Cover image of London Review Bookshop Podcasts
(38)

Rank #143 in Books category

Arts
Books

London Review Bookshop Podcasts

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #143 in Books category

Arts
Books
Read more

Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

Read more

Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
9
2
1
6

When it’s good, it’s good...

By Redlornie - Nov 29 2019
Read more
The content is usually interesting but the sound quality is consistently awful!

Hit hit miss

By colineverest - Oct 26 2019
Read more
This is pretty great but when it’s bad woah!

iTunes Ratings

38 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
9
2
1
6

When it’s good, it’s good...

By Redlornie - Nov 29 2019
Read more
The content is usually interesting but the sound quality is consistently awful!

Hit hit miss

By colineverest - Oct 26 2019
Read more
This is pretty great but when it’s bad woah!

Listen to:

Cover image of London Review Bookshop Podcasts

London Review Bookshop Podcasts

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

James Wood: The Fun Stuff

Podcast cover
Read more
James Wood visited the Bookshop to talk about his new collection of pieces, The Fun Stuff, and to discuss life, literature, and the role of the critic.

Mar 19 2013

1hr 4mins

Play

1606: James Shapiro and Charles Nicholl

Podcast cover
Read more
Ten years after the publication of his highly acclaimed and prize-winning 1599 James Shapiro moves the Shakespeare story on to 1606, the year of *King Lear*, *Macbeth* and *Antony and Cleopatra*. At the shop talking about *1606* (Faber) with Shapiro was Charles Nicholl, author of *The Reckoning*, *The Lodger* and *Traces Remain*.

Nov 19 2015

58mins

Play

Ian Penman and Jennifer Hodgson: It Gets Me Home, This Curving Track

Podcast cover
Read more
Music critic Ian Penman is back with a pioneering book of essays alluding to a lost moment in musical history ‘when cultures collided and a cross-generational and “cross-colour” awareness was born’. It Gets Me Home, This Curving Track (Fitzcarraldo) focuses on black artists, including James Brown, Charlie Parker and Prince, who were at the forefront of innovation and the white artists that followed, adapting their sounds for the mainstream. Described by Iain Sinclair as ‘a laureate for marginal places’ Penman began his career in 1970s at the NME and has since gone on to write for publications such as Sight & Sound, Uncut and the London Review of Books. Penman was in conversation with writer and editor Jennifer Hodgson.

Oct 02 2019

55mins

Play

Walter Benjamin: The Storyteller

Podcast cover
Read more
Curator Gareth Evans and scholar Esther Leslie discussed the fiction of the legendary critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin, published in *[The Storyteller][1]* (Verso) in English translation for the first time. The actor Flossie Draper, Walter Benjamin’s great-grand-daughter, gave readings from the book. His stories revel in the erotic tensions of city life, cross the threshold between rational and hallucinatory realms, celebrate the importance of games, delve into the peculiar relationship between gambling and fortune-telling, and explore, in an intriguingly different way, many of the themes that are familiar from Benjamin's philosophical work. The novellas, fables, histories, aphorisms, parables and riddles in this collection are brought to life by the playful imagery of Paul Klee. *The Storyteller* has been translated and edited by Sam Dolbear, Esther Leslie and Sebastian Truskolaski.

Aug 15 2016

1hr 7mins

Play

LRB at 40: Jeremy Harding, Nikita Lalwani and Adam Shatz

Podcast cover
Read more
LRB contributors and editors convened at the London Review Bookshop in the month of the paper’s 40th anniversary to reflect on the last four decades through the lens of subjects they’ve written about in the pages of the LRB. In the last event of the series, Jeremy Harding and Adam Shatz discussed shared preoccupations including decolonisation and orientalism, Israel-Palestine, 20th-century music, and France, in conversation with the novelist Nikita Lalwani.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 8mins

Play

China Miéville in conversation with The White Review

Podcast cover
Read more
China Miéville read from his work, and discussed some of the issues raised by it with Ben Eastham, co-founder and editor of The White Review.

May 15 2013

1hr 13mins

Play

Mathias Enard and Elif Shafak: Tell Them of Battles, Kings and Elephants

Podcast cover
Read more
Man Booker International-shortlisted novelist Mathias Enard, 'the most brazenly lapel-grabbing French author since Michel Houellebecq', returns with Tell Them of Battles, Kings and Elephants (tr. Charlotte Mandell), his fourth novel to appear in English after Zone, Street of Thieves and Compass. In 1506, Michelangelo – a young but already renowned sculptor – is invited by the sultan of Constantinople to design a bridge over the Golden Horn. Michelangelo, after some hesitation, flees Rome and an irritated Pope Julius II – whose commission he leaves unfinished – and arrives in Constantinople. Constructed from real historical fragments, Tell Them of Battles, Kings, and Elephants is a thrilling novella about why stories are told, why bridges are built, and how seemingly unmatched pieces, seen from the opposite sides of civilization, can mirror one another. Enard was in conversation with Elif Shafak.

Jan 09 2019

56mins

Play

Walter Benjamin, The Storyteller: The Verso podcast in collaboration with the London Review Bookshop

Podcast cover
Read more
In the latest Verso podcast in collaboration with the London Review Bookshop, Esther Leslie, Marina Warner and Michael Rosen join Gareth Evans to discuss Walter Benjamin's experimentation with form and media, his concept of storytelling and the communicability of experience, and the themes that run throughout Benjamin’s creative and critical writing.

Jun 07 2016

58mins

Play

László Krasznahorkai in conversation with Colm Tóibín

Podcast cover
Read more
Our first Literary Friendships event brought together Colm Tóibín with his friend the writer László Krasznahorkai.

Dec 05 2012

1hr 33mins

Play

Guestbook: Ghost Stories: Leanne Shapton and Adam Thirlwell

Podcast cover
Read more
In her latest work Guestbook: Ghost Stories (Particular Books) Leanne Shapton, through a series of stories and vignettes, encounters the uncanny. Are our experiences of ghosts and the unworldly mere fantasies of the mind, or are they solid evidence of the supernatural? In a book designed, curated and illustrated by Shapton herself, she provides some, but by no means all of the answers. Toronto-born Shapton rose to literary prominence with her genre-defying Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, published by Bloomsbury in 2009. Her subsequent works, including Was She Pretty?, Swimming Studies and Toys Talking, have continued to baffle those readers and booksellers who like to know exactly which shelf to put a book on. She was in conversation with novelist and critic Adam Thirlwell.

Jul 30 2019

49mins

Play

How Should a Novel Be? Sheila Heti with Adam Thirlwell

Podcast cover
Read more
Sheila Heti was in conversation about writing, life and the future of fiction with the critic and experimental novelist Adam Thirlwell.

Apr 30 2013

58mins

Play

Writers on Recordings: Colm Tóibín on Elizabeth Bishop

Podcast cover
Read more
New York's 92nd Street Y has been a home to the voices of literature for 80 years, hosting in its famed Reading Series the greatest literary artists of the 20th century and recording for posterity their appearances as part of its vast audio archive. Featuring Colm Tóibín on Elizabeth Bishop and Rachel Cusk on Katherine Anne Porter, the Writers on Recordings series invites contemporary authors to discuss the legendary voices that have meant the most to them. Each conversation features rare archival recordings and is led by Bernard Schwartz, who produces 92Y's Reading Series as director of its Unterberg Poetry Center. Now in its third year, the series is produced in collaboration with the 92nd Street Y and Queen Mary University of London.

Aug 14 2019

1hr 20mins

Play

Writers on Recordings: Rachel Cusk on Katherine Anne Porter

Podcast cover
Read more
New York's 92nd Street Y has been a home to the voices of literature for 80 years, hosting in its famed Reading Series the greatest literary artists of the 20th century and recording for posterity their appearances as part of its vast audio archive. Featuring Colm Tóibín on Elizabeth Bishop and Rachel Cusk on Katherine Anne Porter, the Writers on Recordings series invites contemporary authors to discuss the legendary voices that have meant the most to them. Each conversation features rare archival recordings and is led by Bernard Schwartz, who produces 92Y's Reading Series as director of its Unterberg Poetry Center. Now in its third year, the series is produced in collaboration with the 92nd Street Y and Queen Mary University of London.

Aug 17 2019

1hr 7mins

Play

Out of the Woods: Luke Turner and Olivia Laing

Podcast cover
Read more
After the disintegration of the most significant relationship of his life, the demons Luke Turner has been battling since childhood are quick to return - depression and guilt surrounding his identity as a bisexual man, experiences of sexual abuse, and the religious upbringing that was the cause of so much confusion. It is among the trees of London's Epping Forest where he seeks refuge. But once a place of comfort, it now seems full of unexpected, elusive threats that trigger twisted reactions. Turner was in conversation with Olivia Laing (*Crudo*; *The Lonely City*).

Jan 23 2019

52mins

Play

Jarvis Cocker

Podcast cover
Read more
To mark the publication of the paperback edition of Mother, Brother, Lover, Jarvis Cocker joined us at the shop for a conversation with the novelist Jon McGregor – ‘Cocker’s lyrics were what made me want to tell stories’, McGregor wrote in the Guardian’s ‘My Hero’ column.

Oct 22 2012

1hr 1min

Play

Riot. Strike. Riot: Joshua Clover and Nina Power on the New Era of Uprisings

Podcast cover
Read more
Baltimore. Ferguson. Tottenham. Clichy-sous-Bois. Oakland. Ours has become an 'age of riots' as the struggle of people versus state and capital has taken to the streets. In this podcast listen to award-winning poet and theorist Joshua Clover and writer and philosopher Nina Power unpick a new understanding of this present moment and its history. Rioting was the central form of protest in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and was supplanted by the strike in the early nineteenth century. It returned to prominence in the 1970s, profoundly changed along with the coordinates of race and class. Historical events such as the global economic crisis of 1973 and the decline of organized labor, viewed from the perspective of vast social transformations, are the proper context for understanding these eruptions of discontent. As social unrest against an unsustainable order continues to grow, how can future antagonists be guided in their struggles toward a revolutionary horizon?

Aug 23 2016

1hr 28mins

Play

Radical Sacrifice: Terry Eagleton and Daniel Soar

Podcast cover
Read more
Professor Terry Eagleton’s more than 40 books have explored, in consistently invigorating ways, the many and surprising intersections and confluences of literature, culture, ideology and belief. His latest book Radical Sacrifice (Yale) draws on the Bible, the Aeneid, Hegel, Marx, Heidegger and Henry James in a brilliant meditation on the concept of sacrifice, fundamentally reconfiguring it as a radical force within modern life and thought. Professor Eagleton was in conversation about his latest work with Daniel Soar, senior editor at the London Review of Books.

Apr 24 2018

1hr 3mins

Play

Dressed: Shahidha Bari and Marina Warner

Podcast cover
Read more
In her first book Dressed (Jonathan Cape), Shahidha Bari explores the hidden memories, meanings and ideas which are wrapped up in our clothes; themes of privacy, freedom, love and objectification are treated garment by garment. Bari was in conversation with Marina Warner, whose most recent book is Forms of Enchantment (Thames & Hudson).

Jul 16 2019

1hr 1min

Play

Notes to Self: Emilie Pine and Katherine Angel

Podcast cover
Read more
First published by Irish independent Tramp Press, Emilie Pine’s Notes to Self became a phenomenal word-of-mouth bestseller. Now picked up on this side of the water by Hamish Hamilton, Pine’s debut collection of autobiographical essays is a poignant, radically honest and fiercely intelligent account of the pains and joys of living as a woman in the 21st Century. She was in conversation with Katherine Angel, author of Unmastered: A Book on Desire, Most Difficult to Tell.

Feb 06 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson: Brexit and the End of Empire

Podcast cover
Read more
Things fall apart when empires crumble. Rediscovery of past glories is attempted again and again, until eventually those living in what was once the heart of the empire become reconciled with their fate. Many of the British are not yet reconciled. A major cause of Brexit was a stoked-up fear of immigrants, but Rule Britannia: Brexit and the End of Empire (Biteback Publishing) argues that at its heart the rhetoric of Brexit was the playing out of older school curricula that had been dominated by empire. Brexit was led by people, almost all men, who mostly had fond memories of something that never was as great as they believed it to be. Co-authors Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson were in conversation. The conversation was chaired by writer and researcher Maya Goodfellow.

Feb 13 2019

59mins

Play

Self-Portrait: Celia Paul with Catherine Lampert

Podcast cover
Read more
Celia Paul, born in India in 1959 and now resident in Bloomsbury is widely regarded as one of the most important artists working in Britain today. Following a passionate affair with painter Lucian Freud and figuring in several of his canvases she emerged as an immensely talented painter, initially focussing on intimate depictions of family life before more recently turning to the broader scale of landscape and sea-scape. Her memoir Self-Portrait (Jonathan Cape) is an invaluable first-hand account of the trials and rewards of making great art, and has been described by Esther Freud as ‘An insight into the white-knuckle determination needed to make great art, and why it is so few women painters reach the heights. An astoundingly honest book, moving and engrossing – full of truths.’ Paul was in conversation about her work with curator and art writer Catherine Lampert.

Dec 04 2019

59mins

Play

This is Not Propaganda: Peter Pomerantsev with Marina Hyde and Carl Miller

Podcast cover
Read more
Something strange has happened to truth in the past few years. Politicians, marketeers, Twitterists and others seem to have come to the conclusion that it doesn’t matter if what they say is true as long as some people believe it (and even that doesn’t seem to matter all that much sometimes). In his latest book This is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality (Faber) intrepid investigative reporter Peter Pomerantsev travels the world, from China to Russia to Syria to the Balkans and to Brexit Britain in an often surprising investigation of why we can no longer believe what we say, or say what we believe. Peter Pomerantsev was in conversation with Guardian columnist Marina Hyde and Carl Miller, author of The Death of the Gods.

Nov 27 2019

52mins

Play

Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Saidiya Hartman and Lola Olufemi

Podcast cover
Read more
At the beginning of the 20th Century, the first emancipated generation of black women in the USA were obliged, sometimes enabled and often hindered in creating new ways of living after the abolition of slavery. In Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments (Profile), Professor Saidiya Hartman tells the inspiring and surprising stories of these pioneers, whose discoveries about how to be in the world have been followed and emulated by people, black, white, gay, straight, cis, trans and other, ever since. Hartman was in conversation about her work with writer and activist Lola Olufemi.

Nov 20 2019

1hr 1min

Play

November: Jorge Galán and Mark Dowd

Podcast cover
Read more
Jorge Galán’s extraordinary non-fiction novel Noviembre, now published in an English translation by Jason Wilson as November, recounts the horrifying murder of six Jesuit priests and two women during the Salvadorian civil war in 1989, dealing both with its aftermath and the complex political situation from which the atrocity arose. Its original publication in Spanish led to death threats against the author which forced Galán to flee his native country. Galán was in conversation with journalist Mark Dowd who has written widely and produced several documentaries on the relationship between religion and human rights. The interpreter was Cecilia Lipovseck from [Multilateral London][2]. This event is made possible by the generous support of Instituto Cervantes and Elisabeth Hayek.

Nov 13 2019

58mins

Play

Surfacing: Kathleen Jamie and Philip Hoare

Podcast cover
Read more
In her latest book ‘Surfacing’ (Sort of Books), poet and essayist Kathleen Jamie explores what emerges: from the earth, from memory and from the mind. Her travels take her from Arctic Alaska to the sand dunes and machair of Scotland in a quest to discover what archaeology might tell us about the past, the present and the future. Her writing throughout is marked, as always, by an acute attention to the natural world. She was in conversation about her work with Philip Hoare, author of ‘Leviathan’ and ‘Risingtidefallingstar’.

Nov 07 2019

52mins

Play

LRB at 40: Jeremy Harding, Nikita Lalwani and Adam Shatz

Podcast cover
Read more
LRB contributors and editors convened at the London Review Bookshop in the month of the paper’s 40th anniversary to reflect on the last four decades through the lens of subjects they’ve written about in the pages of the LRB. In the last event of the series, Jeremy Harding and Adam Shatz discussed shared preoccupations including decolonisation and orientalism, Israel-Palestine, 20th-century music, and France, in conversation with the novelist Nikita Lalwani.

Nov 05 2019

1hr 8mins

Play

LRB at 40: Nell Dunn, Tessa Hadley and Joanna Biggs

Podcast cover
Read more
Join LRB contributors and editors at the London Review Bookshop in the month of the paper’s 40th anniversary, as they reflect on the last four decades through the lens of subjects they’ve written about in the pages of the LRB. Nell Dunn and Tessa Hadley discuss fictional representations of women’s everyday lives with the LRB’s Joanna Biggs.

Oct 26 2019

53mins

Play

LRB at 40: William Davies and Katrina Forrester

Podcast cover
Read more
Join LRB contributors and editors at the London Review Bookshop in the month of the paper’s 40th anniversary, as they reflect on the last four decades through the lens of subjects they’ve written about in the pages of the LRB. On Wednesday 16 October, William Davies and Katrina Forrester discussed shared preoccupations including the subjects of their recent books, Nervous States: How Feeling Took Over the World and In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy.

Oct 22 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

LRB at 40: Rosemary Hill and Iain Sinclair

Podcast cover
Read more
Join LRB contributors and editors at the London Review Bookshop in the month of the paper’s 40th anniversary, as they reflect on the last four decades through the lens of subjects they’ve written about in the pages of the LRB. In the first event of the series, Rosemary Hill and Iain Sinclair discussed shared preoccupations starting with London.

Oct 20 2019

1hr 18mins

Play

Against Memoir: Michelle Tea and Juliet Jacques

Podcast cover
Read more
In Against Memoir (And Other Stories), Michelle Tea takes us through the hard times and wild creativity of queer life in America. Via a series of essays, addresses and fragments she reclaims Valerie Solanas as an absurdist, remembers the lives and deaths of the lesbian motorcycle gang HAGS and introduces us to activists at a trans protest camp. Tea was in conversation with writer Juliet Jacques.

Oct 16 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

Time Lived Without Its Flow: Denise Riley, Max Porter, Emily Berry

Podcast cover
Read more
Denise Riley’s devastating long poem ‘A Part Song’, written in response to the death of her son, was first published in the LRB in 2012 and later became the kernel of her acclaimed collection Say Something Back (Picador). The poem’s prose counterpart Time Lived, Without Its Flow was initially published in a small edition by Capsule Press but has now been made more readily available in a new edition, also from Picador. Riley was in conversation about her essay with the writer Max Porter, author of Grief is the Thing with Feathers and Lanny and with the poet Emily Berry, author of Dear Boy and Stranger, Baby.

Oct 09 2019

1hr 4mins

Play

Ian Penman and Jennifer Hodgson: It Gets Me Home, This Curving Track

Podcast cover
Read more
Music critic Ian Penman is back with a pioneering book of essays alluding to a lost moment in musical history ‘when cultures collided and a cross-generational and “cross-colour” awareness was born’. It Gets Me Home, This Curving Track (Fitzcarraldo) focuses on black artists, including James Brown, Charlie Parker and Prince, who were at the forefront of innovation and the white artists that followed, adapting their sounds for the mainstream. Described by Iain Sinclair as ‘a laureate for marginal places’ Penman began his career in 1970s at the NME and has since gone on to write for publications such as Sight & Sound, Uncut and the London Review of Books. Penman was in conversation with writer and editor Jennifer Hodgson.

Oct 02 2019

55mins

Play

Rough Trade Readings: Will Burns/Joe Dunthorne/André Naffis-Sahely/Charlotte Newman/Martha Sprackland

Podcast cover
Read more
An evening of readings to celebrate the first birthday of Rough Trade Editions. André Naffis-Sahely read from his Americana-themed The Other Side of Nowhere; he was joined by Martha Sprackland, Will Burns, Joe Dunthorne and Charlotte Newman, whose pamphlets (Milk Tooth, Germ Songs, All The Poems Contained Within Will Mean Everything To Everyone and Counter Reform, respectively) contain some of the liveliest poetry being published today.

Sep 25 2019

1hr 6mins

Play

Nell Zink and Alex Clark: Doxology

Podcast cover
Read more
Nell Zink, born in Virginia in 1964 and now resident in Germany, is one of the most remarkable novelists of her, and indeed any generation. Her exuberant creations, always inflected with political, social and ecological concern, have won worldwide acclaim for their recklessness, their inventiveness and their sheer stylistic brilliance. She read from the latest of them, *[Doxology][1]* (4th Estate), a tale that begins with the iconic tragedy of 11 September 2001 and spins out from it into America’s past and potential futures, she discussed it with Alex Clark of the Guardian. [1]: /on-our-shelves/book/9780008323486/doxology

Sep 17 2019

58mins

Play

Nicola Barker and Ali Smith: I Am Sovereign

Podcast cover
Read more
In twelve inimitable, eccentric, hilarious, disturbing and powerful novels, Nicola Barker has established herself as one of the most inventive and powerful voices in contemporary British fiction. To mark the publication of the thirteenth, I Am Sovereign (William Heinemann), Barker was in conversation about experiment, fiction, contemporaneity and a great deal else besides with the novelist and short story writer Ali Smith.

Sep 11 2019

1hr 5mins

Play

Deborah Levy and Shahidha Bari: The Man Who Saw Everything

Podcast cover
Read more
‘A writer is only as interesting as what she pays attention to.’ Deborah Levy is the author of many plays, novels, short stories and essay collections. Inventive, experimental and compulsively readable, her work has won many awards, accolades and prizes. Her latest novel The Man Who Saw Everything (Hamish Hamilton) plays with time and memory in a gripping exploration of the weight of history and the disastrous consequences of trying to ignore it. ‘There’s no one touching the brilliance of Deborah Levy’s prose today’ writes Lee Rourke. Levy was in conversation with Shahidha Bari, academic, critic and author of Dressed: The Secret Life of Clothes (Jonathan Cape).

Sep 04 2019

57mins

Play

Tragedy, the Greeks and Us: Simon Critchley and Shahidha Bari

Podcast cover
Read more
At the New School in New York, where Simon Critchley teaches, ‘Critchley on Tragedy’ is one of the most consistently oversubscribed courses. Now, in Tragedy, the Greeks and Us (Profile) he explains, in often surprising ways, why Greek Tragedies remain so compellingly relevant to modern times, in the way they confront us with things about ourselves we don’t want to believe, but are nevertheless true. Critchley was in conversation with Shahidha Bari, Senior Lecturer in Romanticism at Queen Mary, University of London.

Aug 28 2019

55mins

Play

Afterglow: Eileen Myles

Podcast cover
Read more

Aug 27 2019

58mins

Play

The Mars Room: Rachel Kushner and Adam Thirlwell

Podcast cover
Read more
Romy Hall, the protagonist of Rachel Kushner’s latest novel *[The Mars Room][1]* (Cape), is beginning two consecutive life sentences plus six months at a women’s correctional facility. Cut off from everything she knows and loves – The Mars Room, a San Francisco strip club where she once earned a living, her seven-year-old son Jackson now in the care of her estranged mother – Romy begins a terrifying new life, detailed with humour and precision by Kushner. George Saunders writes ‘Kushner is a young master. I honestly don't know how she is able to know so much and convey all of this in such a completely entertaining and mesmerizing way.’ She read from her latest novel, and was in conversation about it with the novelist and critic Adam Thirlwell. [1]: /on-our-shelves/book/9781910702673/mars-room

Aug 26 2019

1hr 7mins

Play

Melissa Benn and Ed Miliband: Life Lessons

Podcast cover
Read more

Aug 25 2019

1hr 9mins

Play