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Chapter Audio Books on PodOmatic

Updated 7 days ago

Arts
Books
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Hosted on PodOmatic, free public domain audio books, presented in Chapters format. Material sourced from audioowl.com. The chapters format is suitable for iTunes, iPods and iPhones only.

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Hosted on PodOmatic, free public domain audio books, presented in Chapters format. Material sourced from audioowl.com. The chapters format is suitable for iTunes, iPods and iPhones only.

iTunes Ratings

42 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
8
6
2
5

I can’t listen to it :(

By superstarproxi - Dec 30 2019
Read more
Don’t know what to say...

Love it

By Gigizac - Dec 17 2010
Read more
Just wish they had more available to listen to.

iTunes Ratings

42 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
8
6
2
5

I can’t listen to it :(

By superstarproxi - Dec 30 2019
Read more
Don’t know what to say...

Love it

By Gigizac - Dec 17 2010
Read more
Just wish they had more available to listen to.
Cover image of Chapter Audio Books on PodOmatic

Chapter Audio Books on PodOmatic

Latest release on Mar 02, 2010

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Hosted on PodOmatic, free public domain audio books, presented in Chapters format. Material sourced from audioowl.com. The chapters format is suitable for iTunes, iPods and iPhones only.

Rank #1: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

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By: Lewis Carroll (1832-1898) Note the chapter markers are not aligned properly due to irregularities among audio encodings. http://www.audioowl.com/book/alices-adventures-in-wonderland-by-lewis-carroll

Jan 25 2010

2hr 52mins

Play

Rank #2: Nellie Bly: Ten Days in a Madhouse

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By: Nellie Bly (1864-1922) In 1887 Nellie Bly, one of the first female newspaper writers, and a young reporter who would soon go on to make a career for herself as an investigative journalist and “stunt” reporter, had herself committed to the Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum in New York. Her purpose was to discover what life was like for those who had been deemed insane. She was surprised to discover the depth of mistreatement of the patients. Partially as a result of her reporting, more money was allocated to the asylum and reforms were put into place. http://www.audioowl.com/book/ten-days-in-a-madhouse-by-nellie-bly

Jan 26 2010

2hr 41mins

Play

Rank #3: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

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By: Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is a memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and ex-slave, Frederick Douglass. It is generally held to be the most famous of a number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period. In factual detail, the text describes the events of his life and is considered to be one of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th Century in the United States. http://www.audioowl.com/book/narrative-of-the-life-of-frederick-douglass-by-frederick-douglass

Jan 25 2010

4hr 3mins

Play

Rank #4: Two Poe Tales

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By: Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allan Poe is best known for his famous short horror stories; however, horror is not the only genre in which he wrote. How To Write a Blackwood Article and its companion piece A Predicament are satirical works exploring the pieces of the formula generally seen in short horror stories (”articles”) found in the Scottish periodical “Blackwood’s Magazine” and the successful misapplication of said formula by – horrors! – a woman author! – respectively. http://www.audioowl.com/book/two-poe-tales

Jan 25 2010

58mins

Play

Rank #5: John Locke: Two Treatises of Civil Government

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By: John Locke (1632-1704) The Two Treatises of Civil Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke. The First Treatise is an extended attack on Sir Robert Filmer’s Patriarcha, which argued for a divinely-ordained, hereditary, absolute monarchy. The more influential Second Treatise outlines a theory of civil society based on natural rights and contract theory. Locke begins by describing the “state of nature,” and goes on to explain the hypothetical rise of property and civilization, asserting that the only legitimate governments are those which have the consent of the people. Locke’s ideas heavily influenced both the American and French Revolutions. His notions of people’s rights and the role of civil government provided strong support for the intellectual movements of both revolutions. (Summary adapted from Wikipedia) http://www.audioowl.com/book/two-treatises-of-civil-government-by-john-locke

Feb 11 2010

11hr 4mins

Play

Rank #6: Shakespeare: King Lear

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By: William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

King Lear is widely held as the greatest of Shakespeare’s tragedies; to some, it is the greatest play ever written. King Lear abdicates the British throne, to divide his kingdom among his three daughters in proportion to their professed love of him. His plan misfires when Cordelia, his youngest and favourite daughter, refuses to flatter her father; she is disinherited and banished.

This LibriVox recording marks the 400th anniversary of the first performance of the play, on December 26th 1606.

LibriVox trivia….. This entire project was completed in just a week, from conception to delivery… A LibriVox record for a major dramatic work!

(Summary by David Barnes)

http://www.audioowl.com/book/king-lear-by-william-shakespeare

Feb 04 2010

3hr 23mins

Play

Rank #7: United States Historical Documents

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The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) http://www.audioowl.com/book/us-historical-documents

Feb 04 2010

1hr 22mins

Play

Rank #8: Shakespeare’s Sonnets

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By: William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Shakespeare’s Sonnets, or simply The Sonnets, comprise a collection of 154 poems in sonnet form written by William Shakespeare that deal with such themes as love, beauty, politics, and mortality. The poems were probably written over a period of several years http://www.audioowl.com/book/shakespeares-sonnets

Jan 25 2010

2hr 20mins

Play

Rank #9: Thoreau: Civil Disobedience

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By: Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Civil Disobedience is an essay by Henry David Thoreau. Published in 1849 under the title Resistance to Civil Government, it expressed Thoreau’s belief that people should not allow governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that people have a duty both to avoid doing injustice directly and to avoid allowing their acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican-American War. (Summary from Wikipedia). http://www.audioowl.com/book/on-the-duty-of-civil-disobedience-by-henry-david-thoreau

Jan 25 2010

1hr 21mins

Play

Rank #10: Patrick Henry: Give Me Liberty

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By: Patrick Henry (1736-1799) This speech was given March 23, 1775, at St. John’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, and is credited with having singlehandedly convinced the Virginia House of Burgesses to pass a resolution delivering the Virginia troops to the Revolutionary War. In attendance were Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. Reportedly, the crowd, upon hearing the speech, jumped up and shouted, “To Arms! To Arms!”

Jan 27 2010

9mins

Play

Henri Poincaré: Science and Hypothesis

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By: Henri Poincaré Jules Henri Poincaré (1854–1912) was one of France’s greatest mathematicians and theoretical physicists, and a philosopher of science. As a mathematician and physicist, he made many original fundamental contributions to pure and applied mathematics, mathematical physics, and celestial mechanics. He was responsible for formulating the Poincaré conjecture, one of the most famous problems in mathematics. In his research on the three-body problem, Poincaré became the first person to discover a chaotic deterministic system which laid the foundations of modern chaos theory. He is considered to be one of the founders of the field of topology. Poincaré introduced the modern principle of relativity and was the first to present the Lorentz transformations in their modern symmetrical form. He discovered the remaining relativistic velocity transformations and recorded them in a letter to Lorentz in 1905. Thus he obtained perfect invariance of all of Maxwell’s equations, the final step in the formulation of the theory of special relativity. (Summary from Wikipedia) http://www.audioowl.com/book/science-and-hypothesis-by-henri-poincare

Mar 02 2010

7hr 2mins

Play

Lysander Spooner: Vices are not Crimes

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By: Lysander Spooner (1808-1887) Lysander Spooner was an American individualist anarchist, entrepreneur, political philosopher, abolitionist, supporter of the labour movement, and legal theorist of the nineteenth century. Here he gives his views on the role of Governments in the private lives of their citizens (Summary by Annise) http://www.audioowl.com/book/vices-are-not-crimes-by-lysander-spooner

Feb 12 2010

1hr 16mins

Play

Shakespeare: Richard II

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By: William Shakespeare (1564-1616) The Tragedy of King Richard II, by William Shakespeare, is the first of the history series that continues with Parts 1 and 2 of King Henry IV and with The Life of King Henry V. At the beginning of the play, Richard II banishes his cousin Henry Bolingbroke from England. Bolingbroke later returns with an army and the support of some of the nobility, and he deposes Richard. Richard is separated from his beloved Queen, imprisoned, and later murdered. By the end of the play, Bolingbroke has been crowned King Henry IV. Audio edited by J. M. Smallheer and John Gonzalez. (Summary by Laurie Anne Walden) Characters: Narration, Keeper, and Lord – read by Annie Coleman King Richard II and First Servant – read by Peter Yearsley Northumberland and Gaunt – read by Chip Bolingbroke – read by Kayvan Sylvan Aumerle – read by John Gonzalez Henry Percy – read by Michael Sirois York – read by Martin Clifton Mowbray – read by Mark F. Smith Surrey and Willoughby – read by Nikolle Doolin Salisbury – read by David Barnes Bushy and Carlisle – read by Cecelia Prior Bagot, Abbot, Scroop, and Exton – read by Linton Green – read by deadwhitemales Queen Isabel – read by Joy Chan Duchess of York – read by Kristen McQuillin Berkeley – read by Rainer Ross – read by Mr. Baby Man Fitzwater and Groom – read by Sean McKinley Marshal – read by Lenny Glionna Jr. Captain and First Herald – read by Hugh Mac Duchess of Gloucester – read by Gesine Lady – read by Maureen S. O’Brien Gardener, Second Herald, and Second Servant – read by Kara Shallenberg http://www.audioowl.com/book/the-tragedy-of-king-richard-ii-by-william-shakespeare

Feb 12 2010

3hr 2mins

Play

Sholem Aleichem: Jewish Children (Yudishe Kinder)

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By: Sholem Aleichem (1859-1916) Although written from a child’s perspective, this is not a kids book but a series of funny, poignant, and sometimes disturbing stories about life in a late 19th-century Russian-Jewish village — the world of my grandparents. Sholem Rabinovich (1859-1916) was born in Pereiaslav, Ukraine and later immigrated to New York. His short stories about Tevye and his daughters were freely adapted into the musical FIDDLER ON THE ROOF. Rabinovich’s will contained the following injunction: “Let my name be recalled with laughter or not at all.” His translator, Hannah Berman, was Irish of Lithuanian descent. Some of these stories may be too intense for younger children. (summary by Adrian Praetzellis) http://www.audioowl.com/book/jewish-children-by-sholem-aleichem

Feb 12 2010

33mins

Play

Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet

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By: William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

Romeo and Juliet is an early tragedy by William Shakespeare about two teenage “star-cross’d lovers” whose “untimely deaths” ultimately unite their feuding households. The play has been highly praised by literary critics for its language and dramatic effect. It was among Shakespeare’s most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Its influence is still seen today, with the two main characters being widely represented as archetypal young lovers.
(Summary from Wikipedia)

http://www.audioowl.com/book/romeo-and-juliet-version-3-by-william-shakespeare-0901

Feb 12 2010

3hr 2mins

Play

John Locke: Two Treatises of Civil Government

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By: John Locke (1632-1704) The Two Treatises of Civil Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke. The First Treatise is an extended attack on Sir Robert Filmer’s Patriarcha, which argued for a divinely-ordained, hereditary, absolute monarchy. The more influential Second Treatise outlines a theory of civil society based on natural rights and contract theory. Locke begins by describing the “state of nature,” and goes on to explain the hypothetical rise of property and civilization, asserting that the only legitimate governments are those which have the consent of the people. Locke’s ideas heavily influenced both the American and French Revolutions. His notions of people’s rights and the role of civil government provided strong support for the intellectual movements of both revolutions. (Summary adapted from Wikipedia) http://www.audioowl.com/book/two-treatises-of-civil-government-by-john-locke

Feb 11 2010

11hr 4mins

Play

John Stuart Mill: On Liberty

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By: John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) Published in 1859, On Liberty details Mill’s view that individuals should be left wholly free to engage in any activity, thought or belief that does not harm others. Simple though it sounds, it is a position that challenges our ideas on the very nature of government and society, and sheds light on some of the key issues we face today. A key text of political philosophy, On Liberty has been continuously in print since its first publication. (Summary by David Barnes). http://www.audioowl.com/book/on-liberty-by-john-stuart-mill

Feb 04 2010

6hr 26mins

Play

United States Historical Documents

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Read more
The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) http://www.audioowl.com/book/us-historical-documents

Feb 04 2010

1hr 22mins

Play

Shakespeare: King Lear

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By: William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

King Lear is widely held as the greatest of Shakespeare’s tragedies; to some, it is the greatest play ever written. King Lear abdicates the British throne, to divide his kingdom among his three daughters in proportion to their professed love of him. His plan misfires when Cordelia, his youngest and favourite daughter, refuses to flatter her father; she is disinherited and banished.

This LibriVox recording marks the 400th anniversary of the first performance of the play, on December 26th 1606.

LibriVox trivia….. This entire project was completed in just a week, from conception to delivery… A LibriVox record for a major dramatic work!

(Summary by David Barnes)

http://www.audioowl.com/book/king-lear-by-william-shakespeare

Feb 04 2010

3hr 23mins

Play

Patrick Henry: Give Me Liberty

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By: Patrick Henry (1736-1799) This speech was given March 23, 1775, at St. John’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, and is credited with having singlehandedly convinced the Virginia House of Burgesses to pass a resolution delivering the Virginia troops to the Revolutionary War. In attendance were Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. Reportedly, the crowd, upon hearing the speech, jumped up and shouted, “To Arms! To Arms!”

Jan 27 2010

9mins

Play

George Washington: Presidential Farewell Address

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George Washington's Farewell Address was written to "The People of the United States" near the end of his second term as President of the United States and before his retirement to Mount Vernon. Originally published in David Claypoole's American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796 under the title "The Address of General Washington To The People of The United States on his declining of the Presidency of the United States," the letter was almost immediately reprinted in newspapers across the country and later in a pamphlet form. The "Friends and Fellow-Citizens" The work was later named a "Farewell Address," as it was Washington's valedictory after 45 years of service to the new republic, first during the Revolution as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and later as the nation's first president. The letter was originally prepared in 1792 with the help of James Madison, as Washington prepared to retire following a single term in office. However, he set aside the letter and ran for a second term after his Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, and his Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson, convinced him that the growing divisions between the newly formed Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties, along with the current state of foreign affairs, would tear the country apart in the absence of his leadership. Four years later, as his second term came to a close, Washington revisited the letter and with the help of Hamilton prepared a revision of the original draft to announce his intention to decline a third term in office; to reflect the emerging issues of the American political landscape in 1796; and to parting advice to his fellow Americans, express his support for the government eight years following the adoption of the Constitution; and to defend his administration's record. The letter was written by Washington after years of exhaustion due to his advanced age, years of service to his country, the duties of the presidency, and increased attacks by his political opponents. It was published almost two months before the Electoral College cast their votes in the 1796 presidential election. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington's_Farewell_Address http://librivox.org/short-nonfiction-collection-vol-007/

Jan 27 2010

38mins

Play

Magna Carta

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The original document is in Latin so this can only be a fairly rough approximation of the actual content. The text used is the first version in the Gutenberg collection. – Magna Carta is the most significant early influence on the long historical process that has led to the rule of constitutional law today. Magna Carta was originally created because of disagreements between the Pope, King John and his English barons over the rights of the King. Magna Carta required the king to renounce certain rights and respect certain legal procedures and to accept that the will of the king could be bound by law. http://www.audioowl.com/book/magna-carta

Jan 26 2010

28mins

Play

Nellie Bly: Ten Days in a Madhouse

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By: Nellie Bly (1864-1922) In 1887 Nellie Bly, one of the first female newspaper writers, and a young reporter who would soon go on to make a career for herself as an investigative journalist and “stunt” reporter, had herself committed to the Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum in New York. Her purpose was to discover what life was like for those who had been deemed insane. She was surprised to discover the depth of mistreatement of the patients. Partially as a result of her reporting, more money was allocated to the asylum and reforms were put into place. http://www.audioowl.com/book/ten-days-in-a-madhouse-by-nellie-bly

Jan 26 2010

2hr 41mins

Play

Shakespeare’s Sonnets

Podcast cover
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By: William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Shakespeare’s Sonnets, or simply The Sonnets, comprise a collection of 154 poems in sonnet form written by William Shakespeare that deal with such themes as love, beauty, politics, and mortality. The poems were probably written over a period of several years http://www.audioowl.com/book/shakespeares-sonnets

Jan 25 2010

2hr 20mins

Play

Oscar Wilde: Aphorisms

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By: Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) In 1894, Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) published two short collections of aphorisms: “A Few Maxims For The Instruction Of The Over-Educated”, in the Saturday Review newspaper, and “Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young”, in the Oxford student magazine The Chameleon. By turns witty, intellectual, counter-intuitive and obtuse, the collections came to be seen by many as emblematic of Wilde’s style, and countless collections of Wildean aphorisms have since been published. (Summary by Carl Manchester) http://www.audioowl.com/book/aphorisms-by-oscar-wilde

Jan 25 2010

11mins

Play

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

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By: Lewis Carroll (1832-1898) Note the chapter markers are not aligned properly due to irregularities among audio encodings. http://www.audioowl.com/book/alices-adventures-in-wonderland-by-lewis-carroll

Jan 25 2010

2hr 52mins

Play

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

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By: Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is a memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and ex-slave, Frederick Douglass. It is generally held to be the most famous of a number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period. In factual detail, the text describes the events of his life and is considered to be one of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th Century in the United States. http://www.audioowl.com/book/narrative-of-the-life-of-frederick-douglass-by-frederick-douglass

Jan 25 2010

4hr 3mins

Play

Thoreau: Civil Disobedience

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By: Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Civil Disobedience is an essay by Henry David Thoreau. Published in 1849 under the title Resistance to Civil Government, it expressed Thoreau’s belief that people should not allow governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that people have a duty both to avoid doing injustice directly and to avoid allowing their acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican-American War. (Summary from Wikipedia). http://www.audioowl.com/book/on-the-duty-of-civil-disobedience-by-henry-david-thoreau

Jan 25 2010

1hr 21mins

Play

Two Poe Tales

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By: Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allan Poe is best known for his famous short horror stories; however, horror is not the only genre in which he wrote. How To Write a Blackwood Article and its companion piece A Predicament are satirical works exploring the pieces of the formula generally seen in short horror stories (”articles”) found in the Scottish periodical “Blackwood’s Magazine” and the successful misapplication of said formula by – horrors! – a woman author! – respectively. http://www.audioowl.com/book/two-poe-tales

Jan 25 2010

58mins

Play

Sun Tzu: The Art of War

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By: Sun Tzu (c. 554 BC.-496 BC) The Art of War is a Chinese military treatise written during the 6th century BC by Sun Tzu. Composed of 13 chapters, each of which is devoted to one aspect of warfare, it has long been praised as the definitive work on military strategies and tactics of its time. Translated by Lionel Giles. http://www.audioowl.com/book/the-art-of-war-by-sun-tzu-2

Jan 25 2010

1hr 12mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

42 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
8
6
2
5

I can’t listen to it :(

By superstarproxi - Dec 30 2019
Read more
Don’t know what to say...

Love it

By Gigizac - Dec 17 2010
Read more
Just wish they had more available to listen to.