is just a number!

Mar 01 2018

1hr 9mins

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Rank #3: Fast Talk, ep. 84: Pro training tips with George Bennett

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George Bennett of the Jumbo-Visma WorldTour team, who at one point was sitting fourth at this year’s Tour de France, has had a phenomenal season.

In the course of our recent conversation with George about recovery and adaptation, we talked with the New Zealand-born rider about how he was managing his recovery from the Tour de France to get ready for the Vuelta a España. That lead to an entire conversation about how George trains, and his tips for hitting peak form. That's the basis for this episode.

Today, we cover:

- First, something that is fascinating but probably won’t help many of us: how to complete two consecutive grand tours.

- Second, the training approach that George has found works for him. While many of his teammates need high intensity work, George does very little, and focuses primarily on long endurance rides. But he emphasizes that the method that works for you is highly individual.

- We discuss if George’s approach is appropriate for amateur riders, or if we should focus more on intensity. Bennett points out that different work can lead to very different strengths and weaknesses.

- Next, we have a long talk about the importance of eating enough and keeping your glycogen stocked up.

- Finally, George offers a final word on having the confidence to rest, and to not take your training too seriously.

Along with George, we hear from Grant Holicky, formerly of Apex Coaching when this interview was conducted, and now with Forever Endurance Coaching. Grant addresses how to time your season, particularly as an amateur rider.

Let's make you fast!

Sep 27 2019

1hr 4mins

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Rank #4: VN Pod, ep. 151: Tour de France wrap up, plus Vaughters on cycling's EPO era

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Andrew Hood and Fred Dreier present their final analysis of the 2019 Tour de France. Did the race's truncated finish ruin the excitement? Will we remember Egan Bernal's victory for his stunning attack, or because of the shortened stages?

Then, the guys discuss the future of Team Ineos, which now has three Tour de France champions, all of whom will want to win the race next year. How should the British squad navigate the strange leadership story that is bound to pop up?

Then, we have a long and frank discussion with Team EF Education First manager Jonathan Vaughters, who has written a new book, "One-Way Ticket: Nine Lives on Two Wheels" about his experience in pro cycling. Vaughters has some great insight on cycling's so-called 'EPO era,' and the social pressures that he and his peers felt to dope.

Vaughters sheds light on some of the anecdotes and opinions in his book, and talks about why he's confident in the current generation of pro cyclists.

This week's episode is sponsored by Whoop, the performance tool that is changing the way people track their fitness and optimize their training. Whoop tracks your heart rate and gives you a strain scores that lets you know how strenuous your training was on your body, with additional information around your sleep and recovery to tell you how well your body rebounds from training. Right now, listeners can get 15 percent off a Whoop device by going to www.whoop.com and using the code 'velo' at checkout. www.whoop.com.

Aug 02 2019

1hr 18mins

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Rank #5: Fast Talk podcast, ep. 83: Training the Gut with Asker Jeukendrup

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Just ask any Tour rider who’s frequently burning 5000 calories or more per day about in-race nutrition and they’ll tell you that it’s both critical and tricky to get right. You can spend months getting your legs ready for your target event, you can be putting out the best numbers of your life, and that can all be wiped away by a poorly timed bonk or intestinal cramping.

You have to consume enough carbohydrates to keep the legs ticking over when the race gets hard, but at the same time you need to make sure they are well tolerated and you’re able to absorb them. It’s a tricky balance and it’s highly individual. Simply buying the newest, coolest sports nutrition product isn’t going to get you there.

You have to find what works for you. But just as importantly, you have to remember that in-race nutrition, just like almost all things, is trainable and while you’re out three doing your big weekend ride, or hard hill repeats, you need to dedicate some time to training the gut.
So, today we'll dive into nutritional training and talk about:

1. Applying a scientific approach to figuring out your carbohydrate needs and whether you are a fat burner or a carbohydrate burner.

2. Second, G.I. distress. Some thoughts on what causes it and why intestinal permeability may be a factor

3. Next, we’ll discuss race nutrition and why changing up what you eat on race day may not be your best strategy.

4. Fourth, why most people can only absorb 60g of carbohydrates per hour but we’re still recommending trying to get 90g. That sounds like a lot, but it’s actually only about 360 calories which is still less than what you’re going to burn in an hour during a big race.

5. The best mix of carbohydrates to improve absorption

6. Why you need to dedicate time every week to training your gut – no different from the time and energy you invest in training your legs,.

7. Finally, we’ll talk about any potential health concerns with focused race nutrition and briefly touch both on the microbiome and l-glutamine
Our primary guest today is none other than Dr Asker Jeukendrup. Dr Juekendrup, is one of the most renowned sports nutrition researchers in the World. He was Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Sport Science. He ran the Gatorade Sports Science Institute back when it was the center coaches and team managers were looking to for the leading hydration research. Dr Jeukendrup now has his own company, Mysportscience and works with Team Jumbo Visma.
Along with Dr Jeukendrup, we talked with Katie Compton, the winner of 15 consecutive national titles, and a four-time silver medalist at ‘cross worlds. She’s familiar with G.I. problems during races and shared with Chris some of her thoughts.
Next, we checked in with Colby Pearce, at this point our unofficial third regular on Fast Talk. He had some warnings about getting too caught up in traditional sports nutrition products and emphasized the importance of also considering health.
Finally, we touched base with Ryan Kohler, the head coach at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center. Ryan frequently works with athletes on training their guts for their target events and shared some of his strategies.
Alright, pull out your Swedish fish.... throw them in the trash and get some real sports nutrition and let's make you fast!

Sep 14 2019

1hr 28mins

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Rank #6: Fast Talk, ep. 87: Preventing cycling injuries through strength and conditioning with Jess Elliott

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Typically, when we hear the words “strength training,” we think of going into the gym, slapping some plates on a bar, and seeing what we can lift. The more, the better.

But there’s a lot more to strength training than that, especially for those of us focused on endurance sports. Strength and conditioning is also about maintaining proper function, training neural patterns, and preventing injury. Sports like cycling, by nature, cause imbalances. If all you do is ride your bike, an overuse injury is nearly guaranteed for your future.

We also believe that weight training aids performance on the bike. Regardless of your position, as Coach Connor likes to point out, no matter what you believe, race performance will suffer if you’re sitting on the sidelines with a bad back or painful knee injury.

So, in this episode of Fast Talk, we’re going to discuss four of the most common overuse and imbalance injuries in cyclists and how to address them with off-the-bike work and proper bike fit.
Patellar tendinitis, or pain at the front of the knee. Cycling is a quad dominant sport. Keeping balance and doing some loaded eccentric work can help prevent this very common pain.

Pelvic obliquity, a broad term for imbalances and asymmetrical movements in the hips.

Back pain. A proper bike fit and learning to rely on your glutes and hamstrings instead of the postural muscles of the back can go a long way towards preventing this all-too-common issue.

Thoracic kyphosis, a fancy term for a slouched back, which is common among cyclists. Regular exercise to open the chest will help you improve posture off the bike.

Our guest today is owner of Tag Performance and University of Denver faculty member in Human Performance and Sports, Jess Elliot. [you can link here to episode 32 which she also appeared in]

Jess recently taught a half-day workshop on strength training for endurance athletes at the Training Peaks Endurance Summit and, for those of you in the Colorado area, because of the popularity of that workshop, she’s hosting it again on December 7. Go to her website at tagperformanceco.com/events to sign up. Use the code “fastlabs” to get a $25 discount.

You’re going to hear a lot of technical terms in this episode; we hope you walk away with an understanding that effective strength training is about more than creating a list of exercises then going to the gym and giving it your best shot. Proper movement, ensuring you are activating the correct firing patterns, and lifting an appropriate weight are all crucial. To help out, Jess is posting videos of most of the exercises we discuss on her website.

Along with Jess, Trevor talked with Charles Van Atta, the head biomechanist and fitter at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center. There’s no point in doing the off-the-bike work to resolve an over-use injury if a poor bike fit is promoting it. Charles addresses each of our four injuries from a bike fit perspective.

With that, let’s make you fast.

Nov 09 2019

1hr 46mins

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Rank #7: Fast Talk, ep. 36: Inside the new science of climbing

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Is climbing as simple as power-to-weight ratios? Not so much. In the January/February issue of VeloNews magazine, we dug into the rarely explored science of climbing. This podcast goes behind the scenes of the making of that article, and the many fascinating discoveries that came out of it.

Co-hosts Trevor Connor and Chris Case turned themselves into mad scientists and convinced WorldTour pro Sepp Kuss (LottoNL-Jumbo) to join them for several time trials up a few Boulder climbs in the quest for answers.

Chief among the questions was simply: does climbing come down to power-to-weight or does your climbing technique make a difference? In other words, if two riders weigh the same and average the same wattage, will they have the same time up a climb regardless of how they ride? Answering that question led to several others, including how a rider's "type" affects his or her climbing and what's the difference between pros and amateurs.

We also discovered some surprising answers about how different riders climb, how cadence plays a role, and if those basic online calculators can really predict your time up a climb. We also collected novel on-the-road biomechanical data.

This special episode of Fast Talk takes a deeper dive into our in-house experiment, more so than any magazine article could. No, our experiment wasn't worthy of publication in the journal Science, but we had a lot of fun, we discovered some things that we're very excited about, and, most importantly, we hope to help all of you become better climbers.

Joining us for the podcast is Ryan Kohler of the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center, who helped with the experiments on the road.

Jan 19 2018

1hr 10mins

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Rank #8: Fast Talk live! Nutrition, compression apparel, the placebo effect

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This week, the Fast Talk podcast went live! Hosts Trevor Connor and Chris Case fielded questions on Facebook from podcast listeners like you. Here are a few (of the many) topics we covered:

- How does oatmeal compare to other grains?
- What type of riding should I do to prepare for a gran fondo with 7,400 meters of climbing?
- Is compression clothing beneficial? When and for how long should I use it?
- What's the difference between the inflammation caused by training and that caused by certain foods?

Feb 09 2018

1hr 7mins

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Rank #9: VeloNews Voices | PYSO ep. 12: 2019 Tour de France, Stage Twelve

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SPECIAL GUEST DOWNHILL LEGEND AND SPORTS TRAINER - OSCAR SAIZ (oscarsaiz.com)

After things go up, Oscar Saiz gets down to the business of descending. Technique, Courage and how driving video games can be a safe and valuable teaching tool for riders learning to read the road.

The boys in the Peleton as well as the PYSO boys played fair today. Bobby and Gus discuss managing breakaways. How emotions play a part in racing and mental Freshness. Ups and Downs. Terminal Velocity.White Knuckles. Hot Topic was the Rohan Dennis Investigation - Bobby's previous pick for tomorrow's ITT. Things are starting to HEAT UP in the TDF!

Jul 18 2019

56mins

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Rank #10: Fast Talk, ep. 68: The big picture — the three types of rides you should do

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In this episode we’re taking a step back — way back — to see the forest for the tress. Let me explain: Many of you have been fascinated by our recordings with scientists and coaches like Stephen Seiler, John Hawley, Iñigo San Millan, and Joe Friel. Now, we’ve sifted through hours of Fast Talk recordings with our many distinguished guests to bring context to what we hope is a simplified, unified message about the fundamental principles of these previous shows: there are just three types of rides. Yes, that’s a simplification. Yes, you’re getting our bias. So, if you want that high level of detail, please return to those past episodes.

In this episode, we’re talking about the forest. We’re hoping to give you a framework to understand all that scientific detail. And we’re going to keep it simple.

We’ll discuss:

- First, when you take away the complexity, training boils down to three ride types in most training models.

- We’ll give a simple zone system, based on physiology, and explain why that’s important.

- We’ll define the long ride: why it’s important, how to execute it, and why there are no shortcuts.

- We’ll define the high-intensity ride: why less is more with this type of ride and why executing it with quality is so critical. Dr. Seiler actually divides these rides into two categories — threshold rides and high-intensity work. For this podcast, we’re lumping them together, but we will hear from Dr. Seiler about why we shouldn’t neglect threshold work despite the current popularity of one-minute intervals and Tabata work.

- We’ll discuss the recovery ride. Ironically, for most of us, this is the hardest to execute. When we’re time-crunched, we might think that spending an hour spinning easy on the trainer is not time well spent. We’ll discuss why that philosophy is dangerous to take.

- Finally, we’ll talk about some of the exceptions, including sweet spot work and training races.

We’ve included excerpts from Dr. San Millan, once the exercise physiologist for the Garmin-Slipstream WorldTour team, among others. We’ll hear several times from Dr. Stephen Seiler, who is often credited with defining the polarized training model, which developed from his research with some of the best endurance athletes in the world. Dr. John Hawley will address both long rides and high-intensity work. Dr. Hawley has been one of the leading researchers in sports science for several decades and is a big proponent of interval work and carbohydrate feeding, but even he feels there’s a limit. Grant Holicky, formerly of Apex Coaching in Boulder, Colorado, has worked with some of the best cyclists in the world. He sees undirected training, those “sort of hard” rides, as one of the biggest mistakes athletes can make. He’ll explain why. And finally, we’ll hear from legendary coach Joe Friel about sweet spot work and why it does have a place… even though technically it’s not one of our three rides.

Now, to the forest! Let’s make you fast.

Feb 22 2019

1hr 35mins

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Rank #11: Fast Talk ep. 80: Properly executing intervals is hard; keep your training plan simple

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Complex training prescriptions are becoming increasingly popular. In this episode, we ask the question: Does it really need to be that complex? What do you gain from this complexity?

With the help of seven different experts — coaches, scientists, and athletes — we’re going to try to make three key points:

- Human physiology is very complex
- Properly executing intervals is very difficult
- But, the prescription should be simple.

There was no guest with us in our studio for this recording, but since this is a summary episode, we pulled a lot of segments from past shows. Our guests this week include:

- Legendary mountain bike world champion, and a guy who never gets old, Ned Overend. Ned almost sounded scared when he talked with us about the possibility of training with power or heart rate. Yet, despite having almost no metrics, and no structured routine, he’s developed a remarkably sophisticated system of training.

- Next, we’ll hear from Houshang Amiri, head coach at the Pacific Cycling Centre and past Canadian national team coach. Houshang shared with Trevor his thoughts on complex interval routines.
It wouldn’t be an episode on interval work without hearing from Dr.
- Stephen Seiler, a top physiologist and researcher in Europe, who’s been credited with formalizing the polarized training model. We pulled a few clips from Dr. Seiler sharing his thoughts on interval prescription and execution.

- But what about athletes who have grown up with power and pre-programmed workouts on their head units? We included an interview we haven’t used before with 2018 Tour of Utah winner Sepp Kuss. While he relies heavily on power, it’s not as simple as setting a target number before he gets on the bike and sticking to it.

- Next we grabbed a clip with Dr. Andy Coggan and Hunter Allen, authors of “Training and Racing with a Power Meter” which was updated this year. They invented probably the most common training zone model in the world (though they don’t like the word zones.) They talked with us about the value of zone models or levels.

- Trevor pulled out an old interview with Trek-Segafredo rider Toms Skujins. Like Sepp, Toms talks about just some of the many decisions that go into effectively executing his interval work.
- Finally, we hear from 2017 U.S. national champion Larry Warbasse of Ag2r La Mondiale. Larry talked with us about the importance of seeing your training sessions in a broader context. Otherwise, you can execute perfectly and still get off track.

Aug 02 2019

1hr 49mins

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Rank #12: Fast Talk pod, ep. 35: How to train in the cold

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Are you getting out to ride this winter? This podcast covers the physiological effects of training in the cold, from muscle damage to the increased caloric demands. We also discuss tips and tricks to set up your bike, stay warm, and even keep your bottles from freezing. And if it's too damn cold, we explain the best way to balance time indoors on the trainer with outdoor rides.

We speak with Dr. Stephen Cheung, Dr. Inigo San Millan, Trek-Segafredo pro rider Kiel Reijnen, and former cyclocross champion Tim Johnson about the best ways to get fit this winter.

Jan 05 2018

1hr 10mins

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Rank #13: Fast Talk, ep. 82: The importance of adaptations, with George Bennett

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Recovery, recovery, recovery... you’ve heard us talk about it before. You’ve heard a lot of our guests preach about its importance. Well, now let’s confuse you a bit. The ultimate goal of training is, of course, to adapt. And there’s a critical distinction between adaptation and recovery. They are not the same thing. In fact, sometimes what helps one, hurts the other.

Recovery is about doing what you can so the legs are ready for your next workout. Adaptation is about the body repairing the damage caused by training—if the training provides enough stress, it will repair the system to come back stronger. But what’s good for that repair process may have you feeling less than perfect on the bike the next day.

Today, we’re going to dive into this important difference and focus on adaptations—what causes them and how to aid them. We’ll talk about:

- First, the difference between recovery and adaptation.
- Second, how the immune system is intimately involved in both, and why we’ve come to the realization in recent years that reducing inflammation can be counterproductive.
- Next, we’ll talk about the three stages of repair. Remember that training does damage. We are weaker after hard rides. It’s during the repair process that we get stronger, and the immune system is the repair man. Much like the local cable guy, the immune system is going to work at its own pace regardless of what you do or say.
- Next, we discuss how there’s a delicate balance between damage and repair, and when you get out of balance by doing too much training, it starts a vicious cycle that prevents further adaptations and leads to burnout
- We’ll talk with George Bennett, who put in a fantastic Tour de France performance, helping his GC leader, Steven Kruijswijk, land on the podium. George discusses what he does to aid adaptations.
- Finally, we’ll finish with a conversation about the things that do help adaptations and the things that hurt it, despite the fact that a lot of endurance athletes do them.

Our primary guest today is George Bennett, member of the Jumbo-Visma WorldTour team. George joins us for part of the episode—we spared a rider of his caliber from having to sit through Trevor’s initial lecture on immunology.

We also hear from Joe Friel, author of “The Cyclists Training Bible.” In the most recent edition of his book, Joe makes the important distinction between recovery and adaptations.

Next we talk with Brent Bookwalter of Mitchelton-Scott. In order to adapt, we have to first do damage. Brent talks with us about the important balance between damage and repair.

Then we catch up with Boulder-based coach extraordinaire Colby Pearce. And finally, we talk with Paulo Saldanha, the owner of PowerWatts. Paulo talks about ways to find the right amount of damage, and why we should rethink taking antioxidants.

Aug 31 2019

1hr 30mins

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Rank #14: VN Pod, ep. 164: What killed the 2020 Amgen Tour of California; Tejay van Garderen interview

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On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, Fred and Andy discuss the recent news that AEG has cancelled the 2020 Amgen Tour of California.

Why is the race cancelled? The guys take a deep dive into the business of North American bike racing, and explain why the revenue model has always been challenging for big races like the Tour of California. The guys also discuss what the race meant for North American riders, and what its absence means for the WorldTour riders.

Then, we hear from Tejay van Garderen, who won the 2013 edition of the race. Van Garderen discusses his own history at the Tour of California, and how it shaped him into the race he is today. All that and more on today's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Nov 05 2019

57mins

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Rank #15: VN Pod, ep. 156: Kate Courtney! Plus, Sepp Kuss's Vuelta win and cycling's young guns

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Kate Courtney just became the first American in 17 years to win the XC mountain bike World Cup. On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, we catch up with Courtney to talk about her dream season.

Before talking to Courtney, Fred Dreier and Andrew Hood team up to discuss the action at the Vuelta a España, including the thrilling stage victory by American Sepp Kuss, a regular on the pod. What were the tactical decision that led Kuss to win? What does his victory tell us about Jumbo-Visma's attitude toward its younger racers?

Then, Andy discusses the generational shift currently happening in the UCI WorldTour, with young riders like Tadej Pogacar, Egan Bernal, and Remco Evenepoel all surging to the forefront of pro cycling. This dynamic bucks tradition in pro cycling, where young riders often needed to pay their dues before being given the opportunity to win.

Finally, we hear from American Lawson Craddock, who has become one of the most aggressive riders in this year's Vuelta a España. Craddock has spent the entire race attacking into breakaways.

This week's episode is sponsored by Whoop, the performance tool that is changing the way people track their fitness and optimize their training. Whoop tracks your heart rate and gives you a strain scores that lets you know how strenuous your training was on your body, with additional information around your sleep and recovery to tell you how well your body rebounds from training. Right now, listeners can get 15 percent off a Whoop device by going to www.whoop.com and using the code 'velo' at checkout. www.whoop.com.

Sep 11 2019

1hr 3mins

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Rank #16: VN podcast, ep. 71: Cobbled classics start Saturday!

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Can you feel that? The cobbled classics kick off this weekend with Omloop Het Nieuwsblad! We look ahead to that race and Kuurne-Brussels-Kuurne. Who is riding well? Why did Sagan decide to skip these fun early spring openers?

Plus, we call up European correspondent Andrew Hood for an inside look at the crazy media scrum that was Ruta del Sol. Ruta del Sol? Yep, it was Chris Froome's debut race, and as you'd expect, there was a lot to discuss.

All that, and we also look back on last week's other stage races: Tour of Oman and Volta ao Algarve.

Feb 20 2018

54mins

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Rank #17: Fast Talk, ep. 66: Demystifying Periodization with Joe Friel

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Periodization is, in many ways, the pinnacle of advanced training. Taking the step to periodize graduates you to a professional approach, one with purpose, long-term vision, and organized planning.

But periodization can also be confusing and, frankly, a little scary. Periodizing your training means diving into a world of new concepts, things like training blocks, mesocycles, and increasing specificity. For those of us with jobs, families, who have to deal with inclement weather, it’s harder to plan ahead, to know on Monday what we might fit in on Friday, let alone how to plan our next four-week transition phase. Looking at it in that context, it’s hard to fault those who just hop on Zwift and start smashing it when they have a rare spare hour.

The question is, does periodization need to be that complicated? And, while it may be a necessity for pros, can it help those of us with only seven or eight hours to train each week?

For answers to those very questions and many more, let’s take a deep dive with the man credited with bringing periodization to cycling back in the 1990s, Joe Friel.

Today we’ll discuss, first,

- What exactly is periodization? The truth is it’s not as complicated and scary as it may sound. At its simplest, it’s just a way of structuring your season to prepare for your target races. Heard about base training in the winter and top-end work in the spring? That's periodization.
- The history of periodization from its first use among Soviet athletes to its introduction to cycling.
- The principles of training, including overload, specificity, reversibility, and individualization. These four concepts are at the core of periodization.
- With the principles as our base, we’ll dive into the different forms of periodization, starting with traditional linear periodization. It’s the oldest and most common form, but that doesn't mean it isn’t effective.
- Next we’ll talk about reverse periodization and why it might not be best for the weekend warrior, even if Chris Froome is doing it.
- Next we’ll talk about non-linear forms of periodization, including undulating periodization and the most recently developed strategy called block periodization.
- Then we’ll finish up with a few tips on how to pick a periodization strategy that’s right for you — assuming you want to use one at all.

Our guest today is legendary coach Joe Friel, who just recently published a new edition of the definitive book on training, The Cyclists Training Bible. The first edition back in the 1990s introduced periodization to cyclists but it only covered traditional periodization. This new edition covers all of the strategies we discuss in this podcast.

We also briefly hear from Sepp Kuss, of the Jumbo-Visma team, who, surprisingly, tried periodization for the first time this season as a WorldTour rider.

Next, we talk with Paulo Saldanha, among other things the coach of Mike Woods of the EF Education First team, who has very unique periodization approaches with both his top pros and the masters athletes he coaches.

Finally, we’ll hear from Colby Pearce, a regular contributor to Fast Talk, who will give his opinion on periodization and how to pick an approach for you.

Jan 25 2019

1hr 9mins

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Rank #18: VN Pod, ep. 170: Gage Hecht on winning the U.S. CX title and balancing cross with road

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Gage Hecht rode away with the 2019 U.S. Cyclocross National Championships this past weekend in Lakewood, Washington. On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, we go inside Hecht's dominating win at 'cross nats, including Hecht's thoughts on the crash that knocked rival Kerry Werner out of second place.

Also, Hecht has balanced his commitments on the road with his cyclocross ambitions. Which does he prefer the most? We find out, and discover why Hecht may have to choose cyclocross or road in the coming years.

All that and more on this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Dec 19 2019

26mins

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Rank #19: VN Pod, ep. 163: 2020 Tour de France vs. Giro d'Italia; plus Annemiek van Vleuten

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On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, Andy Hood and Fred Dreier analyze the routes for the 2020 Tour de France and Giro d'Italia.

The Tour has adopted a modern route with shorter stages, punchy climbs, and a lack of flat time trials. On paper, this course appears to cater to French riders like Julian Alaphilippe or Thibaut Pinot.

The Giro, meanwhile, has revealed another long and punishing route that is packed with stages over 200 kilometers in length. The Giro is again hoping for week 3 dramatics, with three punishing mountain stages and a final individual time trial to keep fans hoping for a last-minute win. Will such a scenario play out?

Finally, we're joined by recently crowned UCI World Road Champion Annemiek van Vleuten, who takes us inside her big win in Yorkshire. Van Vleuten also believes her new rival, Chloé Dygert, has become the big favorite for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

This week's episode is sponsored by VeloSwap, the nation's largest used bike expo and swap. It's happening Saturday, November 2 at the National Western Complex in Denver, Colorado. Get your tickets today at veloswap.com/tickets.

Oct 29 2019

44mins

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Rank #20: VeloNews Voices | PYSO ep. 20: 2019 Tour de France, Stage Twenty

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Nibali's snowball's-chance-in-hell or the tour for that matter pays off as he holds off the field for one more stage victory! Perhaps a resume builder for his switch over to TREK next season?
New contracts, higher salaries, post-tour criteriums. Its a whole new world after today's stage 20 at the greatest sports event and greatest cycling podcast in the world

Jul 27 2019

51mins

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Fast Talk, ep. 93: Balancing sport and life, with Brent Bookwalter

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Hello and welcome to Fast Talk! I'm your host Chris Case. Today we have a great episode in store for you, with someone you’ve heard from many times before on Fast Talk. Today, we’re finally joined by Brent Bookwalter of the Mitchelton-Scott WorldTour team, a man of both wisdom and humility, for a full conversation on balancing life and sport.

What do pros know about that balance, you ask? “They’re pampered!” you’re probably thinking. Well, not exactly true. The life of a pro cyclist is not as glamorous as you might think. We’ll discuss that misconception, but we’ll spend the majority of our conversation learning the many ways in which Brent has learned to balance training and racing with being a good husband, a soon-to-be-father, a son and friend, and a gran fondo promoter, among many other things. Through the years of racing both at the neo-pro level through to the WorldTour, Brent has dealt with limited time—sometimes well, sometimes not so well—which has forced him to prioritize his life in myriad ways. And it’s those tips that apply to all of us.

The high level of physical and mental performance that is demanded of pro athletes while they also strive to maintain healthy relationships and interests outside of their career, means that they have been forced to master “life-balance.”

While we don’t all deal with the issues related to pro cyclists’ in our own lives, there are common themes about self-care, spending time on relationships, knowing your personal limits, and working to keep your passions alive that we can all relate to.

Today, along with Brent, we spoke to long-time pro and coach Katie Compton, as well as two of our favorite coaches and soon-to-be Fast Labs podcast hosts, Grant Holicky and Colby Pearce.

If you didn't catch it yet, we released our first bonus podcast last week. That’s right, Fast Talk is now a weekly podcast. Coach Connor and I were able to answer a few of your questions, one related to overtraining and burn-out—not-interchangeable terms, thank you Dr. Seiler for the correction—and one related to physiological testing.

If you have a question for us you can either write us at Fasttalk@fastlabs.com OR, as you may have heard by now, we have a number setup for you to call – it's 719-800-2112 . Leave a voicemail with your question. If we can hear you loud and clear in the message, we may include the recording in the show.

Now, bust out your balance board, brush up on your communication skills, it’s time to compartmentalize. Let’s make you fast!

Jan 16 2020

1hr 11mins

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VN Pod, ep. 173: Quick Step's 2020 goals; Betsy Welch joins VeloNews

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The VeloNews Podcast welcomes the newest staff editor to join the publication, Betsy Welch.

On this week's episode of the podcast we speak with Betsy about the various topics she will be covering, from women's cycling to gravel and mountain bike racing. We recently held a focus group for female cyclists in Boulder, Colorado, and Betsy discusses what we learned from the 40 women who attended. What are the storylines driving interest amongst female riders?

Then, Andrew Hood calls in to discuss what he learned from Deceuninck-Quick Step's training camp, where he interviewed Remco Evenepoel, Julian Alaphilippe, and Zdenek Stybar. Evenepoel is making his grand tour start at just 19; Alaphilippe is targeting the Olympics.

Hood is off to the Tour Down Under, which kicks off the WorldTour schedule in just a few days. All that and more on this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Jan 15 2020

34mins

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Tech Pod: Helmet Technology

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Helmets have come a long way since leather hairnets, or even more minimalist than that, the perfectly coiffed head of hair. While EPS foam has dominated helmet construction for decades now, a new crop of technologies have emerged in recent years to address the types of forces your brain is likely to encounter during a crash.

Tech editor Dan Cavallari traveled to New York City in early 2019 to find out more about Bontrager's Wavecel technology. He sat down with Wavecel's inventor to find out what makes this green, wavy plastic different than other green, wavy plastics we've seen before.

And Jens Voigt chimes in with some of his experiences with head injuries and the evolution of helmets in the pro peloton.

Jan 13 2020

40mins

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Fast Talk, Ep. 92: Q&A on intensity vs. volume, overtraining, lab testing, and more

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Hello and welcome to this bonus episode of Fast Talk. These new episodes, which we’ll publish every other week to supplement our flagship shows, will typically run a little shorter than our regular episodes, and they’ll also be more geared toward answering your questions, but all in all, they’ll contain the same great content you’ve come to expect from Fast Labs, and from Coach Connor and Chris Case.

Our regular, full-length episodes with multiple guests addressing the current science in training and your requested topics will still continue on, of course. For this first bonus episode, we’re doing a bit of everything. For starters, during our episode a few weeks back with the Cycling Gym, we recorded an analysis of some recent physiological research. Trevor hadn’t done a nerd bomb in a while and was feeling the need. But it didn’t really fit with the episode. So, we’ll start with Trevor’s summary of a few studies and what they say about how to structure your training.

We’ll also answer listener questions on overtraining, laboratory testing, and much more.

If you have a question for us, give us a call at 719-800-2112 and leave us a voicemail. If we can hear you loud and clear in the message, we may include the recording in the show. As always, you can also email us at fasttalk@fastlabs.com.

Now, let’s make you fast!

Jan 09 2020

36mins

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VN Pod, ep. 172: Froome's setback, gravel entrepreneurs, and TJ Eisenhart interview

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Welcome back from the holidays!

The VeloNews Podcast returns with the first episode of 2020, and there is plenty to discuss. Andrew Hood and Fred Dreier jump into three major storylines from these early days of the decade.

The dangerous wildfires in Australia have not yet threatened the Santos Tour Down Under, but major endurance events are often cancelled in the wake of tragedy and natural disasters. Fred and Andy discuss the upcoming race, and whether or not the fires will force organizers to cancel it.

The U.S. gravel cycling scene is already generating headlines, as more pro road riders jump into off-road cycling. As it turns out, these riders are changing the business model of pro cycling in America by attracting personal sponsors that may have otherwise gone to a pro team or race. How could this shift change the American cycling landscape?

Chris Froome is back in the news, as stories circulated that he left a Team Ineos training camp in early December. Were these stories accurate or overblown?

Then, we have an interview with domestic road pro TJ Eisenhart, who is leaving the road behind to launch his own gravel racing team. Eisenhart explains why he's heading to gravel racing and delves into his own personal setbacks in road cycling. Plus, he explains why his gravel team supports a new business model.

All that and more on this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Jan 08 2020

59mins

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Fast Talk, ep. 91: Beyond the data—training is about more than just the numbers

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Happy New Year’s, Fast Talk friends!

We are excited to be speeding into 2020 with our new company, Fast Labs, and continuing our partnership with VeloNews. For starters, and due to popular demand, Fast Talk will now be a weekly show. These new bi-monthly bonus episodes will be a bit shorter than the traditional Fast Talk episode, but in them you’ll find similar, detailed scientific physiology explanations, special interviews with your favorite pros, coaches, and experts, and we’ll also regularly answer your questions.

To that end, thank you to the listeners who called and left us a voicemail over the holidays. We’ll be recording a special listener questions episode in the next week, so make sure to get your questions in as soon as you can. The number to call is 719-800-2112. If we can hear you loud and clear in the message, we may include the recording in the show.

Now, episode 91. The focus of this episode can be summarized in a single, powerful sentiment: There is great value in keeping track of your numbers, at analyzing the data you’ve gathered with your power meter, heart rate strap, or other device, but if all you do is focus on the numbers, and make them the end-goal themselves, you are missing out on very critical aspects of your training.

So, the underlying message of episode 91 is simple: Think of the numbers not as the target or the goal, but as a tool. What we will emphasize today are the many critical aspects of training and coaching that don’t show up in the data.

Our primary guest is a very successful former professional cyclist turned coach Julie Young, whose road racing career stretched over a decade with teams including Saturn and Timex. She continues to race today at a very high level across multiple disciplines, and is currently part of the talented team behind the Kaiser Permanente Sports Medicine Endurance Lab in California.

We’re also joined by co-owner of The cycling Gym, Coach Steve Neal, as well as Trek-Segafredo's Ruth Winder, the reigning American national champion on the road.

Now, set your preferred analytics software aside for a minute. Let’s focus on you, your brain, and this moment. Let’s make you fast!

Jan 03 2020

1hr 14mins

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VN Pod, ep. 171: Alex Howes on Kanza, USPro, and mountain biking

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It's the final episode of The VeloNews Podcast of 2019, and we here at VeloNews want to wish all of you a Happy Holidays!

For our final show we have an interview with USPro road champion (and friend of the show) Alex Howes. Alex takes us inside his big win, and discusses the joy and pain of racing the Dirty Kanza 200, as well as his big racing plans for 2020.

We hope you have a great break and will see you all in 2020.

Dec 24 2019

21mins

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20 most important tech stories of the decade

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The decade is coming to a close, so VeloNews tech editor Dan Cavallari and editorial director Ben Delaney count down the most significant bicycle gear and tech developments to occur since 2010. Some of these advancements changed the way we ride (Indoors? On dirt? It all happened!) and some never gained a foothold.

What do you think of our list of the top 20 most important tech stories of the decade? Have questions or feedback? Think we missed a few? Be sure to tweet @browntiedan to let us know!

Dec 23 2019

47mins

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Fast Talk, ep. 90: Innovative approaches to base training

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Base training has traditionally been all about long, slow rides. But that's tough if you live in the northern hemisphere and you hate the cold, or lack the necessary equipment to ride safely outdoors when road conditions might be perilous and light is limited.

Today, we’re discussing how best to deal with those challenges that plague the northern hemisphere this time of year. (Apologies to all of our friends in the southern hemisphere!) Does it kill your motivation to ride? Do you feel the fitness literally draining from your body? Don't let it!

The darkness, cold temperatures, and perilous road conditions of the winter months don’t have to be any sort of barrier. In fact, as you’ll learn in this episode, this time of year is the perfect time to find a host of new ways to stay motivated, add variety to your training methods, try something new, reinvigorate your work ethic, and, ultimately, set yourself up to improve performance when the racing begins later in the year.

Our primary guests today are Andrew Randell and Steve Neal, the owners of Toronto's The Cycling Gym, joined by one of their athletes, Jeremiah Groen, someone who we imagine is similar to a lot of our listeners: "I'm a very amateur cyclist, don't do many races; I mostly just want to be fit."

These three Canadians don’t care about the winter blues! Their advice? Get brave and get outside. Yes, even in the dark and even in the snow. But if you can’t or won’t go outside, they have plenty of sage advice on how best to hit the gym, the trainer, or the weight room to get the most, and the most balance, out of your training sessions.

We’ll also hear from pro roadie Erica Clevenger. She divulges some of her favorite methods of cross training. All that and much more, including some tech advice from Lennard Zinn.

By the end of this episode, you’ll understand that using the base season properly to prepare for the build to come and the all-important race season to follow can be a very enjoyable time of year.

Now, let's make you fast!

Dec 20 2019

1hr 9mins

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VN Pod, ep. 170: Gage Hecht on winning the U.S. CX title and balancing cross with road

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Gage Hecht rode away with the 2019 U.S. Cyclocross National Championships this past weekend in Lakewood, Washington. On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, we go inside Hecht's dominating win at 'cross nats, including Hecht's thoughts on the crash that knocked rival Kerry Werner out of second place.

Also, Hecht has balanced his commitments on the road with his cyclocross ambitions. Which does he prefer the most? We find out, and discover why Hecht may have to choose cyclocross or road in the coming years.

All that and more on this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Dec 19 2019

26mins

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VN Pod, ep. 169: Katie Compton on her U.S. CX national championship streak

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Katie Compton heads to Tacoma, Washington this week for the USA Cycling National Cyclocross Championships, where she is the 15-time defending national champion.

This week on The VeloNews Podcast we catch up with Compton to talk about her legendary streak at U.S. nationals. Who are the women to challenge her at U.S. nationals? What role does confidence play in her many victories?

Compton then discusses some of the wider dynamics at play in international cyclocross, from the rise of young female racers from The Netherlands, to the proposed 16-race World Cup calendar for 2021.

All that and more on this week's interview with Katie Compton.

Dec 11 2019

33mins

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Fast Talk, ep. 89: The value of physiological testing

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Riding on the gold-standard Velotron in a laboratory, and breathing into an uncomfortable face mask while a physiologist like our guest Jared Berg pokes your ear for blood might not sound like a good time at all. Which is probably why Coach Connor can't get enough.

But this week’s show is about exactly that—physiological testing. The end result of a good test is a robust set of data specific to you, which can help you understand things like your true physiological training zones, how much carbohydrate you burn for a given effort, and just how well you can get up infamous climbs like Magnolia Road here in Boulder.

Learning about your body’s unique capacity for work is crucial as you prepare for races and work on pushing yourself to your full potential. Our guest, Jared Berg, the lead exercise physiologist at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center in Boulder, is going to walk us through some of the most common performance tests, including the VO2Max test and the lactate test, describing each protocol as well as its benefits.

You’ll learn what’s the right test for you, the ins and outs of the various protocols, and how to prepare yourself for the day of testing. We’ll also discuss how to select a lab that will give you the most accurate data.

Maybe you'll even learn how to pronounce a few new words with us. Ever heard of symmorphosis? Can you say it? Coach Connor can’t...

Oh, and if you haven't seen it yet, drop everything and check out the legendary bike racing movie, American Flyers. It's available on Amazon Prime for $2.99, which is probably too much, but, hey, it’s educational. You can’t consider yourself a true cyclist, nor will you fully appreciate this episode, until you’ve seen it.

Finally, if things already sound a little different and you notice a lot better sound quality on this episode, that’s because we have a new producer on the show! Jana Martin has joined our team, and we’re incredibly excited about that. She comes to us with over a decade of podcast and television production experience. In other words, now that Trevor isn’t allowed to touch the computer, the show is going to get better!

As always, send us your feedback and thoughts at fasttalk@fastlabs.com.

Dec 07 2019

1hr 29mins

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VN Pod, ep. 168: The 2019 VeloNews Awards

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What were the races, riders, and moments from the 2019 pro cycling season that were simply the best? On today's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, Andrew Hood and Fred Dreier discuss the annual VeloNews Awards issue, and dig into the moments that defined the 2019 season.

The VeloNews Awards gives praise to the Best Male and Female riders, plus the top moments of the year. This year, the issue also dug into the top storylines from the decade. Fred and Andy discuss two of these storylines, and examine why each one helped define the past 10 years of pro cycling.

The holidays are right around the corner, and right now VeloPress has a great deal: Subscribe to VeloNews and receive a free VeloPress book of your choice. Go to www.velopress.com for more information.

Dec 04 2019

53mins

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VeloNews Tech Podcast: Smart trainers and virtual riding

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The VeloNews Tech Podcast returns from a lengthy hiatus, and tech editor Dan Cavallari gets a cohost! Editorial director Ben Delaney joins us to chat about smart trainers and cycling indoors.

With the explosive growth of indoor riding and racing, smart trainer technology and all the peripherals surrounding them have grown up in a hurry. Cavallari and Delaney discuss the evolution of smart trainers and the importance of Zwift to the growth of indoor cycling.

Dec 03 2019

53mins

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VN Pod, ep. 167: How gravel and MTB are growing women's cycling

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Gravel cycling and backcountry mountain bike racing are booming, with events like the Dirty Kanza, Epic Rides, and SBT GRVL races attracting throngs of participants each year.

As it turns out, these events are also bringing female cyclists into our sport, and providing a new challenge for women who are longtime participants.

On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, we sit down with VeloNews contributor Betsy Welch, who covered gravel and mountain bike racing this season. Betsy attended events like Leadville 100 MTB, Dirty Kanza, and Epic Rides, and also participated in them as well. In her reporting, she examined why these events and their respective communities are so welcoming to female riders.

Cycling fans, the holidays are right around the corner, and we have the perfect gifts for those cyclists in your lives. Right now you can subscribe to VeloNews print magazine and receive a free Velopress book of your choice. That's right, popular titles like "Zinn and the Art of Mountain-Bike Maintenance," "Sagan: My World," and "The Cyclists's Training Bible" can be yours.

Plus, on Monday Dec. 2 all titles at Velopress.com will be discounted by 33 percent. Shop now at www.velopress.com

Nov 26 2019

38mins

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Fast Talk, ep. 88: Planning a limited race season with Colby Pearce and Grant Holicky

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We all understand that to race or ride our best, we need to periodize our season. That’s obvious and essential for a pro who’s racing upwards of 80 races in a season. Simply put, they wouldn’t survive if they went hard all the time: They need a base, they need rest, and they need peaks.

But what about those of us who only have three or four races in a season. Or to take it one step further, what about those of us who don’t race, or who may do a gran fondo at some point. How do we map out our seasons and prepare for those couple events? Do we still need to periodize? Can we be on form all year round?

Today we'll dive into these questions and talk about:

- What we can learn from the pros. Even though they do a lot more races, the same physiological principles apply when you’re talking about reaching your best form. And the pros have learned a lot about how do that right.

- What you can’t take from pros. The simple fact that they do so many races means they can race themselves into shape. That’s a lot harder to do when you have a month between each of your events. So, we’ll talk about what not to mimic.

- Next we’ll dive into a few scenarios including one in which you have four or five races in your season and they are all within a short time frame; a second scenario in which you have four or five races but they are spread out with long periods of time between each; the scenario of doing a single big event; and finally, the scenario in which you don’t participate in any official events, but love to hit the local weekly group ride.

Today, we are using a roundtable format with three top level coaches to answer these questions. Our first guest is the now famous, much loved Colby Pearce. Also joining us is the always infamous, also loved Grant Holicky with Forever Endurance.

Now, let's make you fast!

Nov 22 2019

1hr 11mins

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VN Pod, ep. 166: Rebecca Fahringer on growing cyclocross's female participation

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On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, we speak with Rebecca Fahringer of the Kona-Maxxis-Shimano pro cyclocross team. Rebecca is currently leading USA Cycling's Pro CX standings, and has won five major North American races this year.

Rebecca shares insights on how she progressed through the ranks from a collegiate newbie to a North American pro. She talks about the desire to race in North America, rather than base herself overseas.

And Rebecca explains why cyclocross is a great entry point for women into cycling.

Nov 20 2019

37mins

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VN Pod, ep. 165: Peter Stetina goes gravel racing; Patrick Redford on covering cycling for Deadspin

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What types of bicycle racing stories appeal to a mainstream sports audience? It's a topic we've often thought about here at VeloNews. On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, we speak with Patrick Redford, who covered pro cycling for the sports website Deadspin.com.

Patrick also takes us through the fateful past few months at Deadspin, which saw the entire editorial staff resign after the outlet's ownership tried to alter its focus and voice.

Before we hear from Redford, Fred Dreier and Andrew Hood discuss the week's biggest story, which was that WorldTour veteran Peter Stetina will become a full-time gravel racer in 2020. Stetina is trading the Tour de France for Dirty Kanza, the Belgian Waffle Ride, and other big gravel events, and he's doing so in his relative prime, at age 33.

What does this news, when matched with the cancellation of the Amgen Tour of California, tell us about the state of U.S. bicycle racing? The guys discuss the ongoing trends in professional and participatory cycling, and try to read the tea leaves for what it means for the sport.

All that and more on today's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Nov 13 2019

1hr 3mins

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PYSO Ep. 36 | The Off-Season

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Bobby and Gus bring you this special edition of PYSO from Pace Ranch in Tucson, AZ. And not only are the guys together in the same room, but they have a special guest too. Nicola Cranmer, the founder and GM of the TWENTY20 Women’s Pro Cycling Team joins the podcast.

The trio talk cover a variety of topics including:
* What riders do during their off-season (spoiler alert: not much according to Bobby)
* The physical & mental importance of taking time off the bike
* The cancellation of the Amgen Tour of California & what it means for American cycling
* Weekly Zwift rides with Team Twenty20 - join them!!
* Ad hoc Fall training camps (Bobby despises them), and formal Dec/Jan camps.
* New kits, new bikes, and new teams.

Got questions for Bobby and Gus? Send them over to SuperFan@Velonews.com. If they answer your question you'll get a pair of PYSO socks.

Nov 12 2019

47mins

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Fast Talk, ep. 87: Preventing cycling injuries through strength and conditioning with Jess Elliott

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Typically, when we hear the words “strength training,” we think of going into the gym, slapping some plates on a bar, and seeing what we can lift. The more, the better.

But there’s a lot more to strength training than that, especially for those of us focused on endurance sports. Strength and conditioning is also about maintaining proper function, training neural patterns, and preventing injury. Sports like cycling, by nature, cause imbalances. If all you do is ride your bike, an overuse injury is nearly guaranteed for your future.

We also believe that weight training aids performance on the bike. Regardless of your position, as Coach Connor likes to point out, no matter what you believe, race performance will suffer if you’re sitting on the sidelines with a bad back or painful knee injury.

So, in this episode of Fast Talk, we’re going to discuss four of the most common overuse and imbalance injuries in cyclists and how to address them with off-the-bike work and proper bike fit.
Patellar tendinitis, or pain at the front of the knee. Cycling is a quad dominant sport. Keeping balance and doing some loaded eccentric work can help prevent this very common pain.

Pelvic obliquity, a broad term for imbalances and asymmetrical movements in the hips.

Back pain. A proper bike fit and learning to rely on your glutes and hamstrings instead of the postural muscles of the back can go a long way towards preventing this all-too-common issue.

Thoracic kyphosis, a fancy term for a slouched back, which is common among cyclists. Regular exercise to open the chest will help you improve posture off the bike.

Our guest today is owner of Tag Performance and University of Denver faculty member in Human Performance and Sports, Jess Elliot. [you can link here to episode 32 which she also appeared in]

Jess recently taught a half-day workshop on strength training for endurance athletes at the Training Peaks Endurance Summit and, for those of you in the Colorado area, because of the popularity of that workshop, she’s hosting it again on December 7. Go to her website at tagperformanceco.com/events to sign up. Use the code “fastlabs” to get a $25 discount.

You’re going to hear a lot of technical terms in this episode; we hope you walk away with an understanding that effective strength training is about more than creating a list of exercises then going to the gym and giving it your best shot. Proper movement, ensuring you are activating the correct firing patterns, and lifting an appropriate weight are all crucial. To help out, Jess is posting videos of most of the exercises we discuss on her website.

Along with Jess, Trevor talked with Charles Van Atta, the head biomechanist and fitter at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center. There’s no point in doing the off-the-bike work to resolve an over-use injury if a poor bike fit is promoting it. Charles addresses each of our four injuries from a bike fit perspective.

With that, let’s make you fast.

Nov 09 2019

1hr 46mins

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More Juli Young 👍

By Hughes225 - Jan 03 2020
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Really like hearing Julie Young’s perspectives on training in episode 91 👍

Good Pocsast on Supplements

By Rando Richard - Mar 15 2019
Read more
Fast Talk #65 on pickle juice, beetroot juice and dark chocolate rocks!