Cover image of VeloNews Podcasts
(438)
Sports

VeloNews Podcasts

Updated about 1 month ago

Sports
Read more

Bike racing at its finest. VeloNews podcasts utilize our network of reporters, commentators, and coaches to bring you inside pro cycling and improve your own riding and racing.

Read more

Bike racing at its finest. VeloNews podcasts utilize our network of reporters, commentators, and coaches to bring you inside pro cycling and improve your own riding and racing.

iTunes Ratings

438 Ratings
Average Ratings
335
53
24
10
16

Great show

By Rideyourbikenow - Mar 20 2020
Read more
This is a great show. Very informative and good topic you don’t usually get with a cycling podcast.

More Juli Young 👍

By Hughes225 - Jan 03 2020
Read more
Really like hearing Julie Young’s perspectives on training in episode 91 👍

iTunes Ratings

438 Ratings
Average Ratings
335
53
24
10
16

Great show

By Rideyourbikenow - Mar 20 2020
Read more
This is a great show. Very informative and good topic you don’t usually get with a cycling podcast.

More Juli Young 👍

By Hughes225 - Jan 03 2020
Read more
Really like hearing Julie Young’s perspectives on training in episode 91 👍
Cover image of VeloNews Podcasts

VeloNews Podcasts

Latest release on Jul 06, 2020

Read more

Bike racing at its finest. VeloNews podcasts utilize our network of reporters, commentators, and coaches to bring you inside pro cycling and improve your own riding and racing.

Rank #1: VeloNews Tech Podcast: eTap vs Di2 cage match!

Podcast cover
Read more
The great debate finally hits the VeloNews Tech Podcast: eTap, or Di2?

The electronic shifting systems from SRAM and Shimano each offer distinct advantages and disadvantages — and ultimately, each system has a personality all its own. SRAM's wireless eTap AXS system is the newcomer, attempting to unseat Shimano's wired Dura-Ace Di2 system that has proven itself reliable, smooth, an ergonomically sleek for years now.

If Dan and Ben had to spend their money on just one system, which would they choose? Find out on this episode.

May 18 2020

35mins

Play

Rank #2: Fast Talk, ep. 30: Myth Busters—Why we can't talk about lactic acid

Podcast cover
Read more
Ouch, it burns! But what is "it" — the root cause of the pain in your legs when you smash it up a hard climb? For the longest time, we colloquially called "it" lactic acid. It turns out that was wrong.

Coach Trevor Connor and Caley Fretz examine the chemistry that occurs in our muscles while riding and racing. They talk to Dr. Iñigo San Millán, who is the director of Colorado University's exercise physiology lab. Best of all, they give you practical advice for your own training to help make that burn go away — or at least make you faster even if it hurts.

Oct 19 2017

59mins

Play

Rank #3: Fast Talk podcast, ep. 83: Training the Gut with Asker Jeukendrup

Podcast cover
Read more
Just ask any Tour rider who’s frequently burning 5000 calories or more per day about in-race nutrition and they’ll tell you that it’s both critical and tricky to get right. You can spend months getting your legs ready for your target event, you can be putting out the best numbers of your life, and that can all be wiped away by a poorly timed bonk or intestinal cramping.

You have to consume enough carbohydrates to keep the legs ticking over when the race gets hard, but at the same time you need to make sure they are well tolerated and you’re able to absorb them. It’s a tricky balance and it’s highly individual. Simply buying the newest, coolest sports nutrition product isn’t going to get you there.

You have to find what works for you. But just as importantly, you have to remember that in-race nutrition, just like almost all things, is trainable and while you’re out three doing your big weekend ride, or hard hill repeats, you need to dedicate some time to training the gut.
So, today we'll dive into nutritional training and talk about:

1. Applying a scientific approach to figuring out your carbohydrate needs and whether you are a fat burner or a carbohydrate burner.

2. Second, G.I. distress. Some thoughts on what causes it and why intestinal permeability may be a factor

3. Next, we’ll discuss race nutrition and why changing up what you eat on race day may not be your best strategy.

4. Fourth, why most people can only absorb 60g of carbohydrates per hour but we’re still recommending trying to get 90g. That sounds like a lot, but it’s actually only about 360 calories which is still less than what you’re going to burn in an hour during a big race.

5. The best mix of carbohydrates to improve absorption

6. Why you need to dedicate time every week to training your gut – no different from the time and energy you invest in training your legs,.

7. Finally, we’ll talk about any potential health concerns with focused race nutrition and briefly touch both on the microbiome and l-glutamine
Our primary guest today is none other than Dr Asker Jeukendrup. Dr Juekendrup, is one of the most renowned sports nutrition researchers in the World. He was Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Sport Science. He ran the Gatorade Sports Science Institute back when it was the center coaches and team managers were looking to for the leading hydration research. Dr Jeukendrup now has his own company, Mysportscience and works with Team Jumbo Visma.
Along with Dr Jeukendrup, we talked with Katie Compton, the winner of 15 consecutive national titles, and a four-time silver medalist at ‘cross worlds. She’s familiar with G.I. problems during races and shared with Chris some of her thoughts.
Next, we checked in with Colby Pearce, at this point our unofficial third regular on Fast Talk. He had some warnings about getting too caught up in traditional sports nutrition products and emphasized the importance of also considering health.
Finally, we touched base with Ryan Kohler, the head coach at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center. Ryan frequently works with athletes on training their guts for their target events and shared some of his strategies.
Alright, pull out your Swedish fish.... throw them in the trash and get some real sports nutrition and let's make you fast!

Sep 14 2019

1hr 28mins

Play

Rank #4: Fast Talk, ep. 32: A cyclist's guide to the weight room

Podcast cover
Read more
We cyclists can get a little lost in the weight room. That doesn't mean strength training doesn't have important benefits though. We are joined by Jess Elliott, who is the sports performance coach and biomechanist at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center. She helps us understand the fundamentals of strength workouts in the weight room: what to do, how to do it, and how many times to lift those big hunks of iron. Plus, we speak with pro rider Brent Bookwalter (BMC) about how he fits weight lifting into his busy travel schedule.

Nov 20 2017

1hr 9mins

Play

Rank #5: Fast Talk pod, ep. 34: Become a climber (even if you live in a flat place)

Podcast cover
Read more
In this episode of Fast Talk, we tackle the always-popular topic of climbing. A listener in Iowa asked if he could become a better climber. Not only will we answer his question, we’ll describe ways in which anyone can improve their technique, efficiency, and power to refine their climbing.

Surprisingly, climbing isn't as simple as dropping a few pounds or spending your days riding in the Rockies. We look at the question from a few angles: First, does dropping weight make you a better climber? The fact is, for the last few decades, winners of the Tour de France, who can climb with the best, aren't the lightest athletes. Why this is has a lot to do with something called allometric scaling. Secondly, we'll discuss whether you need to climb hills to be a climber. Is it really just a question of power-to-weight? Finally, we'll take a closer look at the particulars of climbing, including the effects of grade, cadence, standing vs. staying seated, and the importance of core strength.

We’re joined by a collection of talented riders and coaches: Sepp Kuss, newly signed with the LottoNL-Jumbo WorldTour squad; Dr. Iñigo San Millan, director of the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center; as well as fantastic climbers Joe Dombrowski and Ned Overend.

Dec 21 2017

1hr 3mins

Play

Rank #6: Fast Talk, ep. 59: Preventing cycling's most common injuries, with Dr. Andy Pruitt

Podcast cover
Read more
In this episode of Fast Talk, we speak with the guru of cycling medicine and ergonomics, Dr. Andy Pruitt, about cycling's most common injuries and how to prevent them. The discussion includes: 1)What used to be the most common over-use injury — knee problems — why they are no longer the most common problem, and how it’s possible for most of us to go through the rest of our cycling careers without one. 2)Back problems — these have eclipsed knee issues as the most common cycling complaint. Unfortunately, the cycling position is not kind to the lower back, but there are still things we can do to prevent pain. 3) Saddle sores, numbness, and pressure issues, and how with the right saddle and fit most of these issues can be addressed. 4) Just like the back, the cycling position can be tough on the neck. We’ll discuss. 5) Feet and hands — many of us think that numbness is just part of riding a bike. But the truth is that if you're experiencing numbness, something is wrong, and it can generally be solved. 6) Finally, for those of you still clinging to that 1980's mindset, we'll talk about just how bad it was then and why you want to get with the 2000s.

Nov 01 2018

1hr 17mins

Play

Rank #7: Fast Talk, ep. 90: Innovative approaches to base training

Podcast cover
Read more
Base training has traditionally been all about long, slow rides. But that's tough if you live in the northern hemisphere and you hate the cold, or lack the necessary equipment to ride safely outdoors when road conditions might be perilous and light is limited.

Today, we’re discussing how best to deal with those challenges that plague the northern hemisphere this time of year. (Apologies to all of our friends in the southern hemisphere!) Does it kill your motivation to ride? Do you feel the fitness literally draining from your body? Don't let it!

The darkness, cold temperatures, and perilous road conditions of the winter months don’t have to be any sort of barrier. In fact, as you’ll learn in this episode, this time of year is the perfect time to find a host of new ways to stay motivated, add variety to your training methods, try something new, reinvigorate your work ethic, and, ultimately, set yourself up to improve performance when the racing begins later in the year.

Our primary guests today are Andrew Randell and Steve Neal, the owners of Toronto's The Cycling Gym, joined by one of their athletes, Jeremiah Groen, someone who we imagine is similar to a lot of our listeners: "I'm a very amateur cyclist, don't do many races; I mostly just want to be fit."

These three Canadians don’t care about the winter blues! Their advice? Get brave and get outside. Yes, even in the dark and even in the snow. But if you can’t or won’t go outside, they have plenty of sage advice on how best to hit the gym, the trainer, or the weight room to get the most, and the most balance, out of your training sessions.

We’ll also hear from pro roadie Erica Clevenger. She divulges some of her favorite methods of cross training. All that and much more, including some tech advice from Lennard Zinn.

By the end of this episode, you’ll understand that using the base season properly to prepare for the build to come and the all-important race season to follow can be a very enjoyable time of year.

Now, let's make you fast!

Dec 20 2019

1hr 9mins

Play

Rank #8: Fast Talk, ep. 54: Applying the polarized model, with Dr. Stephen Seiler

Podcast cover
Read more
We received so many questions after we published episode 51, "Polarizing your training, with Dr. Stephen Seiler," we decided to take an even closer look at the polarized model of endurance training, to help listeners execute such a model in their training.

Our discussion includes:

- Why cycling is an aerobic sport

- What is meant by the two thresholds — LT1 and LT2 — and how to determine yours, both in terms of power and heart rate. Dr. Seiler provides a test protocol to determine LT2, which may sound very similar to Neal Henderson's test that was described in episode 33, “Is FTP dead?”

- Why it's important not to over-estimate LT1 or LT2, and how to use them to determine your zones in a three-zone model.

- The specifics of zone 1 training: how long, how much, how easy? We take a deep dive into what zone 1 training is all about, why it's important to keep those rides easy, and the value of long rides.

- Finally, we discuss the 80-20 principle of the polarized model and how to put it into practice to map out your week.

Aug 30 2018

1hr 30mins

Play

Rank #9: VeloNews Voices | PYSO ep. 12: 2019 Tour de France, Stage Twelve

Podcast cover
Read more
SPECIAL GUEST DOWNHILL LEGEND AND SPORTS TRAINER - OSCAR SAIZ (oscarsaiz.com)

After things go up, Oscar Saiz gets down to the business of descending. Technique, Courage and how driving video games can be a safe and valuable teaching tool for riders learning to read the road.

The boys in the Peleton as well as the PYSO boys played fair today. Bobby and Gus discuss managing breakaways. How emotions play a part in racing and mental Freshness. Ups and Downs. Terminal Velocity.White Knuckles. Hot Topic was the Rohan Dennis Investigation - Bobby's previous pick for tomorrow's ITT. Things are starting to HEAT UP in the TDF!

Jul 18 2019

56mins

Play

Rank #10: Fast Talk, ep. 87: Preventing cycling injuries through strength and conditioning with Jess Elliott

Podcast cover
Read more
Typically, when we hear the words “strength training,” we think of going into the gym, slapping some plates on a bar, and seeing what we can lift. The more, the better.

But there’s a lot more to strength training than that, especially for those of us focused on endurance sports. Strength and conditioning is also about maintaining proper function, training neural patterns, and preventing injury. Sports like cycling, by nature, cause imbalances. If all you do is ride your bike, an overuse injury is nearly guaranteed for your future.

We also believe that weight training aids performance on the bike. Regardless of your position, as Coach Connor likes to point out, no matter what you believe, race performance will suffer if you’re sitting on the sidelines with a bad back or painful knee injury.

So, in this episode of Fast Talk, we’re going to discuss four of the most common overuse and imbalance injuries in cyclists and how to address them with off-the-bike work and proper bike fit.
Patellar tendinitis, or pain at the front of the knee. Cycling is a quad dominant sport. Keeping balance and doing some loaded eccentric work can help prevent this very common pain.

Pelvic obliquity, a broad term for imbalances and asymmetrical movements in the hips.

Back pain. A proper bike fit and learning to rely on your glutes and hamstrings instead of the postural muscles of the back can go a long way towards preventing this all-too-common issue.

Thoracic kyphosis, a fancy term for a slouched back, which is common among cyclists. Regular exercise to open the chest will help you improve posture off the bike.

Our guest today is owner of Tag Performance and University of Denver faculty member in Human Performance and Sports, Jess Elliot. [you can link here to episode 32 which she also appeared in]

Jess recently taught a half-day workshop on strength training for endurance athletes at the Training Peaks Endurance Summit and, for those of you in the Colorado area, because of the popularity of that workshop, she’s hosting it again on December 7. Go to her website at tagperformanceco.com/events to sign up. Use the code “fastlabs” to get a $25 discount.

You’re going to hear a lot of technical terms in this episode; we hope you walk away with an understanding that effective strength training is about more than creating a list of exercises then going to the gym and giving it your best shot. Proper movement, ensuring you are activating the correct firing patterns, and lifting an appropriate weight are all crucial. To help out, Jess is posting videos of most of the exercises we discuss on her website.

Along with Jess, Trevor talked with Charles Van Atta, the head biomechanist and fitter at the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center. There’s no point in doing the off-the-bike work to resolve an over-use injury if a poor bike fit is promoting it. Charles addresses each of our four injuries from a bike fit perspective.

With that, let’s make you fast.

Nov 09 2019

1hr 46mins

Play

Rank #11: VN Pod, ep. 156: Kate Courtney! Plus, Sepp Kuss's Vuelta win and cycling's young guns

Podcast cover
Read more
Kate Courtney just became the first American in 17 years to win the XC mountain bike World Cup. On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast, we catch up with Courtney to talk about her dream season.

Before talking to Courtney, Fred Dreier and Andrew Hood team up to discuss the action at the Vuelta a España, including the thrilling stage victory by American Sepp Kuss, a regular on the pod. What were the tactical decision that led Kuss to win? What does his victory tell us about Jumbo-Visma's attitude toward its younger racers?

Then, Andy discusses the generational shift currently happening in the UCI WorldTour, with young riders like Tadej Pogacar, Egan Bernal, and Remco Evenepoel all surging to the forefront of pro cycling. This dynamic bucks tradition in pro cycling, where young riders often needed to pay their dues before being given the opportunity to win.

Finally, we hear from American Lawson Craddock, who has become one of the most aggressive riders in this year's Vuelta a España. Craddock has spent the entire race attacking into breakaways.

This week's episode is sponsored by Whoop, the performance tool that is changing the way people track their fitness and optimize their training. Whoop tracks your heart rate and gives you a strain scores that lets you know how strenuous your training was on your body, with additional information around your sleep and recovery to tell you how well your body rebounds from training. Right now, listeners can get 15 percent off a Whoop device by going to www.whoop.com and using the code 'velo' at checkout. www.whoop.com.

Sep 11 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

Rank #12: VN Pod, ep. 172: Froome's setback, gravel entrepreneurs, and TJ Eisenhart interview

Podcast cover
Read more
Welcome back from the holidays!

The VeloNews Podcast returns with the first episode of 2020, and there is plenty to discuss. Andrew Hood and Fred Dreier jump into three major storylines from these early days of the decade.

The dangerous wildfires in Australia have not yet threatened the Santos Tour Down Under, but major endurance events are often cancelled in the wake of tragedy and natural disasters. Fred and Andy discuss the upcoming race, and whether or not the fires will force organizers to cancel it.

The U.S. gravel cycling scene is already generating headlines, as more pro road riders jump into off-road cycling. As it turns out, these riders are changing the business model of pro cycling in America by attracting personal sponsors that may have otherwise gone to a pro team or race. How could this shift change the American cycling landscape?

Chris Froome is back in the news, as stories circulated that he left a Team Ineos training camp in early December. Were these stories accurate or overblown?

Then, we have an interview with domestic road pro TJ Eisenhart, who is leaving the road behind to launch his own gravel racing team. Eisenhart explains why he's heading to gravel racing and delves into his own personal setbacks in road cycling. Plus, he explains why his gravel team supports a new business model.

All that and more on this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Jan 08 2020

59mins

Play

Rank #13: Fast Talk, ep. 82: The importance of adaptations, with George Bennett

Podcast cover
Read more
Recovery, recovery, recovery... you’ve heard us talk about it before. You’ve heard a lot of our guests preach about its importance. Well, now let’s confuse you a bit. The ultimate goal of training is, of course, to adapt. And there’s a critical distinction between adaptation and recovery. They are not the same thing. In fact, sometimes what helps one, hurts the other.

Recovery is about doing what you can so the legs are ready for your next workout. Adaptation is about the body repairing the damage caused by training—if the training provides enough stress, it will repair the system to come back stronger. But what’s good for that repair process may have you feeling less than perfect on the bike the next day.

Today, we’re going to dive into this important difference and focus on adaptations—what causes them and how to aid them. We’ll talk about:

- First, the difference between recovery and adaptation.
- Second, how the immune system is intimately involved in both, and why we’ve come to the realization in recent years that reducing inflammation can be counterproductive.
- Next, we’ll talk about the three stages of repair. Remember that training does damage. We are weaker after hard rides. It’s during the repair process that we get stronger, and the immune system is the repair man. Much like the local cable guy, the immune system is going to work at its own pace regardless of what you do or say.
- Next, we discuss how there’s a delicate balance between damage and repair, and when you get out of balance by doing too much training, it starts a vicious cycle that prevents further adaptations and leads to burnout
- We’ll talk with George Bennett, who put in a fantastic Tour de France performance, helping his GC leader, Steven Kruijswijk, land on the podium. George discusses what he does to aid adaptations.
- Finally, we’ll finish with a conversation about the things that do help adaptations and the things that hurt it, despite the fact that a lot of endurance athletes do them.

Our primary guest today is George Bennett, member of the Jumbo-Visma WorldTour team. George joins us for part of the episode—we spared a rider of his caliber from having to sit through Trevor’s initial lecture on immunology.

We also hear from Joe Friel, author of “The Cyclists Training Bible.” In the most recent edition of his book, Joe makes the important distinction between recovery and adaptations.

Next we talk with Brent Bookwalter of Mitchelton-Scott. In order to adapt, we have to first do damage. Brent talks with us about the important balance between damage and repair.

Then we catch up with Boulder-based coach extraordinaire Colby Pearce. And finally, we talk with Paulo Saldanha, the owner of PowerWatts. Paulo talks about ways to find the right amount of damage, and why we should rethink taking antioxidants.

Aug 31 2019

1hr 30mins

Play

Rank #14: PYSO, ep. 39: How cycling coverage has changed over the decades

Podcast cover
Read more
Bobby and Gus dig into the way cycling has been covered over the years, how that coverage is evolving, and how it might be covered in the future.

We are joined by special guest, the extraordinary photographer Jered Gruber, to get his view from behind the camera at races and beautiful cycling places around the world.

Feb 13 2020

1hr 9mins

Play

Rank #15: VN Podcast, ep. 52: The world championships of banned beards

Podcast cover
Read more
It was a three-Pete! The world championships in Bergen, Norway finished up over the weekend and Peter Sagan took home his third rainbow in a row. Fred Dreier, Caley Fretz, and Spencer Powlison discuss whether WorldTour riders should be allowed in the U23 race, how the American women could have factored in the finale, whether Tom Dumoulin's TT win is a bad sign for Chris Froome, and more. Plus, a deep discussion of a Belgian team's new beard ban.

Sep 26 2017

47mins

Play

Rank #16: Tech Podcast: Is gravel suspension necessary?

Podcast cover
Read more
Gravel bikes have gone soft! By which of course we mean suspension has become a stable in some form or another on most gravel bikes. Flexing seatposts, decouplers, and even full-suspension designs have all aimed to make gravel riding more comfortable.

But is it necessary?

Tech editor Dan Cavallari talked with VeloNews editorial director Ben Delaney to get his take on the gravel bike he has tested over the years. Does Ben think suspension is here to stay?

And Cavallari chats with Zack Vestal from Niner Bikes to get deeper into the design considerations behind the MCR (Magic Carpet Ride), the first full-suspension gravel bike to hit the market.

Apr 20 2020

36mins

Play

Rank #17: Fast Talk, ep. 65: Debunking supplements, and the positives of beet juice, cocoa, and ketone esters

Podcast cover
Read more
Those who take their training and racing seriously are always looking for something to give them an edge — that marginal gain — including nutritional supplements.

So much has been promised to us in pill form, it’s created a multi-billion-dollar industry. Those promises carry into enhanced endurance performance. And many athletes have resorted to the morning supplement cocktail believing it will make them better cyclists. But there’s a dark side. Those cocktails can actually hurt performance, certainly affect health, and lead to even darker, ethically-challenged places.

Today, we’re going to talk about supplements and our concerns with them, and then cover a few foods that actually do work.

We’ll discuss:

- We thought about bashing all the supplements that don'’t work, but then realized we only have an hour. So instead, Trevor will read a description of every supplement that does work. That list combined with a discussion of its sources will cover the first three minutes.

- We'll talk about supplements in general and why they can be a big concern.

- And with those concerns in context, we’ll start addressing things that have been proven to help, staring with pickle juice.

- Next on our list is beet root juice which can not only help performance, but has been shown to have health benefits as well.

- Believe it or not, we’re going to talk about chocolate — or more specifically the active ingredient, cocoa flavonoids, which also, surprisingly, have both performance and health benefits.

- That, of course, leads to something that frequently comes up in the sports nutrition literature — chocolate milk. It’s as effective as most recovery mixes. So, the key question is how effective are the mixes?

- Finally, we’ll revisit the ketogenic diet and specifically supplementing with ketone esters.

- Our primary guest today is Ryan Kohler, the manager of the University of Colorado Sports Medicine and Performance Center who holds a masters degree in sports nutrition and exercise science. Ryan has helped Trevor and I with many previous articles and behind-the-scenes work with some of our experiments, shall we call them. We’re excited to finally get him in front of the mic, even if he is a little shy.

In addition, we'll talk with world-renowned coach Joe Friel, author of the definitive book on training, "The Cyclists Training Bible." We asked Joe his opinion about supplementation based on decades of coaching.

We'll also hear from endurance mountain biker Rebecca Rusch and Apex Coaching owner Neal Henderson, the personal coach of world time trial champion Rohan Dennis. They'll each give us their thoughts on supplements and a few things they've found that work.

Jan 11 2019

1hr 9mins

Play

Rank #18: Fast Talk, ep. 68: The big picture — the three types of rides you should do

Podcast cover
Read more
In this episode we’re taking a step back — way back — to see the forest for the tress. Let me explain: Many of you have been fascinated by our recordings with scientists and coaches like Stephen Seiler, John Hawley, Iñigo San Millan, and Joe Friel. Now, we’ve sifted through hours of Fast Talk recordings with our many distinguished guests to bring context to what we hope is a simplified, unified message about the fundamental principles of these previous shows: there are just three types of rides. Yes, that’s a simplification. Yes, you’re getting our bias. So, if you want that high level of detail, please return to those past episodes.

In this episode, we’re talking about the forest. We’re hoping to give you a framework to understand all that scientific detail. And we’re going to keep it simple.

We’ll discuss:

- First, when you take away the complexity, training boils down to three ride types in most training models.

- We’ll give a simple zone system, based on physiology, and explain why that’s important.

- We’ll define the long ride: why it’s important, how to execute it, and why there are no shortcuts.

- We’ll define the high-intensity ride: why less is more with this type of ride and why executing it with quality is so critical. Dr. Seiler actually divides these rides into two categories — threshold rides and high-intensity work. For this podcast, we’re lumping them together, but we will hear from Dr. Seiler about why we shouldn’t neglect threshold work despite the current popularity of one-minute intervals and Tabata work.

- We’ll discuss the recovery ride. Ironically, for most of us, this is the hardest to execute. When we’re time-crunched, we might think that spending an hour spinning easy on the trainer is not time well spent. We’ll discuss why that philosophy is dangerous to take.

- Finally, we’ll talk about some of the exceptions, including sweet spot work and training races.

We’ve included excerpts from Dr. San Millan, once the exercise physiologist for the Garmin-Slipstream WorldTour team, among others. We’ll hear several times from Dr. Stephen Seiler, who is often credited with defining the polarized training model, which developed from his research with some of the best endurance athletes in the world. Dr. John Hawley will address both long rides and high-intensity work. Dr. Hawley has been one of the leading researchers in sports science for several decades and is a big proponent of interval work and carbohydrate feeding, but even he feels there’s a limit. Grant Holicky, formerly of Apex Coaching in Boulder, Colorado, has worked with some of the best cyclists in the world. He sees undirected training, those “sort of hard” rides, as one of the biggest mistakes athletes can make. He’ll explain why. And finally, we’ll hear from legendary coach Joe Friel about sweet spot work and why it does have a place… even though technically it’s not one of our three rides.

Now, to the forest! Let’s make you fast.

Feb 22 2019

1hr 35mins

Play

Rank #19: Tech Podcast: Using power meters indoors and outdoors

Podcast cover
Read more
Tech editor Dan Cavallari and editorial director Ben Delaney give you the basics on what you need to take advantage of power both indoors and outdoors.

Since many of us are doing a fair bit of Zwifting these days, Delaney and Cavallari discuss how to use your power meter — and more broadly, power in general — to get the most out of your Zwift sessions. There are three fundamental ways to use Zwift: riding, training, and racing. Listen to find out how to optimize your power meter and settings to get the most out of each type of virtual ride.

Apr 06 2020

31mins

Play

Rank #20: Fast Talk, ep. 37: Sugar, wheat, paleo, and performance nutrition

Podcast cover
Read more
NOTE: This is an updated version of episode 37. We apologize for uploading the previous, rough cut of this podcast. This is the one you want ... Thanks for listening!

We take on the always-controversial subject of nutrition. Why is it so controversial? First, it’s very personal: Many people, trained or untrained, have strong opinions on the subject, and a lot of heated debate revolves around what is healthy and what is best for performance. We’ve had a few prominent guests on Fast Talk previously, and they’ve given their opinions on the subject. But thus far we have strayed away from revealing our thoughts — until now.

In this podcast we’ll discuss what we think is healthy and what isn't. We’ll talk about what foods to eat, we'll take on the question of wheat, nutrient density, and sugar. Unlike other episodes, in this show Coach Trevor Connor will not only be the co-host, he’ll also be the guest of honor. His research in graduate school focused on many of these topics, and what he’ll share are his educated opinions.

Feb 01 2018

1hr 4mins

Play

What are cooling fabrics and how do they work?

Podcast cover
Read more
Can dark fabrics keep you cool? It used to be standard practice to err on the side of light colors in hot weather, but with modern fabrics, it's entirely possible to stay cool and dry even if you're wearing black clothing.

Of course, that comes with a caveat: The clothing needs to be designed specifically to keep you cool. Makes sense, right? Rob Pickels from Pearl Izumi joins VeloNews tech editor Dan Cavallari on the tech podcast to wade through the science that makes a cool fabric, and how you can stay cool and dry on your next summer ride.

Jul 06 2020

37mins

Play

PYSO, ep. 59: The Cyclists' Alliance founder Iris Slappendel on creating change

Podcast cover
Read more
After being elected by her racing peers to serve on the athlete's commission for the UCI in 2015, Iris Slappendel quickly realized that there was no overarching structure of support for female riders. So, she created one. The Cyclists' Alliance was founded in 2017 to support female racers during and after their careers.

The Cyclists' Alliance is a union funded by donations and subscriptions. Approximately one third of the women's peloton are paying members, Slappendel says.

As a veteran former racer, Slappendel talks with PYSO hosts and former racers Bobby Julich and Gus Morton about the discrepancies between women's and men's unions for riders, and how they all interact with the UCI.

"It took me 10 years, but I realized there's no one holding teams or anyone accountable for how the riders are treated," Slappendel said of her thought process behind starting The Cyclists' Alliance. "And I think that was the spark that started me thinking about a union or at least having a better representation of the riders and the stakeholders."

Slappendel says that while the sport has made strides forward since 2004 when she began racing — "there are more top riders, more riders who are able to live from the sport, more good races" — that the sport still has a long way to go.

"It's becoming a professional sport, but it's not there yet," she said.

Listen in for a fascinating conversation on the dynamics of life as a female professional rider.

Jul 02 2020

46mins

Play

VN Podcast: VN Pod, ep. 197: Why Austin's Driveway Series returned to racing

Podcast cover
Read more
Bicycle racing is slowly returning amid the COVID-19 pandemic, and Austin's Driveway Series criterium events have been some of the first to come back. The Driveway held its first race since the shutdown on June 18, and then held another one on June 25.

Why has the series returned, and what safety protocols is it following? On this week's episode we link up with series founder Andrew Willis to discuss the Driveway's return to racing. As it turns out, Willis' decision to come back isn't as straightforward as you may assume.

Before we hear from Willis, Andrew Hood and James Startt come on the podcast to discuss pro cycling's sprint to the Tour de France, which is less than two months away. Teams are finalizing rosters and organizing pre-race training camps. The race has yet to publicize its health precautions, which has left riders and journalists playing the guessing game.

This week’s episode is sponsored by Whoop, the performance tool that is changing the way people track their fitness and optimize their training. Whoop tracks your heart rate and gives you a strain scores that lets you know how strenuous your training was on your body, with additional information around your sleep and recovery to tell you how well your body rebounds from training. Right now, listeners can get 15 percent off a Whoop device by going to www.whoop.com and using the code ‘VELONEWS’ at checkout.

Jul 01 2020

1hr 5mins

Play

Tech Podcast: What is moment of inertia and why does it matter?

Podcast cover
Read more
Tech guru Lennard Zinn joins VeloNews tech editor Dan Cavallari on this episode of the VeloNews Tech Podcast to explain the concept of moment of inertia, and why it matters when you ride your bike.

Zinn walks us through the basic physics of the way weight moves on your bicycle, and why rotational weight can affect how quickly you get your bike up to speed. More importantly, Zinn gives us a general guide as to what's better for you: deep section wheels, or climbing wheels.

Jun 29 2020

32mins

Play

PYSO, ep. 58: Keeping cool with Steven de Jongh

Podcast cover
Read more
As racing returns to the real world with the Slovenian national championship, Bobby and Gus cover all the happenings in the Zwift community. Also, Gus's brother Lachlan Morton is an absolute madman! Gus gives his perspective on Lachlan Everesting not once but twice in one week to set the world record.

Hear all about these stories and listen to an exclusive interview with director Steven de Jongh of Trek-Segafredo. We talk to Steven about his calm, cool demeanor, and how his recovery from a scary cycling accident has added more perspective to his approach to directing and life.

It's time to Put Your Socks On.

Jun 25 2020

1hr

Play

VN Podcast: VN Pod, ep. 196: How Black British cyclists were shut out of the Olympics

Podcast cover
Read more
Our reporting on the intersection of race and cycling continues this week with a conversation with Dr. Marlon Moncrieffe, a professor at Brighton University in the UK.

A former elite track sprinter, Dr. Moncrieffe studies the history of minority ethnic groups in 20th century Britain. His 2018 book, 'Made in Britain: Uncovering the life-histories of Black-British Champions in Cycling' explores the stories of Black British riders who were excluded from the country's success at the Olympic games and abroad.

Dr. Moncrieffe explains how the success of British Cycling at the 2012 Olympics broadcast an extremely white vision of cycling to the country. Since there were no Black riders chosen for the team, cycling was therefore cast as a white-only sport, despite the fact that numerous minority riders compete at the elite level.

Dr. Moncrieffe explains how elite sport, media coverage, and brand messaging are all connected in the inclusion and exclusion of minorities in sport.

This week’s episode is sponsored by Whoop, the performance tool that is changing the way people track their fitness and optimize their training. Whoop tracks your heart rate and gives you a strain scores that lets you know how strenuous your training was on your body, with additional information around your sleep and recovery to tell you how well your body rebounds from training. Right now, listeners can get 15 percent off a Whoop device by going to www.whoop.com and using the code ‘VELONEWS’ at checkout.

Jun 24 2020

43mins

Play

Tech Podcast: Can you trust your GPS elevation data?

Podcast cover
Read more
Editorial director Ben Delaney and senior editor Betsy Welch needed a challenge — much like the rest of us craving races that have been halted during these strange times. Everesting? That seems a bit too intense for mere mortals, so Ben and Betsy settled on Project 14er instead, attempting to conquer 14,000 feet of elevation in a single ride.

But with Lachlan Morton's troubles with official elevation data resulting in his record being expunged, the question of elevation data reliability comes squarely into focus. Can you trust your GPS elevation data? Why did Morton have data problems? Find out on this episode of the VeloNews tech podcast.

Jun 22 2020

33mins

Play

PYSO, ep. 57: Sprinter-turned-firefighter Tyler Farrar joins special host Christian Vande Velde

Podcast cover
Read more
Which is harder: racing for the win in the grand tours, or working as a firefighter? Listen to former top pro Tyler Farrar, who has done both.

This week on Put Your Socks On, coach Bobby Julich is joined by special guest host Christian Vande Velde as Angus Morton is out in the field.

Christian and Bobby talk with Tyler about his early career - from racing as a junior and pro domestically to going to Cofidis and then Slipstream - how he dealt with the loss of his close friend and training partner Wouter Weylandt, his recovery from COVID-19 and much more.

Jun 18 2020

1hr 9mins

Play

VN Podcast: VN Pod, ep. 195: Diversity in cycling with the Major Taylor Iron Riders club

Podcast cover
Read more
Our reporting on American cycling's lack of diversity continues this week, as we speak with five board members of the Major Taylor Iron Riders club. The club members are: Patrick Merosier, Natasha Merle, Chris Hasfal, Darrell Tucker, and club president Dereka Hendon-Barnes.

MTIR is based in New York City and it is comprised largely of African American, Latino, and Caribbean American riders. The club is one of the most visible ones in the tri-state region, due to its large membership and its flashy kits.

The five members of the club discuss the racism and bias they have felt in the cycling world, and how the exclusionary and clique-ish nature of the racing scene is a turnoff to minorities. The club members also discuss the different challenges in cycling they face due to the color of their skin. Why is MTIR so successful at bringing minority cyclists to our sport? It's a feeling of inclusion and community and comfort, say the club members.

This week’s episode is sponsored by Whoop, the performance tool that is changing the way people track their fitness and optimize their training. Whoop tracks your heart rate and gives you a strain scores that lets you know how strenuous your training was on your body, with additional information around your sleep and recovery to tell you how well your body rebounds from training. Right now, listeners can get 15 percent off a Whoop device by going to www.whoop.com and using the code ‘VELONEWS’ at checkout.

Jun 17 2020

1hr 13mins

Play

Tech Podcast: Does the bike industry have a packaging problem?

Podcast cover
Read more
On this week's episode of the VeloNews Tech Podcast, tech editor Dan Cavallari talks with Velocio Apparel's CEO Brad Sheehan to get to the bottom of why packaging is such a big problem in the bike industry.

The bicycle industry often touts itself as an eco-friendly alternative to automobiles, and it certainly is that. But in terms of packaging, sourcing materials, and landing products in a consumer's hands, the industry has a long way to go to make itself truly eco-friendly.

Jun 15 2020

37mins

Play

PYSO, ep. 56: Jolanda Neff on competition, overcoming injuries, and YouTubing

Podcast cover
Read more
Road bikes, cyclocross bikes, mountain bikes, and motorbikes — Neff loves riding them all. On this episode, the multi-time world champ talks about the special Swiss cycling programs that helped propel her to the top.

Bobby and Gus speak with Neff about her early days of competition (she won the first race she entered at age six), overcoming injuries, and her new series Jolanda Land on YouTube.

After getting stuck in the U.S. for 2.5 months because of travel restrictions, Neff is back in Switzerland now for a national training camp, where eight of the nine riders have world junior titles to their names. How does Switzerland create such successful riders? Part of it, Neff believes, is the unique race formats for young kids that prioritize handling skills and not just pedaling.

Like many Olympic-bound athletes, the coronavirus pandemic has changed Neff's life and timing, but after the Swiss star suffered a terrible crash in December, the extra preparation time is probably a blessing.

Neff, a veteran of the Rio Olympic where she placed eighth in the road race and sixth in the cross-country mountain bike race, talks with Bobby, an Olympic medalist himself, about lessons she wants to take into the Tokyo Olympics. Forefront among them, is advocating to have trusted female staff with her.

"I need to have the people around me in those days before the Olympics and during the Olympics that I've been working with for years," she says. "In Rio, we did not have one single female person on staff. I get along great with men, that's no problem. But at the competition, you need a certain balance and especially for me, my physio that I've been working with for years, she is a girl. She was not selected to go to the Olympics. So I've been working on that very much."

At the coming Olympics, Neff will be unable to race both road and mountain because the two competitions are on the same day.

Outside of the Olympics, Neff recently launched a YouTube channel.

"I want to show people cycling is social. It's fun. It's great. It keeps you fit. I don't want to show like, 'ah, it's so hard to train and everyone who's at that level has to put in work and has to train hard,'" she says. "For me, what got me into mountain biking and what I want to inspire other people to get into mountain biking is the fun, the social aspect."

Jun 11 2020

47mins

Play

VN Pod, ep. 194: Discussing racism in cycling with Rahsaan Bahati and Allen Lim

Podcast cover
Read more
On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast we discuss the role that racial bias and racism play in our sport with Rahsaan Bahati and Allen Lim.

Bahati and Lim are both veterans of the U.S. cycling scene, and they are both riders who came to the sport from minority communities. Bahati is black and grew up in Compton; Lim is a Chinese-American immigrant who grew up in Los Angeles.

Both men charted their own paths through U.S. cycling and achieved heights in the sport. And both men had to navigate racial discrimination and U.S. cycling's fraternity-like social scene to get there.

Lim and Bahati share their own experiences in American cycling. They also discuss the ways in which cycling can make itself more open to minorities from different backgrounds.

This week’s episode is sponsored by Whoop, the performance tool that is changing the way people track their fitness and optimize their training. Whoop tracks your heart rate and gives you a strain scores that lets you know how strenuous your training was on your body, with additional information around your sleep and recovery to tell you how well your body rebounds from training. Right now, listeners can get 15 percent off a Whoop device by going to www.whoop.com and using the code ‘VELONEWS’ at checkout.

Jun 09 2020

1hr

Play

Tech Podcast: 3D-printed saddles are here, but why?

Podcast cover
Read more
Both Fizik and Specialized released 3D-printed saddles in 2020. The neat-o looks of both perches are enough to grab your attention, but why are brands looking to 3D printing to create saddles anyway? What does 3D printing offer that regular old foam can't accomplish?

Tech editor Dan Cavallari talks with Garrett Getter from Specialized to find out what's unique about the big red S's Mirror technology, which brings a 3D-printed cushion to its already popular Power saddle.

Jun 08 2020

38mins

Play

PYSO, ep. 55: Reggie Miller on athletic greatness, racism, & the importance of hard conversations

Podcast cover
Read more
Basketball Hall of Famer, Olympic gold medalist, and all-around legendary player Reggie Miller is now a huge cyclist. He joins Bobby Julich and Gus Morton to talk about the impact of sports on culture, and the impact of culture on sports, in both broad terms and in this specific moment in time.

On the Put Your Socks On podcast, Miller encourages us all, especially white people, to "put our ears on" and listen.

Miller talks about the positive role sports can play in society, and how the coronavirus has put that on hold in many ways.

"I think sports in general and especially the NBA has always had a huge platform in terms of healing. But I think a lot of people are frustrated right now because covid and the coronavirus has stopped everything. So there's no outlet for people," Miller says. "Sports used to be the great equalizer in healing form. You know, after 9/11 it was baseball. You remember George Bush going to Yankee Stadium and throwing out the first ball, you know, 'We won't be defeated.'"

Miller, Julich, and Morton talk about the similarities between Michael Jordan and Lance Armstrong, and about how Miller first got into cycling. They talk about Miller's first bikes (a Giant, then a custom Moots, then a Santa Cruz), and Miller's charitable work.

Miller also talks about the importance of having uncomfortable conversations.

"When you see a murder on TV of George Floyd, and this has been going on forever, and people are frustrated, they're tired, they're hurt," he says. "And you keep telling people to turn the other cheek and do have peaceful protests, and change never comes about. They are tired. So what? You know, we saw Colin Kaepernick taking a knee a peaceful protest to what has been going on, and he gets blackballed from the NFL format. And I see all these images now of police and other people kneeling. It's funny how things have come full circle because the murder of George Floyd and this officer kneeling on him forcibly for over eight minutes, lynching this man on national TV for the world to see and you got Colin Kaepernick has been telling you guys this has been going on forever."

"Sports and its brightest stars can help heal the pain hopefully, but it starts from within. People need to start listening and when I say people, white people need to start listening to the pain of black and brown people in this country and in the world because it's been going on way too long," Miller says. "A young man goes out for a jog — for a jog! — and gets murdered for that, you know, we got to stop. Sometimes you've got to take an aggressive approach to create change, they want change, and it starts with people getting out there and getting to the polls and voting. You don't like a prosecutor? You don't like a president? You don't like an attorney general? You don't like a judge, vote them out. Go vote, people, get them out."

Miller says people people don't want to have these conversations because they don't want to believe that racism in 2020 exist. "This goes back 400 years. I mean, I don't want to go in a history lesson here because this is a basketball and cycling show. But as long as people are willing to have a conversation and admit that racism is alive and well in America in what can we do black and brown people and white people, how can we help one another, get past this, if they're willing to have that conversation, that's the only way the healing is going to start," Miller says. "But if you're going to sit in your nice house, and turn the channel and think if we're not going to go anywhere, is nothing, no change will ever evolve from that. So if you're willing to listen, and open up and say, 'You know what, you're right.' God gave us two ears, and one mouth. Listen, put your listening ears on."

And with that, give this episode of Put Your Socks on a listen.

Jun 04 2020

1hr

Play

VN Pod, ep. 193: The founder of Everesting; should media be at the TDF?

Podcast cover
Read more
On this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast our examination of the Everesting phenomenon continues. We speak with Andy van Bergen, the Australian cyclist who founded the Everesting challenge back in 2014 and who now oversees the website that chronicles Everesting attempts across the globe.

Van Bergen has seen the number of Everesting attempts skyrocket in recent weeks, and also a number of to pro riders have attempted to break the record. We discuss why the latest attempt by German rider Emanuel Buchmann was deemed not a record, and why the rules governing Everesting are so stringent.

Before hearing from van Bergen, we link up with Andrew Hood and James Startt to discuss cycling's march toward the Tour de France. Pro teams are now creating specific plans for Tour de France prep, including grouping riders and staff together as they prepare for the race.

Also, there is a simmering debate over whether or not media should be allowed at this year's Tour due to fears over spreading coronavirus. We discuss the pros and cons of media involvement at the race.

All that and more on this week's episode of The VeloNews Podcast.

Jun 03 2020

1hr 2mins

Play

Tech Podcast: What makes a good pair of bibshorts?

Podcast cover
Read more
Tech editor Dan Cavallari and senior editor Betsy Welch have been testing bibs — a lot of them. How do we determine which bibs are good and which ones aren't so hot? As it turns out, it all depends on who you are, and where you're riding.

Betsy gives us the skinny on pee-friendly women's bibs, while Dan reveals his make-or-break feature that absolutely has to be present on a pair of bibshorts for them to be considered good ones. Find out what it is on this episode of the VeloNews Tech Podcast.

Jun 01 2020

42mins

Play

PYSO, ep. 54: Tejay van Garderen on risk assessment and not taking the joy of racing for granted

Podcast cover
Read more
American Tejay van Garderen, twice a fifth place finisher overall and winner of the white jersey at the Tour de France, wishes he had taken more time to appreciate the good times during his career. Whether it was winning the Tour of California, or just having fun rooming with riders like George Hincapie or Taylor Phinney, van Garderen says he took a lot of things for granted.

“I wish I would have savored the moment a little bit more and appreciated it,” he said. “ I always just thought, ‘Okay, I'm here now and I'm gonna go there and that's a stepping stone. That's kind of the story of cycling in a nutshell. You never stop to just say, ‘Hey, what I did was pretty cool.’ I wish I had done that a little bit more.”

Van Garderen talks at length on this episode of Put Your Socks On about trying to keep perspective heading into the strange 2020 season.

In 2016, van Garderen skipped the Olympics because of another virus. At the time, his wife Jessica was six months pregnant, and he didn’t want to risk contracting the Zika virus.

Van Garderen also talks about the people who helped get him to where he is today, including a framebuilder in Bozeman, Montana: Carl Strong. “Without him I wouldn't have been a bike racer,” van Garderen said. “I just I wouldn't been wouldn't have been able to afford it.”

May 28 2020

53mins

Play

VN Pod, ep. 192: Marina Zenovich on LANCE; Everesting 101

Podcast cover
Read more
On this week's podcast we interview producer/director Marina Zenovich on her new ESPN 30 for 30 documentary LANCE, which chronicles the rise and fall of Lance Armstrong.

Zenovich spent two years producing the film, and she interviewed Armstrong on eight different occasions. Yet the film is one of many films, books, and magazine articles written about Armstrong. Zenovich explains why, after the other media projects were done, she still felt compelled to produce a film on the disgraced champion.

Everesting continues to be the buzzword in the U.S. cycling scene, with even more amateur and elite riders opting to ride 29,000 vertical feet on their bicycles. Senior Editor Betsy Welch joins the show to discuss the Everesting trend, the various different ways riders are choosing to Everest, and the strategies riders are following to record fastest times.

This week's episode is sponsored by Roll Massif, organizer of eight iconic cycling events in Colorado. Right now listeners of the podcast can get 15 percent off event entry by going to rollmassif.com and using the code Velonews15 at checkout.

May 27 2020

42mins

Play

Tech Podcast: Phil Gaimon knows why you should pay for Strava

Podcast cover
Read more
On this episode of the VeloNews Tech Podcast, retired pro cyclist Phil Gaimon joins tech editor Dan Cavallari to talk about how Strava has turned into an important tool in Gaimon's post-racing life. Gaimon recounts how he first started using Strava as a way to stay fit and have fun, and how it morphed into something that helped him define a sense of purpose, particularly regarding some of the charitable fundraising he does.

Gaimon also chats about his Everesting record, which lasted a few days before he was unseated by Keegan Swenson. Most importantly, Gaimon reminds us all that while Strava is a powerful tool worth spending our money on, it's important to remember the fun part of it all — it's just riding bikes, and that's ultimately what should put a smile on our faces.

May 22 2020

39mins

Play

PYSO, ep. 53: World champ Chloe Dygert, Twenty20 boss Nicola Cranmer on pursuing greatness

Podcast cover
Read more
Some riders are superstitious, believing that they need everything just so in order to perform. They need just the right lucky clothing, or just the right type of coffee. World time trial champion Chloe Dygert is not such a rider. She doesn't even drink coffee. She just thrives off viewing the best riders in the world as benchmarks, and then getting to work on surpassing them.

In this episode of Put Your Socks On, Dygert and her Team Twenty20 boss Nicola Cranmer discuss the pursuit of greatness. In Cranmer's case, that means finding and nurturing talented riders in challenging times as well as good times. For Dygert, that means a relentless work ethic and a refusal to settle — even for her current status as one of the absolute best riders in the world.

"I'm definitely the kind of person that if you tell me, I can't do something, I'm going to do it, and I'm going to do it better than you would ever think," Dygert says. "I have role models, but I don't look at them and say I want to be like them. I look at them and say, 'you are a benchmark to what I want to be. I'm going to surpass you, I'm going to be better than you.' I want to be the best at anything and everything I do, and I thrive off of pain. I thrive off of other people's doubt, and I think that's also a huge benefactor into who I am today."

As the world of cycling contemplates a cautious return to racing, Cranmer floats the idea of racing time trials exclusively for a little while. What does the reigning world TT champ think of this? "I would not be opposed," Dygert says.

May 21 2020

47mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

438 Ratings
Average Ratings
335
53
24
10
16

Great show

By Rideyourbikenow - Mar 20 2020
Read more
This is a great show. Very informative and good topic you don’t usually get with a cycling podcast.

More Juli Young 👍

By Hughes225 - Jan 03 2020
Read more
Really like hearing Julie Young’s perspectives on training in episode 91 👍