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The Brookings Cafeteria

Updated 8 days ago

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Politics
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Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

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Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

iTunes Ratings

404 Ratings
Average Ratings
318
71
7
3
5

Love the topics

By Shaking with laughter - Jan 17 2020
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Love the topics! I've learned so much. though sometimes I wish you talked more about the faults of america. We do so many things wrong, and it's important to confront and discuss that. Thank you though!!

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
Read more
I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.

iTunes Ratings

404 Ratings
Average Ratings
318
71
7
3
5

Love the topics

By Shaking with laughter - Jan 17 2020
Read more
Love the topics! I've learned so much. though sometimes I wish you talked more about the faults of america. We do so many things wrong, and it's important to confront and discuss that. Thank you though!!

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
Read more
I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.
Cover image of The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

Latest release on Feb 14, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 8 days ago

Rank #1: The case for trade and the TPP

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Mireya Solís, senior fellow and the Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies in the Brookings Center for East Asia Policy Studies, explores the domestic and international importance of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, comments on what the presidential candidates are saying about trade, and also addresses the fears people have about losing their jobs to trade. Also stay tuned for our regular economic update from David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to .

Aug 19 2016

32mins

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Rank #2: Iran’s 1979 revolution and its legacies today

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In a special episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, five Brookings experts—, , , , and —describe how the consequences of Iran’s 1979 revolution affected Iran and the region and continue to shape a range of international dynamics today. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Jan 25 2019

1hr 7mins

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Rank #3: 10 years after the Great Recession, why aren't more Americans working?

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10 years after the Great Recession, new research from the at Brookings scholars  and demonstrates that although the 'jobs gap' from the recession is now closed, millions of American men and women of prime working age remain out of the labor force. Also in this episode,  explains what's happening in Congress and discusses new research on private sector investment in health research and development. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the .

Sep 15 2017

45mins

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Rank #4: Baltimore a year after the riots

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One year after: Observations on the rise of innovation districts , a fellow with the , discusses the current economic, social, and political situation in Baltimore a year after the riots.
“1/5 people in Baltimore lives in a neighborhood of extreme poverty,” Vey says. In this podcast, Vey describes the current state of Baltimore and urges the start of discussions about the abject poverty facing many cities in the United States.
Also in this episode: stay tuned for our presidential election update with . Also, discusses global drug policy and the upcoming United Nations General Assembly special session on drug policy.
Show Notes
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Apr 01 2016

32mins

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Rank #5: The Facts on Inequality, Wealth, Income, and Working May Surprise You

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Economic issues are prolific in the public sphere, from taxes and inequality, to jobs and productivity and more. Even Thomas Piketty's book on wealth distribution is now a bestseller. How can a person make sense of the terms and of the discussion? One way is to talk to an economist, like , a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program at Brookings. In this podcast, he offers his expertise to explain issues such as middle-class income gains, wealth distribution and Piketty's book in ways that both surprise and enlighten.
Show notes:
• • • • •

May 21 2014

39mins

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Rank #6: Hacking hospitals: Is our personal information at risk?

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In this episode, , a fellow in the Brookings Institution's , explains the current dilemma of security breaches of medical records that are hitting the health care industry.  “The difference between the IT revolution in the health care sector and in any other sector is that other businesses embraced IT naturally and gradually and that allowed them to prepare in all other technological and organizational aspects that are necessary to appropriately use IT,” says Yaraghi. “In the health care sector it happened overnight. From 9.4% in 2008 to 96.9 in 2014.” Also stay tuned for our regular economic update with , who talks about taxes; and hear our new Metro Lens segment with  who discusses concentrated poverty in places like Cleveland and San Antonio. Show notes: Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to .

Apr 15 2016

29mins

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Rank #7: How to fix capitalism for America’s workers

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From slow wage growth, to increasing numbers of men out of the labor market, to rising inequality and rising compensation for CEOs, today’s capitalism may not be working for workers. In May, the Guardian newspaper published a series of solutions to these and related problems, titled . On this episode, two of the authors in the series—Isabel Sawhill and Steven Pearlstein—join Richard Reeves to discuss their ideas for helping workers in today’s economy. During the conversation, Reeves calls four outside experts to ask them for their solution, and then the trio of experts in the studio discuss the idea.  Richard Reeves is the John C. and Nancy D. Whitehead Chair, a senior fellow in Economic studies, director of the Future of the Middle Class Initiative, and co-director of the Center on Children and Families at Brookings. He is the author of “,” published by the Brookings Institution Press. Isabel Sawhill is a senior fellow in Economic Studies at Brookings and author, most recently, of “.” Steven Pearlstein, business and economics columnist for the Washington Post and Robinson professor of public affairs at George Mason university. His recent book is titled, “” Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Jun 14 2019

1hr 3mins

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Rank #8: The Affordable Care Act, America's health, and leading the CBO

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"I think the Affordable Care Act is actually doing quite well," says Senior Fellow  in this podcast. Rivlin, the Leonard D. Schaeffer Chair in Health Policy Studies and director of the  at Brookings, cited the expansion of medical insurance coverage, declining cost growth, and other positive factors for the ACA. She also reflects on continued political opposition to the law, the impending King v. Burwell Supreme Court case, and what it was like to stand up a new federal agency, the Congressional Budget Office, in 1975.
Also in the podcast, Senior Fellow , director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, offers his regular "Wessel's Economic Update."

Show Notes:
•  (with Mark McClellan)
• 
• 

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Feb 06 2015

31mins

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Rank #9: Foreign policy in the Obama era

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, executive vice president of the Brookings Institution, offers his take on a broad spectrum of foreign policy issues, including peace in the Middle East, the liberal international order, and his own journey in foreign affairs leadership and policymaking. He also discusses the contours of an "Obama doctrine" in foreign policy, and whether the next president will bring continuity or change. Also in this podcast: an economic update from , director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also hear , visiting fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, discuss his upcoming book “.”   Show Notes   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to . Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carissa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, Brionne Smith, and our intern Sarah AbdelRahim.

May 13 2016

44mins

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Rank #10: Americans fear the wrong threats

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The authors of a new book argue that national security “fearmongering” is causing U.S. leaders to focus more on the threats that Americans perceive—like terrorism and nuclear war—than the ones that exist at home, like gun violence and the opioid crisis. In Clear and Present Safety: The World Has Never Been Better and Why That Matters to Americans (Yale University Press), Michael Cohen and Micah Zenko argue that “The American public is being fed, by politicians and pundits alike, a steady diet of threat inflation that has made them deeply fearful of the world outside their borders.“ In this episode, Thomas Wright, director of the Center on the United States and Europe and senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy at Brookings, speaks with Zenko, a columnist at Foreign Policy, about the premise of the book, the geopolitical risks that do exist, and what role foreign policy might play in the 2020 presidential election. Zenko explains why the mid-1990s were the most dangerous time to be alive, the wide array of domestically driven risks, and why these factors matter more to American security than distant threats. Also, meet Christen Linke Young, a fellow in our USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy. Find out what she’s working on and why she recommends reading both Dreamland, by Sam Quinones, about the rise of the opioid epidemic, and Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace.   Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Jul 05 2019

37mins

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Rank #11: Is the Israeli-Palestinian peace process dead?

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, senior fellow in the  at Brookings, interviews , author of the new book from the Brookings Institution Press, “.” Elgindy is a nonresident fellow in the Center for Middle East Policy and previously served as an advisor to the Palestinian Leadership in Ramallah on permanent status negotiations with Israel from 2004 to 2009, and was a key participant in the Annapolis negotiations throughout 2008.  Also, Wessel’s Economic Update in which Senior Fellow David Wessel offers three reasons why we don’t necessarily have to address the rising U.S. budget deficit through increased taxes and cutting spending right now. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Apr 19 2019

52mins

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Rank #12: Trump's national security and defense team

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Donald Trump’s inauguration as 45th president of the United States is right around the corner, and so the nation's (and world's) focus turns to the end of his transition to the White House and the start of his administration. Senior Fellow --director of research for Foreign Policy, co-director of the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence, and the Sydney Stein, Jr., Chair--came on the show to talk about the president-elect’s incoming national security team and the most salient foreign policy, national security, and defense issues for the new administration.  Also in this episode, Senior Fellow , director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, talks about investing in human capital in his regular Wessel's Economic Update. And, Visiting Fellow talks about China's global rise and how the U.S. and European Union can meet the challenge Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. BCP is part of the .

Jan 06 2017

48mins

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Rank #13: America’s 'insane' politics

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Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow in Governance Studies, expands on his widely popular new article in The Atlantic titled, “How American Politics Went Insane.” Also in this episode, Metropolitan Policy Program Associate Fellow Devashree Saha examines the impact of crashing oil prices on state and metro economies.   Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Vanessa Sauter, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to .

Aug 12 2016

23mins

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Rank #14: The global political economy

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Kemal Derviş, vice president and director of Global Economy and Development at Brookings, discusses policies for a globally interdependent world, which is the focus of his new book “Reflections on Progress: Essays on the Global Political Economy.” Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, answers a listener’s question on whether ideology or choice of candidate is more important for American voters in our regular “Ask an Expert” segment. Additionally, Richard Shearer, senior research associate and senior project manager with the Metropolitan Policy Program, examines the ways in which the divide between big city and small town America play out in our politics. Finally, an excerpt from a recent Brookings event featuring Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and British Member of Parliament Tristram Hunt talking about cities in the age of Trump and Brexit. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. BCP is part of the .

Dec 16 2016

49mins

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Rank #15: Why the poorest kids quit high school

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, a nonresident senior fellow in Economic Studies, explains her new research (with Phillip Levine for the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity) on high school students who are growing up in places with high income inequality and their decision to stay in high school or not.
“Kids at the bottom of the income distribution are discouraged by higher levels of income inequality as opposed to being driven by it,” Kearney says. “Low income kids are more likely to drop out of high school than high income kids. But conditional to being low income, kids who are growing up in states or cities characterized by high levels of lower tail income inequality—a greater gap between the bottom and the middle—are more likely to drop out of high school.”
Also in this episode: Our regular economic update with , senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also stay tuned to hear our new Metro Lens segment with, vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program.
Show Notes:
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Mar 18 2016

26mins

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Rank #16: The top economic issues in 2020

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, vice president and director of Economic Studies at Brookings, and , the Robert S. Kerr Senior Fellow and policy director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, share their views on the state of the U.S. economy and the top economic issues facing the country in the upcoming year. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Jan 03 2020

25mins

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Rank #17: The 1967 Arab-Israeli War

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Between June 5 and June 10, 1967, Israel and an Arab coalition of Egypt, Syria, and Jordan fought a war that Israelis call the Six Day War, and that Arabs generally call the June War. By war’s end, Israel had captured territories on all three fronts: the Sinai Peninsula and Gaza Strip from Egypt; the Golan Heights from Syria; and the West Bank and East Jerusalem from Jordan. And with those territories hundreds of thousands of people, primarily Palestinians (today numbering millions), came under Israeli control. In this episode, five Brookings scholars share their insights and expertise on a range of current policy issues that have roots in the conflict. These include how the war changed both Israel and its Arab neighbors; the transformation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the rise of political Islam as an alternative to Arab secular nationalism, particularly in Egypt; regional repercussions and peace deals; and the role of US diplomacy. On the 50th anniversary of the 1967 War, our experts look back as they look forward to grapple with these issues and how the conflict’s legacies continue to resonate today. This episode is part of a larger effort by the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings to offer perspectives on the war’s anniversary, to ask what can be learned from it, and how these lessons inform our understanding about the current turmoil in the region.

Jun 02 2017

56mins

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Rank #18: 2016 election (not-a-horse race) update

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, deputy director of the and a senior fellow in , discusses the fundamental dynamics of the 2016 election, the importance of the ground game, vice presidential picks, and prospects for the Senate and/or House flipping from Republican to Democratic control. “I think policy itself is what’s not getting enough attention in these campaigns. … It is not something that is a sexy issue that people want to particularly hear about, they are more interested in the horse race or in this case the fighting that is going on,” Hudak says. “What Americans need to do is take a step back and think about the issues that matter most to them. You have to think a lot about what issues matter the most to you and hold the candidates accountable as much as possible.” Also in this podcast, Teresa Ter-Minassian explains public-private partnerships and their role in development based on her paper for the new project on Show Notes Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to

Jun 17 2016

33mins

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Rank #19: The Syrian refugee crisis

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, a visiting fellow in the , discusses the current situation with and solutions for the Syrian refugee crisis.  “The scale, scope and complexity of the Syria crisis is staggering. Nearly half a million people have lost their lives, 13.5 million are in need of humanitarian assistance, 6.5 million are internally displaced, and there 5 million refugees in neighboring countries - namely, Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. And hundreds of thousands have made their way to Europe in search of refuge and rights,” McKenzie says. Also in this episode: Bill Finan talks to Nonresident Senior Fellow in , and , TÜSİAD Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy, about their new book Show Notes Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to

Jun 24 2016

29mins

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Rank #20: Robert Putnam on "Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis"

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Brookings Fellows  and  speak with noted political scientist and author Robert Putnam, professor of public policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, about his new book . Putnam explains how an “opportunity gap” has emerged over the past twenty-five years between education for wealthy and poor children in America, and how differences in politics, class, and race are impacting the American dream.

Also in this episode, Governance Studies Fellow  explains "What's Happening in Congress."

 Show Notes:
- - 

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Apr 02 2015

22mins

Play