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Between the Liner Notes

Between the Liner Notes is an award winning documentary-style podcast about music, why it is the way it is and how it got to be that way. Each episode highlights a piece of lost, forgotten or obscured music history. This show is hosted by Matthew Billy and produced by the Goat Rodeo podcast network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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03: I Want My MTV

In 1981, no one believed people would watch a cable channel that aired music videos 24 hours a day. This is the story about how MTV proved them all wrong. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

53mins

4 Oct 2015

Rank #1

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15: Boy Bands, Blimps & Ponzi Schemes

This is the story of boy band impresario and convicted Ponzi schemer, Lou Pearlman. Listen as Pearlman biographer, Tyler Gray and talent manager Jeanne Tanzy-Williams discuss an individual who was larger than life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

45mins

14 Nov 2016

Rank #2

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16: The Fake Zombie Invasion

When “Time of the Season” became a hit song in 1969, the Zombies had already disbanded. Yet for some reason, there was a band touring around America calling itself the Zombies. Listen as Daniel Ralston, author of the article “The True Story Of The Fake Zombies,” talks about unearthing this forgotten piece of music history. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

20mins

19 Dec 2016

Rank #3

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11: The District

The story of how Jazz began in New Orleans See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

40mins

20 Jun 2016

Rank #4

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04: Why Won't They Let Sharkey on the Radio?

Imagine if all your favorite songs were banned from the radio. Well, that actually happened during the Great Radio Boycott of 1941. The United State’s most famous songwriters collectively decided to pull their catalogues from the public airwaves. This was their response to the radio stations refusing to pay a fair price for the music they broadcast. The boycott lasted for only ten months, but the consequences were far reaching, especially for one entertainer named Sharkey. Sharkey was forced to watch as his radio career became collateral damage in this historic battle. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

42mins

2 Nov 2015

Rank #5

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12: 3,000 Beatniks Riot in Village

Every Sunday since the end of World War II, musicians journeyed to Washington Square Park to sing folk-songs. Until one Sunday—after the City of New York denied the musicians a singing permit—they decided to protest instead. What resulted was a violent confrontation with authority. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

38mins

25 Jul 2016

Rank #6

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05: Who Owns Happy Birthday?

Jennifer Nelson is a documentary film maker who wanted to make a movie about the song “Happy Birthday to You.” When she inquired about using the song in her film the owners of the song forced her to pay for it, and she did. However, while Jennifer Nelson was doing research for her film she uncovered some evidence that could prove that the people she paid may not actually own the song, and never did.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

36mins

1 Dec 2015

Rank #7

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13: The Execution of Joe Hill

In 1915, Joe Hill, a Swedish-American labor activist, was unjustly convicted and executed by the State of Utah, but not before leaving behind a body of work that would inform the next generation of American folk music. In this episode, we talk with William Adler author of the Joe Hill Biography titled, "The Man Who Never Died," and Clayton Simms, a criminal defense attorney working to get Joe Hill exonerated more than a century later. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

43mins

3 Sep 2016

Rank #8

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14: Give 'em the Hook

Vaudeville was once America's most popular form of entertainment. Audiences flocked to the theaters to watch an array of performances ranging from standard singers and comedians, to shadow puppets and a man who eats weird stuff. A few savvy businessmen recognized vaudeville's popularity early on, and ruthlessly built vast networks of theaters. They transformed popular entertainment, for the first time, into big business. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

31mins

11 Oct 2016

Rank #9

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10: Jingle Brains

Jingles are traditionally defined as short songs about a product that are written for TV or radio, but—with songs like Poo-Pourri’s “Imagine Where You Can Go” being released on the internet—does the traditional definition need to be expanded? Listen as Tim Taylor, author of “The Sounds of Capitalism” and Helen Zaltzman, the host of The Allusionist, take us through the century long history of ad music, and examine what jingles sound like in the internet age. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

36mins

9 May 2016

Rank #10