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Rank #47 in Science category

Science

Science Magazine Podcast

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #47 in Science category

Science
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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

iTunes Ratings

507 Ratings
Average Ratings
330
78
40
37
22

In depth and fascinating science news

By sarahgoldy - May 10 2020
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This is a great podcast that goes in depth into science and explains stories in detail. Topics include covid19 and also lots of other interesting areas from ecology to anorexia, ancient societies and neurology.

The Best

By gilledfreak - Mar 08 2018
Read more
Sarah is amazing. Love this podcast

iTunes Ratings

507 Ratings
Average Ratings
330
78
40
37
22

In depth and fascinating science news

By sarahgoldy - May 10 2020
Read more
This is a great podcast that goes in depth into science and explains stories in detail. Topics include covid19 and also lots of other interesting areas from ecology to anorexia, ancient societies and neurology.

The Best

By gilledfreak - Mar 08 2018
Read more
Sarah is amazing. Love this podcast
Cover image of Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

Latest release on Jul 09, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail about 1 month ago

Rank #1: The home microbiome and a news roundup (29 August 2014)

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Sharing microbes around the house; roundup of daily news.

Aug 29 2014

22mins

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Rank #2: Ancient DNA and a news roundup

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Elizabeth Culotta discusses the ancient DNA revolution and David Grimm brings online news stories about rising autism numbers, shark safety, and tiny cloudmakers. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: Alexander Maklakov]

Jul 23 2015

19mins

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Rank #3: Building brain-like computers (8 Aug 2014)

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A new class of gamma ray sources; roundup of daily news.

Aug 08 2014

11mins

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Rank #4: Human superpredators and a news roundup

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Chris Darimont discusses the impact of humans' unique predatory behavior on the planet and Catherine Matacic talks with Sarah Crespi about whistled languages, Neolithic massacres, and too many gas giants. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Image credit: Andrew S Wright]

Aug 20 2015

24mins

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Rank #5: 3-parent gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases and a news roundup

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Kimberly Dunham-Snary discusses the long-term health considerations of gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases and David Grimm talks about the smell of death, Mercury crashing, and animal IQ. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Ben Gracewood CC BY-NC 2.0, via flickr]

Sep 24 2015

22mins

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Rank #6: Safer jet fuels and a daily news roundup

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Julia Kornfield discusses the design of safer jet fuel additives using polymer theory to control misting and prevent fires, David Grimm talks about building a better sunscreen, cultures that don't count past four, and does empathy mean feeling literal pain. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Image credit: Eduard Marmet/CC BY-SA-3.0]

Oct 01 2015

24mins

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Rank #7: Comet chemistry and a news roundup

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Fred Goesmann discusses Philae's bumpy landing on Comet 67P, and the organic compounds it detected there, and Hanae Armitage talks with Sarah Crespi about this week’s online news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: NAVCAM/ESA/Rosetta]

Jul 30 2015

19mins

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Rank #8: Psychedelic research resurgence and a news roundup (4 Jul 2014)

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Psychedelic research resurgence; roundup of daily news with David Grimm.

Jul 04 2014

17mins

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Rank #9: High-altitude bird migration and a news roundup

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Charles Bishop discusses the "roller-coaster" flight strategy of bar-headed geese as they migrate across the Himalayas between their breeding and wintering grounds. Online news editor David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: © Nyambayar Batbayar]

Jan 15 2015

24mins

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Rank #10: Science funding for people not projects and a news roundup (25 Jul 2014)

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NIH opts to back researchers rather than research; roundup of daily news with David Grimm.

Jul 25 2014

14mins

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Rank #11: Testosterone, women, and elite sports and a news roundup

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Katrina Karkazis discusses the controversial use of testosterone testing by elite sports organizations to determine who can compete as a woman, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images]

May 21 2015

29mins

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Rank #12: Podcast: An omnipresent antimicrobial, a lichen ménage à trois, and tiny tide-induced tremors

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Stories on a lichen threesome, tremors caused by tides, and a theoretical way to inspect nuclear warheads without looking too closely at them, with Catherine Matacic.   Despite concerns about antibiotic resistance, it seems like antimicrobials have crept into everything—from hand soap to toothpaste, and even fabrics. What does the ubiquitous presence of these compounds mean for our microbiomes? Alyson Yee talks with host Sarah Crespi about one antimicrobial in particular—triclosan—which has been partially banned in the European Union.     [Image: T. Wheeler/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Jul 21 2016

29mins

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Rank #13: Tracking aquatic animals, cochlear implants, and a news roundup

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Sara Iverson discusses how telemetry has transformed the study of animal behavior in aquatic ecosystems, and Monita Chatterjee discusses the impact of cochlear implants on the ability to recognize emotion in voices, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories with Sarah Crespi. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © marinesavers.com]

Jun 11 2015

34mins

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Rank #14: Effective Ebola vaccines and a daily news roundup

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Andrea Marzi discusses a vaccine that is effective against Ebola in monkeys and David Grimm talks about weigh-loss surgery, carbon suckers, and sexist HVAC. Hosted by Sarah Crespi. [Img: NIAID]

Aug 06 2015

17mins

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Rank #15: Mysterious racehorse injuries, and reforming the U.S. bail system

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Southern California’s famous Santa Anita racetrack is struggling to explain a series of recent horse injuries and deaths. Host Meagan Cantwell is joined by freelance journalist Christa Lesté-Lasserre to discuss what might be causing these injuries and when the track might reopen.

In our second segment, researchers are racing to understand the impact of jailing people before trial in the United States. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about the negative downstream effects of cash bail—and what research can tell us about other options for the U.S. pretrial justice system.

Last up is books, in which we hear about the long, sometimes winding, roads that food can take from its source to your plate. Books editor Valerie Thompson talks with author Robyn Metcalfe about her new work, Food Routes: Growing Bananas in Iceland and Other Tales from the Logistics of Eating.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

*Correction, 1 April, 12 p.m.: A previous version of this podcast included an additional research technique that was not used to investigate the Santa Anita racetrack.

Download the transcript (PDF) 

Listen to previous podcasts.

About the Science Podcast

[Image: Mark Smith/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Mar 28 2019

36mins

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Rank #16: The planetary boundaries framework, marine debris, and a news roundup

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Will Steffen discusses the processes that define the planetary boundaries framework: a safe operating space within which humanity can still thrive on earth. Jenna Jambeck examines the factors influencing how much plastic debris a nation contributes to the ocean. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Bo Eide Creative Commons License BY-NC-ND 2.0]

Feb 12 2015

28mins

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Rank #17: How our brains may have evolved for language, and clues to what makes us leaders—or followers

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Yes, humans are the only species with language, but how did we acquire it? New research suggests our linguistic prowess might arise from the same process that brought domesticated dogs big eyes and bonobos the power to read others’ intent. Online News Editor Catherine Matacic joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how humans might have self-domesticated themselves, leading to physical and behavioral changes that gave us a “language-ready” brain.

Sarah also talks with Micah Edelson of the University of Zurich in Switzerland about his group’s research into the role that “responsibility aversion”—the reluctance to make decisions for a group—might play when people decide to lead or defer in a group setting. In their experiments, the team found that some people adjusted how much risk they would take on, depending on whether they were deciding for themselves alone or for the entire group. The ones who didn’t—those who stuck to the same plan whether others were involved or not—tended to score higher on standardized tests of leadership and have held higher military rank.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Download a transcript of this episode (PDF)

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Scaly breasted munia/Ravi Vaidyanathan; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Aug 02 2018

25mins

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Rank #18: Spatial neurons and a news roundup

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Gyorgy Buzsáki discusses how two types of neurons in the brain's hippocampus work together to map an animal's environment. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: © Isaac Planas-Sitjà]

Feb 05 2015

18mins

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Rank #19: Cosmic rays from beyond our galaxy, sleeping jellyfish, and counting a language’s words for colors

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This week we hear stories on animal hoarding, how different languages have different numbers of colors, and how to tell a wakeful jellyfish from a sleeping one with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic, Brice Russ, and Sarah Crespi.  

Andrew Wagner talks to Karl-Heinz Kampert about a long-term study of the cosmic rays blasting our planet. After analyzing 30,000 high-energy rays, it turns out some are coming from outside the Milky Way.  

Listen to previous podcasts.   

[Image: Doug Letterman/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Sep 21 2017

23mins

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Rank #20: Treating the microbiome, and a gene that induces sleep

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Orla Smith, editor of Science Translational Medicine joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what has changed in the past 10 years of microbiome research, what’s getting close to being useful in treatment, and how strong, exactly, the research is behind those probiotic yogurts.

When you’re sick, sleeping is restorative—it helps your body recover from nasty infections. Meagan Cantwell speaks with Amita Sehgal, professor of neuroscience at the University of Pennsylvania and an investigator at Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Maryland, about the process of discovering a gene in fruit flies that links sleep and immune function.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Download the transcript (PDF)

Listen to previous podcasts.

About the Science Podcast

[Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Jan 31 2019

20mins

Play