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Rank #35 in Science category

Science

You Are Not So Smart

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #35 in Science category

Science
Read more

You Are Not So Smart is a show about psychology t…

Read more

You Are Not So Smart is a show about psychology t…

iTunes Ratings

1171 Ratings
Average Ratings
887
154
49
37
44

Exploration of why we behave the way we do

By Sarita Estrella - Feb 03 2020
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But things got weird with the crickets LOL

MUST LISTEN TO

By Alex Timing - Nov 25 2019
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This is one of my very few Must Have podcasts.

iTunes Ratings

1171 Ratings
Average Ratings
887
154
49
37
44

Exploration of why we behave the way we do

By Sarita Estrella - Feb 03 2020
Read more
But things got weird with the crickets LOL

MUST LISTEN TO

By Alex Timing - Nov 25 2019
Read more
This is one of my very few Must Have podcasts.
Cover image of You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

Latest release on Jul 13, 2020

Read more

You Are Not So Smart is a show about psychology t…

Rank #1: 167 - How to Talk to People About Things (rebroadcast)

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In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things -- that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Squarespace: www.squarespace.com/sosmart

Nov 18 2019

1hr 45mins

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Rank #2: 093 - The Backfire Effect - Part One

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We don’t treat all of our beliefs the same.

The research shows that when a strong-yet-erroneous, belief is challenged, yes, you might experience some temporary weakening of your convictions, some softening of your certainty, but most people rebound from that and not only reassert their original belief at its original strength, but go beyond that and dig in their heels, deepening their resolve over the long run.

Psychologists call this the backfire effect, and this episode is the first of three shows exploring this well-documented and much-studied psychological phenomenon, one that you’ve likely encountered quite a bit lately.

In this episode, we explore its neurological underpinning as two neuroscientists at the University of Southern California’s Brain and Creativity Institute explain how their latest research sheds new light on how the brain reacts when its deepest beliefs are challenged.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Casper Mattresses: www.casper.com/sosmart | Offer Code = sosmart

Jan 13 2017

44mins

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Rank #3: 143 - How to Talk to People About Things

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In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things -- that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Squarespace: www.squarespace.com/sosmart

Dec 17 2018

1hr 46mins

Play

Rank #4: 061 - Mindfulness - Michael Taft

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You have the power to wield neuroplasticity to your advantage.

Just as you can change your body at the atomic level by lifting weights, you can willfully alter your brain by...thinking in a certain way. In this episode we explore using your brain to change your brain at the level of neurons and synapses beyond what is possible through other methods like learning a new language or earning a degree in chemistry. With mindfulness meditation, the evidence seems to suggest that one can achieve a level of change that would be impossible otherwise. The more you attempt to focus, the better you get at focusing on command, and so a real change begins taking place - you slowly become able to think differently, to hold thoughts differently and to dismiss thoughts that before led to attention difficulties or what feels like unwanted thoughts or clutter - and that’s not magical or the result of shaking hands with a deity, it’s biological. Listen as author and meditation teacher Michael Taft explains the benefits of secular, scientific practice of modern mindfulness meditation

Oct 22 2015

1hr 22mins

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Rank #5: 161 - Bad Habits

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In this episode, Dr. Jud Brewer, a neuroscientist and addiction psychiatrist, discusses bad habits and how to change them.

He is the author of The Craving Mind: From Cigarettes to Smartphones to Love -- Why We Get Hooked and how We Can Break Bad Habits -- and his TED Talk on how to change a bad habit has more than 12 million views.

But...we talk about so many other things in this episode. It's a free association smorgasbord of brain stuff that will rattle your head.

::: Show Notes at YouAreNotSoSmart.com :::

SPONSORS:

• Medical Mysteries: https://www.parcast.com/medicalmysteries
• Squarespace: www.squarespace.com/sosmart -- offer code: SOSMART

Aug 25 2019

1hr 17mins

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Rank #6: 073 - Bayes' Theorem

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We don’t treat all of our beliefs equally.

For some, we see them as either true or false, correct or incorrect. For others, we see them as probabilities, chances, odds. In one world, certainty, in the other, uncertainty.

In this episode you will learn from two experts in reasoning how to apply a rule from the 1700s that makes it possible to see all of your beliefs as being in “grayscale,” as neither black nor white, neither 0 nor 100 percent, but always somewhere in between, as a shade of gray reflecting your confidence in just how wrong you might be...given the evidence at hand.

• Show notes: http://bit.ly/1Nfby8T

• Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

• Donate Directly through PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/DavidMcRaney

SPONSORS
• MIT Press: https://mitpress.mit.edu/smart
• Casper Mattresses: https://casper.com/sosmart
• The Great Courses Plus: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart

Apr 08 2016

1hr 30mins

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Rank #7: 122 - Tribal Psychology

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The evidence is clear that humans value being good members of their tribes much more than they value being correct. We will choose to be wrong if it keeps us in good standing with our peers.

In this episode, we explore how that affects politics and science communication, and how it is driving our growing partisan divide.

Feb 26 2018

1hr 8mins

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Rank #8: 100 - The Replication Crisis

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"Science is wrong about everything, but you can trust it more than anything."

That's the assertion of psychologist Brian Nosek, director of the Center for Open Science, who is working to correct what he sees as the temporarily wayward path of psychology.

Currently, psychology is facing what some are calling a replication crisis. Much of the most headline-producing research in the last 20 years isn't standing up to attempts to reproduce its findings. Nosek wants to clean up the processes that have lead to this situation, and in this episode, you'll learn how.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Squarespace: www.squarespace.com | Offer Code = sosmart

Apr 20 2017

49mins

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Rank #9: 004 - The Self

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In this episode we discuss the self and interview Bruce Hood, author of "The Self Illusion." Also, at the end, we eat a chewy chocolate chip cookie and discuss therapeutic touch.

Jul 01 2012

50mins

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Rank #10: 078 - The Existential Fallacy

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Hypothetical situations involving dragons, robots, spaceships, and vampires have all been used to prove and disprove arguments.

Statements about things that do not exist can still be true, and can be useful thinking tools for exploring philosophical, logical, sociological, and scientific concepts.

The problem is that sometimes those same arguments accidentally require those fictional concepts to be real in order to support their conclusions, and that’s when you commit the existential fallacy.

In this episode we explore the most logical logical fallacy of them all, the existential fallacy. No need to get out your pens and paper, we will do that for you, as we make sense of one the most break-breaking thinking mistakes we’ve ever discovered.

Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com

• Patreon: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

• Donate Directly through PayPal: www.paypal.me/DavidMcRaney

SPONSORS
• Bombas: www.Bombas.com/SOSMART
• Casper: www.casper.com/sosmart
• The Great Courses Plus: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart

Jun 16 2016

34mins

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Rank #11: 003 - Confabulation

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In this episode, we discuss confabulation with neuroscientist V.S. Ramachandran, and at the end of the episode we taste a cranberry chocolate chip cookie while contemplating positive affirmations.

May 28 2012

28mins

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Rank #12: 110 - Sleep Deprivation and Bias

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If you could compare the person you were before you became sleep deprived to the person after, you’d find you’ve definitely become...lesser than.

When it comes to sleep deprivation, you can’t trust yourself to know just how much it is affecting you. You feel fine, maybe a bit drowsy, but your body is stressed in ways that diminish your health and slow your mind.

In this episode, we sit down with two researchers whose latest work suggests sleep deprivation also affects how you see other people. In tests of implicit bias, negative associations with certain religious and cultural categories emerged after people started falling behind on rest.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: Free month at www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Squarespace: 10 percent off with the code SOSMART

Sep 10 2017

32mins

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Rank #13: 037 - Motivation - Daniel Pink

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What motivates you to keep going, to reach for your dreams, to persist and endure? Psychology has, over the last 40 years, learned a great deal about human motivation and drive. In this episode we ask Daniel Pink, author of Drive, how we can better put that knowledge to use in our lives, and in our workplaces and institutions.

Nov 23 2014

1hr 14mins

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Rank #14: 128 - Happy Brain

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What makes you happy? As in, what generates happiness inside the squishy bits that reside inside your skull? That's what author and neuroscientist Dean Burnett set out to answer in his new book, Happy Brain, which explores both the environmental and situational factors that lead to and away from happiness, and the neurological underpinnings of joy, bliss, comfort, love, and connection. In the episode you'll hear all that and more as we talk about what we know so far about the biological nature of happiness itself.

May 21 2018

1hr 28mins

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Rank #15: 067 - The Fallacy Fallacy

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If you have ever been in an argument, you've likely committed a logical fallacy, and if you know how logical fallacies work, you've likely committed the fallacy fallacy.

Listen as three experts in logic and arguing explain just what a formal argument really is, and how to spot, avoid, and defend against the one logical fallacy that is most likely to turn you into an internet blowhard.

• Show Notes: http://bit.ly/1nfOgcu

• Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

• Donate Directly through PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/DavidMcRaney

SPONSORS
• Trunk Club: http://bit.ly/1Sp2wZj
• The Great Courses Plus: http://bit.ly/26kDXpU
• Casper Mattresses: https://casper.com/sosmart

Jan 14 2016

41mins

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Rank #16: 059 - The Illusion Of Control - Michael And Sarah Bennett

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In the show, you'll hear Michael elaborate on why that is. In this episode, our guests are Harvard-trained psychiatrist Michael I. Bennett and his comedy writer daughter Sarah Bennett whose new book, Fuck Feelings, makes the case for accepting the illusion of control as a guiding principle for living a better life.

Time and again, study after study, psychologists have found that in situations in which the outcomes are clearly, undoubtable random or otherwise outside the realm of control, people tend to latch onto any shred of evidence that could be interpreted otherwise. It's a habit that can lead to self-loathing, ineffectual strategies for change, and lives filled with missed opportunities and squandered productivity.

As the Bennetts explain in the book, most people seek a therapist in an effort to actively deny that they don't have any control over their emotions. Stuck in a neurotic, fruitless loop, people begin to wonder why they can't achieve perpetual happiness or erase their proclivity to procrastinate. If they could just fix the things they see as broken, they could then become the people they've always wanted to be and finally begin their lives.

But just how much control do you really have over your feelings or your essential nature? According to the Bennetts, much less than you would like to believe. Your efforts are better spent elsewhere.

In this episode, listen as Michael and Sarah explain what you should be doing instead, and why they say - "Fuck feelings."

After the interview, I discuss a news story about how people can be fooled into believing a meal is delicious when told a master chef cooked the meal.

In every episode, after I read a bit of self delusion news, I taste a cookie baked from a recipe sent in by a listener/reader. That listener/reader wins a signed copy of my new book, “You Are Now Less Dumb,” and I post the recipe on the YANSS Pinterest page. This episode’s winner is Tiffany R Carrell who submitted a recipe for buttermilk cookies. Send your own recipes to david {at} youarenotsosmart.com.

Sep 23 2015

1hr 5mins

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Rank #17: 052 - Learned Helplessness

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Stuck in a bad situation, even when the prison doors are left wide open, we sometimes refuse to attempt escape. Why is that? In this episode learn all about the strange phenomenon of learned helplessness and how it keeps people in bad jobs, poor health, terrible relationships, and awful circumstances despite how easy it might be to escape any one of those scenarios with just one more effort. In the episode, you'll learn how to defeat this psychological trap with advice from psychologists Jennifer Welbourne, who studies attributional styles in the workplace, and Kym Bennett who studies the effects of pessimism on health.

Jun 23 2015

45mins

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Rank #18: 036 - The Dunning-Kruger Effect

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Have you ever been confronted with the fact that you were in over your head, or that you had no idea what you were doing, or that you thought you were more skilled at something than you actually were? At its most extreme, this is called the Dunning-Kruger effect - the fact that it is very easy to be both unskilled and unaware, and in this episode we explore how it works and where you might expect to see it your own life.

Nov 10 2014

1hr 31mins

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Rank #19: 163 - The Happiness Lab

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In this episode we welcome Yale psychologist Laurie Santos who discusses her new podcast, The Happiness Lab which explores how wrong and misguided we can be when we pursue the things we think will make us happy or avoid the things that we think will make us sad.

Based on the psychology course she teaches at Yale - the most popular class in the university’s 300-year history - The Happiness Lab is a tour of the latest scientific research into what does and does not make us happy.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: Free month at www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Squarespace: Use the offer code SOSMART at www.squarespace.com for 10 percent off your first purchase.

Sep 23 2019

1hr 10mins

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Rank #20: 083 - Idiot Brain - Dean Burnett

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In this episode we interview Dean Burnett, author of "Idiot Brain: What Your Brain is Really Up To." Burnett's book is a guide to the neuroscience behind the things that our amazing brains do poorly.

In the interview we discuss motion sickness, the pain of breakups, why criticisms are more powerful than compliments, the imposter syndrome, anti-intellectualism, irrational fears, and more. Burnett also explains how the brain is kinda sorta like a computer, but a really bad one that messes with your files, rewrites your documents, and edits your photos when you aren't around.

Dean Burnett is a neuroscientist who lectures at Cardiff University and writes about brain stuff over at his blog, Brain Flapping hosted by The Guardian.

SPONSORS:

• The Great Courses Plus: http://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Blue Apron: http://www.blueapron.com/yanss

Show notes at: http://www.youarenotsosmart.com

Aug 25 2016

53mins

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184 - The Blind Spots Between Us

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Our guest in this episode is Dr. Gleb Tsipursky, a disaster-avoidance expert who has spent more than 20 years training businesses how to de-bias themselves. 

He is the author for Never Trust Your Gut and he is here to talk about his new book The Blind Spots Between Us.

Jul 13 2020

1hr 13mins

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183 - Black Lives Matter

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In this episode, members of the Association of Black Psychologists gather in a roundtable discussion to explore Black Lives Matter and the social movement taking place right now in The United States.

Jun 29 2020

1hr 12mins

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182 - The A/B Effect (rebroadcast)

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So, you might think that, in general, as an idea, as a practice, the A/B test would be beloved, supported, and encouraged as a way to test out policies and practices and drugs and treatments, but new research shows that a significant portion of the public does not feel this way, enough to cause doctors and lawmakers and educators to avoid A/B testing altogether.

-- Show Notes at: youarenotsosmart.com --

-- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart --

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses Plus: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• BetterHelp: www.betterhelp.com/YANSS

Jun 15 2020

1hr 27mins

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181 - Pluralistic Ignorance (rebroadcast)

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There are several ways to define pluralistic ignorance, and that’s because it’s kind of a brain twister when you try to put it into words. On certain issues, the majority of the people believe that the majority of the people in a group believe what, in truth, the minority of the members believe. Or put another way, it is the erroneous belief that the majority is acting in a way that matches its internal philosophies, and that you are one of a small number of people who feel differently, when in reality the majority agrees with you on the inside but is afraid to admit it outright or imply such through its behavior. Everyone in a group, at the same time, gets stuck following a norm that no one wants to follow, because everyone is carrying a shared, false belief about everyone else’s unshared true beliefs.

-- Show Notes at: youarenotsosmart.com --

-- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart --

SPONSORS

• BetterHelp: BetterHelp.com - offer code YANSS

Jun 01 2020

1hr 29mins

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180 - Meltdown

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In this episode we sit down with Chris Clearfield, author of Meltdown: Why Our Systems Fail and What We Can Do About It

May 18 2020

1hr 53mins

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179 - The Memory Illusion

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Our guest on this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast is Dr. Julia Shaw, the author of The Memory Illusion, Julia is famous among psychologists because she was able to implant false memories into a group of subjects and convince 70 percent of them that they were guilty of a crime they did not commit, and she did so by using the sort of sloppy interrogation techniques that some police departments have been truly been guilty of using in the past.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart

• BetterHelp -- Offer code: YANSS -- www.betterhelp.com/YANSS

May 03 2020

1hr 19mins

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178 - Behind the Curve (rebroadcast)

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In this episode, we sit down with the director and producers of the documentary film, Behind the Curve, an exploration of motivated reasoning and conspiratorial thinking told through the lives of people who have formed a community around the belief that the Earth is flat.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• BetterHelp -- Offer code: YANSS -- www.betterhelp.com/YANSS
• Brooklinen: www.brooklinen.com -- Offer code: YANSS

Apr 19 2020

1hr 21mins

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177 - COVID - 19

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Flatten the curve.

That idea has spread through the population faster than COVID-19 ever could.

That’s the power of culture, of human psychology, of brains interacting with brains. Of course, culture and human psychology and brains interacting with brains are also how the virus spread to begin to with, and that is what this show is about — the psychology behind the spread, and the prevention of the spread, of COVID-19.

When I asked followers on Twitter what kind of show they would want if I did a show about the psychology of this moment, the answer I received the most was, “Why aren’t people staying at home?” so, that’s the first thing we talk about (even though we may soon be asking, "Why DIDN'T people stay at home?")

The second most-asked question was “how do we persuade people, in times like this, to take precautions and follow guidelines?" so that is segment two. And the other topic most requested was how do to deal with anxiety and loneliness and relationships right now. So, that is segment three.

This is a show with six experts, answering all of this, across three segments: Why we respond to situations like this in the way that we do, how to encourage people to respond differently both now and in the future, and how to take care of yourself during a long period of isolation?

- SEGMENT ONE: 5:00
- SEGMENT TWO: 50:00
- SEGMENT THREE: 1:18:00

Oh, and #GoVictorian

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses Plus -- www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/SMART

• BetterHelp -- Offer code: YANSS -- www.betterhelp.com/YANSS

Apr 05 2020

2hr 2mins

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176 - Socks and Crocs - Part Two

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Priors are what neuroscientists and philosophers call the years of experience and regularity leading up to the present. All the ways a ball has bounced, all the ways a pancake has tasted, the way the dogs in your life have barks, or bitten, or hugged you when you were sad -- these all shape the brain, literally. They form and prune our neural networks, so in situations that are uncertain, unfamiliar or ambiguous, we depend on those priors to help us disambiguate the new information coming into the brain via our senses.

But what happens when we don't share those priors?

This episode is about the science behind The Dress, why some people see it as black and blue, and others see it as white and gold. But it’s also about how the scientific investigation of The Dress lead to the scientific investigation of socks and Crocs, and how the scientific investigation of socks and Crocs may be, as one researcher told me, the nuclear bomb of cognitive neuroscience.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• Brooklinen: www.brooklinen.com -- Offer code: YANSS

Mar 26 2020

1hr 7mins

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175 - Socks And Crocs - Part One

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Back in 2015, before Brexit, before Clinton vs. Trump, before weaponized Macedonian internet trolls, one NPR affiliate called The Dress, “The debate that broke the internet,” and The Washington Post referred to it as “The drama that divided the planet.”

This episode isn’t just about the science behind The Dress. it’s about how the scientific investigation of The Dress lead to the scientific investigation of socks and crocs, and how the scientific investigation of socks and crocs may be, as one researcher told me, the nuclear bomb of cognitive neuroscience.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

Mar 08 2020

36mins

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174 - Bad Advice (rebroadcast)

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In this episode, we sit down with vaccine expert Dr. Paul Offit to discuss his new book, Bad Advice or Why Celebrities, Politicians, and Activists Aren't Your Best Source of Health Information.

Offit has been fighting for years to promote vaccines, educate the public, and oppose the efforts of anti-vaxxers, and in his new book he offers advice for science consumers and communicators on how to deal with what he calls the opaque window of modern media which gives equal time to non-experts when it comes to discussing vaccination and other medical issues.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Brooklinen: www.brooklinen.com -- Offer code: YANSS

Feb 24 2020

1hr 7mins

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173 - Rule Makers, Rule Breakers

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In this episode, we sit down with psychologist Michele Gelfand and discuss her new book: Rule Makers, Rule Breakers: How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World.

In the book, Gelfand presents her research into norms, and a fascinating new idea. It isn’t norms themselves that predict how cultures will react, evolve, innovate, and clash -- but how different cultures value those and sanction people who violate them. She categorizes all human cultures into two -- kinds, tight and loose -- and argues that all human behavior depends on whether a person lives in tight culture or a loose one.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart

Feb 10 2020

1hr 13mins

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172 - Team Human (rebroadcast)

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In this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast we sit down with one of the original cyberpunks, the famed journalist, documentarian, media theorist, all-around technology superstar and weirdo, Douglas Rushkoff.

MIT considers Rushkoff one of the "world's ten most influential thinkers," and in the episode we talk about his latest (and 20th) book, Team Human.

The book is a bit of a manifesto in which he imagines a new counterculture that would revolt against the algorithms that are slowly altering our collective behavior for the benefit of shareholders. Instead, he implores us, we should curate a digital, psychedelic substrate that embraces the messiness of human beings: our unpredictability, our pursuit of novelty and innovation, and our primate/animal/social connectedness.

The book is presented in a series of aphorisms that add up to a rallying cry for building communities outside of what the machines that tend our walled gardens might suggest we build. As the title suggests, he would prefer that we turned our technological attention to encouraging and facilitating teamwork.

In the book, he says that any technology whose initial purpose is to connect people will eventually become colonized and repurposed to repress and isolate them. But, the good news is that we’ve seen this pattern so often that we can now stop it in its tracks and choose to build something else. In the interview, you’ll hear what his thoughts are on all this -- and much more.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart

Jan 27 2020

1hr 11mins

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171 - Partisan Brains

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Jay Van Bavel studies “from neurons to social networks...how collective concerns -- group identities, moral values, and political beliefs -- shape the mind and brain,” and in this episode we travel to his office at NYU to sit down and ask him a zillion questions about how the brain uses motivated reasoning to create the separate realities we argue over on a daily basis.

Jan 13 2020

1hr 27mins

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170 - Mark Sargent

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In October of 2019 I sat down with prominent Flat Earther Mark Sargent in Stockholm, Sweden at the Gather Festival to try and understand the reasoning behind his beliefs, and non-beliefs, that run counter to the scientific consensus that the Earth is a globe.

Dec 30 2019

1hr 2mins

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169 - Art

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Moira Dillon studies how “the physical world in which we live shapes the abstract world in which we think,” and in this episode we travel to her Lab for the Developing Mind at NYU to sit down and ask her a zillion questions about how the brain creates the reality we interact with, and how we attempt to communicate that reality to others through language, art, geometry, and mathematics.

Dec 15 2019

1hr 44mins

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168 - Not a Scientist (rebroadcast)

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Our guest in this episode of the You Are Not So Smart Podcast is Dave Levitan, a science journalist with a new book titled: Not a Scientist: how politicians mistake, misrepresent, and utterly mangle science.

In the book, Levitan takes us through 12 repeating patterns that politicians fall into when they mistake, misrepresent, and mangle science. Some are nefarious and intentional, some are based on ignorance, and some are just part of the normal business of politicians managing their public image or trying to appeal to their base.

--- • Show Notes: www.youarenotsosmart.com

-- • Parcast: Natural Disasters
-- • Squarespace: www.squarespace.com CODE: SOSMART

Dec 02 2019

41mins

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167 - How to Talk to People About Things (rebroadcast)

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In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things -- that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial.

- Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com
- Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart

SPONSORS

• The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
• Squarespace: www.squarespace.com/sosmart

Nov 18 2019

1hr 45mins

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166 - Prevalence Induced Concept Change (rebroadcast)

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In this episode we explore prevalence induced concept change. In a nutshell, when we set out to change the world by reducing examples of something we have deemed problematic, and we succeed, a host of psychological phenomena can mask our progress and make those problems seem intractable -- as if we are only treading water when, in fact, we’ve created the change we set out to make.

Sponsors:

-- • The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart

||| Show Notes at YouAreNotSoSmart.com |||

Nov 04 2019

30mins

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165 - The Friendship Cure (rebroadcast)

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On this episode, we welcome journalist Kate Leaver to talk about her new book The Friendship Cure in which she explores the crippling, damaging, life-threatening impact of loneliness and the severe mental health impacts of living a life disconnected from a support network of close contacts. But...there is a cure...learning how to connect with others and curate better friendships.

In the interview we talk about loneliness, how to make friends, the difference between male and female friendship, platonic friendships, friends with benefits and lots, lots, more.

-- • The Great Courses: www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/smart
-- • Ministry of Supply: www.ministryofsupply.com CODE: YANSS
-- • MEL Science: www.melscience.com CODE: text DAVID to 64-000

Oct 21 2019

1hr 23mins

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iTunes Ratings

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Exploration of why we behave the way we do

By Sarita Estrella - Feb 03 2020
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But things got weird with the crickets LOL

MUST LISTEN TO

By Alex Timing - Nov 25 2019
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This is one of my very few Must Have podcasts.