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The Brookings Cafeteria

Updated 12 days ago

Rank #164 in Politics category

Business
Non-Profit
News
Politics
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Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

Read more

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

iTunes Ratings

412 Ratings
Average Ratings
323
72
8
4
5

Love the topics

By Shaking with laughter - Jan 17 2020
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Love the topics! I've learned so much. though sometimes I wish you talked more about the faults of america. We do so many things wrong, and it's important to confront and discuss that. Thank you though!!

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
Read more
I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.

iTunes Ratings

412 Ratings
Average Ratings
323
72
8
4
5

Love the topics

By Shaking with laughter - Jan 17 2020
Read more
Love the topics! I've learned so much. though sometimes I wish you talked more about the faults of america. We do so many things wrong, and it's important to confront and discuss that. Thank you though!!

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
Read more
I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.
Cover image of The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

Latest release on May 29, 2020

Read more

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

Rank #1: Do Common Core Standards Really Matter?

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Forty-four states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics. Despite initial enthusiasm, criticism of and outright opposition to the standards are beginning to arise. , a senior fellow in the  at Brookings, explains how the Common Core came about, why some are opposed to it now, and what his research shows about its impact on student achievement.
Show notes:
•  (Loveless)•  (Loveless, in 2012 Brown Center Report)•  (West and Bleiberg)•  (Brown Center event)•  (West and Bleiberg)•  (Brown Center event)•  (Loveless)•

Apr 25 2014

31mins

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Rank #2: Robert Putnam on "Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis"

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Brookings Fellows  and  speak with noted political scientist and author Robert Putnam, professor of public policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, about his new book . Putnam explains how an “opportunity gap” has emerged over the past twenty-five years between education for wealthy and poor children in America, and how differences in politics, class, and race are impacting the American dream.

Also in this episode, Governance Studies Fellow  explains "What's Happening in Congress."

 Show Notes:
- - 

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Apr 02 2015

22mins

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Rank #3: Bruce Katz on the 21st Century Metro: Innovative, Powerful, and Leading the Country Forward

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“Cities and metro areas are networks, they are not governments; therefore we need to put them central to the debate of how the country moves forward,”  says in this podcast on the metropolitan revolution—metro areas’ recognition that they are where change does and should happen, especially in an era of congressional gridlock. Katz, vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program and also the Adeline M. and Alfred I. Johnson Chair in Urban and Metropolitan Policy, explains that the nation’s 388 metropolitan areas are “the true organic economies”; discusses why metro areas are at the “vanguard of policy innovation”; describes why the traditional federalism pyramid should be flipped to feature cities and metros on top; and offers insights into the new spatial geography of innovation that is spurring production-oriented economic growth.
Also in the podcast, Governance Studies Fellow  offers his regular update, "What's Happening in Congress."

Show Notes:
•  (with Jennifer Bradley)•  (with Julie Wagner)•  (Adie Tomer and Joseph Kane)•  • • 

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Jan 20 2015

37mins

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Rank #4: Grand strategy in the age of Trump

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Hal Brands, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, discusses his new book, “,” and what an “America First” foreign policy framework looks like. Also in this episode, explains the economic development incentives that state and local governments offer to get corporations, such as Amazon, to locate there. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the .

Apr 17 2018

28mins

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Rank #5: America’s 'insane' politics

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Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow in Governance Studies, expands on his widely popular new article in The Atlantic titled, “How American Politics Went Insane.” Also in this episode, Metropolitan Policy Program Associate Fellow Devashree Saha examines the impact of crashing oil prices on state and metro economies.   Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Vanessa Sauter, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to .

Aug 12 2016

23mins

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Rank #6: Taxes and the IRS

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“Anger at the IRS for the complexity of the tax system is misplaced,” says Senior Fellow  in this podcast. “The IRS does not legislate the tax code; Congress does. And if the tax code is complicated, that is Congress’s fault.” Gale, co-director of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, explains one reason why the complicated tax code might be a good thing. Gale also addresses a variety of issues, including: what tax reform means; whether reform is good for economic growth; what are meant by a flat tax and consumption tax; and political rhetoric about abolishing the IRS.

"You can argue about whether you want lower taxes or higher taxes, but I don’t think there should be an argument about whether we want an effective enforcement agency. It’s just a good government thing." - Bill Gale

Show Notes:
(event w/ IRS Commissioner Koskinen)
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Apr 13 2015

21mins

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Rank #7: Becoming brilliant: What science tells us about raising successful children

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, senior fellow in the  and a psychology professor at Temple University, and University of Delaware professor Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, also a psychologist, discuss their new book: "." In this podcast, Hirsh-Pasek and Golinkoff discuss ways to reimagine what successful learning looks like in a global world using six major skills that will help kids succeed beyond traditional perceptions of success such as good test scores. “What we need to do is train thinkers, to be able to attack the problems in the world,” Golinkoff says. These skills prepare children to become competitive business leaders, entrepreneurs, and scientific pioneers. As Hirsh-Pasek says, “The times have changed. As more businesses realize that their interactions are going to be global, they realize that they need creative thinkers, innovators, and problem solvers.” Also stay tuned for our regular economic update with as he looks at four big questions to determine what this year and next will look like for the U.S. economy. Show Notes Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carissa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, Brionne Smith, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to

Jun 10 2016

45mins

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Rank #8: What Putin and Russia want

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Pavel Baev, nonresident senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, addresses the character and ambitions of President Vladimir Putin and discusses what policies to pursue in managing the challenging U.S.-Russia relationship. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, provides her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” update. This week: special elections in Kansas and Georgia and avoiding government shutdown. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the

Apr 21 2017

28mins

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Rank #9: The 1967 Arab-Israeli War

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Between June 5 and June 10, 1967, Israel and an Arab coalition of Egypt, Syria, and Jordan fought a war that Israelis call the Six Day War, and that Arabs generally call the June War. By war’s end, Israel had captured territories on all three fronts: the Sinai Peninsula and Gaza Strip from Egypt; the Golan Heights from Syria; and the West Bank and East Jerusalem from Jordan. And with those territories hundreds of thousands of people, primarily Palestinians (today numbering millions), came under Israeli control. In this episode, five Brookings scholars share their insights and expertise on a range of current policy issues that have roots in the conflict. These include how the war changed both Israel and its Arab neighbors; the transformation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the rise of political Islam as an alternative to Arab secular nationalism, particularly in Egypt; regional repercussions and peace deals; and the role of US diplomacy. On the 50th anniversary of the 1967 War, our experts look back as they look forward to grapple with these issues and how the conflict’s legacies continue to resonate today. This episode is part of a larger effort by the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings to offer perspectives on the war’s anniversary, to ask what can be learned from it, and how these lessons inform our understanding about the current turmoil in the region.

Jun 02 2017

56mins

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Rank #10: Kim Jong Un’s ascent to power in North Korea

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In her new book, "Becoming Kim Jong Un: A Former CIA Officer's Insights into North Korea's Enigmatic Young Dictator," Brookings Senior Fellow Jung Pak describes the rise of North Korea's ruler. In this episode, she is interviewed by Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow Sarah Binder offers four lessons about how Congress has responded to the coronavirus pandemic, and what may follow. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 01 2020

47mins

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Rank #11: How the US embassy in Prague aided Czechoslovakia's Velvet Revolution

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In late 1989, popular protests against the communist government in Czechoslovakia brought an end to one-party rule in that country and heralded the coming of democracy. The Velvet Revolution was not met with violent suppression as had happened in Prague in 1968. A new book from the Brookings Institution Press documents the behind the scenes role that the US Embassy in Prague, led by Ambassador Shirley Temple Black, played in meeting with students and dissidents, and helping to prevent a violent crackdown by the regime. Norm Eisen, a senior fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings and a former US Ambassador to the Czech Republic, is the editor of this new book, titled "Democracy’s Defenders: U.S. Embassy Prague, the Fall of Communism in Czechoslovakia, and Its Aftermath," which is told through the lens of diplomatic cables between the embassy and Washington. He is interviewed on this episode by Brookings Press Director Bill Finan. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel explains the Paycheck Protection Program that was part of the multi-trillion dollar stimulus bill passed recently by Congress, and what lessons we can derive from its passage and implementation. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Apr 24 2020

22mins

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Rank #12: Burma/Myanmar and Aung San Suu Kyi

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In this podcast, , a nonresident senior fellow in the , discusses Myanmar’s transition to democracy, examining the economic, social and political aspects of the transition, as well as potential obstacles in the short run.
“So much foreign aid has poured in and will continue to pour in now that Aung San Suu Kyi is leading the government that it may do more harm than good, becoming a factor that actually derails the transition," says Rieffel.
Also in this episode: another installment of "" with Senior Fellow Emeritus ; and a conversation with , director of at Brookings.
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to .

Apr 08 2016

40mins

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Rank #13: 10 years after the Great Recession, why aren't more Americans working?

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10 years after the Great Recession, new research from the at Brookings scholars  and demonstrates that although the 'jobs gap' from the recession is now closed, millions of American men and women of prime working age remain out of the labor force. Also in this episode,  explains what's happening in Congress and discusses new research on private sector investment in health research and development. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the .

Sep 15 2017

45mins

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Rank #14: Iran’s 1979 revolution and its legacies today

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In a special episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, five Brookings experts—, , , , and —describe how the consequences of Iran’s 1979 revolution affected Iran and the region and continue to shape a range of international dynamics today. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Jan 25 2019

1hr 7mins

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Rank #15: The top economic issues in 2020

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, vice president and director of Economic Studies at Brookings, and , the Robert S. Kerr Senior Fellow and policy director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, share their views on the state of the U.S. economy and the top economic issues facing the country in the upcoming year. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Jan 03 2020

25mins

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Rank #16: Why the poorest kids quit high school

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, a nonresident senior fellow in Economic Studies, explains her new research (with Phillip Levine for the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity) on high school students who are growing up in places with high income inequality and their decision to stay in high school or not.
“Kids at the bottom of the income distribution are discouraged by higher levels of income inequality as opposed to being driven by it,” Kearney says. “Low income kids are more likely to drop out of high school than high income kids. But conditional to being low income, kids who are growing up in states or cities characterized by high levels of lower tail income inequality—a greater gap between the bottom and the middle—are more likely to drop out of high school.”
Also in this episode: Our regular economic update with , senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also stay tuned to hear our new Metro Lens segment with, vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program.
Show Notes:
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Mar 18 2016

26mins

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Rank #17: Islam: A conversation with Shadi Hamid

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Shadi Hamid, senior fellow in the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World in the Center for Middle East Policy and author of the new book , discusses his own personal experience as an American Muslim, and talks about Islam in the context of modern America and the world. Also in this episode Constanze Stelzenmueller, Robert Bosch Senior Fellow in the , discusses refugee integration in Germany.   Links Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World Islamic Exceptionalism: How the Struggle Over Islam Is Reshaping the World  “Temptations of Power: Islamists and Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East ” Trump's proposed ban on Muslims Is Islam "exceptional"?   Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to

Jul 15 2016

56mins

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Rank #18: How artificial intelligence will change the future of work

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, director of the Center for Technology Innovation, discusses his recent book “.” West explains that as robots, artificial intelligence, and automation make it possible to be more productive while working fewer hours, society must change its definition of work. Also in this episode, foreign policy expert Célia Belin unveils why she became a scholar and Susan Hennessey introduces , a database of experts in technology policy from diverse backgrounds. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter.

May 18 2018

41mins

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Rank #19: Baltimore a year after the riots

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One year after: Observations on the rise of innovation districts , a fellow with the , discusses the current economic, social, and political situation in Baltimore a year after the riots.
“1/5 people in Baltimore lives in a neighborhood of extreme poverty,” Vey says. In this podcast, Vey describes the current state of Baltimore and urges the start of discussions about the abject poverty facing many cities in the United States.
Also in this episode: stay tuned for our presidential election update with . Also, discusses global drug policy and the upcoming United Nations General Assembly special session on drug policy.
Show Notes
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on , listen on , and send feedback email to .

Apr 01 2016

32mins

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Rank #20: The Pakistan challenge

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, senior fellow and director of the , offers his expert view on the policy challenges facing the new administration with respect to Pakistan, their double-sided government, and their tumultuous regional relations. Also in this episode, , fellow in , returns with her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” update. This week: confirming Neil Gorsuch, passing an Obamacare replacement, contention over the budget, and the investigation of Russian interference into the US presidential election. Finally, Tom Loveless examines disproportionate suspension rates for African American students from his . Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter.  The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the .

Mar 24 2017

35mins

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Immigrants and the coronavirus pandemic: A conversation with Rep. Judy Chu

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In this episode, Governance Studies Senior Fellow John Hudak interviews Representative Judy Chu (D-Calif.), who represents California's 27th Congressional District, about immigrants and immigration in the context of the coronavirus pandemic. Rep. Chu talks about legislation intended to help immigrants—especially frontline workers—get the assistance they need, and addresses whether she thinks immigration reform is possible at some point in the future. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 29 2020

30mins

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A new paradigm for valuing Black communities

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In his new book, "Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities," just published by Brookings Institution press, Andre Perry takes readers on a tour through six-majority Black cities whose assets and strengths are undervalued, and offers a new paradigm to determine the value of Black communities. On this episode, Robert Wicks interviews Perry, a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, about his book. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow Sarah Binder walks you through three developments on Capitol Hill in Washington that deserve a closer look. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 22 2020

35mins

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Gender equality, unpaid work, and women's suffrage

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Senior Fellow Isabel Sawhill leads a conversation with Stephanie Aaronson, the vice president and director of Economic Studies at Brookings, and Molly Kinder, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, about some of the key issues in women’s participation in the workforce and society, with attention to the gender impact of the coronavirus pandemic. This episode marks the launch of "19A," the new gender equality series at the Brookings Institution. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 15 2020

45mins

Play

The case for reparations for Black Americans

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Is it time to pay reparations to the descendants of enslaved Black Americans? That’s the topic of a new Big Ideas paper from the Brookings Policy 2020 initiative, and the authors--Rashawn Ray and Andre Perry--are on the show to discuss it. Ray is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings and also an associate professor of sociology at the University of Maryland, where he serves as executive director of the Lab for Applied Social Science Research.  Perry is a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings and a scholar in residence at American University. He is also author of the just released book from Brookings Institution Press titled, Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 12 2020

37mins

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Addressing COVID-19 in resource-poor and fragile countries

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Responding to coronavirus as individuals, society, and governments is challenging enough in the United States and other developed countries with modern infrastructure and stable systems, but what happens when a pandemic strikes resource-poor and fragile countries that have few hospitals, lack reliable electricity, water, and food supplies, don’t have refrigeration, and suffer from social and political violence?   To explore these scenarios and talk about policy solutions during the coronavirus pandemic, Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings, talks with Paul Wise, a medical doctor and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, where he is also a professor of pediatrics at Stanford Hospital. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 09 2020

53mins

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Techstream: Where technology and policy intersect

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On this episode, a discussion about a new Brookings resource called Techstream, a publication site on brookings.edu that puts technologists and policymakers in conversation. Chris Meserole, a fellow in Foreign Policy and deputy director of the Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Technology Initiative, explains what Techstream is and some of the issues it covers. Also on the episode, Darrell West, the vice president and director of Governance Studies at Brookings, answers a listener’s question about how the coronavirus might affect the U.S. presidential election. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 08 2020

29mins

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Technology competition between the US and a Global China

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In this special edition of the Brookings Cafeteria Podcast, Lindsey Ford, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Foreign Policy, interviews two scholars on some of the key issues in the U.S.-China technology competition, which is the topic of the most recent release of papers in the Global China series. Tom Stefanick is a visiting fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings, and Chris Meserole is a fellow and deputy director of the Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Technology Initiative. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 05 2020

37mins

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Kim Jong Un’s ascent to power in North Korea

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In her new book, "Becoming Kim Jong Un: A Former CIA Officer's Insights into North Korea's Enigmatic Young Dictator," Brookings Senior Fellow Jung Pak describes the rise of North Korea's ruler. In this episode, she is interviewed by Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow Sarah Binder offers four lessons about how Congress has responded to the coronavirus pandemic, and what may follow. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

May 01 2020

47mins

Play

Global China's advanced technology ambitions

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In this special edition of the Brookings Cafeteria Podcast, Lindsey Ford, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Foreign Policy, interviews two authors of the most recent release of papers in the Global China series focused on China's aspiration to be a global technology leader. Saif Khan and Remco Zwetsloot are both research fellows at the Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET) at Georgetown University, which collaborated with Foreign Policy at Brookings to release this new tranche of papers. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Apr 28 2020

28mins

Play

How the US embassy in Prague aided Czechoslovakia's Velvet Revolution

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In late 1989, popular protests against the communist government in Czechoslovakia brought an end to one-party rule in that country and heralded the coming of democracy. The Velvet Revolution was not met with violent suppression as had happened in Prague in 1968. A new book from the Brookings Institution Press documents the behind the scenes role that the US Embassy in Prague, led by Ambassador Shirley Temple Black, played in meeting with students and dissidents, and helping to prevent a violent crackdown by the regime. Norm Eisen, a senior fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings and a former US Ambassador to the Czech Republic, is the editor of this new book, titled "Democracy’s Defenders: U.S. Embassy Prague, the Fall of Communism in Czechoslovakia, and Its Aftermath," which is told through the lens of diplomatic cables between the embassy and Washington. He is interviewed on this episode by Brookings Press Director Bill Finan. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel explains the Paycheck Protection Program that was part of the multi-trillion dollar stimulus bill passed recently by Congress, and what lessons we can derive from its passage and implementation. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Apr 24 2020

22mins

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How US military services are responding to the coronavirus and the pandemic's impact on military readiness

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On this special edition of the podcast, four U.S. military officers who are participating in the 2019-2020 class of Federal Executive Fellows at Brookings share their expert insights about the effects that the coronavirus pandemic is having on the readiness of their respective services, and how their services are responding to the crisis. Brookings Senior Fellow Michael O'Hanlon moderated the conversation with: Colonel Thomas Burke, a U.S. Army aviator Lieutenant Colonel Chesley Dycus, a mobility pilot with the U.S. Air Force Colonel Eric Reid, a career infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps, and Commander Jessica Worst, a U.S. Coast Guard officer. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at . The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Apr 21 2020

23mins

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Why Boko Haram in Nigeria fights western education

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The terrorist group Boko Haram has killed tens of thousands of people in Nigeria, displaced millions, and infamously kidnapped nearly 300 schoolgirls in 2014, many of whom remain missing. The phrase “boko haram” translates literally as “Western education is forbidden.” In this episode, the author of a new paper on Boko Haram talks about her research and findings on this dangerous militant group. Madiha Afzal, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings, is the author of “From ‘Western Education is Forbidden’ to the world’s deadliest terrorist group: Education and Boko Haram in Nigeria.” She’s interviewed by Michael O’Hanlon, a senior fellow and director of research in Foreign Policy at Brookings. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Apr 17 2020

32mins

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What Americans think about President Trump's response to the coronavirus pandemic

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In this special edition of the podcast, with Brookings Senior Fellows Bill Galston and Elaine Kamarck discuss President Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, his administration's response, and public opinion on that response. Also, what effect will the crisis and response to it have on the election in November? Galston is the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in Governance Studies and Kamarck is the founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management at Brookings. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Apr 15 2020

29mins

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What coronavirus teaches us about addressing climate change

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On this episode, Andrea Risotto, the associate vice president of communications at Brookings, interviews William Burke-White and Todd Stern about the connection between the global coronavirus pandemic and the international response to climate change. Burke-White is the Richard Perry Professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a visiting fellow in foreign policy at Brookings. Stern is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and is part of the Cross-Brookings Initiative on Energy and Climate. He served from January 2009 until April 2016 as the special envoy for climate change at the Department of State. Also on this episode, a presidential election is still coming in the fall, and a variety of policy issues remain at the forefront. Earlier this year we asked students to send us questions about issues in the campaign, and have been including them here as part of the Policy 2020 initiative at Brookings. In this episode, Senior Fellow Michael Hanson, director of the Brown Center on Education Policy, answers a student’s question about paying for higher education and dealing with student loan debt. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Apr 10 2020

41mins

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How cities and states are responding to COVID-19

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As Congress passes multi-trillion dollar economic support packages in response to the economic and physical shocks of the coronavirus pandemic, what are state and local governments doing to respond? What kinds of economic and other assistance do they need? What will be the enduring impact of this crisis on workers and certain industries? On this episode, two Brookings experts address these and related issues. Amy Liu is vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program and Mark Muro is a senior fellow and policy director of the program. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow Sarah Binder offers three lessons on we can learn from Congress’s efforts to address the crisis and what lies ahead. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Apr 03 2020

42mins

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Brookings experts on the $2 trillion coronavirus response package

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The U.S. Congress has passed a $2 trillion economic support package in response to coronavirus. To analyze what’s in the measure, a group of scholars from the Economic Studies program at Brookings linked up in a conference call. This episode is a replay of that conversation, which was moderated by Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary policy. Also on the episode: Jay Shambaugh, senior fellow and director of the Hamilton Project at Brookings Ryan Nunn, policy director of the Hamilton project and a fellow in Economic Studies Nellie Liang, the Miriam K. Carliner Senior Fellow in Economic Studies and who is affiliated with the Hutchins Center Josh Gotbaum, a guest scholar in Economic Studies and served as director of the U.S. Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. and as Assistant Secretary of Treasury for Economic Policy Louise Sheiner, the Robert S. Kerr Senior Fellow in Economic Studies and policy director of the Hutchins Center. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Mar 28 2020

26mins

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The 1979 Iranian Revolution's enduring impact on the world

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In a new book from the Brookings Institution Press, titled "The Iranian Revolution at Forty," more than two dozen experts look back on the rise of the Islamic Republic and explore what the startling events of 1979 continue to mean for the volatile Middle East as well as the rest of the world. On this episode, the editor of this volume, Suzanne Maloney, joins Brookings Press Director Bill Finan to discuss the Iranian Revolution’s continued relevance today. Maloney is the interim vice president and director of Foreign Policy at Brookings. Also on this episode, Chris Meserole answers a student’s question about the risks of data mining and the ways personal Facebook data is use. This is part of our ongoing Policy 2020 Ask an Expert feature. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Mar 27 2020

29mins

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Fiona Hill on the role of expertise and public servants in a time of crisis

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On this episode, Brookings President John R. Allen interviews Brookings Senior Fellow Fiona Hill about the role that public servants and expertise have during a time of crisis.  Also on the show, Senior Fellow David Wessel offers six points on economic stimulus in response to the coronavirus pandemic.  Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter.   The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Mar 20 2020

44mins

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The Affordable Care Act at 10 years

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On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, perhaps the most significant change in health care policy since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. But opposition to the law has been unrelenting since before its enactment, and efforts to repeal it in the courts are ongoing. In this episode, Christen Linke Young, a fellow with the USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy, discusses where we are a decade after the law’s enactment. Her extensive experience in health policy includes working as a senior policy advisor for health reform in the White House. Also on this episode, Sarah Binder, Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, discusses what’s happening in Congress. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts  or on , send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

Mar 13 2020

35mins

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America’s housing crisis and the gatekeeping of opportunity

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Jenny Schuetz, a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and an expert on housing issues, interviews Conor Dougherty, an economics reporter at the New York Times and author of the new book Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America. In his book, Dougherty reports on the housing crisis as seen in the San Francisco Bay area and what it may mean for the nation’s future. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow Jonathan Rauch answers a student’s question about how to combat extreme polarization in our politics. This is part of our ongoing Policy 2020 Ask an Expert feature. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Mar 06 2020

49mins

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Love the topics

By Shaking with laughter - Jan 17 2020
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Love the topics! I've learned so much. though sometimes I wish you talked more about the faults of america. We do so many things wrong, and it's important to confront and discuss that. Thank you though!!

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
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I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.