OwlTail

Cover image of Tá Falado: Brazilian Portuguese Pronunciation for Speakers of Spanish
(81)
Education
Courses
Language Learning

Tá Falado: Brazilian Portuguese Pronunciation for Speakers of Spanish

Updated about 1 month ago

Education
Courses
Language Learning
Read more

Tá Falado provides Brazilian Portuguese pronunciation lessons for speakers of Spanish. Podcasts illustrate pronunciation differences between Spanish and Portuguese and present scenarios showing cultural differences between the U.S. and Brazil. Tá Falado is part of the Brazilpod project and is produced at the College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas at Austin. Website URL: http://coerll.utexas.edu/brazilpod/tafalado/

Read more

Tá Falado provides Brazilian Portuguese pronunciation lessons for speakers of Spanish. Podcasts illustrate pronunciation differences between Spanish and Portuguese and present scenarios showing cultural differences between the U.S. and Brazil. Tá Falado is part of the Brazilpod project and is produced at the College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas at Austin. Website URL: http://coerll.utexas.edu/brazilpod/tafalado/

iTunes Ratings

81 Ratings
Average Ratings
57
14
4
4
2

Outstanding

By ingrid_t - Jan 18 2019
Read more
As a fluent Spanish speaker and beginner Portuguese learner, this podcast was absolutely perfect. It's so well-made though that I think you would benefit even if you had no knowledge of Spanish. The episodes provide a super-useful, entertaining guide to grammar and pronunciation. Orlando's enthusiasm for grammar is contagious, and there are lots of humorous moments that made me chuckle! Also, I loved Valdo's voice and could listen to him speak Portuguese all day! I always listened with the PDF open as a reference; it was really helpful to be able to read along with the dialogue and also to study the additional cultural and grammar notes. I'm grateful to the UT team for providing such a high-quality free resource.

Great podcast!

By Jara512 - Jul 21 2015
Read more
I have looked for a good resource to learn Portuguese and this is great! I really enjoy the thought that goes into the dialogue and the speakers are great! Thank you for your hard work in making this possible for people like myself! muito obrigado

iTunes Ratings

81 Ratings
Average Ratings
57
14
4
4
2

Outstanding

By ingrid_t - Jan 18 2019
Read more
As a fluent Spanish speaker and beginner Portuguese learner, this podcast was absolutely perfect. It's so well-made though that I think you would benefit even if you had no knowledge of Spanish. The episodes provide a super-useful, entertaining guide to grammar and pronunciation. Orlando's enthusiasm for grammar is contagious, and there are lots of humorous moments that made me chuckle! Also, I loved Valdo's voice and could listen to him speak Portuguese all day! I always listened with the PDF open as a reference; it was really helpful to be able to read along with the dialogue and also to study the additional cultural and grammar notes. I'm grateful to the UT team for providing such a high-quality free resource.

Great podcast!

By Jara512 - Jul 21 2015
Read more
I have looked for a good resource to learn Portuguese and this is great! I really enjoy the thought that goes into the dialogue and the speakers are great! Thank you for your hard work in making this possible for people like myself! muito obrigado

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

Cover image of Tá Falado: Brazilian Portuguese Pronunciation for Speakers of Spanish

Tá Falado: Brazilian Portuguese Pronunciation for Speakers of Spanish

Latest release on Dec 11, 2007

Best weekly hand curated episodes for learning

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 1 month ago

Rank #1: Supplementary Lesson 2: Portuguese Consonant Sounds

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Supplementary Lesson 2: Portuguese Consonant Sounds
  • filename: tafalado_suppl_02.mp3
  • track number: 26/46
  • time: 5:33
  • size: 3.90 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Unlike the regular podcast lessons, we've included some other supplementary lessons. Think of these as a sort of Appendix to the regular lessons. In this second supplementary lesson, we provide an audio sample of all of major consonant sounds for Brazilian Portuguese. This should give you a sense of each of the sounds.

Apr 05 2007

5mins

Play

Rank #2: Lesson 24: Intonation

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Lesson 24: Intonation
  • filename: tafalado_24.mp3
  • track number: 25/46
  • time: 15:05
  • size: 10.61 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Today's lesson is totally different. Instead of listening to a dialog and comparing the sounds to Spanish, our team discusses a number of audio clips that illustrate Brazilian Portuguese intonation patterns. Do not worry about understanding what they clips are saying. The objective of today's lesson is to listen to the music, rhythm, and pitch of Brazilian Portuguese. And yes, Brazilians do think of Halls Mentho-Lyptus as candy!

Clip #1, from Lesson 13 dialog
Valdo and Vivian

Portuguese: Ah, é mesmo. Dentro de alguns cinemas aqui eles servem comida. Gostoso, né?
Spanish: Ah, es cierto. Dentro de algunos cines aquí se sirve comida. Qué chévere, ¿no?
English: That's right. In some of the theaters they serve food. That's cool, right?

---
Clip #2, Lesson 13 dialog
Michelle and Vivian

Portuguese: Então tá. A gente come massa com espinafre e toma umas bebidas enquanto assiste o filme.
Spanish: Está bien. Nosotros comemos pasta con espinacas y tomamos unas bebidas mientras miramos la película.
English: OK then. We'll have pasta with spinach and we'll have a few drinks while watching the movie.

---
Clip #3, 'Hot Dog' or 'Hoti Doggie'
Michelle, Valdo, José Luis, and Orlando

- Eu quero ver ele pronunciar 'hoti doggie.'
- É porque foi uma controvérsia porque ela queria que eu falasse 'fasti foodi' mas eu não falo 'fasti foodi.'
- Eu também não falo 'fasti foodi', mas eu vou forçar aqui porque todo mundo fala!
- No cultural note vamos fazer ...
- O que cê fala geralmente?
- Cachorro quente.
- Não, mas a gente fala 'hoti doggie.'
- Mas se você dissesse ...
- Se falasse no Brasil ...
- Ele, como sabe ingles, ele vai falar 'hot dog' ...
- Ninguém vai entender o que é, né? É lógico.
- ... mas as pessoas falam 'hoti doggie.' É como falar 'fasti foodi.'
- Eu queria salientar isso nos cultural note, que eu não falo 'hoti doggie' ...

---
Clip #4
Michelle, Valdo, Jose Luis, and Orlando:

- 'Fasti Foodi'
- Eu também não falo assim Valdo, mas eu vou dar uma forçada porque as pessoas falam.
- O que cê fala?
- Não, a gente fala 'fast food' mas as pessoas falam 'fasti foodi' com 'i' no final.
- Mas o objetivo é esse, né? da lição.
- Exatamente,
- Mas eu queria que ...
- ... enfatize que nós não falamos assim.
- Que nós dois, né?
- Nós não falamos mas o resto é normal.

---
Clip #5
Michelle, Valdo, Jose Luis, and Orlando:

- Na verdade eu não escuto muito a gente falar 'hoti doggie'. O pessoal fala ...
- Sim, fala mais cachorro quente, mas quando vai falar.
- É que a gente precisava de usar essas palavras para ...
- We'll play with it, we'll let people know that cachorro quente is also said a lot.
- Mas, quando as pessoas vão falar, fala 'hoti doggie'.
- If they ever say it.
- Sim.
- Porque Orlando lo dirá en inglés, hot dog.
- Eu diria cachorro quente, para falar a verdade, eu falaria em português ...
- Eu não falaria hot dog nunca
- Sim, mas tem lugares também
- We need to come up with some epenthetic vowel ...
- I fully understand what we are doing.

---
Clip #6
Michelle, Valdo, Jose Luis, and Orlando:

- Outra coisa que você pode incluir, se cê quiser, que eu lembrei agora, Halles...
- O que é Halles?
- Halles.
- Eu nunca ouvi as pessoas pronunciarem Halles.
- É Halles.
- Escuto pronunciar Halls
- É, eu sempre falo Halls. Gente, eu sempre falo assim.
- Una clase divina.
- For us, Jose Luis, you will not believe this, but for us Halls is a medicine. You know, throat lozenges, when you have a sore throat you have Halls.
- Oh yea.
- In Brazil, they eat it like candy!
- Candy.
- They sell Halls like candy!
- Yea,
- Yea. It's like...
- E eu pronuncio Halls sempre. Eu nunca ouvi Halles.
- Is it candy, I mean the Halls?
- No. A primeira vez que eles ofereceram para mim Halls como se fosse candy eu pensei, what is this?
- Para mim foi estranho achar que o povo usa aqui como remédio.
- Não, não, no Brazil não. Imagina! Uma balinha, que cê compra todo dia, toma todo dia.
- Toma não, chupa todo dia, uma balinha...
- Pra botar bom hálito na boca.
- Sim.
- Oh, I like that.
- OK, we better get rolling here.

Mar 28 2007

15mins

Play

Similar Podcasts

Brazilian Portuguese Podcast, by RLP

Carioca Connection: Brazilian Portuguese Conversation.

Learn Portuguese - BrazilianPodClass (Previous Episodes)

Learn Portuguese - BrazilianPodClass - Video Edition HD

Learn Portuguese - BrazilianPodClass

Speaking Brazilian Podcast

Learn Portuguese | PortuguesePod101.com

SBS Portuguese - SBS em Português

Practice Portuguese

Portuguese With Carla Podcast

Portuguese Lab Podcast | Learn European Portuguese

Say it in Portuguese

Portuguese News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

SBS Spanish - SBS en español

Advanced Spanish with Spanish Obsessed

Rank #3: Lesson 23: Cool Little Words, Nicknames

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Lesson 23: Cool Little Words, Nicknames
  • filename: tafalado_23.mp3
  • track number: 24/46
  • time: 9:11
  • size: 6.46 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Let's see if we have this right? Michelle's family gave her the nickname 'witch' because of how moody she became when under stress at school, right? Wow, that's a mean nickname, at least from a North American point of view. This lesson is a bit different in that we don't look at pronunciation directly, but we do look at the little extra words that people add to their speech, like, you know, umm, well, like, whatever, you know?

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Cê sabe que os americanos acham estranho certos apelidos que a gente coloca nas pessoas.
Valdo: Diga aí ... vem cá, eles não usam apelidos?
Michelle: Então, veja só ... quando eu digo que meu apelido no Brasil é 'bruxa' ninguém acredita. Eles acham estranho, um pouco cruel, sabe?
Valdo: Peraí ... eles não usam apelidos como 'gordo', 'magrela', 'baixinho', 'alemão'? Pô, isso é uma forma de demonstrar, tipo, amizade no Brasil, né?
Michelle: Viu, não é que eles não usam apelidos aqui, mas é diferente, entende? Geralmente é só um diminutivo do nome, como 'Liz' para Elizabeth, 'Bob' para Robert, tá vendo?
Valdo: Ah, tá ... não é um nome engraçado como os que a gente usa e que vem de uma característica física que a pessoa tenha, por exemplo. Ah, sei ... Bom, então a gente se fala mais tarde, falô?

Spanish
Michelle: Sabe que los americanos consideran raros los apodos que les damos nosotros a outros.
Valdo: Dime, ven acá, ¿no utilizan ellos apodos?
Michelle: Entonces, mira, cuando les digo que mi apodo en Brasil es 'bruja' nadie lo cree. Ellos piensan que es muy raro y un poco cruel, ¿sabe?
Valdo: Espera, ¿no usan ellos apodos como 'gordo', 'flaquito', 'bajito', 'alemán'? Pues, eso es una forma de mostrarles, a ver, amistad en Brasil, ¿no?
Michelle: 'Bob' para Robert, tá vendo?
Ves, no es que no utilizan apodos aquí, pero es diferente, ¿sabe? Generalmente es una forma diminutivo del nombre, como 'Liz para Elizabeth, 'Bob' para Robert, ¿lo ves?
Valdo: Está bien, no serúa un nombre chistoso como los que nosotros usamos, estos que vienen de las características físicas que la persona tenga por ejemplo. Bien, entonces podemos hablar más de eso más tarde, ¿está bien?

English
Michelle: You know that Americans think it is strange the way we give nicknames to other people.
Valdo: Come on, tell me, you mean they don't use nicknames?
Michelle: So, look, when I tell them that my nickname in Brazil is 'witch' nobody believes it. They think it is strange and a little cruel, you know?
Valdo: Hold on ... you mean they don't say things like 'fat', 'skinny', 'short', 'German'? Wow, this is the way that we show, you know, friendship in Brazil, right?
Michelle: You know, it's not that they don't use nicknames, but it's different, you know? Generally they just use diminutive forms of a name like 'Liz for Elizabeth, 'Bob' for Robert, you see?
Valdo: OK then, so it's not a funny name like the ones that we use that come from some physical characteristic that the person hás for example. I've got it, OK, we'll talk more later, OK?

Mar 23 2007

9mins

Play

Rank #4: Grammar Lesson 7: Para with Indirect Pronouns, Ice Water at Restaurants

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 7: Para with Indirect Pronouns, Ice Water at Restaurants
  • filename: tafalado_gra_07.mp3
  • track number: 33/46
  • time: 12:23
  • size: 8.71 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
For all of you who learned how to speak Spanish, we all relive the nightmare experience of learning direct and indirect object pronouns. Lo is direct, le is indirect. When you use both put the indirect first; but you can't say le lo, so change le to se and then say se lo, as in se lo di 'I gave it to him' ... Bad memories for sure, but the good news is that none of that happens in Portuguese. In fact, Brazilians hardly ever use indirect objects. Instead they just say para ele 'to him', para ela 'to her', para eles 'to them'. That's what Orlando, Valdo, Michelle, and Jose Luís talk about in this lesson, which is just para vocês!

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: Por que o garçom trouxe tanta água para aquele povo da outra mesa?
Michelle: Aqui é um costume servir água nos bares e restaurantes para os clientes mesmo quando se pede outra coisa pra beber.
Valdo: Garçom, traga duas cervejas pra gente, por favor. Nada de água!
Michelle: Valdo, e pede pra ele uma salada de palmito também.
Valdo: Puxa! O garçom só fica dando água pra eles, olha lá. Eles vão ficar bêbados com tanta água!
Michelle: Aqui é impressionante... assim que você chega, a primeira coisa que eles fazem é entregar um copo cheio de água com gelo pra você.

Spanish
Valdo: ¿Por qué el camarero les trajo tanta agua a aquellas personas de la otra mesa?
Michelle: Aquí a los clientes es normal servirles agua en los bares y restaurantes aún cuando piden otra cosa para beber.
Valdo: Camarero, tráiganos dos cervezas por favor. Y nada de agua!
Michelle: Valdo, pídele que traiga una ensalada de palmito también.
Valdo: Uau, el camarero continúa dándoles agua, mira. Se emborracharán con tanta agua.
Michelle: Aquí es impresionante ... luego que vengas, la primera cosa que hacen es entregarte un vaso lleno de agua con hielo.

English
Valdo: Why did the waiter take so much water to those people at that other table?
Michelle: Here it's customary to serve customers water in bars and restaurants even when they have asked for something else to drink.
Valdo: Waiter, bring us two beers please. And no water!
Michelle: Valdo, ask him to bring a heart of palm salad too.
Valdo: Wow! The waiter keeps on giving them water, look at that. They are going to get drunk on so much water.
Michelle: It's impressive here ... as soon as you arrive the first thing they do is bring you a glass full of ice water.

Jun 14 2007

12mins

Play

Most Popular Podcasts

The Joe Rogan Experience

TED Talks Daily

The Tim Ferriss Show

The Daily

Stuff You Should Know

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Rank #5: Grammar Lesson 8: Plural of words that end in 'ão', Car Insurance

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 8: Plural of words that end in 'ão', Car Insurance
  • filename: tafalado_gra_08.mp3
  • track number: 34/46
  • time: 13:22
  • size: 9.40 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
So why is the plural of alemão alemães, but he plural of nação is nações? And why would the plural of mão be mãos? You know what, Valdo and Michelle have some hints to clear it all up. What's amazing is that they can talk about that and still have time to talk about car insurance in Brazil.

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Minha situação financeira melhorou e eu quero fazer um montão de coisas.
Valdo: Só toma cuidado pra você não ficar acostumada com um padrão de vida que não é o seu.
Michelle: Mas os padrões daqui são diferentes do Brasil. As situações são outras e eu quero aproveitar.
Valdo: Eh, você tem razão. Se você tem condições de pagar um seguro alto, compra logo um carro zero!
Michelle: Minha condição financeira realmente está boa, mas eu não quero fazer um seguro de automóvel.
Valdo: Mas aqui o seguro do carro é obrigatório. No Brasil, a gente faz por outras razões, você sabe, tipo ser roubado.

Spanish
Michelle: Mi situación financiera ha mejorado y quiero hacer un montón de cosas.
Valdo: Pero cuidado para que no te acostumbres con el estándar de vida que no sea el tuyo.
Michelle: Pero los estándar de aquí son diferentes a los del Brasil. Las situaciones son diferentes y quiero aprovechar.
Valdo: Sí, tienes razón. Si tienes condiciones de pagar un seguro alto, compra luego un carro nuevo!
Michelle: Mi condición financiera realmente está buena, pero yo no quiero comprar un seguro de automóvil.
Valdo: Pero aquí el seguro de automóvil es obligatorio. En el Brasil nosotros lo compramos por otras razones, sabes, como el robo.

English
Michelle: My financial situation has improved and I want to do a whole bunch of things.
Valdo: But be care that you don't get used to a standard of living that isn't yours.
Michelle: But the standards here are different then in Brazil. The situation is different and I want to take advantage of it.
Valdo: Yea, you are right. If you are in a condition to pay the high insurance, buy yourself a new car right away.
Michelle: My financial situation is really just fine, but I don't want to buy car insurance.
Valdo: But here car insurance is obligatory. In Brazil we buy it for other reasons, you know, like against theft.

Jun 20 2007

13mins

Play

Rank #6: Grammar Lesson 11: Topic-Comment Patterns, Special Needs Privileges

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 11: Topic-Comment Patterns, Special Needs Privileges
  • filename: tafalado_gra_11.mp3
  • track number: 37/46
  • time: 12:01
  • size: 8.46 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Just look at that barriga! Clearly the polite thing to do, at least in Brazil, would be to have a special line at banks, post offices, and supermarkets for those that have 'special' needs. However, the other day, in this condition, with that barriga, Michelle had to wait in line at the U.S. post office just like one of the 'regular' people. Grammatically, Orlando seems to love topic-comment patterns almost too much. Is it possible that grammar is really that interesting?

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Você acredita que eu fiquei quase duas horas na fila do correio ontem? Lá no Brasil, as grávidas, elas têm preferência.
Valdo: Mas aqui os idosos, as grávidas e as mulheres com crianças de colo, eles não têm prioridade nenhuma.
Michelle: Pois é, ainda bem que no Brasil isso é lei. Meu pai, por exemplo, ele sempre pega a fila dos idosos no banco.
Valdo: Por falar nisso, no Brasil um amigo meu, ele sempre leva a mãe idosa pro banco só pra não pegar fila.
Michelle: Eh, no Brasil as pessoas, às vezes, elas usam e abusam desse direito.
Valdo: Mas por outro lado, os cidadãos americanos, eles não têm essas facilidades.

Spanish
Michelle: ¿Tú crees que tenía que esperar casi dos horas en la fila del correo ayer? En el Brasil, las mujeres embarazadas tienen preferencia.
Valdo: Pero aquí los mayores, las embarazadas y las mujeres que tienen niños pequeños no tienen ninguna prioridad.
Michelle: Así es, lo bueno es que en el Brasil eso existe por ley. Mi papá, por ejemplo, siempre entra en la fila de los mayores de edad que hay en el banco.
Valdo: Hablando de eso, en el Brazil un amigo mío siempre lleva a su mamá al banco para no tener que esperar en la fila.
Michelle: Sí, en el Brazil, hay personas, a veces, que usan y abusan de ese derecho.
Valdo: Pero por otro lado, los ciudadanos americanos no tienen estas facilidades.

English
Michelle: Can you believe that I had to wait nearly two hours in the line at the post office yesterday? In Brazil pregnant women are given preferred treatment.
Valdo: But here the elderly, pregnant women, and women with small children don't seem to have any priority.
Michelle: Right, it's a good thing that in Brazil this is the law. My father, for example, always gets in the elderly line at that bank.
Valdo: Speaking of which, I have a friend in Brazil who always takes his elderly mother to the bank with him so that he won't have to wait in line.
Michelle: Yea, in Brazil sometimes there are people who use and abuse this right.
Valdo: But on the other hand, Americans don't have these options.

Jul 16 2007

12mins

Play

Rank #7: Grammar Lesson 15: False Cognates, Driver's License

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 15: False Cognates, Driver's License
  • filename: tafalado_gra_15.mp3
  • track number: 41/46
  • time: 10:50
  • size: 7.62 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
No kidding, Orlando was in Mexico City one time and saw a man in Chapultepec Park who was selling helados esquisitos. Why would anyone want to buy 'weird' ice cream? Turns out, in Spanish esquisito means exquisite, and Mexicans actually like to have their helado esquisito! It's a positive thing. In Portuguese, esquisito means strange or weird. OK, that's what we mean by false cognates. Although many words between Spanish and Portuguese are similar, there are others that trick you because the meaning isn't what you expect.

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: Você tirou sua carteira de motorista aqui no Texas?
Michelle: Tirei sim. E logo comecei a dirigir pra todos os lugares.
Valdo: Você não ficou surpresa ao saber que aqui se consegue a carteira aos 16 anos? Porque no Brasil só a partir dos 18. E o seu teste, você foi bem?
Michelle: Você acredita que eu coloquei meu apelido no computador ao invés do meu nome e sobrenome?
Valdo: Ah, é que você ainda estava grávida! Você não ficou embarassada em dirigir no dia do teste com aquele barrigão?
Michelle: Claro que não! Eu até freqüentei a universidade grávida.

Spanish
Valdo: ¿Sacaste tú la licencia de conducir aquí en Texas?
Michelle: Sí, la saqué. Y después empecé a manejar por todos los lugares.
Valdo: ¿No te sorprendiste al saber que aquí se consigue la licencia a los 16 años de edad? Porque en el Brasil sólo a partir de los 18. Y tu examen, ¿cómo saliste?
Michelle: ¿Puedes creer que puse mi sobrenombre en la computadora en lugar de mi nombre y apellido?
Valdo: Y todavía estabas embarazada! ¿No te avergonzaste en manejar el día del examen con esa barriga?
Michelle: Claro que no! Yo también asistí a la universidad embarazada.

English
Valdo: Did you get your driver's license here in Texas?
Michelle: Yes, I got it. And then I began to drive everywhere.
Valdo: Weren't you surprised to find out that here one can get their driver's license at 16? Because in Brazil you have to be 18. And how about your test, how did it go?
Michelle: Can you believe that I put my nickname on the computer instead of my first and last name?
Valdo: Wow, and you were still pregnant! Weren't you embarrassed about driving for your test with that big stomach?
Michelle: Of course not! I even attended the university while pregnant.

Sep 18 2007

10mins

Play

Rank #8: Grammar Lesson 9: Possessive Pronouns, How to Dress Like an American

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 9: Possessive Pronouns, How to Dress Like an American
  • filename: tafalado_gra_09.mp3
  • track number: 35/46
  • time: 12:29
  • size: 8.78 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Who would have ever guessed that Valdo and Michelle think that jeans and flip flops make a strange combination? Looks like we've just seen one more thing that makes Americans stand out. Note that this picture has got three Brazilians trying to dress like North Americans! Oh yes, and grammar-wise, we're talking about possessive pronouns. You might say, OUR comments to YOUR lesson.

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Valdo, olha pra aquela menina ... veja a bolsa dela!
Valdo: O que é que tem a bolsa dela? É parecida com a sua bolsa.
Michelle: Você sabe, no Brasil a gente nunca usaria uma bolsa de paetê como a dela durante o dia.
Valdo: É verdade! Olha a calça dele ... jeans com chinelo!
Michelle: Eh, por aí a gente percebe a diferença entre a roupa deles e a nossa.
Valdo: Mas esse é o nosso conceito, como brasileiros, sobre a roupa deles. Será que aos olhos deles as suas roupas também não são um pouco bregas?

Spanish
Michelle: Valdo, mira aquella chica ... mira su bolsa.
Valdo: ¿Cuál es el problema con su bolsa? Se parece a tu bolsa.
Michelle: Tú sabes, en el Brasil nunca usaríamos una bolsa de lentejuelas como la de ella durante el día.
Valdo: Es verdad! Mira sus pantalones ... vaqueros con chinelas!
Michelle: Por aquí te das cuenta de la diferencia entre su ropa y la nuestra.
Valdo: Pero esa es nuestra idea, como brasileños, sobre su ropa. ¿Será que para ellos la ropa tuya sería un poco rara también?

English
Michelle: Valdo, look at that girl ... look at her purse!
Valdo: What wrong with her purse? I looks like your purse.
Michelle: You know, in Brazil we'd never use a sequined purse like she's got during the daytime.
Valdo: You're right! And look at her pants ... jeans with flip flops!
Michelle: Yea, around here you notice the difference between their clothing and ours.
Valdo: But that is our idea, as Brazilians, about their clothes. Don't you think that in from their perspective your clothes might seem a little tacky too?

Jun 27 2007

12mins

Play

Rank #9: Grammar Lesson 10: Word Order of Negative Phrases, Paying for Parties

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 10: Word Order of Negative Phrases, Paying for Parties
  • filename: tafalado_gra_10.mp3
  • track number: 36/46
  • time: 11:25
  • size: 8.02 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
'Não, não sei não.' This is the pattern for Brazilians, to say 'no' three times in the sentence. It's not that Valdo and Michelle are negative people, but they sure get their point across. And speaking of their point of view, if YOU invite them to a party, YOU should really pay the tab!

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: Michelle, você não quer ir no aniversário do meu amigo? Vai ser em um restaurante aqui em Austin.
Michelle: Não, eu não quero não.
Valdo: Por que? Cê não quer comer comida boa não?
Michelle: Querer eu quero, mas aqui, mesmo sendo convidado, a gente tem que pagar! Não, isso não está certo não!
Valdo: Eh, no Brasil não se faz isso não. Quem convida dá banquete. Mas aqui é assim, fazer o quê. Você não quer ir mesmo?
Michelle: Não, não e não.

Spanish
Valdo: Michelle, ¿te gustaría ir a una fiesta de cumpleaños de un amigo mío? Será en un restaurante aquí en Austin.
Michelle: No, no quiero.
Valdo: ¿Por qué? ¿No quieres comer buena comida?
Michelle: Querer, sí lo quiero, pero aquí, aun cuando te invitan, somos nosotros quienes tenemos que pagar. No, eso no es cierto!
Valdo: Sí, en el Brasil no se hace así. Quien invita es el que paga todo. Pero aquí es así, ¿qué se puede hacer? ¿De verdad no quieres ir?
Michelle: No, no quiero.

English
Valdo: Michelle, do you want to go to the birthday party of a friend of mine? It will be in a restaurant here in Austin.
Michelle: No, I don't want to.
Valdo: Why? Don't you want to eat some good food?
Michelle: I want to, but here, even if you are invited, we have to pay. No, that's not right!
Valdo: Yea, in Brazil you wouldn't do that. Whoever does the inviting provides for all. But that's the way it is here. Are you sure you don't want to go?
Michelle: No way.

Jul 06 2007

11mins

Play

Rank #10: Grammar Lesson 14: Absence of Direct Object Pronouns, Mobile Homes

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 14: Absence of Direct Object Pronouns, Mobile Homes
  • filename: tafalado_gra_14.mp3
  • track number: 40/46
  • time: 10:24
  • size: 7.32 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
OK, so you are driving down the freeway and you see a semi going 70 mph and there is a mobile home being pulled along. Well, yes, I do see why that would seem rather shocking to a Brazilian. Thanks go to Valdo and Michelle for making that observation. Grammar-wise, we are also going to talk about dropping direct object pronouns. Better to drop pronouns than mobile homes from semis!

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Você viu aquele caminhão levando aquela casa inteirinha?
Valdo: Vi sim. Que coisa, né?
Michelle: Pois é, a primeira vez que vi tomei um susto. Você compraria aquela casa pra você?
Valdo: Não, não compraria não. Prefiro a minha casa de concreto no Brasil que está bem presa ao chão. E você transportaria sua casa assim com tudo dentro?
Michelle: Transportaria sim. Por que? Você não gosta desse sistema não?
Valdo: Não gosto muito não. Como já te disse, prefiro minha casa bem presa ao chão.

Spanish
Michelle: ¿Viste tú aquel camión llevando aquella casa entera?
Valdo: Sí lo vi. Qué cosa, ¿verdad?
Michelle: Pues, la primera vez que lo vi, me asusté. ¿Comprarías tú aquella casa?
Valdo: No, no la compraría. Prefiero que mi casa en Brasil sea de concreto y que esté bien fijada en el suelo. ¿Transportarías tú la casa así con todo adentro?
Michelle: Sí, la transportaría. ¿Por qué? ¿A ti no te gusta el sistema?
Valdo: No me gusta mucho. Como ya te dije, prefiero una casa que esté en el suelo.

English
Michelle: Did you see that truck carrying that whole house?
Valdo: I did see it. How weird, huh?
Michelle: Yeah, the first time that I saw one it surprised me. Would you ever buy that house for you?
Valdo: No, I wouldn't buy it. I prefer a concrete home in Brazil that is well attached to the ground. And would you transport your house like that with every thing in it?
Michelle: Yes, I would transport it. Why? Don't you like the system here?
Valdo: No, I don't like it a lot. As I already told you, I prefer my house to be stuck to the ground.

Sep 13 2007

10mins

Play

Rank #11: Grammar Lesson 12: Personalized Infinitive, Paying for your Education

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 12: Personalized Infinitive, Paying for your Education
  • filename: tafalado_gra_12.mp3
  • track number: 38/46
  • time: 13:07
  • size: 9.22 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Not only are Brazilians thought of as being very friendly, now they even want to personalize their infinitive verbs! Valdo and Michelle lead the way in showing us how to do the same. Culturally, we talk about the price of education in the United States. And take a peek at this picture! Orlando's really into the Texas Pride. Hook 'em Horns!

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: É bom fazermos as contas porque esse mês vai ser duro pagar a universidade.
Valdo: Quando eles mandarem o valor a gente se preocupa com isso.
Michelle: Mas é importante não esquecermos que as universidades públicas aqui nos Estados Unidos não são gratuitas como no Brasil.
Valdo: Pois é, e como custa caro! Por isso é que depois de terminarem os estudos os alunos estão todos pobres e endividados.
Michelle: Ainda bem que para as universidades públicas no Brasil só basta passarmos no vestibular e pronto.
Valdo: É verdade. Para os alunos freqüentarem as universidades privadas no Brasil, eles têm que pagar, mas para cursarem as públicas, que são mantidas pelo governo, não.

Spanish
Michelle: Sería bueno preparar el presupuesto porque este mes va a ser duro pagar la universidad.
Valdo: Cuando ellos mandan la cuenta nos preocupamos mucho.
Michelle: Pero es importante recordar que las universidades públicas aquí en los Estados Unidos no son gratuitas como en el Brasil.
Valdo: Es verdad, y qué caro es! Es por eso que después de terminar con los estudios los alumnos están pobres y endeudados.
Michelle: Lo bueno de las universidades públicas en el Brasil es que nada más se necesita pasar el vestibular y ya.
Valdo: Es verdad. Para asistir a las universidades privadas en el Brazil, hay que pagar, pero no para matricularse en las públicas, que son mantenidas por el gobierno.

English
Michelle: It would be a good thing to do our budget because this month it is going to be tough to pay for the university.
Valdo: When they send the bill we really get worried about things.
Michelle: But it's important to remember that public universities in the United States are not for free like they are in Brazil.
Valdo: Right, and it is expensive! That's why after students are done with their studies they end up poor and in debt.
Michelle: Fortunately in public universities in Brazil you just need to past the vestibular and that's it.
Valdo: That's true. For those students who would like to attend a private university, they'll have to pay. But for those who enroll in the public ones, which are paid for by the government, they don't need to.

Jul 23 2007

13mins

Play

Rank #12: Grammar Lesson 6: The Verb 'Ficar', Studying in Cafés

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 6: The Verb 'Ficar', Studying in Cafés
  • filename: tafalado_gra_06.mp3
  • track number: 32/46
  • time: 11:11
  • size: 7.87 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
In this lesson Orlando dreams about being able to use the verb 'ficar' when he is talking in Spanish. Ah, if they just had that verb in Spanish, it would make things a lot easier. Of course, for you Spanish speakers, you now have a chance to add 'ficar' to your Portuguese. Whether it means to become, to be, to stay, to remain, to keep on, or any of the other meanings, you are sure to love this fantastic verb. And whoever said that verbs weren't fun? One caution, however, don't study your verbs in a café, at least not in Brazil. Michelle and Valdo have a hard time getting used to the idea of studying in a café.

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: Eu fico pensando como as pessoas aqui conseguem se concentrar nos estudos ficando horas e horas sentadas nos cafés.
Michelle: É mesmo! No Brasil a gente geralmente fica em casa ou na biblioteca estudando.
Valdo: Eu fico meio distraído com o movimento das pessoas entrando e saindo.
Michelle: Fora que você fica mais pobre, porque pra ficar lá você sempre tem que consumir algo.
Valdo: E ainda ficar de molho na fila pra comprar qualquer coisa.
Michelle: É, às vezes eu fico com um pouco de receio de ir estudar nos cafés exatamente por isso.

Spanish
Valdo: Sigo pensando como las personas aquí consiguen concentrarse en los estudios pasando horas y horas sentadas en los cafés.
Michelle: De acuerdo. En el Brasil generalmente nos quedamos en casa o en una biblioteca para estudiar.
Valdo: Me distrai con el movimiento de personas que entran y salen.
Michelle: Y además uno pasa a ser más pobre porque para sentarse allí uno siempre tiene que tomar algo.
Valdo: Y todavía tienes que esperar en la fila para comprar alguna cosa.
Michelle: Sí, a veces me siento un poco reticente en estudiar en los cafés precisamente por eso.

English
Valdo: I keep wondering how people here can concentrate on their studies while sitting around for hours in cafes.
Michelle: I know. In Brazil we generally stay at home or study in the library.
Valdo: I get distracted with all the movement of people coming in and out.
Michelle: Besides that, you end up poorer because in order to stay there you have to keep drinking something.
Valdo: And you've also got to wait in line just to buy something.
Michelle: Yea, sometimes I feel a little reticent to study in cafes precisely because of that.

Jun 07 2007

11mins

Play

Rank #13: Lesson 20: Pronunciation of 'lh', Automatic Sprinklers

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Lesson 20: Pronunciation of 'lh', Automatic Sprinklers
  • filename: tafalado_20.mp3
  • track number: 21/46
  • time: 12:38
  • size: 4.44 MB
  • bitrate: 48 kbps
The 'mulher molhada trabalhava' is rendered in Spanish as 'mujer mojada tabajaba.' That's our basic rule: words spelled with 'j' in Spanish are often spelled with 'lh' in Portuguese. However, you've got to hear the podcast to find out how they are pronounced. Culturally Valdo and Michelle admire the number of automatic sprinklers that are found in residential areas in the United States.

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Um dia desses eu vi uma mulher toda molhada enquanto trabalhava.
Valdo: É mesmo? Me conta isso melhor. Quero saber os detalhes.
Michelle: Ela estava recolhendo uns galhos que estavam espalhados em frente de um condomínio quando os esguichos começaram a molhá-la.
Valdo: Ela não ouviu o barulho da água molhando as folhas?
Michelle: Não, porque esses aparelhos começam a esguichar água de repente e sem fazer barulho. E isso é muito comum aqui.
Valdo: Eh, então talvez valha a pena ficar de olho e escolher bem o lugar onde você pára.

Spanish
Michelle: Estos días yo vi a una mujer toda mojada cuando trabajaba.
Valdo: ¿De veras? Cuéntame mejor. Quiero saber con detalles.
Michelle: Ella estaba recogiendo unas ramas que estaban esparcidas en frente del condominio cuando la regadera empezó a mojarla.
Valdo: ¿Ella no escuchó el ruido del agua que mojaba la hojas?
Michelle: No, porque esos aparatos comienzan a regar agua de repente y sin hacer ruido. Y eso es muy común aquí.
Valdo: Entonces, vale la pena ver y escoger bien el lugar donde se va a parar.

English
Michelle: Recently I saw a woman who got all wet while working.
Valdo: Really? Tell me more. I want to know the details.
Michelle: She was gathering some branches that were spread out in front of a condominium when the sprinklers started soaking her.
Valdo: Didn't she hear the noise of the water hitting against the leaves?
Michelle: No, because these sprinklers begin to spray water all of a sudden and without making any noise. It's really common here.
Valdo: OK, so it's probably worth it to be on the lookout and choose carefully the place where you stop.

Mar 07 2007

12mins

Play

Rank #14: Grammar Lesson 4: Future Subjunctive, Soda Refills at Restaurants

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 4: Future Subjunctive, Soda Refills at Restaurants
  • filename: tafalado_gra_04.mp3
  • track number: 30/46
  • time: 13:55
  • size: 9.78 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
When you go, you will buy a soda. If you buy a soda, you will get refills. As soon as you get refills, you will sit down with friends to talk. Those who sit and talk with friends, will have a great time. Yes, all of those sentences require the 'future subjunctive' in Portuguese. So, if you listen to Orlando, Valdo, Michelle, and José Luís, you will also learn how to use the future subjunctive. Don't be intimidated, Spanish speaking friends, it's easier than you think!

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Não sei, tô me sentindo meio gorda ... se a gente for jantar hoje à noite eu só vou tomar água.
Valdo: Eu vou tomar refrigerante e o quanto eu puder, afinal com esse sistema de refil a gente pode beber o quanto quiser.
Michelle: Eh, mas quando nós chegarmos lá fique atento com os copos ...
Valdo: Fique tranqüila, os copos são diferentes. E se estivermos com muita fome, será que eles vão deixar a gente repetir sem pagar de novo?
Michelle: Claro que não! O refil é só pra bebida.
Valdo: Se Deus quiser a gente ainda vai adotar esse sistema no Brasil.

Spanish
Michelle: No sé, me siento un poco gorda ... si comemos esta noche solamente voy a tomar agua.
Valdo: Yo voy a tomar refrescos, y todo lo que pueda, a final con ese sistema de refill se puede beber cuanto desee.
Michelle: Está bien, pero al llegar cuidado con los vasos ...
Valdo: Tranquílate, los vasos son diferentes. Y si tenemos mucha hambre, ¿será que se permite que nosotros repitamos sin pagar otra vez?
Michelle: Claro que no! El refill es sólo para la bebida.
Valdo: Si Diós quiere, tal vez podamos adoptar ese sistema en el Brasil.

English
Michelle: I don't know, I'm feeling a little fat ... if we go out to eat tonight I'm only going to drink water.
Valdo: I'm going to drink sodas and as much as I want, after all, with this refill system we can drink as much as we want to.
Michelle: OK, but when we get there keep an eye on your cups ...
Valdo: Don't worry, the cups are different. And if we are really hungry, do you think that they'll let us have seconds on food without paying again?
Michelle: Of course not! The refills are only for the drinks.
Valdo: God willing, maybe we can adopt this system in Brazil.

May 25 2007

13mins

Play

Rank #15: Grammar Lesson 5: Disappearing Reflexive Verbs, Use of Coupons

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 5: Disappearing Reflexive Verbs, Use of Coupons
  • filename: tafalado_gra_05.mp3
  • track number: 31/46
  • time: 9:39
  • size: 6.79 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Here's a trick question for Spanish speakers: Would it be better in Portuguese to say the equivalent of 'Siéntate' or 'Siéntese'? Answer: Don't worry about the reflexive pronouns. Chances are that Brazilians won't use them either. In this lesson Valdo and Michelle help the rest of us to get a sense of the disappearing reflexive pronouns in Portuguese. Michelle also adds how cool she thinks the use of coupons is here in Texas as well.

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: Você deitou tarde ontem?
Michelle: Deitei bem tarde e levantei bem cedinho.
Valdo: Por que? Senta aqui e me conta.
Michelle: Eu lembrei que tinha um monte de cupons que vencia hoje... daí eu corri pra loja para usá-los.
Valdo: Eu acho legal esse sistema de cupons daqui. Sempre aproveito os descontos e ganho várias coisas de graça.
Michelle: Oh, desculpe, tenho que ir... esqueci que tenho mais dois cupons pra usar agora à tarde.

Spanish
Valdo: ¿Te acostaste tarde ayer?
Michelle: Me acosté muy tarde y me levanté muy temprano.
Valdo: ¿Por qué? Siéntate aquí y cuéntame.
Michelle: Me acordé que tenía un montón de cupones que se vencía hoy ... así corrí a las tiendas para usarlos.
Valdo: Me gusta este sistema de cupones de aquí. Siempre aprovecho los descuentos y gano varias cosas gratis.
Michelle: Oh, descúlpaame, tengo que irme ... se me olvidó que tengo dos cupones más que necesito usar esta tarde.

English
Valdo: Did you go to bed late yesterday?
Michelle: I went to bed really late and I got up really early.
Valdo: Why? Sit down hear and tell me about it.
Michelle: I remembered that I had a whole bunch of coupons that were expiring today ... so I ran to the store to use them up.
Valdo: I love this system of coupons that they have here. I always take advantage of the discounts and I get a lot of things for free.
Michelle: Oh, I'm sorry, I've got to go ... I forgot that I have a couple of coupons that need to be used this afternoon.

May 31 2007

9mins

Play

Rank #16: Grammar Lesson 13: Gender in Portuguese and Spanish, Buying Alcohol

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 13: Gender in Portuguese and Spanish, Buying Alcohol
  • filename: tafalado_gra_13.mp3
  • track number: 39/46
  • time: 11:33
  • size: 8.12 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
To be clear, we are referring to gender agreement. Get ready: although gender is 95% the same between Spanish and Portuguese, there are a few words that change. Is it o leite or a leite? O sal or a sal? O origem or a origem? Valdo and Michelle clarify things for us. Culturally, at what age can you buy alcohol in Brazil?

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: O leite, o mel e o sal que você pediu para eu comprar já estão aqui.
Michelle: E o vinho, a cerveja e a água, você não trouxe? E o computador, onde está?
Valdo: Eta, esqueci da água e do computador. Mas as bebidas alcoólicas não me deixaram trazer porque eu estava sem minha identidade.
Michelle: Mas como assim? Qual a origem disso?
Valdo: Pois é, eles fizeram uma análise equivocada do meu rosto. Acharam que eu tinha menos de 21 anos.
Michelle: Mas isso é um bom sinal, Valdo. Acharam que você era de menor! Mas você sabe que independente da idade você sempre tem que mostrar a identidade para comprar álcool aqui.

Spanish
Valdo: La leche, la miel, y la sal que pidió que comprara ya están aquí.
Michelle: Y el vino, la cerveza y el agua, ¿no los trajiste? Y la computadora, ¿dónde está?
Valdo: Ay, se me olvidó el agua y la computadora. Pero no permitieron que comprara las bebidas alcohólicas porque no llevaba mi identificación.
Michelle: ¿Pero como así? ¿Cuál es el origen de eso?
Valdo: Pues, se equivocaron en el análisis de mi rostro. Pensaron que tenía menos de 21 años.
Michelle: Pero eso es una buena señal Valdo. Pensaron que eras más joven! Y tú sabes que no importa la edade que tengas, hay que siempre mostrar la identificación para comprar alcohol aquí.

English
Valdo: The milk, the honey, and the salt that you asked me to buy are already here.
Michelle: And the wine, beer, and water, didn't you bring them? And the computer, where is it?
Valdo: Shoot, I forgot the water and the computer. But they didn't let me buy the alcohol because I didn't have my ID.
Michelle: What do you mean? What's going on here?
Valdo: Right, well they missed analyzed things based on my face. They thought I was less than 21 years old.
Michelle: But that's a good sign Valdo. They thought you were younger! But you know that it doesn't matter how old you are, you always have to show ID to by alcohol here.

Aug 03 2007

11mins

Play

Rank #17: Lesson 22: Epenthetic Vowels (wow, fancy word!), Fast Food

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Lesson 22: Epenthetic Vowels (wow, fancy word!), Fast Food
  • filename: tafalado_22.mp3
  • track number: 23/46
  • time: 11:50
  • size: 8.32 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Epenthe ... what? Epenthetic vowels. We know, it sounds like a tropical disease, but it's really the linguistic feature that produces such great Brazilian words as 'piquenique' for picnic. Valdo isn't sure he can bring himself to say 'hoti doggie' for 'hot dog,' but he has no problem with 'fasti foodi.'

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: Você já observou como a comida daqui é diferente da nossa?
Michelle: É óbvio que sim! E o mais absurdo é que a gente não tem opção: é fast food todo dia!
Valdo: Você está absolutamente certa! No Brasil, nós nunca substituiríamos um prato de arroz e feijão por um pedaço de pizza ou por um hot dog.
Michelle: É verdade. Nossa comida é digna dos deuses!
Valdo: Ainda bem que nós não somos adeptos a esse sistema, né?
Michelle: Pois é ... apesar do nosso ritmo de vida ser igual, sempre optamos por ter pelo menos uma refeição de verdade.

Spanish
Valdo: ¿Ha observado usted como la comida de aquí es diferente que la nuestra?
Michelle: Sí, es obvio. Y lo más absurdo es que no hay otra opción: es fast food todos los días
Valdo: Absolutamente, usted tiene toda la razón. En Brasil, nunca substituiríamos un plato de arroz y frijoles por una pizza o por una hot dog.
Michelle: Es verdad. Nuestra comida es digna de los dióses.
Valdo: Felizmente no somos adeptos a ese sistema, ¿verdad?
Michelle: Pues sí ... puede ser que nuestra ritmo de vida sea igual, pero siempre hay opciones para comer una comida de verdad.

English
Valdo: Have you ever observed how food here is different from ours?
Michelle: It's obvious yes. And the most absurd thing is that we have no options here: fast food every day!
Valdo: You are absolutely correct. In Brazil we would never substitute a plate of rice and beans for a slice of pizza or for a hot dog.
Michelle: That is true. Our food is worthy of the gods!
Valdo: It's a good thing that we aren't very adept at their system, you know?
Michelle: You're right ... even if our rhythm of life is just like theirs, we'll always take time to at least have a real meal.

Mar 19 2007

11mins

Play

Rank #18: Lesson 21: Pronunciation of Syllable-final 'l', Making Prints of Digital Photos

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Lesson 21: Pronunciation of Syllable-final 'l', Making Prints of Digital Photos
  • filename: tafalado_21.mp3
  • track number: 22/46
  • time: 13:20
  • size: 9.38 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
If you would like to say the name of their country correctly, Michelle and Valdo are here to show us how to say 'Brasil,' which really comes out more like 'Braziw.' That is the trick in lesson 21. They also share their experience at self-service digital photo machines.

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: No Brasil a gente sempre tem alguém que revela as nossas fotos. E aqui, qual é o procedimento ideal?
Michelle: Aqui não falta lugar que tenha essas máquinas de alta tecnologia para imprimir fotos multicoloridas.
Valdo: A última vez que revelei as minhas a cor azul ficou muito saltada. Não gostei do resultado final.
Michelle: Eh, aqui quem revela as fotos somos nós mesmos. É só salvar num CD ou levar o cartão de memória da máquina, selecionar no painel as fotos que você quer e imprimir no papel.
Valdo: Nada mal, hein? Culturas diferentes, né? Mas é fácil usar essas máquinas? É igual a um caixa eletrônico?
Michelle: É super fácil. Você pode revelar mais de mil fotos e o custo não é alto.

Spanish
Valdo: En Brasil siempre hay alguien que revela las fotos. Y aquí, ¿cuál es el procedimiento ideal?
Michelle: Aquí no faltan lugares donde hay esas máquinas de alta tecnología para imprimir fotos de colores.
Valdo: La última vez que revelé la mías el color azul quedó muy fuerte. No me gustó el resultado final.
Michelle: Sí, aquí revelamos las fotos nosotros mismos. Es solo grabar en un CD o llevar la memoria de la cámara, seleccionar en la pantalla las fotos que desea y luego imprimir en el papel.
Valdo: Está bien, ¿verdad? Culturas diferentes, ¿no? ¿Es fácil usar esas máquinas? ¿Es igual a un cajero automático?
Michelle: Es súper fácil. Se puede revelar más de mil fotos y el costo no es alto.

English
Valdo: In Brazil there is always someone who will develop our pictures. And here, what's the best procedure?
Michelle: Here there is no lack of these high tech machines where you can get colored prints.
Valdo: Last time I developed (my pictures) the blue color came out too strong. I didn't like how they looked.
Michelle: Here you can develop your own pictures. You just have to save them to a CD or take the memory card, select the prints you want on the screen and print them out on paper.
Valdo: Not bad, right? Different cultures I guess. But is it easy to use these machines? Is it like an ATM machine?
Michelle: It's really easy. You could print out a thousand pictures and it doesn't cost a lot.

Mar 13 2007

13mins

Play

Rank #19: Grammar Lesson 3: Plurals with 'l', Gas Stations

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 3: Plurals with 'l', Gas Stations
  • filename: tafalado_gra_03.mp3
  • track number: 29/46
  • time: 13:15
  • size: 9.31 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
The plural of Brazil, if there were two of them, would be 'Brasis.' Now that would be a strange word! Spanish speakers aren't sure how to make those words that end in 'l' plural. Orlando, Valdo, Michelle, and José Luís try to tell us that it is as easy as drop the 'l' and add 'is,' but we're sure there is more to it than that. While they are talking about plurals, Valdo and Michelle also tell us about their experience in getting used to self serve gas stations in the U.S. too!

Dialog

Portuguese
Valdo: Aquele homem está fazendo sinal pra gente baixar o farol do carro?
Michelle: Não! Vamos deixar os faróis acesos ... E onde está o frentista pra colocar o combustível no nosso automóvel?
Valdo: Aqui não é tão fácil como no Brasil. Os automóveis são abastecidos pelo próprio motorista.
Michelle: Como assim? Por que as coisas são tão difíceis aqui?
Valdo: Ah, não é tão difícil assim! Pagar com o cartão e colocar a mangueira no carro são coisas bem fáceis de fazer ... você consegue!
Michelle: É, mas você tem que concordar que não há sinais claros indicando nada disso.

Spanish
Valdo: ¿Aquel hombre nos está indicando que bajemos las luces del carro?
Michelle: No! Vamos a dejar las luces ascendidas ... ¿Y dónde está el mozo para poner el combustible en el carro?
Valdo: Aquí no es tan fácil como en el Brasil. Los carros son abastecidos por el propio motorista.
Michelle: ¿Cómo así? ¿Por qué las cosas son tan difíciles aquí?
Valdo: Ah, no es tan difícil así. Pagar con la tarjeta y poner la manguera en el carro son cosas bien fáciles de hacer ... tú lo consigues.
Michelle: Sí, pero tendrás que estar de acuerdo que no hay ninguna seña clara que indique nada de eso.

English
Valdo: That man is signaling that we should turn down the headlights?
Michelle: No! Let's leave the lights on ... And where is the attendant to put gas in our car?
Valdo: It's not as easy here as it is in Brazil. The cars are filled up by the drivers themselves.
Michelle: What do you mean? Why are things so difficult here?
Valdo: It's not so difficult. Paying with the credit card and putting the hose in your car are easy things to do ... you can do it!
Michelle: Yea, but you have to agree that there are no clear signs indicating any of this.

May 21 2007

13mins

Play

Rank #20: Grammar Lesson 2: Contractions, Getting Change From A Machine

Podcast cover
Read more
  • asset title: Grammar Lesson 2: Contractions, Getting Change From A Machine
  • filename: tafalado_gra_02.mp3
  • track number: 28/46
  • time: 12:20
  • size: 8.67 MB
  • bitrate: 96 kbps
Can you believe how many contractions Portuguese has? : nesse, num, do, naquele, aos, pelo, etc. The list goes on and on. When speakers of Spanish catch on to these contractions, sentences become instantly easier to understand. And that, of course, is what Orlando, Michelle, Valdo, and Jose Luís hope to do with today's lesson on contractions. At the same time, culturally, Valdo and Michelle found it hard to find their change that automatically fell out of a machine at the supermarket. Sure enough, that would be a new experience for visitors from Brazil.

Dialog

Portuguese
Michelle: Ficar na fila é duro, né?
Valdo: Que tal se a gente passar pelo meio e chegar naquele outro caixa?
Michelle: Do lado de lá? Tá bom.
Valdo: Viu, às vezes me confundo com o troco nesses supermercados. Por que eles nunca colocam as moedas nas nossas mãos?
Michelle: Porque as moedas caem das maquininhas que ficam ao lado do caixa.
Valdo: Ah, tá ... é que nos supermercados brasileiros a gente recebe todo o troco dos próprios caixas.

Spanish
Michelle: Esperar en la fila es duro, ¿verdad?
Valdo: ¿Qué tal si pasamos por el centro y esperamos en aquel otro cajero?
Michelle: ¿Del otro lado? Está bien.
Valdo: Sabe, a veces me confundo con el cambio en esos supermercados. ¿Por qué ellos nunca dejan las monedas en nuestra mano?
Michelle: Porque las monedas caen de las maquinitas que están al lado de la caja.
Valdo: Ah, entiendo ... es que en los supermercados brasileños uno recibe todo el cambio de los propios cajeros.

English
Michelle: Wating in line is tough, isn't it?
Valdo: How about if we go towards the middle and wait at the other cashier?
Michelle: That other side over there? OK.
Valdo: You know, some times I get confused with the change in these supermarkets. Why don't they ever put the change in your hands?
Michelle: Because the coins come out of the little machines that are next to the cashier.
Valdo: Ah, I get it, it's just that in the Brazilian supermarkets you get your change directly from the cashiers.

May 12 2007

12mins

Play