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Rank #162 in Business category

Business
Technology
Entrepreneurship

Equity

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #162 in Business category

Business
Technology
Entrepreneurship
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Equity is TechCrunch’s venture capital podcast. In each episode, you'll hear the stories behind the money that runs Silicon Valley. TechCrunch reporter Alex Wilhelm teams up with Danny Crichton and the most notable VCs in the industry to analyze who's raising, who's selling out and who's going public.

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Equity is TechCrunch’s venture capital podcast. In each episode, you'll hear the stories behind the money that runs Silicon Valley. TechCrunch reporter Alex Wilhelm teams up with Danny Crichton and the most notable VCs in the industry to analyze who's raising, who's selling out and who's going public.

iTunes Ratings

169 Ratings
Average Ratings
110
20
17
11
11

5 stars but...

By JackieJomez - Nov 09 2019
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Love the pod. Can we talk less about SoftBank? Lots of other cool stuff going on that’s overlooked

Makes my Friday

By thebigchuzz - Jul 10 2018
Read more
Just wish it was a little longer!

iTunes Ratings

169 Ratings
Average Ratings
110
20
17
11
11

5 stars but...

By JackieJomez - Nov 09 2019
Read more
Love the pod. Can we talk less about SoftBank? Lots of other cool stuff going on that’s overlooked

Makes my Friday

By thebigchuzz - Jul 10 2018
Read more
Just wish it was a little longer!
Cover image of Equity

Equity

Latest release on Feb 21, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 3 days ago

Rank #1: Apple and Amazon buy more companies, and Uber’s unfortunate saga

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Hear what the latest Apple and Amazon acquisitions mean for tech M&A, how the Uber scandals will impact its business, and what one of the industry's top LPs thinks of the state of venture capital right now.

Mar 24 2017

25mins

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Rank #2: More scooter dollars, Slack’s revenue projections, and the IPO traffic jam

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

We’re back! After what I think was our first-ever break, Kate Clark and I sat down to dig into the latest startup venture news. There was a lot. We had to skip a few rounds to squeeze the show down to size, but we still hit the biggest stories.

Jan 18 2019

22mins

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Rank #3: Scooters 2.0, Munchery ghosts, and solving contraceptive deserts

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

This week we had the gang back together with our own Connie Loizos at the helm, Kate Clark in the studio as well, Alex on the phone, and Ed Sim from Boldstart Ventures onboard as well. A good crew for a busy week.

Jan 25 2019

51mins

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Rank #4: Growth is out, profitability is in

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

This week Kate and Alex held the reins as a duo (check out our chat with Greylock's Sarah Guo from last week here) to dig into an enormous raft of news. And don't worry, it's not all late-stage happenings. We're discussing early-stage news every week because that's what the listeners want!

Up top we dug into Kate's excellent work covering the Superhuman founder's new micro fund, or at least his attempt at raising such a fund. Our main question is how can he be a good VC and a good executive at the same time? Folks don't tend to do both at the same time because they're each more than full-time jobs. Having two such gigs sounds hard.

But hey, it's not just athletes and musicians who can bring outsized interest to deals. In-demand founders can have a similar effect. We'll be keeping a close eye on the upcoming fun. Moving on.

Next we turned to the other end of the venture landscape, looking at Founder's Fund's new capital vehicles. With a combined $2.7 billion in eventual capital, FF is hoping to build a financial redoubt from which they can rain capital down on late-stage targets wherever they may be.

Is it a bit late in the cycle to cut late-stage checks to companies that might otherwise go public? That's the gamble so far as we can see it, but perhaps with WeWork's IPO dreams turned to nightmares, there's demand among a group of companies for another 12 months in the private markets. And that means more money is required.

On the theme of more money, Lime is raising some more and we were treated to new financial results from The Information's great work getting the figures. Or discussion asked the question of how far the company's unit economics could improve. Kate said that Lime is investing a lot now in developing better hardware, so their scooters can last more than 5 minutes on the roads before breaking down. She thinks things will start looking up when its deploying only new, fancy, good scooters. Alex is bearish.

Before we could turn back to the early-stage market and wrap up, we had to cover the latest from WeWork. SoftBank did in the end come and save the day (at least for now) for the company, meaning that WeWork lives on, though layoffs are expected sooner rather than later. Who knows what the future holds...

And finally, Vendr, a company that is profitable, raised a $2 million round. This is interesting because, again, it's profitable! And the startup willing shared some financial data with us--a rarity. Read more about the recent Y Combinator graduate here.

Oct 25 2019

33mins

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Rank #5: Tesla, Apple, Spotify earnings and the DocuSign, Smartsheet IPO Recap

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Today is Katie Roof's last day on Equity. She will be missed as she moves on to her next endeavor. This week she was joined by TechCrunch's Connie Loizos and M.G. Siegler from Google Ventures. They talked Tesla, Apple, Spotify earnings and the DocuSign and Smartsheet IPO Recap

May 04 2018

26mins

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Rank #6: Changes at Y Combinator, $1.5B more for ridehailing, and Airbnb buys HotelTonight

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.We're back to basics this week with Kate Clark at the helm, Alex Wilhelm in the sidecar, and a stack of venture capital news and happenings to get through. And to make everyone feel included, we kicked off the episode with a roll-call of new VC funds.Then, of course, we dug into the recent news out of Y Combinator. The famed accelerator is shopping around for a San Francisco HQ, signaling the end of an era where Silicon Valley ruled the world as home to YC and other the top-tier venture funds that have since moved South to The City by the Bay.Next up was the new Grab round, a fresh $1.46 billion from the Vision Fund into what TechCrunch noted is now a $4.5 billion Series H. Amazingly, we've typed that out correctly. Grab, now topped up with about $8.8 billion in capital raised is not the ridehailing shop that has raised the most capital, though it does round out the top three.Next, Alex wanted to talk about Chime. Kate isn't too big on fintech, but the $200 million round into the neo-bank brought its total capital raised to $300 million. That's a lot of coin for the company which grew its accounts from one million last year, to three million. (Don't forget that Acorns raised $105 million earlier this year.)Changing gears, the Latin American scene, already hotting up, is going to get even warmer with the arrival of a new $2 billion fund from SoftBank. Called the SoftBank Innovation Fund, the Japanese telecom giant wants to raise a total of $5 billion to invest in emerging markets across South America. I know what you're thinking: damn, that's a lot of cash. Yes, yes it is.Final,ly this week, hours before we hit record, Airbnb agreed to acquire the popular hotel booking app HotelTonight for what's reported to be about a flat price to its last valuation (~$465 million). The deal made us wonder if the Airbnb IPO could be delayed due to the roughly half-billion deal (provided that reports bear out). We haven't confirmed the transaction price, so more from us when we have it. Also, this is hardly Airbnb's first buy.That and we had fun. See you all in seven days!

Mar 08 2019

26mins

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Rank #7: Everyone Raises $100M, Pinterest And Zoom Want To Go Public, And HelloSign

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines. This week we recorded as a trio: Connie Loizos holding down the studio with our guest, the ever-present Jeff Clavier of Uncorked Capital. I dialed in from the what was the East Coast, back before it froze over.

Feb 01 2019

31mins

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Rank #8: Spotify steadies, DocuSign’s big year, and scooters are the new blockchain

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

This week Katie Roof and I were joined by David Welsh, part of KKR’s growth equity shop. (His formal title: Member and Head of TMT Growth Equity, where “member” actually means “partner,” it turns out.)

And what a week it was. There was news aplenty to get through, not the least of which that Spotify’s shares — as of airtime, at least — were being pretty reasonable. After rising sharply above their reference price, they fell some and then recovered a bit on Thursday.

That success, to pick a word, you might think would be an inspiration to other startups. However, our guest made a good case that the market is not about to see a bunch of other companies follows suit in putting together direct listings. Spotify was a bit of an outlier, it seems.

Moving along, we peeked into DocuSign’s latest numbers, which show declining net losses (GAAP, of course), and growing revenue. In short, the firm’s updated numbers that include calendar 2017 (long story, more here) look pretty good, and now DocuSign’s impending IPO’s only real question left concerns pricing.

Equity drops every Friday at 6:00 am PT, so subscribe to us on iTunes, Overcast, Pocketcast, Downcast and all the casts.

Apr 06 2018

27mins

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Rank #9: 'Undercorns,' IPOs and what going public is really about

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.Kate and Alex were here yesterday to dig into the Uber IPO filing; for today's episode, we put that aside and discussed everything else that happened this week. Lucky for us, for the second half of our Thursday podcast-a-thon, the excellent Phil Libin joined us. He was the perfect guest for an IPO-heavy week.You may know Libin as a co-founder of Evernote, or part of General Catalyst, a venture shop. What's he up to now? We took the time to let him explain it, so listen up and you'll find out.This week we talked about a few other IPO results, including what's going on with Lyft's stock price (it's going down and Uber's expected IPO price range isn't helping) in the wake of the company's own hugely successful IPO (in terms of capital raised). Lyft may be losing altitude due simply to hype wearing off but at least now we understand how important its first earnings call will be. We turned next to Pinterest, the buzzy visual search engine that's now being called an 'undercorn.' We didn't spend too much time mocking the phrase, interestingly, instead, our guest explained his philosophical stance on IPOs, in general. He spoke for a while and Alex and Kate nodded their heads in agreement. They especially agreed with his claim that companies shouldn't have to sacrifice culture for profits, amen! Staying on the IPO theme, PagerDuty was next. It's IPO performance has been huge, and big, and impressive. And in a wave of appreciation towards everyone who has listened to the show for a long time, we did not spend 14 minutes arguing about IPO pricing. You're welcome! We ended with Kate doing a rapid-fire review of all the venture capital funds that announced closes this week because there were a lot, including Slow Ventures, Defy.VC and Texas's LiveOak Venture Partners. If you're already itching for more Equity, we have a feeling next week will be another heavy news week with Pinterest and Zoom's IPO on the docket.

Apr 12 2019

29mins

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Rank #10: Robinhood raises, Flipkart exits, and MoviePass is running out of cash

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-themed podcast where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

This week Matthew Lynley, Connie Loizos and myself were joined by Villi Iltchev, a partner at August Capital.

It was good that we had a full crew on deck, as the news flew thick and varied this week. In honor of the news cycle, we took on as much of it as we could inside a single episode.

And as we’re sure that you guessed, we had to talk about the Flipkart-Walmart deal first. The staggering transaction sees the American IRL commerce giant with a proven appetite for e-commerce players bring the India unicorn into its fold. This is the second multi-billion-dollar startup deal for Walmart in recent memory. (Jet.com was the first unicorn to find new nest in the Walton’s rafters.)

May 11 2018

29mins

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Rank #11: Can you really predict the next generation of unicorns?

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

It's a good week here at Equity HQ because our two co-hosts are both back at the same time! Kate Clark and Alex Wilhelm, after each of them taking some time off, led the show today, digging into a wealth of news and happenings.

Here's a quick rundown of what happened on the show this week!

Postmates is still working on its IPO! Despite some reports indicating that the popular on-demand delivery company was talking to rival players about a possible sale, the company's CEO said this week that his firm is still looking to go public. (It's also picking up money this year, and talent.) Selfishly we love this, as we want to read its S-1 and see its numbers, something that wouldn't happen if it wound up subsumed into a larger company. Say, Uber for example.
DouYu priced its IPO at the low-end of its range, but the offering did add lots of new capital to its coffers. Not every IPO raises its range and prices above the heightened interval, DouYu reminds us. But the company's debut is yet another China-based unicorn going public on the U.S. markets, so we had no choice but to pay attention to the streaming and esports-themed company. Recall that Huya, a similar company, went public previously (more here).
CrowdStrike's first earnings report was a success. The cybersecurity business focused on endpoint protection posted revenues of $96.1 million on GAAP net losses of $26 million in the first quarter of fiscal year 2020. The company, if you remember, completed a $612 million NASDAQ initial public offering in June.
The next unicorn list contains some obvious companies (Rothy's, Next Trucking, etc.) and some surprise entries (Lattice?).
100 Thieves has lots of new money, and esports is cool. That's a quick summary, but in detail, the firm added a $35 million Series B to its accounts less than a year after it raised a $25 million Series A. When a firm raises an extra round that quickly, it usually means things are going well.
Patreon raised a big new round. You're all familiar with Patreon, a platform that supports creators. Can a pivot toward SaaS accelerate its path toward a billion-dollar valuation? We think so.
Substack, a plucky favorite of the journalist scene, has fresh capital! Because both Alex and Kate are authors of their very own newsletters (yes, they have a podcast too, sorry), they had plenty of thoughts about this one.

Next week Kate and Alex are back and we may even have a special guest back with us. So make sure you are subscribed, and we'll be right back in just seven days.

Jul 19 2019

28mins

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Rank #12: Spotify’s anti-IPO, Dropbox’s going public, Amazon’s $1B doorbell; and more money for DoorDash

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We had the full crew on hand this week with Matthew Lynley, Katie Roof, and myself, along with Mar Hershenson from Pear Ventures who stepped into the guest chair. It was a damn busy week, with news raining down from the skies. We had to pick the best, so we went with the biggest rounds and exits. You are welcome.

First up, Spotify’s massive not-really-an-IPO, which has a listed $1 billion maximum raise that won’t happen. Indeed, the company is racing ahead with its direct listing, which should see the firm just start trading. You need to get under the hood of its numbers to grok the music streaming business. But, to be clear, if anyone is making money off of streaming, it certainly isn’t Spotify.

Next up we chatted about the Dropbox IPO in light of Box’s recent earnings (and what Box’s recent earnings did for its revenue multiple). Dropbox publicly filed when Box was valued at essentially all-time-highs. Now, after Box shed about a quarter of its value, one of Dropbox’s most critical market comps is worth a lot less.

Also in the news this week was Amazon’s $1 billion purchase of Ring, a connected home company. The value of the deal was actually greater than $1 billion, though no one seems to know precisely how much more. Even more, it’s not the only deal in the space worth mentioning.

All that and we found time to noodle about DoorDash’s massive SoftBank feast, which far more than doubled its capital raised to date. Spending $100 billion, as it turns out, is hard.

Mar 02 2018

36mins

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Rank #13: Pinterest and Lyft move closer to IPO and LPs question the Vision Fund's investment strategy

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

What a week. It had looked a bit quiet with just a few big rounds to cover. I was looking forward to a relaxed episode, frankly. But no, as Kate and I were prepping the show notes, the News Gods opened the heavens and dropped a fifty-weight of mana right on our heads.

Feb 22 2019

25mins

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Rank #14: SoftBank's triple, Pinterest is going public, and the market meltdown

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This week we had 75 percent of the core crew on hand to chat: Connie Loizos, Danny Crichton, and myself. Kate will be back on the show early next year, we promise. We were also joined by Menlo Ventures' Venky Ganesan who was a super great addition to the team.

There was a lot to get through. In fact, we had to toss a few things overboard toward the end due to time. So, we didn't get to US-China cross-border venture flows, or the new Lightspeed China fund, but we did dig into:

SoftBank's latest three mega investments. SoftBank let loose a trio of titanic checks into three companies, including $385 million into Fair, a car-focused company, $400 million into Relay Therapeutics, which deals with "protein motion," and $500 million into Cambridge Mobile Telematics. That's what, $1.285 billion announced in a single week?

Pinterest's impending IPO. As expected, Pinterest is going public. We riffed on its recent revenue growth and the timing of its debut. Honestly, I'm pretty giddy to read this S-1, and I doubt that I am alone.

The US market's crisis. Recording this late in the day on the 20th, we cut the episode right after US tech stocks took a pounding. Dropbox fell under its IPO price as other SaaS players like Box took big hits. Social fell, as Snap and Twitter both swooned, the former falling under $5 per share temporarily. The pain went on, and on, and on.

Big Chinese tech stocks at 52-week lows. It's not only American tech stocks that are in trouble, however; Chinese tech shops that have already gone public are taking their lumps as well. Indeed, as Danny detailed, many firms that were running hot before are now testing full-year lows.

Equity's impending two-week vacation. And to celebrate all of that, this podcast is taking the first two weeks of 2019 off. Mostly so that TechCrunch can decamp to Vegas for CES, but also because after more than 100 episodes, we need to catch our breath. (And restock the fridge with Red Bull. Danny did yawn on this episode, after all!)

Next week we have a special holiday episode involving the ever-brilliant Connie and a guest. Past that, as mentioned above, we are off for two weeks. So, we'll be back as a group in the middle of January.

Dec 21 2018

34mins

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Rank #15: Sam Altman’s bet against Slack

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

This week Kate and Alex broke the discussion into two main themes. The first dealt with early-stage companies, and the second, as you can imagine, later-stage affairs. Don't worry, we don't get to SoftBank for quite some time.

Up top, we dug into Kate's story about Quill, a formerly stealthy company that could be taking on Slack. That or something similar to Slack. Next, we turned to ManiMe, a startup in the beauty space that raised a smaller $2.6 million to take on a market that is valued in the billions.

After that it was time to leave the auspices of the early-stage market and move to, of all things, a public company. GrubHub reported earnings this week. It went poorly. Alex wanted to riff over the company's earnings report and what it could mean for startups that are competing with GrubHub, a leader in the food delivery space that DoorDash and Postmates would prefer to lead themselves.

What impact GrubHub may have on the highly-valued on-demand companies isn't clear yet, but will be pretty damn interesting to see when it does land.

Sticking to the later-stage markets, Alex dug into the problems at Wag which is struggling and looking for a sale despite raising a castle of cash from the Vision Fund. Kate followed that up with notes on problems at Katerra. The Information is reporting this week that the business is going through a number of layoffs and we're wondering if it will suffer the same fate of some of SoftBank's other investments.

And, finally, the changing face of things at SoftBank itself. The great money spigot is slowly cutting flow. How many unicorns that will strand isn't yet clear. But surely it can't be zero.

Nov 01 2019

30mins

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Rank #16: Unpacking DoorDash's $410M Caviar acquisition

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

This week Kate and Alex were back to dig through a surprising number of fresh rounds and new funds along with a little breaking news. The traditional VC summer is nowhere to be seen in 2019, so expect the show to stay packed for the foreseeable future.

DoorDash's decision to buy Caviar from Square upended our agenda. The decacorn's decision to drop $410 million in cash and stock on an asset that Square had spent around $90 million on was nearly confusing. Square couldn't offload the damn thing for $100 million back in 2016; Jack's second company has now shed an unprofitable arm that looked less and less core to its operations as time has gone along. And DoorDash turned cash and stock into a bit of growth.

Next on the docket was Clearbanc. The company, which wants to disrupt venture capital by popularizing the revenue-based financing model, raised a $50 million round and announced a $250 million fund. We're keeping a close eye on this company, as its fast-growth is relatively unmatched. Plus, Kate's interviewing Clearbanc co-founder Michele Romanow at TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco, our annual conference that brings together the leaders of tech today. So that's fun.

In this week's edition of SaaS Watch, Monday.com raised $150 million at a $1.9 billion valuation. The corporate task management and productivity company is another firm selling software to help teams work together more efficiently. Slack, Asana, Notion and others are working in related areas.

Our second to last topic was Compass. There wasn't enough time to go too deep but here's the TL;DR: Compass raised a whopping $370 million on a valuation of $6.4 billion.

And finally, PowerPlant ventures raised a second, larger fund. The new $165 million vehicle will follow the first (a $42 million capital pool, as TechCrunch reported), investing in plant-based food companies. With the epic rise of Beyond Meat on the public markets, plant-based foods are hot and investors want a bite of the results. Also, we dig niche, focused funds.

Reminder, you can connect with us via email at equitypod@techcrunch.com. We're open to feedback, suggestions and even compliments!

Aug 02 2019

23mins

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Rank #17: Unpacking Away's $1.4B valuation, the startup studio model and CrowdStrike's S-1

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.This week was something a bit special for the team, albeit in a sad way. It marked the last episode in which we'd all be together in the current TechCrunch office. It's a place we've spent so much time in so we were all a bit nostalgic. (TC is moving offices, nothing else is changing!)Anyway, there was news to discuss!After Alex went through what he called a "mid-quarter check-in" we got into the meat of things, kicking off with Kate's recent story on Madrona's new startup studio. The $11 million that will be spent on spinning up ideas and spinning out companies forms a model that could be exported to other cities. In Kate's view, there are a few other cities in the nation where the idea could work.After that, we dug into two different pieces of scooter news (Boo!), namely that you can get a Boosted-branded electric scooter for $1,600 or the new Bird One scooter for around $1,300. You know, if you can't find one to rent and want to absorb the maintenance and charging headaches yourself.Next, we turned to Away, a brand you would recognize if we showed you its most famous product. Away has raised another $100 million in Series D funding at a $1.4 billion valuation. Sure, that's a big jump from its $400 million Series C valuation but we think it makes sense.After that, we had to get to the latest from Impossible Foods, which is now sitting atop $300 million fresh dollars. This announcement comes hot off the heels of Impossible Foods' partnership with Burger King.Finally, we turned to the latest S-1 filing from tech: CrowdStrike. You can read Kate's notes here, and Alex's here, but the gist is that this company will go public, the only question is how to price it.Oh, and Slack is pulling off its direct listing on June 20th. Get hyped!

May 17 2019

27mins

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Rank #18: Magic Leap gets $461M more, Travis goes VC, and HQ Trivia scales up

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Mar 09 2018

34mins

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Rank #19: The VCs behind Libra, Facebook's new cryptocurrency

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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

Sadly, Equity co-host Alex Wilhelm is out this week, but for good reason: He's getting married this weekend. Fortunately, we had the esteemed TechCrunch editor Danny Crichton step in to discuss Slack's direct listing, Facebook's new cryptocurrency, the scooter cash desert, startup founder salaries and more with Equity co-host Kate Clark.

We began this week's episode with the latest Slack news. The enterprise communications business was said to price its shares at $26 apiece Wednesday afternoon, valuing the company at around $15.7 billion. We taped this episode on Wednesday, the day before Slack's direct listing. It's now Friday. We'll be back next week to unpack Slack's initial performance on the public markets.

Then, we turned to Facebook's new cryptocurrency, Libra, which will let you buy things or send money to people with nearly zero fees using interoperable third-party wallet apps or Facebook’s own Calibra wallet that will be built into WhatsApp, Messenger and its own app. As Kate mentioned in the podcast, if you're curious at all about Libra, read TechCrunch's Josh Constine's deep dive here. And, of course, listen to the latest episode to learn more about the role VCs have played in the development of the token and what it means for crypto startups.

Next up on the agenda was scooters because we can't seem to tape a single episode of Equity without mentioning VCs favorite sector. The news wasn't great this week, however. We're hearing that Lime, a scooter startup that has raised hundreds of millions in venture capital funding, is having a tough time landing fresh funding. That's a big problem because hardware is a tough and expensive business and if Lime -- and Bird for that matter -- aren't able to secure additional capital, well, it's goodbye scooters.

Finally, Danny and Kate chatted about startup founder salaries. There's not much written on this topic and comprehensive founder salary data is hard to come by. Fortunately, TechCrunch's Ron Miller did a little digging to find out just how much VC-backed entrepreneurs are being paid these days. The results are surprising.

As usual, we'll be back next week. Thanks for listening!

Jun 21 2019

27mins

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Rank #20: Taking Tesla Private, WeWork And Uber Earnings, And What Happened To Crypto

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Production note: Alex’s mic was a bit whack until the 16-minute mark. Please forgive the issue, we noticed and fixed it as fast as we could. Hugs and love!

Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.

This week was a corker. We had Alex Wilhelm in-studio with our guest Minal Hasan, founder of K2 Global, and TechCrunch’s Danny Chriton jumped in from New York to help the crew dig through the biggest and best stuff from the last seven days.

It’s been busy, to say the least. First, we took a look at the Elon-Musk-taking-Tesla-private-situation, which has kept Markets Twitter in suspense for days. We didn’t really get to talk about the Grimes-Azealia Banks stuff, but, hey, stay in your lane and what not. Don’t forget that the latest Telsa upheaval comes on the heels of the firm’s pretty good earnings report.

Next, we took a look at earnings. Not of public companies, mind, but two unicorns that have become so large as to require regular financial disclosure. So, we took a peek into what Uber and WeWork had cooking. In short:

WeWork loses a lot of money, and despite its impressive growth we have some concerns;
Uber loses a lot of money, but due to its impressive growth our group was (on average) not too worried.
Put into simple terms, WeWork’s long-term lease situation has us worried, while Uber’s losses compared to its net revenue seem kinda alright given other financial metrics. Place your own bets, of course.

Moving along we took a dig into the NIO IPO, which you probably haven’t heard about yet. It’s another electric car company, but this time from China. And it’s raising a lot after having essentially zero history as a revenue-generating company. What could go wrong!

And finally, crypto and all that has happened to your favorite coin recently. Hasan was on hand with a grip of good points on the matter. She was a pretty damn great guest.

That’s it for this week, hang tight and come see us at Disrupt.

Aug 17 2018

33mins

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