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Rank #36 in How To category

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All JavaScript Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Updated 13 days ago

Rank #36 in How To category

Education
How To
News
Tech News
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All JavaScript podcasts produced by Devchat.tv: - JavaScript Jabber - My JS Story - JS Rants

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All JavaScript podcasts produced by Devchat.tv: - JavaScript Jabber - My JS Story - JS Rants

iTunes Ratings

235 Ratings
Average Ratings
149
66
9
4
7

Great discussions 👌

By Broken app garbage - Feb 25 2020
Read more
Always a solid panel of peeps from the industry discussing topics currently saturating my Twitter dev timeline 👍🔥

Only listened once

By jaybytez - Oct 24 2019
Read more
One guy commentator kept interrupting the interviewee and seemed defensive every time his beloved technologies weren’t considered the best option. It became super distracting to listen to and disconnected the flow of the discussion.

iTunes Ratings

235 Ratings
Average Ratings
149
66
9
4
7

Great discussions 👌

By Broken app garbage - Feb 25 2020
Read more
Always a solid panel of peeps from the industry discussing topics currently saturating my Twitter dev timeline 👍🔥

Only listened once

By jaybytez - Oct 24 2019
Read more
One guy commentator kept interrupting the interviewee and seemed defensive every time his beloved technologies weren’t considered the best option. It became super distracting to listen to and disconnected the flow of the discussion.
Cover image of All JavaScript Podcasts by Devchat.tv

All JavaScript Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Latest release on May 26, 2020

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All JavaScript podcasts produced by Devchat.tv: - JavaScript Jabber - My JS Story - JS Rants

Rank #1: JSJ 430: Learning JavaScript in 2020 with Matt Crook

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

Matt Crook joins the conversation to talk with the JavaScript Jabber panel to talk about his experience going through Nashville Software School. The panel discusses and asks questions about getting into programming, working through the bootcamp, and what prospects are for bootcamp graduates.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Charles Max Wood
  • Steve Edwards
  • Dan Shappir

Guest

  • Matt Crook

Sponsors

"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!

Picks

AJ O’Neal:

Aimee Knight:

Charles Max Wood:

Steve Edwards:

Dan Shappir:

Matt Crook:

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

Apr 21 2020

1hr 12mins

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Rank #2: JSJ 423: State of JS

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The panelists discuss that latest State of JS survey. They begin talking about the merits and methods of the survey and then discuss the value you can extract from the survey. They also consider the various comparisons and trends presented by the survey and what they may mean.

Panel:

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Charles Max Wood
  • Dan Shappir

Sponsors:

____________________________________________________________

"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!

____________________________________________________________

Links:

Picks:

Aimee Knight:

AJ O’Neal:

Charles Max Wood:

Dan Shappir:

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

Mar 03 2020

50mins

Play

Rank #3: JSJ 256 Wordpress and Wordpress API for JavaScript Developers with Roy Sivan

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On today's JavaScript Jabber Show, Charles, Aimee, Joe, and Cory discuss Wordpress and Wordpress API for JavaScript Developers with Roy Sivan. Roy is a WordPress (WP) developer at Disney Interactive. He has long been a fan of JavaScript and WP. During a WordCamp, the WP Founder announced the need for WP developers to learn JavaScript. But, what's in WP that developers should be interested about? Tune in to learn!

Apr 04 2017

55mins

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Rank #4: JSJ 251 InfoSec for Web Developers with Kim Carter

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On today's episode, Charles Max Wood and Aimee Knight discuss InfoSec for Web Developers with Kim Carter. Kim is a senior software engineer/architect, an information security professional, and the founder of binarymist.io. He is currently working on his book called Holistic InfoSec for Web Developers. Tune in to learn more on what his book is all about.

Feb 21 2017

48mins

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Rank #5: JSJ 248 Reactive Programming and RxJS with Ben Lesh

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On today's episode, Charles Max Wood, Joe Eames, and Tracy Lee discuss Reactive Programming and RxJS with Ben Lesh. Ben works at Netflix and also has a side job for Rx Workshop with Tracy. He is the lead author of RxJS 5. Tune in to learn more about RxJS!

Feb 07 2017

1hr 7mins

Play

Rank #6: JSJ 291: Serverless For JavaScript with Gareth McCumskey

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Panel:

Charles Max Wood 

Aimee Knight

AJ O’Neal

Joe Eames 

Special Guests: Gareth McCumskey

In this episode, JavaScript Jabber speaks with Gareth McCumskey about Serverless For JavaScript. Gareth leads the dev team at Expat Explore in Cape Town, South Africa. Gareth and this team specialize in exploring the Serverless realm in JavaScript. The JavaScript Jabbers panel and Gareth discuss the many different types of serverless systems, and when to implement them, how serverless system work, and when to go in the direction of using Serverless. 

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • What does it mean to be Serverless? 
  • Since platform as a service.
  • Microservice on Docker 
  • Firebase
  • “no backend” 
  • Backend systems 
  • Cloud functions and failure in systems 
  • How do you start to think about a serverless system? 
  • How do decide what to do?
  • AWS Lambda 
  • Working in a different vendor
  • Node 4 
  • Programming JS to deploy 
  • Using libraries for NPM
  • How is works with AWS Lambda
  • Where is the database?
  • More point of failure? 
  • Calls to Slack?
  • Authentication
  • Micro Services
  • Elastic Bean Stalk
  • Static Assets, S3, Managing
  • Testing the services 
  • Integration testing
  • And much more! 

Links:

Picks:

Aimee

AJ

Charles

Gareth

Joe 

Dec 12 2017

54mins

Play

Rank #7: JSJ 304: React: The Big Picture

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Panel:

  • Charles Max Wood
  • Aimee Knight
  • Joe Eames
  • Cory House
  • AJ O'Neal

Special Guests: None

In this episode, the JavaScript Jabber panelists talk about React: The Big Picture, Cory’s course on Pluralsight and what React is all about. They discuss both the pros and cons when it comes to using React and when it would be the best to use this library. They also encourage programmers to use React in a more consistent way so that people can share components.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • What is React: The Big Picture course?
  • React
  • The frameworks work with each other
  • Reason and Elm
  • How to decide when using React is the best option?
  • React tradeoffs
  • JavaScript
  • React expects you to do a little more typing and work
  • React is very close to JavaScript
  • React pushes you towards a single file per component
  • React Round Up
  • Are the Code Mods as wonderful as they sound?
  • Angular
  • Create React App
  • What are Code Mods?
  • Lack of opinionated approach in React
  • Using React in a more consistent way
  • MobX and Redux
  • Start off using just plain React
  • When wouldn’t you want to use React?
  • And much, much more!

Links:

Picks:

Charles

Aimee

Joe

AJ

Mar 13 2018

51mins

Play

Rank #8: JSJ 355: Progressive Web Apps with Aaron Gustafson LIVE at Microsoft Ignite

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Sponsors

Panel

  • Charles Max Wood

Joined by special guest: Aaron Gustafson

Episode Summary 

This episode of JavaScript Jabber comes to you live from Microsoft Ignite. Charles Max Wood talks to Aaron Gustafson who has been a Web Developer for more than 20 years and is also the Editor in Chief at “A List Apart”. Aaron gives a brief background on his work in the web community, explains to listeners how web standardization has evolved over time, where Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) come from, where and how can they be installed, differences between them and regular websites and their advantages. They then delve into more technical details about service workers, factors affecting the boot up time of JavaScript apps, best practices and features that are available with PWAs. 

Aaron mentions some resources people can use to learn about PWAs, talks about how every website can benefit from being a PWA, new features being introduced and the PWA vs Electron comparison. In the end, they also talk about life in general, that understanding what people have gone through and empathizing with them is important, as well as not making judgements based on people’s background, gender, race, health issues and so on.

Links

Picks

Aaron Gustafson:

Charles Max Wood:

Mar 12 2019

55mins

Play

Rank #9: JSJ 245 Styled Components and react-boilerplate with Max Stoiber

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On today's episode, Aimee and Chuck welcome Maximillian "Max" Stoiber to the show. Max hails from Austria and is an expert in open source development at Think Mill. Tune in to JSJ 245 Styled Components and React-Boilerplate with Max Stoiber.

Jan 17 2017

49mins

Play

Rank #10: JSJ 309: WebAssembly and JavaScript with Ben Titzer

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Panel:

  • Charles Max Wood
  • Cory House
  • Aimee Knight

Special Guests: Ben Titzer

In this episode, the JavaScript Jabber panelists discuss WebAssembly and JavaScript with Ben Titzer. Ben is a JavaScript VM engineer and is on the V8 team at Google. He was one of the co-inventors of WebAssembly and he now works on VM engineering as well as other things for WebAssembly. They talk about how WebAssembly came to be and when it would be of most benefit to you in your own code.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Ben intro
  • JavaScript
  • Co-inventor of WebAssembly (Wasm)
  • Joined V8 in 2014
  • asm.js
  • Built a JIT compiler to make asm.js faster
  • TurboFan
  • What is the role of JavaScript? What is the role of WebAssembly?
  • SIMD.js
  • JavaScript is not a statically typed language
  • Adding SIMD to Wasm was easier
  • Easy to add things to Wasm
  • Will JavaScript benefit?
  • Using JavaScript with Wasm pros and cons
  • Pros to compiling with Wasm
  • Statically typed languages
  • The more statically typed you are, the more you will benefit from Wasm
  • TypeScript
  • Is WebAssembly headed towards being used in daily application?
  • Rust is investing heavily in Wasm
  • WebAssembly in gaming
  • And much, much more!

Links:

Picks:

Charles

Cory

Aimee

Ben

  • American Politics

Apr 17 2018

52mins

Play

Rank #11: JSJ 323: "Building a JavaScript platform that gives you the power to build your own CDN" with Kurt Mackey

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Panel:

  • Charles Max Wood
  • AJ ONeal

Special Guests: Kurt Mackey

In this episode, the JavaScript Jabber panel talks to Kurt Mackey about Fly.io. At Fly.io, they are "building a JavaScript platform that gives you the power to build your own CDN." They talk about how Fly.io came to fruition, how CDN caching works, and what happens when you deploy a Fly app. They also touch on resizing images with Fly, how you actually build JavaScript platforms using Fly, and more!

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Fly.io
  • Building a programmable CDN
  • High level overview of Fly.io
  • How did this project come together?
  • CDNs didn’t work with dynamic applications
  • Has been working on this since 2008
  • Extend application logic to the “edge”
  • Putting burden of JavaScript “nastiest” onto the web server
  • Fly is the proxy layer
  • Getting things closer to visitors and users
  • CDN caching
  • Cache APIs
  • Writing logic to improve your lighthouse score
  • Have you built in resizing images into Fly?
  • Managing assets closer to the user
  • Can you modify your own JavaScript files?
  • What happens when you deploy a Fly app
  • Having more application logic
  • DOM within the proxy
  • Ghost
  • React and Gatsby
  • Intelligently loading client JavaScript
  • How do you build the JavaScript platform?
  • And much, much more!

Links:

Sponsors

Picks:

Charles

AJ

Kurt

Jul 26 2018

1hr 3mins

Play

Rank #12: 159 JSJ Why JavaScript Is Hard

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02:54 - Everyone Gets It But Me

04:06 - Tools You “Need” to Know

06:29 - Clojures

07:39 - JavaScript as “Object-Oriented” vs “Event-Oriented”

09:30 - Code That Can’t Be Serialized or Deserialized

10:49 - Clojures (Cont’d)

14:32 - The DOM (Document Object Model)

19:52 - Math Is Hard

  • IEEE754 (Floating-Point Arithmetic)

22:39 - Prototypes

25:43 - Asynchronous Programming

32:23 - Browser Environments

34:48 - Keeping Up with JavaScript

35:46 - Node

  • Nesting
  • Context Switching

42:48 - UTF-8 Conversion

44:56 - Jamison’s Stack

Check out and sign up to get new on React Rally: A community React conference on August 24th and 25th in Salt Lake City, Utah!

Picks

Jason Orendorff: ES6 In Depth (Aimee)
Cat Strollers (Aimee)
Stephano Legacy of the Void (Joe)
A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder (Joe)
Gregor Hohpe: Your Coffee Shop Doesn’t Use Two-Phase Commit  (AJ)
Firefox OS (AJ)
Flame (AJ)
OpenWest 2015 (AJ)
801 Labs Hackerspace (AJ)
Stack Overflow Careers (AJ)
Dota 2 (Jamison)
Beats, Rye & Types Podcast (Jamison)
JS Remote Conf Talks (Chuck)
Workflowy (Chuck)

May 13 2015

58mins

Play

Rank #13: 220 JSJ Teaching JavaScript with Kyle Simpson

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Jul 13 2016

1hr 8mins

Play

Rank #14: JSJ 299: How To Learn JavaScript When You're Not a Developer with Chris Ferdinandi

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Panel: 

AJ O’Neal

Joe Eames

Aimee Knight

Special Guests: Chris Ferdinandi

In this episode, JavaScript Jabber panelist speak with Chris Ferdinandi. Chris teaches vanilla JavaScript to beginners and those coming from a design background. Chris mentions his background in Web design and Web Develop that led him JavaScript development. Chris and the JSJ panelist discuss the best ways to learn JavaScript, as well as resources for learning JavaScript. Also, some discussion of technologies that work in conjunction with vanilla JavaScript.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Teaching JavaScript - Beginners and Design patrons
  • Web Design and Web Development
  • CSS Tricks 
  • Todd Motto
  • How to do jQuery Things without jQuery
  • Doing things like mentors (Todd)
  • When JavaScript makes sense.
  • CSS is easier to learn then JS?
  • Being good at CSS and JS at the same time?
  • How about Node developers?
  • jRuby, DOM
  • Documentation
  • And much more!

Links:

Picks:

AJ

Aimee

Joe

Chris

Feb 07 2018

1hr 11mins

Play

Rank #15: JSJ 399: Debugging with Async/Await with Valeri Karpov

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Valeri Karpov is a maintainer on Mongoose, has started a few companies, and works for a company called Booster Fuels. Today’s topic debugging with Async/Await. The panel talks about some of the challenges of debugging with Async. AJ, however, has never encountered the same problems, so he shares his debugging method. 

Valeri differentiates between .catch vs try...catch, and talks about why he prefers .catch. There are two ways to handle all errors in an async function without leading to an unhandled promise rejection. The first is to wrap the entire body of the async function in a try...catch, has some limitations. Calling an async function always returns a promise, so the other approach is calling .catch on the promise to handle any errors that occur in that function body. One of the key differences is if you return a promise within an async function, and that return promise is wrapped in a try...catch, the catch block won’t get called if that promise is rejected, whereas if you call .catch on the promise that the function returns, you’ll actually catch that error. There are rare instances where this can get tricky and unintuitive, such as where you have to call new promise and have resolve and reject, and you can get unexpected behavior.

The panel discusses Valeri’s current favorite JS interview question, which is,  “Given a stream, implement a function called ‘stream to promise’ that, given a stream, returns a promise that resolves to the concatenation of all the data chunks emitted by the stream, or rejects if the stream emits an error event.” It’s really simple to get this qustion right, and really simple to get it wrong, and the difference can be catastrophic. AJ cautions listeners to never use the data event except in the cases Val was talking about, only use the readable event.

The conversation turns to the function of a readable event. Since data always pushes data, when you get a readable event, it’s up to you to call read inside the function handler, and then you get back a chunk of data, call read again and again until the read returns null. When you use readable, you are in control and you avoid piling functions into RAM. In addition, the right function will return true or false to let you know if the buffer is full or not. This is a way to mix imperative style into a stream.

The next discussion topics are the differences between imperative style and reactive style and how a waits and promises work in a normal four loop. A wait suspends the execution of a function until the promise is resolved. Does a wait actually stop the loop or is it just transpiling like a promise and it doesn’t stop the loop. AJ wrote a module called Batch Async to be not as greedy as promise.all but not as limited as other options.

The JavaScript panelists talk about different async iterators they’ve used, such as Babel. They discuss the merits of Babel, especially since baseline Android phones (which a significant portion of the population of the world uses) run UC Browser that doesn’t support Babel, and so a significant chunk of the population of the world. On the other hand, if you want to target a large audience, you need to use Babel.

Since frameworks in general don’t handle async very well, the panel discusses ways to mitigate this. They talk about different frameworks like Vue, React, and Express and how they support async functions. They discuss why there is no way for you to actually cancel an async option in an actual case, how complex canceling is, and what you are really trying to solve for in the cancellation process. 

Canceling something is a complex problem. Valeri talks about his one case where he had a specific bug that required non-generic engineering to solve, and cancelling actually solved something. When AJ has come across cancellation issues, it’s very specific to that use case. The rest of the panelists talk about their experiences with having to cancel something. 

Finally, they talk about their experience with async generator functions. A generator is a function that lets you enter into the function later. This makes sense for very large or long running data sets, but when you have a bounded items, don’t complicate your code this way. When an async generator function yields, you explicitly need to call next in order for it to pick up again. If you don’t call ‘next’, it’s essentially cancelled. Remember that object.keys and object.values are your friends. 

Panelists

  • Christopher Buecheler

  • AJ O’Neal

  • Charles Max Wood

With special guest: Valeri Karpov

Sponsors

Links

Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter

Picks

AJ O’Neal:

Christopher Buecheler:

Charles Max Wood:

Valeri Karpov:

Oct 10 2019

1hr 3mins

Play

Rank #16: JSJ 294: Node Security with Adam Baldwin

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Panel: 

Charles Max Wood

AJ O’Neal

Joe Eames

Special Guests: Adam Baldwin

In this episode, JavaScript Jabber panelist speak with Adam Baldwin. Adam is a return guest and has many years of application security experience. Currently, Adam runs the Node Security Project/Node Security Platform, and Lift Security. Adam discusses the latest of security of Node Security with Charles and AJ. Discussion topics cover security in other platforms, dependencies, security habits, breaches, tokens, bit rot or digital atrophy, and adding security to your development.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • What is  the Node Security Project/Node Security Platform
  • Dependency trees
  • NPM
  • Tokens and internal data
  • What does Node Security do for me?
  • NPX and NSP
  • Command Line CIL
  • Bit Rot or Digital Atrophy
  • How often should you check repos.
  • Advisories
  • If I NPM install?
  • Circle CI or Travis
  • NSP Check
  • What else could I add to the securities?
  • Incorporate security as you build things
  • How do you find the vulnerabilities in the NPM packages
  • Two Factor authentication for NPM
  • Weak Passwords
  • OL Dash?
  • Install Scripts
  • Favorite Security Story?
  • And much more!

Links:

Picks:

Adam

Charles

AJ

Joe

Jan 04 2018

1hr 8mins

Play

Rank #17: 210 JSJ The 80/20 Guide to ES2015 Generators with Valeri Karpov

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Check out React Remote Conf

01:56 - Valeri Karpov Introduction

02:17 - Booster Fuels

03:06 - ES2015 Generators

05:47 - try-catch

07:49 - Generator Function vs Object

10:39 - Generator Use Cases

12:02 - Why in ES6 would they come out with both native promises and generators?

14:04 - yield star and async await

17:06 - Wrapping a Generator in a Promise

19:51 - Testing

20:56 - Use on the Front-end

22:14 - The 80/20 Guide to ES2015 Generators by Valeri Karpov and Tech Writing

Picks

Why and How Testing Can Make You Happier (Aimee)
Pitango Gelato (Aimee)
The Primal Blueprint by Mark Sisson (Chuck)
The Primal Blueprint 21-Day Total Body Transformation (Chuck)
acquit (Valeri)
nightmare (Valeri)
now (Valeri)
The 80/20 Guide to ES2015 Generators by Valeri Karpov (Valeri)

May 04 2016

42mins

Play

Rank #18: JSJ 276: Vue.js with Maximilian Schwarzmüller

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JSJ 276: Vue.js with Maximilian Schwarzmüller         

This episode of JavaScript Jabber features panelists AJ O’Neal, Aimee Knight, and Charles Max Wood. They talk with special guest Maximilian Schwarzmüller about Vue.js. Tune in to find out more!

[00:02:21] Introduction to Maximilian

Maximilian lives in Germany and is a self-taught web developer. He mostly teaches web development on Udemy and his YouTube channel. Vue.js is just one topic that he teaches. He enjoys teaching and passing on information to other web developers: he believes it is the best thing you can do.

[00:03:10] What other courses do you teach?

He tries to cover basic web development topics. On Udemy Maximilian teaches Angular and generic JavaScript courses. He also teaches courses on Angular and Node.js. On his YouTube channel he teaches more back-end development and Node.js courses.

[00:04:00] Elevator Pitch for Vue.js

Vue.js is a new framework that is popular because it is similar to React but also has Angular features. It is easier to learn than React: not everything is in JavaScript and JXS is not included. It is more also flexible and has better performance than Angular 1. Vue.js is easier than Angular 2 both to learn and master. It is still a JavaScript framework, where developers build single page applications or drop in existing applications to enhance views, control parts of a page with JavaScript, get rid of jQuery, and have an easier time creating applications.

[00:05:10] What are some challenges people run into as they learn it?

If developers are brand new to Vue.js, getting started is easy. It has one thing that a lot of frameworks lack which is awesome documentation. Vuejs.org has a comprehension guide that makes getting started simple. There is a general idea that developers still need to learn of how to structure the app, which is similar to React. Developers have to learn how to build components which is used to build the application. The build template is where everything is controlled with Vue.js. JavaScript code is used as well as template syntax.

[00:06:27] So you build the template and then tell it how each part is supposed to behave with JavaScript?

Yes. To get started use Vue instances, which are JavaScript objects, control parts of the page and it is marked by an id on an HTML element. Then, write a Vue template, which is basically HTML code where extra features can be used to easily output a variable. It makes it much easier to control via Vue instance. Then add a code, add a method which changes the property of Vue instance. It works together and is easy to build up templates and control your page with Vue.

[00:11:12] Vue’s Advantages

That depends on the application. Vue.js is easier to learn, which is an advantage when trying to get new developers. The documentation on the website is excellent, which helps when learning the language. Vue also has it’s own single team that develops it’s products, such as the Vue Router and Vue X. It has better performance, but for extremely big projects Angular 4 may be better.

[00:13:38] Does Vue have routing in it?

Vue.js has its own router. The core Vue team develops it, which is a different package that is downloaded separately. The advantage to this is that if you don’t need the router, then you don’t have it in your bundle but can easily add it. Once it is added it integrates nicely.

[00:14:16] How does the Vue router compare to the React router?

The Vue router offers the same features as the React router: nested routes, passing parameters, route guards, etc. The Vue router integrates nicely into the Vue package. It also injects into every component you have and is very simple. All that has to be done is just to execute one line of code and then the router is in the project.

[00:17:10] How often is Vue.js upgraded and how hard is it to keep up?

Vue.js only has two versions. Upgrading from Vue 1 to Vue 2 is easy. The base syntax and framework is still the same, you just need to adjust and move on. Since Vue 2 they released bigger upgrades. There so far haven’t been any issues upgrading, they have added new features, and still use the old code.

[00:19:09] What is the feature with Vue as far as adoption goes?

It is hard to predict but there are indicators that Vue.js has a good future. Vue.js probably will not overtake Angular but it is becoming important for companies in Asia, which is an important market. They have developed an Ionic version of Vue.js. There has also been an ongoing trend on GitHub.

[00:21:20] Why do we keep having new frameworks and versions?

The language of JavaScript itself is seeing rapid development. New features have been added, new web technologies developed, etc. One reason is that developers do more on the web. They want easier ways of building applications. There is no perfect framework so there has to be tradeoffs between the frameworks. There is no perfect solution for every application so need a framework for every application.

[00:23:16] What is left undone in Vue.js?

It is complete as far as something can be complete. Developers are working on service rendering to improve search engine optimization and initial rendering performance. They are also working on progress web app support.

[00:28:02] What drives the way that Vue grows?

There is simplicity in their documentation. While the documentation is simple, the framework is also easy to learn. Maximilian believes that the reason Vue.js took off is because the documentation and framework work together nicely.

[00:31:19] What is going to keep Vue around?

The support is not based on corporation, but there is an Asian company that is developing a framework that uses Vue to with their own product. Because of this, can draw an assumption that they will keep Vue.js around. Vue.js also has a strong community and core team, giving it a good support system.

[00:34:15] What are people using if they want to use Native Apps but they want to use Vue?

They are having a hard time right now. Frameworks for Quasar and Weex are in the early stages. A Vue.js app needs to be built but there are packages that are working in that direction.

[00:37:25] How do you structure your Udemy courses and what do you think of that as a whole?

Maximilian started teaching Udemy courses about one and a half years ago. He really enjoys teaching. Each course follows a similar pattern. He starts with a rough topic, researches the topic to see what is in demand, and builds a course around projects. He then fits all the things he wants to teach into the project, plans the course curriculum, records and edits the lecture videos, and then finally releases the course.

[00:39:22] What do you get the most questions about with your Vue course?

Questions are mixed. Students dive into the course quickly but then pause. Most questions are about the basics. They usually have something to do with the first few sections of the course or setup problems.

Picks         

AJ:

Aimee:

Charles:

Max:

Links

Aug 29 2017

50mins

Play

Rank #19: JSJ 340: JavaScript Docker with Julian Fahrer

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Panel:

  • Aimee Knight
  • AJ O’Neal
  • Joe Eames
  • Charles Max Wood
  • Chris Ferdinandi

Special Guest: Julian Fahrer

In this episode, the panel talks with Julian Fahrer who is an online educator and software engineer in San Francisco, California (USA). The panel and the guest talk about containers, tooling, Docker, Kubernetes, and more. Check out today’s episode!

Show Topics:

0:00 – Advertisement: KENDO UI

1:00 – Chuck: We have today Julian. Julian, please tell us why you are famous?

1:10 – Julian (Guest): I am a software engineer in San Francisco.

1:35 – Chuck: We had you on Elixir Mix before – so here you are! Give us a brief introduction – tell us about the

1:56 – Julian: About 11 hours. You can get it done in about 1 week. It’s a lot to learn. It’s a new paradigm, and I think that’s why people like it.

2:22 – Aimee: How did you dive into Docker? I feel that is like backend space?

2:35 – Julian: I am a full stack engineer and I have been in backend, too.

3:10 – Aimee: I know that someone has been in-charge of our Dev Ops process until the first job I’ve had. When there is a problem in the deployment, I want to unblock myself and not wait for someone else. I think it’s a valuable topic. Why Docker over the other options?

3:58 – Julian: Let’s talk about what Docker is first?

4:12 – Chuck.

4:23 – Julian: Containers are a technology for us to run applications in isolation from each other.

Julian talks in-detail about what contains are, what they do, he gives examples, and more. Check it out here!

5:27 – Chuck: Makes sense to me. I think it’s interesting that you are talking about the dependencies. Because of the way the Docker works it’s consistent across all of your applications.

5:59 – Julian. Yes, exactly.

Julian talks about containers some more!

6:56 – Chuck asks a question about the container, Docker, and others.

7:03 – Guest: You don’t have to worry about your company’s running operating system, and what you want to use – basically everything runs in the container...

7:30 – Chuck: This short-circuits a lot of it.

7:46 – Guest.

8:00 – Chuck: People will use Docker if your employer mandates it. Is there a learning curve and how do you adapt it within the person’s company?

8:25 – Guest.

8:52 – Aimee: We are using it, too.

8:57 – Guest: Awesome!

9:03 – Aimee: The only downfall is that if you have people who are NOT familiar with it – then it’s a black box for us. We can’t troubleshoot it ourselves. I want to be able to unblock from our end w/o having to go to someone else. That’s my only issue I’ve been having.

10:03 – Guest: I want to see that tooling to be honest.

10:12 – Aimee: Can you talk about how Civil and Docker work together?

10:19 – Guest: Yes!

Julian answers the question.

10:56 – Chuck: How much work it is to get a Docker file to get up and running? How much work would it take?

11:18 – Guest: For the development side in about an hour or two – this is if you understand it already. Putting it into production that’s a different story b/c there is a million different ways to do it. It’s hard to put a time on that.

12:24 – Chuck: Let’s assume they have the basic knowledge (they get how server setup takes place) is this something you could figure out in a day or so?

12:47 – Guest: If you have touched Docker then you can do it in a day; if never then not really.

13:02 – Guest: There might be some stones you will fall over.

13:39 – Panel: The part of the learning curve would be...

13:52 – Guest: The idea behind the container is that the container should be disposable. You could throw it away and then start a new one and it’s fresh and clean.

Guest continues with his answer.

15:20 – Chuck: I have seen people do this with their database engine. If you need to upgrade your database then they grab their container...

15:55 – Guest: You don’t have to worry about setting it up - its provided in the container and...

16:09 – Chuck asks a question.

16:17 – Guest: For production, I would go with a hosted database like RJS, Azure, or other options.

Guest continues.

17:13 – Chuck.

17:20 – Guest: If it dies then you need to...

17:30 – Chuck: We talked about an idea of these containers being something you can hand around in your development team.

Chuck asks a question.

17:50 – Guest answers the question. He talks about tooling, containers, web frontend, and more.

18:48 – Guest asks Aimee a question: Are you using Compost?

18:50 – Aimee: I don’t know b/c that is a black box for us. I don’t know much about our Docker setup.

19:00 – Guest to Aimee: Can I ask you some questions?

19:14 – Guest is giving Aimee some hypothetical situations and asks what their process is like.

19:32 – Aimee answers the question.

20:11 – Guest: You have customizing tooling to be able to do x, y, and z.

20:25 – Aimee: They have hit a wall, but it’s frustrating. Our frontend and our backend are different. We are getting 500’s and it’s a black box for us. It’s the way that ops have it setup. I hate having to go to them for them to unblock us.

21:07 – Chuck: I have been hearing about Kubernetes. When will you start to see that it pays off to use it?

21:20 – Guest answers the question.

22:17 – If I have a simple app on a few different machines and front end and job servers I may not need Kubernetes. But if I have a lot of things that it depends on then I will need it?

22:35 – Guest: Yes.

22:40 – Chuck: What are the steps to using it?

22:45 – Guest: Step #1 you install it.

The guest goes through the different steps to use Docker.

25:23 – Aimee: It makes sense that your UI and your database don’t live in the same container, but what about your API and your database should that be separate?

25:40 – Guest: Yes they should be separate.

26:09 – Chuck: What has your experience been with Docker – AJ or Chris?

26:17 – Panel: I have used a little bit at work and so far it’s been a black box for me. I like the IDEA of it, but I probably need to take Julian’s course to learn more about it! (Aimee agrees!)

One thing I would love (from your perspective, Julian) – if I wanted to get started with this (and say I have not worked with containers before) where would I start?

28:22 – Advertisement – Sentry.io

29:20 – Guest: Good question. You don’t have to be an expert (to use Docker), but you have to be comfortable with the command line, though.

30:17 – Panel: Is there a dummy practice within your course?

30:27 – Julian: We run our own web server and...

30:44 – Panel: I need to check out your course!

31:04 – Guest: It is some time investment, but it’s saved me so much time already so it makes it really worth it.

31:38 – Panel: You are a version behind on Ruby.

31:46 – Guest: ...I just want to make code and not worry about that.

32:04 – Chuck: Updating your server – you would update Ruby and reinstall your gems and hope that they were all up-to-date. Now you don’t have to do it that way anymore.

32:37 – Guest: You know it will behave the same way.

32:48 – Guest: I have some experience with Docker. I understand its value. I guess I will share my frustrations. Not in Docker itself, but the fact that there is a need for Docker...

35:06 – Chuck.

35:12 – Panel: We need someone to come up with...

35:40 – Panel: It’s not standard JavaScript.

35:51 – Chuck: One question: How do you setup multiple stages of Docker?

36:12 – Guest: The recommended way is to have the same Docker file used in the development sate and through to production. So that way it’s the same image.

37:00 – Panel: ...you must do your entire configuration via the environmental variables.

37:29 – Chuck asks a question.

37:36 – Panel: If you are using Heroku or Circle CI...there is a page...

38:11 – Guest and Chuck go back-and-forth.

39:17 – Chuck: Gottcha.

39:18 – Guest.

39:52 – Chuck: I have seen systems that have hyberized things like using Chef Solo and...

You do your basic setup then use Chef Solo – that doesn’t’ make sense to me. Have you seen people use this setup before?

40:20 – Guest: I guess I wouldn’t do it.

40:30 – Chuck.

40:36 – Guest: Only reason I would do that is that it works across many different platforms. If it makes your setup easier then go for it.

41:14 – Chuck: Docker Hub – I want to mention that. How robust is that? Can you put private images up there?

41:38 – Guest: You can go TOTALLY nuts with it. You could have private and public images. Also, your own version. Under the hood it’s called container registry. Yeah, you can change images, too.

42:22 – Chuck: Should I use container registry or a CI system to build the Docker system and use it somewhere else?

42:35 – Guest.

43:24 – Chuck: Where can people find your Docker course?

43:30 – Guest: LEARN DOCKER ONLINE! We are restructuring the prices. Make sure to check it out.

44:05 – Chuck: Picks! Where can people find you online?

44:14 – Guest: Twitter! eBook – Rails and Docker! Code Tails IO!

Links:

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Picks:

AJ

Aimee

Chris

Joe

Charles

Julian

Nov 20 2018

58mins

Play

Rank #20: JSJ 371: The Benefits and Challenges of Server-Side Rendering (SSR) with Dan Shappir

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Panel

  • Charles Max Wood
  • Joe Eames
  • Christopher Buecheler
  • Aimee Knight
  • AJ O’Neal

Joined by special guest: Dan Shappir

Episode Summary

In this episode of JavaScript Jabber, special guest Dan Shappir, Performance Tech Lead at Wix, kicks off the discussion by defining server-side rendering (SSR) along with giving its historical background, and touches on the differences between server rendering and server-side rendering. He helps listeners understand in detail how SSR is beneficial for the web and takes questions from the panel about how it affects web performance in cases where first-time users and returning users are involved, and how does SSR fare against technologies such as pre-rendering. He then elaborates on the pitfalls and challenges of SSR including managing and declaring variables, memory leaks, performance issues, handling SEO, and more, along with ways to mitigate them. In the end, Dan sheds some light on when should developers use SSR and how should they start working with it.

Links

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Picks

Christopher Buecheler:

  • Tip - Take some time off once in a while

Aimee Knight:

AJ O’Neal:

  • Fatherhood!

Joe Eames:

Charles Max Wood:

Dan Shappir:

Jul 02 2019

1hr 10mins

Play

MJS 148: Farzad Yousefzadehr

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In this week's episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood interviews Farzad Yousefzadehr, who was a guest on the React Round Up show. As a Senior Software Engineer, Farzad has the cool job of designing and refactoring existing games at Epic Games. He currently lives in Helsinki, Finland, with his lovely wife and cat.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Farzad Yousefzadehr

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May 26 2020

20mins

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JSJ 434: Understanding and Using ES Modules in Node with Gil Tayar

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Gil Tayar gave a presentation recently on ES modules in Node. He joins the panel to discuss how to use and think about ES modules. With considerable pushback from AJ, Gil explains how to start using modules and what the tradeoffs are between modules, script tags, and build tools.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Charles Max Wood
  • Steve Edwards
  • Dan Shappir

Guest

  • Gil Tayar

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AJ O’Neal:

Aimee Knight:

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Steve Edwards:

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Gil Tayar:

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May 19 2020

1hr 21mins

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JSJ 433: Understanding the Browser Layer with Noam Rosenthal

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

Noam Rosenthal has worked in both web and native technologies. He leads off with a discussion of the history of the web, browsers, and specifically webkit. The panel then goes into how browsers and built and discuss the differences between the different browsers.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Steve Edwards
  • Dan Shappir

Guest

  • Noam Rosenthal

"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!

Links

Picks

AJ O’Neal:

Aimee Knight:

Steve Edwards:

Dan Shappir:

  • Eggs

Noam Rosenthal:

  • Follow Noam on Twitter > @realnoam
  • Hyperisolation
  • The Art of Storytelling

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

May 12 2020

52mins

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MJS 147: Kay Plößer

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

Kay Plößer is an German developer who does front-end and mobile development with React. He primarily focuses on developer relations and will be teaching at a University soon. He got started in programming doing basic scripting and game mods to buy game weapons when the game started. He also build IRC bots and programs that ran in IRC. We dive into his journey through development into React and JavaScript.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Kay Plößer

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May 12 2020

33mins

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JSJ 432: Internet of Things (IoT) with Joe Karlsson

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

Joe Karlsson is a developer advocate at MongoDB. He and the panel walk through the different approaches, uses, and libraries for building IoT with JavaScript

Panel

  • Aimee Knight
  • Charles Max Wood
  • AJ O’Neal
  • Dan Shappir
  • Steve Edwards

Guest

  • Joe Karlsson

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AJ O’Neal:

Aimee Knight:

  • Cutting Your own Hair
  • Joe's Appartment

Charles Max Wood:

Steve Edwards:

Dan Shappir:

Joe Karlsson:

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

May 05 2020

57mins

Play

JSJ 431: Personal Branding for Developers with Morad Stern

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

The JSJ panel talks with Morad Stern from Wix about personal branding; what it is, why it’s important for developers, and how to build it.

Panel

  • Steve Edwards
  • AJ O’Neal
  • Dan Shappir

Guest

  • Morad Stern

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AJ O’Neal:

Steve Edwards:

Dan Shappir:

Morad Stern:

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Apr 28 2020

1hr 5mins

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MJS 146: Håkon Krogh

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

Håkon Krogh is a Norweigan developer who focuses on web performance. We start out discussing working from home in the current pandemic. His current company works in Product Information Management. It's a headless ecommerce system. We dive into his experience learning learning to build applications and learning JavaScript and leading a team.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Håkon Krogh

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Apr 28 2020

41mins

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JSJ 430: Learning JavaScript in 2020 with Matt Crook

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

Matt Crook joins the conversation to talk with the JavaScript Jabber panel to talk about his experience going through Nashville Software School. The panel discusses and asks questions about getting into programming, working through the bootcamp, and what prospects are for bootcamp graduates.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Charles Max Wood
  • Steve Edwards
  • Dan Shappir

Guest

  • Matt Crook

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AJ O’Neal:

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Steve Edwards:

Dan Shappir:

Matt Crook:

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

Apr 21 2020

1hr 12mins

Play

JSJ 429: Learning about Postman with Joyce Lin

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 13th to 15th - register now!

Join us as we talk to Joyce Lin, a developer relations advocate with Postman, and we talk about this amazing tool for interacting with APIs. We discuss it’s more well-known features, and also learn about other less well known, but very powerful features that allow users to greatly increase the usefulness of the tool, both for front end and back end developers.

Panel

  • Aimee Knight
  • Steve Edwards

Guest

  • Joyce Lin

Sponsors

____________________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________

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Steve Edwards:

Joyce Lin:

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

Apr 14 2020

40mins

Play

MJS 145: Varya Stepanova

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 14th to 15th - register now!

Varya is an expert in design systems. She talks about the process of working in and building design systems. She learned basic Pascal at school. She did programming exercises on paper. She then got into building web pages for groups she was a part of. She then picked up PHP and went professional at that point. On the front-end, she began picking up JavaScript and worked using Yandex's internal framework. Follow here story through the rest of the podcast.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Varya Stepanova

Sponsors

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______________________________________

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Varya Stepanova:

  • Learn a New Language!

Apr 14 2020

28mins

Play

MJS 144: Josh Ponelat

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 14th to 15th - register now!

Josh Ponelat is Software Architect at SmartBear working on Swagger and OpenAPI. He's from South Africa. Josh's father is a programmer and was heavily influenced by his father. He started with ANSI-C and hacking on shells. He studied graphic design in school. He got back into programming in PHP and MySQL and wound up transitioning to JavaScript.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Josh Ponelat

Sponsors

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______________________________________

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Josh Ponelat:

  • Miro

  • Pour Over Coffee

Charles Max Wood:

Apr 07 2020

40mins

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JSJ 428: The Alphabet Soup of Performance Measurements

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 14th to 15th - register now!

Dan Shappir takes the lead to explain all of the acronyms and metrics for measuring the performance of your web applications. He leads a discussion through the ins and outs of monitoring performance and then how to improve and check up on how your website is doing.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Steve Edwards
  • Dan Shappir

Sponsors

____________________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________

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Picks

AJ O’Neal:

Aimee Knight:

Dan Shappir:

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

Apr 07 2020

1hr 17mins

Play

JSJ 427: How to Start a Side Hustle as a Programmer with Mani Vaya

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 14th to 15th - register now!


Mani Vaya joins Charles Max Wood to talk about how developers can add the enterepreneur hat to the others they wear by starting a side gig. They discuss various ideas around entrepreneurship, the books they got them from, and how they've applied them in their own businesses.

Panel

  • Charles Max Wood

Guest

  • Mani Vaya

Sponsors

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Mani Vaya:

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Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabbber

Mar 31 2020

45mins

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MJS 143: Paige Niedringhaus

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 14th to 15th - register now!

Paige Niedringhaus started her career as a Digital Marketer before making the move to becoming a software developer at the Home Depot. She current works with React and Node building internal apps for them. This episode discusses the ins and outs of making that transition in a semi-recent world and community.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Paige Niedringhaus

Sponsors

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Mar 31 2020

43mins

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JSJ 426: Killing the Release Night with Progressive Delivery with Dave Karow

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JavaScript Remote Conf 2020

May 14th to 15th - register now!


Dave Karow is a developer evangelist for Split. He dives into how you can deliver software sustainably without burning out. His background is in performance and he's moved into smooth deliveries. He pushes the ideas behind continuous delivery and how to avoid getting paid to stay late in "free" pizzas.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal

  • Aimee Knight

  • Charles Max Wood

  • Dan Shappir

Guest

  • Dave Karow

Sponsors

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____________________________________________________________

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Aimee Knight:

Dan Shappir:

AJ O’Neal:

Charles Max Wood

Dave Karow:

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabb

Mar 24 2020

1hr 13mins

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MJS 142: Daniel Caldas

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Daniel Caldas is a Portuguese developer working and living in Singapore. He learned to code in high school programming in Pascal. He moved up to the university and that's where he encountered JavaScript. He wound up doing a bunch of design work, static websites, and jQuery. He explains his journey and learning methods leading to a job working for Zendesk on their CRM.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Daniel Caldas

Sponsors

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______________________________________

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Daniel Caldas:

Charles Max Wood:

Mar 24 2020

34mins

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JSJ 425: The Evolution of JavaScript

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Dan Shappir takes the lead and walks the panel through the history of JavaScript and a discussion on ES6, TypeScript, the direction and future of JavaScript, and what features to be looking at and looking for in the current iteration of JavaScript.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Charles Max Wood
  • Steve Edwards
  • Dan Shappir

Sponsors

  • Taiko - free and open source browser test automation
  • Split

____________________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________

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AJ O’Neal:

Aimee Knight:

Charles Max Wood:

Steve Edwards:

Dan Shappir:

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Mar 17 2020

1hr 18mins

Play

MJS 141: Jared Palmer

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Jared Palmer has been a guest on 3 different shows on Devchat.tv. He's talked to us about Formik, Razzle, and React. He's taking a break from consulting to build up Formik, Inc and tools for forms. He got started in programming by taking a programming class at Cornell on a lark and quickly transitioned out of Investment Banking after graduating from university. His first apps were custom lock screens for mobile phones. We then move through framer and CoffeeScript and eventually in to JavaScript and React.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Jared Palmer

Sponsors

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Jared Palmer:

  • Remote UI (Shopify)

Charles Max Wood:

Mar 17 2020

42mins

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JSJ 424: UI5 and web components with Peter Muessig

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In this episode of JavaScript Jabber the panelists and guest delve into the advantages of the shadow dom, transitioning from polymer js polyfills to native web components when moving for SAP UI to UI5, which works within React, Vue, Angular, and others.

Panel

  • AJ O’Neal
  • Aimee Knight
  • Steve Edwards
  • Dan Shappir

Guest

Sponsors

____________________________________________________________

"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!

____________________________________________________________

Links

Picks

AJ O’Neal:

Aimee Knight

Steve Edwards

Dan Shappir

Peter Müßig

Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber

Mar 10 2020

42mins

Play

MJS 140: Tommy Hodgins

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Tommy Hodgins is a developer that typically works on A/B tests figuring out how to get websites the outcomes they want. He got into JavaScript and front-end technologies and then read a paper that led him to realize the capabilities of writing software to solve problems. He maintains a front-end focus with his A/B testing work and CSS in JS and other work.

Host: Charles Max Wood

Joined By Special Guest: Tommy Hodgins

Sponsors

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Tommy Hodgins:

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Mar 10 2020

29mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

235 Ratings
Average Ratings
149
66
9
4
7

Great discussions 👌

By Broken app garbage - Feb 25 2020
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Always a solid panel of peeps from the industry discussing topics currently saturating my Twitter dev timeline 👍🔥

Only listened once

By jaybytez - Oct 24 2019
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One guy commentator kept interrupting the interviewee and seemed defensive every time his beloved technologies weren’t considered the best option. It became super distracting to listen to and disconnected the flow of the discussion.