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Building Tomorrow

Updated 6 days ago

Technology
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Politics
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Building Tomorrow explores the ways technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship are creating a freer, wealthier, and more peaceful world.

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Building Tomorrow explores the ways technology, innovation, and entrepreneurship are creating a freer, wealthier, and more peaceful world.

iTunes Ratings

17 Ratings
Average Ratings
16
0
0
0
1

Best so far

By RWWinn - Mar 21 2019
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I hope that we have more like Mr Cantrell. I think that this was the best episode so far . Thanks!👍

Awesome

By Bathe great - Oct 28 2018
Read more
Great info for a hopeful awesome future. 😎

iTunes Ratings

17 Ratings
Average Ratings
16
0
0
0
1

Best so far

By RWWinn - Mar 21 2019
Read more
I hope that we have more like Mr Cantrell. I think that this was the best episode so far . Thanks!👍

Awesome

By Bathe great - Oct 28 2018
Read more
Great info for a hopeful awesome future. 😎
Cover image of Building Tomorrow

Building Tomorrow

Latest release on Feb 20, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 6 days ago

Rank #1: A Libertarian Approach to the Green New Deal

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Join Paul, Joe Verruni, and Peter Van Doren as they discuss why the Green New Deal is neither particularly “green,” all that “new,” nor all that great of a “deal.” However, there is a libertarian response to the Green New Deal that doesn’t just consist of “bah humbug.” There are market-based solutions that can more effectively and sustainably address carbon emissions and other environmental pollution. To illustrate that point, the hosts discuss fascinating new applications of energy storage tech that attempt to solve the “duck curve” problem limiting the adoption of renewable energy sources like wind and solar.

Should we be concerned when both political parties agree? How should libertarians think about the Green New Deal? What is the goal of the Green New Deal? How can we change emitting behavior through mechanisms other than those proposed in the Green New Deal? Will the Green New Deal take away your car (or your cows) entirely?

Further Reading:

The Impossible Green Dream of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, written by Michael Grunwald

The New York Times is trying hard to clean up after AOC’s Green New Deal Mess, written by Becket Adams

The ‘Duck Curve’ Is Solar Energy’s Greatest Challenge

Related Content:

Did Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal Really Save America?, Free Thoughts Podcast

The End of Doom, Free Thoughts Podcast

Mar 07 2019

53mins

Play

Rank #2: Who Wants to Retire a Millionaire?

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Most Americans, including working class Americans, could retire millionaires…if we fixed Social Security. Instead, we are facing a financial crisis when Social Security runs out of money in the mid-2030s and are forced to decided between massive tax increases or major benefit cuts. There is a country that’s a peak into our possible future if we start making smarter choices. Australia enacted major reforms to their retirement system in the 1990s that are just starting to bear fruit. Their superannuation system, though flawed in some ways, shows just how much better a market-based system of individual accounts would be for retirees.

What is the Social Security Trust Fund? When is Social Security suppose to run out? When did we attempt to fix our Social Security problem? What is superannuation?

Further Reading:

Millennials and Super: The Case for Voluntary Superannuation, written by Simon Cowan

Social Security Is Running Dry, And There’s Only One Politically Viable Option To Save It, written by Patrick W. Watson

Fixing Social Security, Commentary from Michael Tanner

Related Content:

Social Security vs. Private Retirement, Antony Davies

Bringing Wealth to the Poor (with Michael Tanner), Free Thoughts Podcast

America’s Middle Class Gets More Welfare Than the Poor, written by Michael Tanner

Dec 12 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

Rank #3: We Googled It (with Hal Varian)

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Matthew Feeney and Peter Van Doren interview Hal Varian about his professional experience starting with his economics column at the New York Times. They also cover other topics like the Google search engine, autonomous vehicles, and working in the age of automation. Varian even suggests that problem with autonomous vehicles is not the vehicle, but the humans that interfere with them.

Is there a market for search engines? How do people use search engines? Is Google a monopoly? Which country has the shortest workweek in the developed world? Is our labor market tightening?

Further Reading:

Sometimes the Stock Does Better Than the Investor That Buys the Stock, written by Hal R. Varian

Googlenomics: A long-read Q&A with chief economist Hal Varian, written by James Pethokoukis

Google chief economist Hal Varian says a robot isn’t after your job, written by Olivera Perkins

Hal Varian on Taking the Academic Approach to Business (Ep. 69), Conversations with Tyler

Related Content:

Will Artificial Intelligence Take Your Job?, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Does More Technology Create Unemployment?, written by A.D. Sharplin and R. H. Mabry

The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence is Best Left to Researchers, written by Ryan Khurana

Oct 17 2019

24mins

Play

Rank #4: Talking Talk Radio (with Brian Rosenwald)

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How did Limbaugh change the radio business? How did the conservative opinion media come to be? Who were the left-wing talk radio hosts while Rush Limbaugh was gaining more and more listeners? Is NPR political advocacy media? What is media bias? Who is Howard Stern and what is “guy talk”? Why are liberal podcasts succeeding in the Trump era?

Conservative talk radio has become an assumed presence in American media and politics, but in this manifestation it is only about three decades old. Historian Brian Rosenwald joins the show to discuss his latest book, Talk Radio’s America: How an Industry Took Over a Political Party that Took Over the United States, which explores the rise of entertainers like Rush Limbaugh from the margins to having incredible influence in national politics. That surprising story has implications for other media, including the future of podcasting, which is allowing previously marginalized voices, from socialists to libertarians, to have greater voice, for good or for ill. 

Further Reading:

Talk Radio’s America: How an Industry Took Over a Political Party That Took Over the United States, written by Brian Rosenwald

Rush Limbaugh’s Problem: How The Internet Changed Talk Radio, written by Brian Rosenwald

Why All The Talk-Radio Stars Are Conservative, written by Abram Brown

Related Content:

Talking Across Political Divides (with Arnold Kling), Free Thoughts Podcast

Is Netflix Ruining Culture?, written by Pamela J. Hobart

The Fairness Doctrine Was Terrible for Broadcasting and It Would Be Terrible for the Internet, written by Paul Matzko

Oct 03 2019

37mins

Play

Rank #5: Ranked Choice Voting, A Better Way to Vote?

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Tired of voting for a political candidate you don’t particularly like who represents a major political party you don’t particularly like so that another candidate who you dislike a little bit more won’t win office? If so, then ranked choice voting might be the electoral reform for you.

Ranked choice voting is a system in which voters don’t just vote for a single candidate for each listed office on their ballot. Instead, they rank all of the candidates running for that seat, 1-2-3 and so on. Then, if no candidate wins a majority of the first place votes, the least successful candidate on the ballot is eliminated and those who preferred them as their 1st choice are then distributed based on their 2nd choice. And so on and so forth until one candidate passes 50%.

Paul and Matthew are joined by Peter Van Doren as they discuss the ramifications of Maine changing to ranked choice voting (RCV) for federal elections in 2018, compare it to other alternative voting methods in other countries, and try to predict the ways it could transform American politics by validating third parties.

What is the “first-past-the-post” voting style? Does the U.S. voting system have an alienation problem? What is the Hastert Rule? Are third parties largely shoved to the side during U.S. elections?

Further Reading:

Resources for Ranked-choice Voting, Provided by the State of Maine

Ranked-choice voting worked in Maine. Now we should use it in presidential races, written by Lawrence Lessig

Ranked-choice voting passes the test in Maine, Boston Globe

Related Content:

Micro-Targeting Voters with Big Data, Building Tomorrow Podcast

“Pay No Attention to the Man Who Won’t Stand Behind the Voting Curtain”, written by Jonathan Banks

Some Very Good Reasons Not to Vote, written by Aaron Ross Powell and Trevor Burrus

Jan 03 2019

57mins

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Rank #6: Health Care without Health Insurance

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What if there was a way your family doctor could provide you with better care for less money and do it without using health insurance at all? Dr. Ryan Neuhofel joins us to discuss what direct primary care is and how it might benefit you.

Doctors offices spend an inordinate amount of time and expense filing paperwork with health insurance companies. By not taking health insurance, direct primary care physicians, like our guest Dr. Ryan Neuhofel, can simultaneously increase the amount of time patients get with their doctors, create price transparency for medical services, improve the work-life balance for physicians themselves, and save money doing it. It’s a radical idea when the conversation about fixing healthcare involves getting more people on health insurance and spending more money in so doing, but it could transform how 80% of Americans access healthcare for 80% of their lives.

What is direct primary care? Is it a more efficient way to deliver care? What is “telemedicine”? Has primary care become a gate-keeper rather than an actual provider? In the future, could we have a system that is like “uber for doctors”?

Further Reading:

Direct Primary Care website

Dr. Ryan Neuhofel website

Wanna Unbreak Medicine? Dr. Ryan Neuhofel Shows Us How, Against Medical Advice Episode 025

Building an Alliance for the Future - Keynote: Dr. Ryan Neuhofel

Related Content:

Better Choice: Healthcare Solutions for America, Free Thoughts Episode

How to Fix Health Care, Free Thoughts Episode

Why Can’t You Email Your Doctor?, Free Thoughts Episode

Aug 30 2018

43mins

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Rank #7: How Smart are "Smart Contracts"?

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This week Kate Sills joins us to respond to several recent articles criticizing smart contracts. One of the issues we cover is the “Oracle problem,” which is how a self-enforcing digital contract can know whether terms have been met in the physical world. Also, we discusses how smart contracts cannot be mere transactional documents but also need to facilitate relationships, something that has led traditional contract law to purposefully include ambiguous or unenforceable clauses. Finally, we talk about Alex Tabbarok’s call for a dedicated arbitration system for smart contract disputes. Disclaimer: While squirrel mortality is referenced briefly during the episode, no members of the Sciuridae family were harmed in the making of this show.

Kate Sill’s case for smart contracts.

Jimmy Song on the Oracle problem.

Alex Tabbarok calls for a smart contract arbitration system.

(Deep Cut) Karen Levy reminds us that contracts are relational documents.

Listen to Kate Sills discuss smart contracts and the blockchain on Free Thoughts.

Jul 12 2018

40mins

Play

Rank #8: Artificial You (with Susan Schneider)

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People may not really know what artificial intelligence is but they are convinced that it will either utterly destroy humankind or lead us into a utopian Singularity between man and machine. But, as philosopher Susan Schneider reminds us, there’s much we don’t know about artificial intelligence, including the nature of consciousness itself. And consciousness, while it may be hard to identify, entails significant ethical obligations, a point that any fan of the HBO show Westworld will quickly grasp. These kinds of questions have been the object of philosophical debate for millennia and it’s a line of inquiry that we should understand before, and not after, we program the first conscious artificial intelligence.

What does it mean to design a mind? What is the ‘problem of other minds’? Why does the consciousness of AI matter? Can machines be conscious? Do you think Androids are conscious? Would we ever have anything like a Westworld with true violence? How much do you replace and you are still you?

Further Reading:

Artificial You: AI and the Future of Your Mind, written by Susan Schneider

‘Westworld’ Science Advisor Talks Brains and AI, written by Jeremy Hsu

Transcending the Brain? AI, Radical Brain Enhancement and the Nature of Consciousness, Susan Schneider at the Harvard Carr Center for Human Rights Policy

Spacetime Emergence, Panpsychism and the Nature of Consciousness, written by Susan Schneider

Related Content:

The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence is Best Left to Researchers, written by Ryan Khurana

Will Artificial Intelligence Take Your Job?, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Sep 19 2019

38mins

Play

Rank #9: Mission Impossible Burger

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If a bear eats a burger in the woods and doesn’t realize it’s not from a cow, does it care? Until bears evolve the ability to communicate, I suppose we’ll never know. It’s an impossible question, but not as impossible as the Impossible Burger it just ate.

The future of meatless meat is here! So we asked the closest thing we have to a bear in the woods at Building Tomorrow, our producer Landry Ayres, to taste test two burgers, one an Impossible Burger and the other a traditional burger. Check out the episode to find out whether Landry guessed between them correctly, then stay for our interview with an Impossible Foods representative about the environmental benefits of this burger that is made from soy protein yet still ‘bleeds’ when you bite into it.

How do you define meat? Does Impossible Burgers taste like regular burgers? What is the environmental impact of the Impossible Burger? What is the key ingredient to the Impossible Burger? Is it possible to make the Impossible Burger at the same price as a regular burger? What is the difference between lab grown meat and the Impossible Burger?

Further Reading:

Impossible Foods

Impossible Burger: Here’s what’s really in it, written by Laura Reiley

Can a Burger Help Solve Climate Change?, written by Tad Friend

Related Content:

The FDA Ruins Everything You Eat, Free Thoughts Podcast

Popping Techno-Utopian Bubbles, Building Tomorrow

When Is a Market Failure Not a Market Failure?, written by Jon Murphy

Nov 28 2019

33mins

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Rank #10: Can You Monetize Everything You Do?

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New technologies have made it possible for us to monetize more and more of our daily lives. First, we discuss the third party marketers who are using devices (eg cellphones, smart speakers) connected to smart tvs to compile data on consumers. While these companies are guilty of deceptive practices, there is the future potential for consumers to profit from that data themselves. Likewise, we cover a new internet browser called Brave, which allows users to sell their own browsing habits to advertisers and which could radically transform digital advertising. Finally, we talk about Ice Poseidon, who is not a lesser known of the Greek deities but a Twitch streamer who allows his followers to watch him go about his day and prank strangers. While a new wave of “always on” streamers often engage in juvenile behavior, they represent the way in which streaming has enabled ordinary people to make a living in ways previously impossible.

Further Readings/References:

Sapna Maheshwari’s NYT article on smart TV surveillance.

Stephen Shankland’s write-up of the Brave browser.

Ice Poseidon shows that it’s possible to simultaneously be repulsed by someone’s behavior and feel bad for them.

Prototype’s latest article, by Julia Slupska, “Election Hacking and the Global Politics of Attention.”

Jul 19 2018

51mins

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Rank #11: Place Your Political Bets

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We return to part two of our interview with John Aristotle Phillips, who is the founder of the political prediction market PredictIt. Instead of trading corporate stocks or pork bellies, PredictIt allows you to trade in political futures. Put your own money on the line when it comes to who will win an election or the next time a politician will say something stupid on social media. While it’s partly entertainment, prediction markets also serve an important social function since they have a more reliable track record for predicting events than even the best pundits and pollsters.

Finally, we talk with Phillips about his surprising personal biography. Long before his time in political consulting and prediction markets, he was known as the “A-Bomb Kid” for designing a nuclear weapon in his dorm room at Princeton University. How many people do you know who have been 1) the subject of a cover story in Rolling Stone (and not a rock star), 2) the focus of a Congressional hearing, and 3) a candidate for Congress themself all before their mid-20s?

What is the best way to predict the outcome of a Democratic or Republican primary campaign? What is PredictIt? How accurate is PredictIt? Why are markets accurate predictors of future events? How is their product better than what polling systems can predict? Should we betting on political events in the first place?

Further Reading:

PredictIt Website

Mushroom: The story of the A-bomb kid, written by John Aristotle Phillips

Related Content:

Micro-Targeting Voters with Big Data, Building Tomorrow Podcast

On Belonging to Governments or Markets, written by Trevor Burrus

What Influences Elections, Free Thoughts Podcast

Dec 06 2018

38mins

Play

Rank #12: The Chinese Surveillance State

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In a previous episode, we covered the transformation of China, which is adopting new tech like delivery drones and digital payment years in advance of the US. But being in the forefront of tech adoption has a darker side when it comes to modern surveillance techniques.

In this episode we parse what is hyperbole and what is reality when it comes to the Chinese surveillance state. That includes social credit systems which combine credit scores with social media behavior and personal payment history. Additionally, local governments are developing facial recognition software that can be used with the hundreds of millions of surveillance cameras littering the country to automatically identify wanted criminals or even to embarrass jaywalkers.

Finally, we discuss some of the groups being targeted for surveillance, including journalists and dissidents. But the worst excesses of the surveillance State have been focused on the Uighur people of western China, many of whom have been subjected to religious persecution or even rounded up and sent to concentration camps for re-education.

How much does the Chinese Government restrict the movement of their citizens? What is Sesame Credit? What is Alibaba? What facial recognition technology does China use? Do law-abiding people change their behavior in response to surveillance revelations?

Further Reading:

Meng Hongwei’s Arrest Shows China Values Economic Progress over Human Rights, written by Jimmy Lewis

Google really is trying to build a censored Chinese search engine, its CEO confirms, written by Brian Fung

Inside China’s Dystopian Dreams: A.I., Shame and Lots of Cameras, written by Paul Mozur

Related Content:

Is China Beating the U.S. at Innovation, Building Tomorrow Podcast

China: The Annihilation of Human Rights, written by David Hart

When Will We Get Fully Autonomous Cars?, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Oct 18 2018

46mins

Play

Rank #13: The Automation Revolution is Upon Us

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How will people respond to artificial intelligence taking their jobs? The rise of political radicalism on both Left and Right in the early twenty-first century is in part a reaction to rising income inequality and slower wage growth despite the increasing automation of jobs and gains in productive efficiency. We are in an ‘Engels pause,’ the lag between new technology that benefits whole economies and the moment those gains filter down to the families of displaced workers. Something similar happened during the industrial revolution during the 19th century, the moment that birthed Marxism. Paul interviews economic historian Carl Frey to discuss what we can learn about our present moment of technological innovation and the social reaction to it from the history of industrialization.

What is the technology trap? Why didn’t the industrial revolution happen earlier? Who are the beneficiaries of technological progress? Can algorithms be creative? What is the difference between originality and creativity?

Further Reading:

The Technology Trap: Capital, Labor, and the Power in the Age of Automation, written by Carl Benefikt Frey

Engel’s Pause: A Pessimist’s Guide to the British Industrial Revolution, written by Robert Allen and Robert C. Allen

Capital in the Twenty-First Century, written by Thomas Piketty

Related Content:

Industrial Revolution, written by Deirdre McCloskey

Will Artificial Intelligence Take Your Job?, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Will Algorithms Replace the Price System?, written by Adam Gurri

Jun 13 2019

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #14: Wearable Tech: Health Care of the Future

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Wearable tech includes everything from wearable thermometers to robotic exoskeletons. It’s a hot investment area for Silicon Valley venture capital funds. But most startups in the wearable industry are very careful to avoid claiming that they are producing “medical devices.” Yet the divide between these wearables and medical devices seems incredibly arbitrary. After all, how is a traditional thermometer that you place under your tongue a medical device, yet a patch that you place on your skin to monitor your PH levels not one?

As this episode explores, that arbitrary distinction is made to avoid regulatory scrutiny from the Food and Drug Administration, which is responsible for medical devices. That regulation has perversely encouraged stagnation in the medical device industry, especially when compared to the bewildering array of new products and innovations coming out of the unregulated wearable industry.

Where is wearable tech heading? What counts as essential and non-essential medical care? Why are health tracking wearables claiming to not be medical devices? How does the FDA regulate medical devices? How can you circumvent having to do a full review of a new medical device? How do FDA processes stifle innovation?

Further Reading:

L’oréal’s New Clip-On Sensor Tracks Your Exposure to UV Rays, by Wired

UVM Study: Wearable Sensor Could Detect Hidden Anxiety, Depression In Young Children, written by Brian Owens

Behind the Boom in Breast Pump Innovation, written by Heather R. Johnson

The Top 10 Mental Health Apps, written by Hannah Nichols

Related Content:

We Got Your Black Friday Shopping List, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Emerging Tech, Free Thoughts Podcast

Health Care without Health Insurance, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Jan 31 2019

46mins

Play

Rank #15: Idaho's Blockchain Won't Be Small Potatoes

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Phil Haunschild joins us this week to discuss how blockchain technology could potentially eliminate the governments’ presence in welfare and charity.

Among the uninitiated, ‘blockchain’ is often treated as a synonym for ‘cryptocurrency.’ But blockchain technology has many other potential applications, including ways of improving the efficiency and transparency of good governance. For example, Phil Haunschild from the Idaho Freedom Foundation explains how a state-level blockchain could replace the expensive requirement to post public notices in newspapers, potentially saving millions of dollars in just one state. Phil then outlines his even grander plan to replace food stamps and other welfare programs with privately-run, blockchain-enabled charities.

How is blockchain a better tool than a state-run database? How do smart contracts work in tandem with blockchain technology? Could blockchain be used in order to eliminate the presence of government in welfare and charity?

Further Reading

A path to eliminate government subsidies for the media, writted by Phil Haunschild

Idaho Freedom Foundation project proposal about how blockchain could allow people to be in control of the welfare system rather than the government. 

Blockchain Could Upend Welfare Programs, written by Phil Haunschild & Janae Wilkerson for the National Review

Related Content

Smart Contracts Aren’t Trustless, Nor Should They Be, written by Kate Sills

What’s in Your (Crypto) Wallet?, Building Tomorrow Episode

Your World on the Blockchain, Free Thoughts Episode

Aug 09 2018

46mins

Play

Rank #16: Why is Rent so Damn High?

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If you’ve ever lived in a city like NYC or San Francisco you’re all too familiar with the incredible cost of housing. A studio apartment might cost as much to rent as a single family home out in the suburbs or a smaller town. While some of that additional cost is just the price we pay for living in desirable locations with abundant job opportunities, a surprising amount of that cost is entirely unnecessary. Bad regulatory policies are the cornerstone of the crisis of affordable housing in America today. Zoning boards keep housing density low, meaning shortages of housing supply in the face of rising demand, a classic recipe for skyrocketing prices. Salim Furth from the Mercatus Center joins Paul Matzko to discuss the causes, consequences, and possible fixes for the housing affordability crisis.

What can we fix so that housing prices become lower? What does it take to build a home in the U.S.? What power does the local government have in the housing market? How are zoning regulations affecting cities? What is the YIMBY movement? What is a thick labor market and how does it support housing? How should you engage with local politics?

Further Reading:

The Two-Board Knot: Zoning, Schools, and Inequality, written by Salim Furth

The Link Between Local Zoning Policy and Housing Affordability in America’s Cities, written by Kevin Erdmann, Salim Furth, and Emily Hamilton

Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities, written by Alain Bertaud

Related Content:

How Government Housing Policy Distorts the American Dream, Free Thoughts Podcast

Is Amazon HQ2 Worth It?, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Apr 18 2019

51mins

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Rank #17: Canning Spam: Getting Rid of Robocalls

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More than 48 billion robocalls bombard American phones each year, taking the ‘phone’ out of ‘smartphone’ for many consumers. Yet while the problem has drastically worsened over the past several years, there may be hope on the horizon. Private, third party companies are giving consumers ways to divert or even combat robocalls. And the FCC has finally cleared up the regulatory confusion that contributed to phone carrier reluctance to directly address the problem themselves. We can hope that in ten years, the robocall scourge will seem as quaint as worries about spam email do today, despite being just as seemingly intractable an issue in the 1990s.

What is spoofing? What is audio fingerprinting? Why don’t cell phone carriers prevent robocalls? How serious is the problem of spam calls? How has email spam become more manageable? How did email change the world?

Further Reading:

Why Robocalls Are Even Worse Than You Thought, written by Tim Harper

Robocalls are overwhelming hospitals and patients, threatening a new kind of health crisis, written by Tony Romm

RoboKiller App

How to Stop Robocalls— Or At Least Slow Them Down, written by Lily Hay Newman

Related Content:

Practical Problems with Regulating Tech in the Public Interest, written by Will Rinehart

The Social Consequences of Multilevel Marketing, written by Pamela J. Hobart

Has Your Phone Hacked Your Brain, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Jun 20 2019

30mins

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Rank #18: What Made the Internet Possible?

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As the threat of government regulation of the internet mounts from both the political Left and Right, Paul and Matthew sit down to talk about the foundational law that made the internet as we know it possible. Ironically, Section 230 was one of the few bits of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 that wasn’t struck down by the courts as a violation of the First Amendment, giving the internet more legal protection than it would have if the moral scolds of the 1990s hadn’t passed the law in the first place. Then, Paul talks with Jennifer Huddleston from the Mercatus Center about her research into the common law origins of Section 230, which rebuts claims that the amendment was some kind of unprecedented “gift” to tech companies.

What was the primary purpose of the Communications Decency Act? What are the ramifications of Section 230? Without Section 230, what would the internet look like? Why is censorship important to the conservative movement?

Further Reading:

What Senator Hawley Gets Wrong about American Identity, written by Aaron Ross Powell

Section 230 Is the Internet’s First Amendment. Now Both Republicans and Democrats Want To Take It Away, written by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

What Republicans are getting wrong about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, written by Zachary Mack

Related Content:

Free Speech Online: Unfriended, Building Tomorrow Podcast

How the FOSTA Rules Create a “Bootleggers and Baptists” Scenario for the 21st Century, written by Paul Matzko

New Conspiracism and Modern Politics (with Russell Muirhead), Free Thoughts Podcast

Aug 01 2019

44mins

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Rank #19: Will 5G Live Up to Its Hype?

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5G not only offers exponentially faster wireless downloads, but it is the key to unlocking a number of other emerging technologies like the internet of things, smart cities, and fleets of self-driving cars. Yet 5G is fantastically expensive and so has incentivized a controversial corporate merger between Sprint and T-Mobile in an attempt to keep pace with AT&T and Verizon.

This week, Paul is joined by tech policy expert Roslyn Layton as they discuss the implications of 5G, the Sprint / T-Mobile merger, and how we should understand property rights and spectrum auctions in an accelerating digital age. 

What is 5G and how is it different than what we currently have? Will machines use the 5G internet? How is 5G intelligent? Where will 5G go first? What do ‘robot bees’ have to do with 5G connection? Is 5G the 4th Industrial Revolution?

Further Reading:

5G wireless: When it makes sense to regulate, written by Roslyn Layton

The future of 5G mobile data could hinge on a battle over utility pole fees, written by Brian Fung

FCC sides with telecom giants in vote to cap 5G fees, written by Harper Neidig

Related Content:

The Sad History of the FCC, Free Thoughts Podcast

Will EU Copyright Break the Internet?, Building Tomorrow Podcast

When Will We Get Fully Autonomous Cars?, Building Tomorrow Podcast

The Real Reason Facebook and Netflix Support Net Neutrality, written by Paul Matzko

Oct 25 2018

43mins

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Rank #20: Haters Gonna Hate Speech

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As recent scandals on social media platforms have shown, content moderation is hard, thankless work. The lines between political satire, hate speech, historical documentation, and obscenity get blurry very quickly even in a single country, let alone when trying to create a one-size-fits-all global moderation standard. Companies like Facebook and Twitter are attempting to routinize their content moderation processes, but Matthew and Paul discuss whether those efforts—however well-intentioned—are too little, too late.

What happened between Crowder and Maza? What debates are happening in the tech space about content moderation? How do we determine hate? How does Facebook respond to questionable content? What is too radical to be posted online? What are the limits to hate speech?

Further Reading:

YouTube’s week from hell: How the debate over free speech online exploded after a conservative star with millions of subscribers was accused of homophobic harassment, written by Benjamin Goggin.

Where’s the Real Harm from Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple?, written by Ryan Bourne

Related Content:

Free Speech Online: Unfriended, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Speech Police, Building Tomorrow Podcast

Practical Problems with Regulating Tech in the Public Interest, written by Will Rinehart

Jul 11 2019

43mins

Play