Cover image of The Principles of War - Lessons from Military History on Strategy, Tactics and Leadership.
(52)
History
Government

The Principles of War - Lessons from Military History on Strategy, Tactics and Leadership.

Updated about 8 hours ago

History
Government
Read more

Learn the lessons of military history by looking at the great battles through the lens of the Principles of War. Part of the enduring nature of war, all good Generals follow the 10 Principles of War. The great Generals of history have the ability to know which of the principles are most important at the decisive moments of the campaign.We study the great battles to draw the lessons on strategy, tactics and leadership.

Read more

Learn the lessons of military history by looking at the great battles through the lens of the Principles of War. Part of the enduring nature of war, all good Generals follow the 10 Principles of War. The great Generals of history have the ability to know which of the principles are most important at the decisive moments of the campaign.We study the great battles to draw the lessons on strategy, tactics and leadership.

iTunes Ratings

52 Ratings
Average Ratings
44
5
2
1
0

Not a professional

By frenchie frier - Dec 07 2019
Read more
But find this very interesting.

Loved the Long Tan Interviews

By Nadir_E - Oct 27 2019
Read more
Great detail and insight while relating the history of the battle of Long Tan - keep it up.

iTunes Ratings

52 Ratings
Average Ratings
44
5
2
1
0

Not a professional

By frenchie frier - Dec 07 2019
Read more
But find this very interesting.

Loved the Long Tan Interviews

By Nadir_E - Oct 27 2019
Read more
Great detail and insight while relating the history of the battle of Long Tan - keep it up.
Cover image of The Principles of War - Lessons from Military History on Strategy, Tactics and Leadership.

The Principles of War - Lessons from Military History on Strategy, Tactics and Leadership.

Latest release on Jan 25, 2020

Read more

Learn the lessons of military history by looking at the great battles through the lens of the Principles of War. Part of the enduring nature of war, all good Generals follow the 10 Principles of War. The great Generals of history have the ability to know which of the principles are most important at the decisive moments of the campaign.We study the great battles to draw the lessons on strategy, tactics and leadership.

Rank #1: 38 - The experience of women in the Soviet Military in WW2.

Podcast cover
Read more

This podcast looks at the contribution of Soviet women to the military in the Great Patriotic War.

Based on the The Unwomanly Face of War, by Svetlana Alexievich which received a Nobel Prize for Literature. 

We discuss:

  • Women in the Air Transport Auxiliary
  • Mary Ellis, the ferry pilot with over 1,000 missions
  • Natalya Meklen, one of the Nacht Hexen with over 800 combat missions in a Po 2. 

What does the female contribution to Total War mean for a moral centre of gravity.

Check out the show notes for more details on the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

May 21 2019

27mins

Play

Rank #2: 35 - The Defence of Nui Dat

Podcast cover
Read more

We continue our discussion with Dave Sabben about the Battle of Long Tan.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

  • Long Tan
  • The Defence of Nui Dat
  • NVA Casualties, 275th NVA Regiment and D445 Battalion.

Mar 24 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #3: 23 - Long Tan 1: Readiness, Conscription and the Nashos

Podcast cover
Read more

We start our look at the Battle of Long Tan, which occured on the 18th August 1966, 4km east of the Australian Task Force base at Nui Dat.  Outnumber 20:1, the Australians took 18 KIA and 24 WIA in one of the most important and most famous battles of the whole Australian involvement in Long Tan.

Our guide through Australian Military's History most famous rubber plantation is Dave Sabben.  Dave was the Platoon Commander of 12 Platoon, Delta Company on that day at Long Tan. 

Conscription has been used by many countries through history as they rapidly increase the size of their defence forces in response to changing strategic circumstances, circumstances that have changed quickly and require a faster response than could be achieved with the full time Defence Force.

How did the Australian Defence Force mobilised for operations in Vietnam?  We look at conscription and the history of professional armies.

We start by looking at some of the components of a professional army and what the role of conscription is within the concept of National readiness.  Professional armies are very expensive to maintain and so we look at 2 components of readiness that are used to decrease the cost of having a large standing force. 

How was conscription for Vietnam different to conscription in Australia during World War 2?

Dave starts by talking us through the conscription process and his initial training at Kapooka. 

We look at the reason for the conscription in the 1960's.

Dave discusses what the aim of the training program was and the skills that officers were to receive at Scheyville. 

How was the training program designed and how were leadership skills developed at OTU Scheyville?

Check out the show notes for the podcast for images and more details for this and other podcast episodes.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 14 2018

26mins

Play

Rank #4: 2 - The Japanese and Allied Centres of Gravity for the Malaya Campaign

Podcast cover
Read more

The Centre of Gravity is that characteristic, capability or locality from which a force, nation or alliance derives its freedom of action, strength or will to fight. 

For the British, the CoG was the Singapore Naval Base.  It was the fundamental part of the defence of the whole of South East Asia.  In times of need the Royal Navy would sail out to Singapore and defeat all comers and ensure that the Empire was secure.  The port at Singapore was central to the defence of Australia.  The base wasn't big enough for the fleet required to keep the seas free.  The fleet was unlikely to sally forth if decisively engaged in Europe, so the fleet base was too small for a fleet that was unlikely ever sail there.  It turned out to be the second largest graving dock in the world at the time.

We look at how the Singapore Strategy became increasingly untenable, but no one was prepared to

In 1940 it became apparent that the Navy would not be able to sail to Singapore 'for the foreseeable future."

LT GEN Percival conducted an analysis of the defence of Singapore before the war.  This dictated that the defence of Singapore would need to be conducted in Malaya and northern Malaya at that.

As the war progressed, Churchill hoped that the US would provide the Navy required to support the British in the Far East, if provoked.

With no Navy to defend the base, the defence of Malaya fell to the Air Force.  With not enough planes and the planes they had being too old, the last line of defence would be the Army.

The defence of the base dictated the way that the Battle of Malaya was fought.

For the Japanese, the CoG analysis is a lot easier.  It was the tank.

The tanks the Japanese had were not great and the tactics they used were not modern, but they had tanks, used them very aggressively and the British had no tanks in Malaya.  The Japanese used the tanks for filleting attacks which were devastating, especially against forces that were not well versed in combined arms, or even anti tank weapons.

A Critical Vulnerability of tanks, of course, is the logistics tail required.  How will Yamashita overcome this?

Mar 15 2018

28mins

Play

Rank #5: 30 - Terrain Analysis for a Social Media War

Podcast cover
Read more

For an information operation that is fought of Facebook, how do you identify the Avenues of Approach?

We use OCOKA to conduct the terrain analysis for Information Analysis.  We look to orientate everyone to the human terrain in an information operation that is conducted using social media.

Observation and Fields of Fire:  Observation is no longer blocked by terrain nor limited by range.  The Internet Research Agency is located in Russia, but they are able to conduct operations as if they were based in Washington DC.  Tools like Twitterfall.  We look at spearfishing email attacks.  Facebook has tools inbuilt to enable adjusting the fall of shot for each of the posts that you are using. 

Cover and Concealment:  In a Social Media war, cover comes from the privacy settings.  Cover is asymmetric in a Social Media war.  We compare Op Tidal Wave 2, a conventional propaganda campaign with leaflet drops, compared to how it could be conducted with Social Media.

Obstacles:  We look at culture and language – grammar in particular.  These are the real barriers for operations conducted on Social Media.   

Key and Decisive Terrain:  The concept of key terrain is fundamentally changed when operations move onto social media.  We compare the 228 massacre in Taiwan and the Key Terrain there with disintermediation that social media creates.

Avenues of Approach:  Traditionally the enemy is canalised into an engagement area, before they can reach their objective.  Social Media war can strike directly at civilians in a target country.  There is no physical terrain to defend.  The avenues of approach now depend on the target demographic – Linkedin, vKontact, Facebook or Snapchat.  We briefly discuss the evolution of avenues of approach for information operations. 

This concludes the ground brief for social media operations.  Are there any questions?

Check out the show notes for the podcast for images and more details for this and other podcast episodes.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Jan 10 2019

30mins

Play

Rank #6: Firepower 31: Western Front 1917 Plenary Session

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series. 

This Plenary Session is conducted by BRIG Philip Winter AM, CSC (Retired)

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 29 2019

19mins

Play

Rank #7: 18 - The Center of Gravity at the Battle of Cannae

Podcast cover
Read more

In a surprise move, we look 2,200 years to look at the Battle of Cannae, a defeat so severe that it is said that every mother in Rome mourned the death of a son.  How could such a crushing defeat of a Roman Army.

In 1992 the Center of Gravity construct was introduced into LWD 1, The Fundamentals of Land Warfare and it has been confusing people ever since.

What is it?  How to build one to give you a list of targetable critical vulnerabilities that you can use to achieve your desired endstate.

Cannae was a double envelopment at Cannae, and has been replicated on numerous times since then.

We look at the Battle of the Trebia and also the Battle of Lake Trasimene.  How did Rome respond to these crushing defeats?

How did Fabius functionally dislocate the Carthaginian Army's cavalry?

What is the difference between the tactical, operational, and strategic level?  What is above the military strategic level of war?

How did Grand Strategy impact on the Fabien tactics that the Roman Army was using?

How did Varro and Paulus manage the Army after taking control from Fabius?

Hannibal has 50,000 troops, but he is faced by a Roman army 86,400. The size of the Roman Army to Gisgo was astonishing.

When it comes to unity of Command, how does having 2 consuls in command of the Roman army work?

The center of gravity is the key characteristic, capability or locality from which a force derives its freedom of action, strength or will to fight.  What was the CoG that Hannibal was targeting at Cannae?

Check out the show notes for the podcast for images and more details for this and other podcast episodes.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Aug 08 2018

29mins

Play

Rank #8: 33 - The practice of Mission Command

Podcast cover
Read more

We look at the current doctrine around Mission Command.

This follows on from our podcast interview with BRIG Ulf Henricsson and the performance of Nordbat 2 in Bosnia.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Mar 17 2019

36mins

Play

Rank #9: Firepower 14: New technology: Munitions, fuses and production for Artillery in WW1

Podcast cover
Read more

This lecture by LT COL David Brooks is presented by BRIG John Cox.

We look at the changes in the technology and the industrial base as Britain and Australia moved to an industrial war footing for the production and development of artillery ammunition.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Apr 30 2019

16mins

Play

Rank #10: Firepower 30: The Gunners of 101st Battery - Lance Bombardier Lindsay Barret DCM

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series. 

The presentation was authored by MAJ Darryl Kelly, OAM (Retired) and is presented by LT COL Jim Catchlove RAA (Retired)

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 27 2019

19mins

Play

Rank #11: 3 - Malaya Campaign Terrain and comparing Japanese and Allied Doctrine

Podcast cover
Read more

The British planned to use Artillery and Air Power to defend Malaya.

Malaya is hot and humid and it has the 29th longest coastline (lots of areas for conducting amphibious operations).  There is a steep mountain range splitting the country between the East and West, and there are very few laterals over the ranges.

The road infrastructure improved over time to support the rubber and tin industries in Malaya and this enabled easy road movement.  They are often 2 lane highways and in a large number of places the roads are cut into the hills forming defiles, perfect for the defence.

The Air Force constructs a number of airfields. Little consideration was given to the provision of local defence for these airfields.  This dictates the ground that the Army is required to defend.

The human terrain consists of British expats, Chinese, Malays, and Indians.  The Chinese are very co-operative with the British, but the Malays, who are exploited as cheap labour, are more co-operative with the Japanese.  Cheap wages for labourers create discontent among the Malays and Indians.  The Indians, being exploited for labour, this increased feelings of Indian Nationalism. 

Racism exacerbated the tensions between the Indians and the British.  Britain relied on a massive expansion of the Indian Army.  The IIIrd Indian Corps had a lot of junior, poorly trained troops.

In Australia, there was a pool of 80,000 in the Commonwealth Military Force.  This pool created 6th Division, 7th Division and 8th Division.  Eighth Div would provide the troops from Australia who would serve in Singapore and Malaya.

The Japanese had been our allies in WW1.  We discuss the Marco Polo incident and the experience that the Japanese troops had prior to the invasion.  The Japanese had been on a war footing for a long time and their Army was much better trained and equipped.

We ran out of time for Doctrine.  Next episode we will try to make the doctrine interesting, if not fascinating!

Mar 15 2018

24mins

Play

Rank #12: 47 - Military Innovation and Creativity with GEN Kenney and the Battle of the Bismarck Sea

Podcast cover
Read more

Why was the 5th Air Force different in the way that it innovated tactically, mechanically and organisationally?

We look at how GEN Kenney lead the 5th Air Force and prepared it for the Battle of the Bismarck sea.  What was it that marked it out as one of the most innovative Air Forces in the Second World War?

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 24 2019

34mins

Play

Rank #13: Firepower 21: Jutland and the advent of Over the Horizon Warfare

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series and  is presented by Rear Admiral James Goldrick (retd).

We look at the technological and tactical advances that led to the Battle of Jutland.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Jul 31 2019

33mins

Play

Rank #14: Firepower 7: Tactics and use of Artillery in the ANZAC Campaign, 1915

Podcast cover
Read more

This lecture is presented by Dr Rhys Crawley, the author of Climax at Gallipoli.

Dr Crawley compares artillery at Gallipoli with the employment of artillery in 1915 on the Western Front. 

Artillery was still seen as an accessory for the artillery, rather than as a separate arms distinct from the infantry.

What lessons where learnt at the Battle of Neuve Chappelle and how were those lessons applied at Gallipoli?

We look at the concentration of artillery at Gallipoli and compare it to the Western Front.

We look at troop / gun ratios and the actual guns that were deployed to Gallipoli.  What was the quality like of the guns that were used?

How many men were required to move the guns?  The average incline was 9% and in some places it was twice that.  This significantly decreased the mobility of the guns and limited the flexibility in the employments of the guns.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for images and more details for this and other podcast episodes.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Dec 03 2018

13mins

Play

Rank #15: 20 Hannibal at the gates of Rome - The process for finding a Center of Gravity

Podcast cover
Read more

Whilst everyone agrees that determining the Center of Gravity is really important, but there is not a lot of information on the actual process to do that.

We look at the inside out methodology by Rueschoff and Dunne as a way of determining the CoG.  This methodology starts with objective, then looks at the critical capabilities that allow the achievement of the objective.

We pause to look at the role that time in CoG analysis.  The CoG can change over time.

War on the Rocks had a great article on the procurement of oil in the Pacific and how a limited assessment of future critical factors can lead to issues.  Who is doing a future Critical Factor analysis?  What role does this have in planning?

We then look at the Eikmeier methodology.  This is based on Ends, Ways and Means.  The Eikmeier methodology provides a user friendly cut down version of systems theory.

  1. Identify the desired endstate.
  2. ID the ways that it can be achieved. (CCs)
  3. List the means required to enable the CC.
  4. Select the entity that can achieve the means that can achieve the endstate.  This is the CoG.
  5. Select critical items from the means on the list.
  6. ID the critical requirements that are vulnerable.

We look at an example of Madonna deciding to be elected as President of the US.  With that Endstate, we look at the ways she could achieve this and the means that she would need to be POTUS.

We look at the validity test to ensure that you have the right entity as being the CoG.

We look at the CoG example for Hannibal at Cannae.  Have a listen to Dan Carlin's Punic Nightmare to get a great idea of what the fighting was like at Cannae. 

We look at the Roman Army that faces Cannae and how he can defeat it.  We look at how Hannibal structured his battle to attack the critical vulnerabilities of the Roman Army.

Hannibal was begged to march on Rome, but he only sent a delegation to Rome to discuss surrender.  One hundred and fifty thousand males had died fighting Hannibal over 3 crippling losses. 

What happened after Cannae? 

How did the Roman moral Center of Gravity impact Hannibal?  Hannibal has destroyed 3 operational level centers of gravity, yet he did not destroy the Roman moral centre of gravity.

Sep 10 2018

35mins

Play

Rank #16: 46 - The Battle of the Bismarck Sea

Podcast cover
Read more

We look at the crucial at what was probably the most important 15 minutes in the entire New Guinea campaign - the Battle of the Bismarck Sea.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 16 2019

30mins

Play

Rank #17: 4 - Comparing Japanese and British Doctrine in Malaya

Podcast cover
Read more

Allied Doctrine had seen little development between the war with significant budget cuts.  The Army was relegated to an Imperial policing role.  It is very Command and Control way of

We look at Sir John Dill and his visit to Tannenburg and his interpretation of 'Mission Command'. 

Malaya was a very laissez-faire, with some units preferring not to train in the jungle.

LT COL Ian Stewart from the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.  He trained one of the best battalions in Malaya.  How was his training methodologies viewed at Malaya Command?

British Staff College focused on strategy, not on Brigade and Division Command, which meant that British officers struggled when commanding one up.

How did the 8th Division transition from the training for desert fighting once they landed in Malaya?

What was the thinking about Combined Arms and how was it trained for?

How did MAG GEN Gordon Bennett train the Division for the withdrawal and what where his thoughts on digging in?

How did the personalities of the individual Battalion Commanders impact each of their battalions.

The Japanese developed a Jungle Warfare in Taiwan to develop doctrine.  They also conducted 10 major exercises for amphibious operations.

The reliance on the bicycle enabled rapid movements of troops with very little logistics impact.

The difference between the Japanese and British highlighted the amount of recent modern warfare experience that each Army had been subjected to.

How did the road impact the thinking for each of the commanders?  How would it shape their actions and dispositions.

What is fighting for the road off the road and how did the British and Indian troops respond to this tactic?

How did the Japanese task organise for their upcoming offensive?

8th Division started from the ground up to develop their doctrine, which meant that there was still significant work to be done after first contact with the enemy.

Mar 15 2018

32mins

Play

Rank #18: 41 - The Assault on Pallier's Hill

Podcast cover
Read more

This assault conducted by troops of 9 Pl, C Coy, 2/14 Bn is a classic infantry platoon attack.  Visit the Principles of War website to see maps, UAV footage and more from the battlefield.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Aug 14 2019

29mins

Play

Rank #19: 36 - Why was Long Tan a Victory?

Podcast cover
Read more

We continue our discussion with Dave Sabben, PL COMD of 11 Pl at Long Tan.

We discuss hand overs and the long term impact of the Long Tan victory by D Coy 6 RAR.

We look at how MAJ Harry Smith prepared the Coy - the training, the techniques and the mindset that set them up for success.

What had his experiences been and how did that help set D Coy up for success on the battlefield?

What was the reaction to the US forces to the reports of the battle that had been sent by the Task Force and why did they get the Presidential Unit Citation?

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Apr 21 2019

27mins

Play

Rank #20: 16 - Malaya Campaign After Action Review Part I

Podcast cover
Read more

In the time that we have been producing the Malaya Campaign series in The Principles of War, the Australian Army has produced a new version of the LWD 3-0, so Army Doctrine is moving faster than this podcast!

We look at the new doctrine and the application of Manoeuvre Warfare.

We look at the  application of tenets of manoeuvre theory.

  • Focusing friendly action on the adversary centre of gravity.
  • Achieving surprise.
  • Identify and prioritising a main effort.
  • Utilising deception.
  • Reconnaissance pull.
  • Operation Tempo
  • Combined arms teams.
  • Applications of joint fires and effects.

We discuss how the logistics tail for the Japanese could have been the critical vulnerability that the Allies could have targeted. 

We discuss the question what would it have been if the 9th Division had been in Malaya rather than the 8th Division?

Got a favourite Australian military quote?  Let us know, we are crowdsourcing a list of best quotes about and by Australians.

We discuss how the Japanese were able to target the Allied moral centre of gravity and how the Asia for the Asian memes undermine the effectiveness of the British Army in Malaya. 

With surprise, we look at the strategic surprise that the Allies experienced with Malaya.  The fact that the Singapore strategy was well understood, especially by people like MAJ GEN Lavarack, who was arguing for a better ability to defend the country.

We look at Group Captain John Lerew and his famous signal "Morituri vos salutamus".  What would cause him to signal his higher headquarters "Those who about to die, salute you."

What effect did a racial bias play in the intelligence appreciation of the Japanese capabilities, especially given the kind of operations that the Japanese were conducting in places like Shanghai. 

Jul 23 2018

29mins

Play

Firepower 34: Artillery and manoeuvre warfare in the Desert War

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series is presented by Dr Jean Bou.

Dr Jean Bou looks at the equipment the artillery used and how it was organised in order to support the Desert Mounted Corps.

He also looks at the role of artillery during the Battle of Beersheeba.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Jan 25 2020

22mins

Play

Firepower: The origins of Artillery Intelligence Fusion

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series is presented by Dr Albert Palazzo and looks at the birth of the Artillery Intelligence fusion capability in WW1.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Dec 25 2019

14mins

Play

Firepower 32 - Menin Road - Cracking the nut

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series is presented by Dr Roger Lee and looks at the Australian Artillery at Menin Road.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Dec 23 2019

25mins

Play

49 - Innovative tactics for the Battle of the Bismarck Sea

Podcast cover
Read more

This is the fourth part of our Battle of the Bismarck Sea Podcast series.

This episode discusses how GEN Kenney fostered a culture of military innovation in the Fifth Air Force.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

Dec 14 2019

30mins

Play

48 - Creating a culture of military innovation - GEN Kenney and the Fifth Air Force

Podcast cover
Read more

This is the third part of our Battle of the Bismarck Sea Podcast series.

This episode discusses how GEN Kenney fostered a culture of military innovation in the Fifth Air Force.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Dec 09 2019

30mins

Play

Firepower 31: Western Front 1917 Plenary Session

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series. 

This Plenary Session is conducted by BRIG Philip Winter AM, CSC (Retired)

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 29 2019

19mins

Play

Firepower 30: The Gunners of 101st Battery - Lance Bombardier Lindsay Barret DCM

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series. 

The presentation was authored by MAJ Darryl Kelly, OAM (Retired) and is presented by LT COL Jim Catchlove RAA (Retired)

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 27 2019

19mins

Play

Firepower 29: Industrialised warfare 1916 - 1918 - Firepower and tactics

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series. 

This session is presented by COL Gerhard Gross of the Bundeswehr Centre for Military History.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 25 2019

25mins

Play

Firepower 28: 1917 - A strategic overview

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series.

This session is presented by Dr Roger Lee. 

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 23 2019

22mins

Play

Firepower 27: Plenary Session for the Western Front - Verdun and the end of the beginning

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series.  The MC for this panel discussion is BRIG John Cox RAA (retd).

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 04 2019

38mins

Play

Firepower 26: Archie - The Development of Anti Aircraft Artillery

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series and  is presented by COL Chris Hunter. 

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Nov 03 2019

11mins

Play

Firepower 25: Feeding the guns - From Arsenal to Gun Position

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series and is presented by MAJ Ian Finlayson RAAOC.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 28 2019

19mins

Play

47 - Military Innovation and Creativity with GEN Kenney and the Battle of the Bismarck Sea

Podcast cover
Read more

Why was the 5th Air Force different in the way that it innovated tactically, mechanically and organisationally?

We look at how GEN Kenney lead the 5th Air Force and prepared it for the Battle of the Bismarck sea.  What was it that marked it out as one of the most innovative Air Forces in the Second World War?

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 24 2019

34mins

Play

46 - The Battle of the Bismarck Sea

Podcast cover
Read more

We look at the crucial at what was probably the most important 15 minutes in the entire New Guinea campaign - the Battle of the Bismarck Sea.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 16 2019

30mins

Play

45 - Leadership and Morale on Palliers Hill

Podcast cover
Read more

With such difficult terrain and being outnumbered, how could Palliers Hill have been a victory for 9 Platoon from the 2/14th?

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 09 2019

26mins

Play

44 - The considerations for the defense of Palliers Hill

Podcast cover
Read more

We discuss the considerations for the defense of Palliers Hill.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Oct 05 2019

25mins

Play

Firepower 24: Shell Shock - The precursor to post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Podcast cover
Read more

What was Shell Shock and how did it manifest itself in WW1?

What treatments were available and how successful were they?

GPCAPT Sany McFarlane AO discusses these issues along with the long term impact of Shell Shock and it's evolution in diagnosis and treatment through WW2 and the Vietnam War.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Sep 29 2019

23mins

Play

Firepower 23: The French Artillery at Verdun

Podcast cover
Read more

This presentation, part of the Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company's Firepower: Lessons from the Great War Seminar Series and is presented by Doctor Roger Lee.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Sep 22 2019

13mins

Play

43 - Considerations for the attack on Pallier's Hill

Podcast cover
Read more

We look at the considerations for the attack as LT Pallier assaults the hill that would come to bear his name.

Please visit the show notes, the drone footage of the hill will provide a much better understanding of the terrain and why this was such a difficult mission.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Sep 04 2019

30mins

Play

42 - The attack goes in on Pallier's Hill

Podcast cover
Read more

How did LT Pallier attack this seemingly impossible objective.  A dug in enemy, minimal OS, limited time and very, very difficult terrain? 

Please visit the show notes, the drone footage of the hill will provide a much better understanding of the terrain and why this was such a difficult mission.

Check out the show notes for the podcast for all of the information that we cover in this episode as well as the images and other details that didn't make it into the podcast.

Join the conversation on Twitter or Facebook.

If you've learnt something from today's podcast, please leave a review for the Podcast on your podcast player.

Aug 29 2019

28mins

Play

iTunes Ratings

52 Ratings
Average Ratings
44
5
2
1
0

Not a professional

By frenchie frier - Dec 07 2019
Read more
But find this very interesting.

Loved the Long Tan Interviews

By Nadir_E - Oct 27 2019
Read more
Great detail and insight while relating the history of the battle of Long Tan - keep it up.